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MONITORING AND EVALUATION TOOLS

C ONTENTS P AGE
Teacher Appraisal Form
1 Appraisal Form #1: Teacher Performance 41
2 Appraisal Form # 2: Classroom Management 42
3 Appraisal Form #3: Record Management 43

4 Appraisal Form #4: Checklist for Lesson Plans 44

5 Appraisal Form #5: Checklist for Teacher/Class Observation 45

SIP Implementation M&E Tools


1. Elements of SIP Implementation M&E Framework 46
2. SIP Implementation M&E Framework Matrix 46
A PROGRESS M&E TOOLS
3 SIP-AIP P HYSICAL ACCOMPLISHMENT F ORM (P HYSICAL O UTPUTS AND F INANCE ) 47
4. SIP-AIP P HYSICAL O UTPUT T RACKING F ORM 48
5. SIP T HREE - YEAR R EPORT ON P HYSICAL O UTPUT AND F INANCIAL S TATUS OF P ROJECTS 49
& P ROGRAMS
6. ISSUES / LESSONS LEARNED / SUSTAINABILITY LOG
Part A: Issues/Problems and Concerns Log 49
P ART B - L OG S HEET O N R ESOLUTION O F I SSUES 50
P ART C - L OG S HEET O N R S USTAINABILITY M EASURES 51
P ART D - L OG S HEET O N L ESSONS L EARNED 52
B 7 RESULTS M&E TOOLS 53
SIP Terminal Review Framework
SIP Terminal Review Report
Results Monitoring Tool – Schools
C. 8 REPORT TEMPLATES for QMT 54
M&E Report Template of SQMT
M&E Report Template of SDQMT
M&E Report Template of DQMT
Appraisal Form #1: Checklist on Classroom Management

TimeMost of the

Some times
All the time

Not at All
Rarely

RATING
ITEM

10 8 6 4 2
Calls learners by name (with the help of memory, IDs, name tags or seat
1 plan)
Implements procedures in group work ( evidence of instituted break-
2 out procedures for peer work or group work)
Implements discipline in letting students enter inside (after flag
3 ceremony, recess, activity outside the classroom, etc)and making them
take exit from the classroom
Implements procedures in the distribution of materials and collection,
4 turning in, and handing back checked learners’ work
5 Employs a facilitated and purposive checking of attendance (finds out
who are absent/cutting classes and why and make a follow up)
6 Implements proactive discipline plan (e.g. detects inappropriate
behavior and intervenes, calls the learners’ attention, deal with
disruption appropriately to avoid arguments)
7 Uses efficient routines in starting and ending class periods
8 Implements specified work formats (themes, exercise notebooks,
experiment notebooks, projects, etc.)
9 Provides authentic rewards and incentives (appropriate praises, facial
expression, gestures)
10 Reminds students of important schedules and assignment efficiently
11 Manages time appropriately (engaged time on task—arrives and leaves
classroom on time and stays in the classroom or activity area for the
whole period)
12 Movement in the classroom (moves around, divides attention equally
among students)
13 Gives clear directions (e.g. giving appropriate examples or non-
examples)
14 Uses of appropriate verbal communication (e.g. provides positive
feedback)
15 Uses of appropriate non-verbal communication (observes entire class
and scans frequently, signals/gestures)
Overall Rating
Description of Rating:
8.5-10 Outstanding
6.5-8.49 Very Satisfactory
4.5-6.49 Satisfactory
2.5-4.49 Unsatisfactory
2.0-2.49 Poor
Appraisal Form# 2: Classroom Management—Ensuring and Maintaining Clean,
Conducive,
Secure, and Energy-Saving Learning Environment

TimeMost of the

Some times
All the time

Not at All
Rarely

RATING
ITEM

10 8 6 4 2
Electric fans/air-conditioned units are turned off when not in use and
1 when not necessary (when there is fresh air, during recess time,
lunchtime, and dismissal)
Lights are turned off when not in use and when not necessary (when
2 there is enough sunlight, during recess time, lunchtime, and dismissal)
3 Water faucets are turned off when not in use and after dismissal
4 Classroom is open before the first session starts.
Classroom is locked when nobody is inside and after dismissal of the last
5 session for the day/night.
6 Classroom has broom/s, dust pan, and garbage containers.
7 Classroom has updated display boards.
8 Classroom has updated bulletin boards (Absences, reminders, best work)
9 Learners do not throw their garbage anywhere.
10 Learners segregate their trash.
Homeroom PTA helps in performing minor repairs/improvement of
11 classroom and its furniture/equipment.
Homeroom PTA helps in performing minor painting works for the
12 classroom and its furniture.

OVERALL RATING (TOTAL RATING 12x100)


Description of Rating:
8.5- 10.0 Outstanding
6.5-8.49 Very Satisfactory
4.5-6.49 Satisfactory
2.5-4.49 Unsatisfactory
2.0-2.49 Poor
Appraisal Form #3: Checklist for Record Management

TimeMost of the

Some times
All the time

Not at All
Rarely

RATING
ITEM

10 8 6 4 2
1 Class record/s
2 Form 1 School Register
3 Form 2 Monthly Attendance and Enrolment
4 Subject Grade Sheets
5 Consolidated Grade Sheets
6 Keeps(monthly)/
Form 137 Permanent Records
7 submits(monthly Form 138 Report Card
8 /quarterly) up- List of Top Ten for a Grading Period
9 to-date reports Form 18-A (for the fourth quarter of SY)
10 Anecdotal Records
11 Lesson Plans
12 Nutritional Status (For the 1st and 4th quarter of SY)
13 Phil-IRI (For the 1st and 4th quarter of SY)
14 Other reports required
15 Class record/s
16 Form 1 School Register
17 Form 2 Monthly Attendance and Enrolment
18 Subject Grade Sheets
19 Accomplishes Consolidated Grade Sheets
neat, accurate,
20 Form 137 Permanent Records
and complete
21 Form 138 Report Card
reports
22 personally List of Top Ten for a Grading Period
23 Form 18-A (for the fourth quarter of SY)
24 Anecdotal Records
25 Lesson Plans
26 Nutritional Status (For the 1st and 4th quarter of SY)

OVERALL RATING (TOTAL RATING 26x100)


Description of Rating:
8.5-10 Outstanding
6.5-8.49 Very Satisfactory
4.5-6.49 Satisfactory
2.5-4.49 Unsatisfactory
2.0-2.49 Poor
Appraisal Form #4: Checklist for Reviewing Lesson Plans

OBSERVED
ITEM REMARKS
YES NO
OBJECTIVES
1 Writes objectives clearly for students
2 Writes objectives in behavioral terms
Objectives are SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Result-oriented,
3
Time-bounded)
Objectives manifest psychomotor, cognitive and affective domains of
4
learning
SUBJECT MATTER
6 Based on PELC/PSSLC Budget of Work (Expectation: On time)
7 Reflects the use of references and IMs
PROCEDURES
8 The strategy used is suitable in developing the lesson/subject matter.
9 Preparatory activity/iesemployed effectivelyprepares or motivates
learners for the lesson (e.g. drill such phonics drill, review, checking of
assignment, unlocking of difficulties, motivation such as a song, poem,
anecdote, mini-story, picture, game, trivia or motivating question)
Activities for the development of the lesson are

10  well-organized
11  objective-oriented
12  meaningful to learners
Activities for the development of the lesson provide opportunities for
learners to
13  develop higher order thinking skills (HOTS)
14  make generalizations/conclusions

15  apply knowledge and skills learned

EVALUATION
16 Directions are brief and concise
17 Items are aligned with the lesson objectives

18 Items are skill-based


ASSIGNMENT
19 Provide clear directions
Provides opportunities to enhance knowledge and skills learned or
20
prepares the learners for the next lesson

Appraisal Form #5: Checklist for Teacher/Class Observation

OBSERVED
ITEM REMARKS
YES NO
INITIAL FOCUS
1 States objectives of the session clearly to students
Gains attention of students (Punctuality, Good Grooming, Posture,
2
Classroom Presence, well-prepared with all lesson paraphernalia)
CONTENT EMPHASIS AND/OR LINKING
3 Stresses the importance/significance/essence of the topic
Linkslesson to learners’ backgrounds and life experiences, past learning
4
including those in other subject areas, and future learning
5 Points out similarities and differences of the previous of the topic to the new
one
COMPREHENSIBLE INPUT
Uses speech appropriate for learners’ proficiency level (slower rate,
5
enunciation, simple sentence structure for beginners)
6 Explain academic tasks clearly
Use a variety of techniques to make content concepts clear (e.g. modeling,
7
visuals, hands-on activities, demonstrations, gestures, body language)
STRATEGIES
Provide ample opportunities for students to use strategies (e.g., problem solving,
8
predicting, organizing, summarizing, categorizing, evaluating, self-monitoring).
Use scaffolding techniques consistently (providing the right amount of support to
9 move students from one level of understanding to a higher level) throughout
lesson.
Use a variety of question types including those that promote higher-order
10 thinking skills throughout the lesson (e.g., literal, analytical, and interpretive
questions).

INTERACTION
Provide frequent opportunities for interactions and discussion between
11
teacher/learner and among learners, and encourage elaborated responses.
Use group configurations that support language and content objectives of the
12
lesson. Provide sufficient wait time for student response consistently.
13 Give ample opportunities for students to clarify key concepts
PRACTICE/APPLICATION
Provide hands-on materials and/or manipulative for students to practice using
14
new content knowledge.
Provide activities for students to apply content and language knowledge in the
15
classroom.
EMPHASIS/REVIEW/ASSESSMENT
11 Give comprehensive review of key vocabularies.
Give a comprehensive review of key content concepts, skills, values, and
12
attitudes.
Provide feedback to learners regularly on their output (e.g. language, content,
13
work)
Conduct assessments of learner comprehension based on learning objectives
14 (e.g. spot checking, group response, individual work, peer work and/or group
work)

SIP IMPLEMENTATION M&E TOOLS

1. E LEMENTS OF SIP I MPLEMENTATION M&E F RAMEWORK

The table below shows the elements of the SIP Implementation M&E Framework and the instructions for filling up each
column of the template.This framework guides both progress (output) monitoring and outcomes (results) evaluation.
C OLUMN I TEM I NSTRUCTIONS
1 SIP Outputs  List the outputs of SIP/AIP
2 Indicator/s  Identify for each output, the information that will tell the achievement of
project objective. This is a qualified/quantified parameter which details the
extent to which an objective has been achieved
 Identify the source where the measure of the attainment of objectives can
be obtained (ex. BEIS, Teacher observation /performance report, SARDO
3 Data Source
Monitoring Form, OSY Tracking system, child health and nutrition chart,
etc.)
 Indicate the strategy that will be employed to collect the data (ex.,
4 Method of Collection Document review, interview, direct observation, survey questionnaire, FGD,
etc.)
5 Timing of Collection  Identify as to when the data collection will happen
6 Data Gathering  Indicate the unit/person responsible for data collection
7 Report Schedule  Identify the when the result/s will be reported

2.. S IP I MPLEMENTATION M&E F RAMEWORK M ATRIX

(The M&E framework matrix of the school for its SIP implementation should be cooperatively done by
the members of the School Quality Management Team headed by the School Head.
PROJECT DATA COLLECTION DATA REPORT
DATA
OBJECTIVES/ INDICATOR/S GATHERE SCHEDUL
SOURCE METHOD TIMING
OUTPUTS (O#) R E
Purpose level objective:

Component Objectives:
Prov. Of Access
RESULTS M&E

Component 1: Physical
Facilities
Component 2: LRM

Component 3: Ancillary

Component 4:
SIP I MPLEMENTATION M&E F RAMEWORK M ATRIX
(C ONTINUED)
PROJECT DATA COLLECTION
DATA DATA REPORT
OBJECTIVES/ INDICATOR/S
SOURCE METHOD TIMING GATHERER SCHEDULE
OUTPUTS (O#)
Outputs
PROGRESS

3. SIP-AIP P HYSICAL ACCOMPLISHMENT F ORM

School: District:
Month/Year: School Year:
.
P HYSICAL O UTPUT F INANCIAL T ARGET
P ROJECT /O UTPUT
T ARGET A CTUAL % B UDGET E XPENDITURE %

N OTE : Write only those outputs with physical L EGEND : % - Percentage of Accomplishment = (Target divided by
and financial targets. Actual) x 100
4. SIP-AIP P HYSICAL O UTPUT T RACKING F ORM

Name of Overall Status –


School: Classification:

Date of SIP SIP Time Frame:


Acceptance

Evaluation Period o AIP Year 1 o AIP Year 2 o AIP Year 3


(Please check):

O BJECTIVES :
The SIP-AIP Physical Output Tracking Form is meant to help:
a. Determine the quarterly progress of the school based on the planned annual (AIP) targets
b. Articulate the adjusted target of the school given the “end of quarter” status
c. Calculate the percentage of annual accomplishment versus the planned annual targets
d. Capture the “unprogrammed / unplanned” outputs of the school based on emerging requirements

I NSTRUCTIONS : S EE E XCEL F ILE

5. SIP T HREE - YEAR R EPORT ON P HYSICAL O UTPUT AND F INANCIAL S TATUS OF P ROJECTS & P ROGRAMS

PHYSICAL OUTPUT FINANCIAL


Y EAR 1 Y EAR 2 Y EAR 3 Y EAR 1 Y EAR 2 Y EAR 3
P HYSICAL
% Done

% Done

% Done

% Done

% Done

% Done
O UTPUTS
Target

Target

Target

Target

Target

Target
Actual

Actual

Actual

Actual

Actual

Actual

N OTE: U SE ADDITIONAL PAGES IF NEEDED


6. I SSUES / L ESSONS L EARNED / S USTAINABILITY L OG
Part A: Issues/Problems and Concerns Log

Report Period:

P REVIOUS I SSUES L OG
Instructions: List the issues/problems/concerns you have encountered during the period (Annual, Quarter or Monthly) that
have caused the non-achievement or delay of the deliverables/targeted outputs. You may write the
issue/problem related to any of the categories below.

CHALLENGES/ ISSUES ENCOUNTERED By Categories Actions taken to RESOLVE the Unit/Person


Issue:
S TRATEGIESOR
TECHNIQUES USED
TO IMPLEMENT
PROGRAM OR
PROJECT

W ORKING
RELATIONSHIPS
BETWEEN AND
AMONG THE
IMPLEMENTATION
TEAMS

G ENERATION AND
UTILIZATION OF
FUNDS /
RESOURCES

CHALLENGES/ ISSUES ENCOUNTERED By Categories Actions taken to RESOLVE the Unit/Person


Issue:

S TAKEHOLDERS ’
PARTICIPATION
CHALLENGES/ ISSUES ENCOUNTERED By Categories Actions taken to RESOLVE the Unit/Person
Issue:

Other factors
outside of
school
environment

6. I SSUES / L ESSONS L EARNED / S USTAINABILITY L OG


P ART B - L OG S HEET O N R ESOLUTION O F I SSUES

I NSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SQMT:


 Take and analyze each of the issues listed in Part A as to whether they have been
resolved/addressed by the school.
 Write in Column 1 these resolved issues and in Column 2, the solution applied.
 In Column 3, list the issues which are beyond the school’s control and which will need the
assistance of the division for its resolution.

1 3
2 4
I SSUES R ESOLVED B Y THE I SSUES N EEDING
S OLUTION APPLIED R EMARKS
SCHOOL A SSISTANCE

N OTE: U SE ADDITIONAL PAGES IF NEEDED


6. I SSUES / L ESSONS L EARNED / S USTAINABILITY L OG
P ART C - L OG S HEET O N R S USTAINABILITY M EASURES

I NSTRUCTIONS :
 Study the list of sustainability measures applied in the implementation of projects/programs given in Column 1.
 Choose from those given what the school has applied during the period to sustain the school projects/programs.
 Indicate in Column 2 the specific action the school has done in applying any of the sustainability measures.
 In Column 4, indicate the result of applying such a strategy.

1 2 3
S USTAINABILITY M EASURES A CTIONTAKEN TO R ESULT
OF
APPLY STRATEGY STRATEGY
1. Fit w/in partner govt policies
 Objectives and activities which “fit” with Partner Government policies have
much better prospect for sustainability as they are more likely to have high-
level political and institutional support both during implementation and
beyond.
2. Participation
 The critical factor in promoting sustainability is the role of the stakeholders;
i.e. those directly concerned with the program or project. Sustainability
cannot be achieved without their involvement and support.
 Ideas are demand-led
 Stakeholders, both men and women should actively participate and have
the opportunity to influence the direction and detail of implementation.
 Time and resources are available for participatory analysis.
3. Management & Organization
 Integrate with and build on local management structures.
 Work with counterparts who are existing in school
 Teamwork approaches are emphasized.
 Permit some flexibility in implementation as lessons are learned
4. Integrate & Build on Govt Operations & Processes
 Activities should integrate with and build on existing government
operations, processes systems and performance monitoring wherever
possible.
 Use available information sources wherever possible. This not only builds
on existing processes so that capacity building has a better chance of
being sustained post-project but also minimizes workload and demand on
stakeholders in providing information
5. Counterpart Contribution
 Counterpart contributions, either in cash or in kind (like counterpart staff
and office space) are a sign of commitment and demonstrate in a tangible
way, that partners place value on the expected benefits.

6. Training
 The provision of appropriate training for identified target groups is a key
strategy for achieving sustainable benefits.
 Effective training should not only “educate” but also motivate.
 Trainees must be selected on merit and include both men and women.
 Trainees must be given the opportunity to apply newly acquired skills on
completion of training.
1 2 3
S USTAINABILITY M EASURES A CTIONTAKEN TO R ESULT
OF
APPLY STRATEGY STRATEGY
7. Information dissemination & Networking
 Generating an understanding of SIP and support for the project’s
objectives among a wide group of stakeholders should be a component of
any sustainability strategy. It can include the use of many types of different
media and group events.
8. Technology
 To promote sustainability the technology to be transferred must be selected
on the basis of its appropriateness in terms of technical and financial
criteria, plus social, gender and cultural acceptability. Training to support
the introduction of any new technology should be relevant and appropriate.
9. Social, Gender & Culture
 Development interventions can fail to deliver sustainable benefits if social,
gender and cultural issues are not taken into account. A greater
participation by girls in identification, design and decision-making is a key
part of any sustainable strategy
10. External Political & Economic factor
11. Anti-Fraud & Corrupt Strategy
12. Other Sustainability measures identified

6. I SSUES / L ESSONS L EARNED / S USTAINABILITY L OG


P ART D - L OG S HEET O N L ESSONS L EARNED
I NSTRUCTIONS :
 Write in Column 1 those experiences/factors which have been productive, useful or influencing the successful
implementation of the project.
 In Column 2, indicate those which have caused delay or unsuccessful delivery of the planned target.
 In Column 3, write the Lessons Learned derived from both facilitating and hindering factors. Lessons learned from
facilitating factors are stated as “values/ good practices/ principles.”Lessons learned from hindering factors are
stated as “what could have been
Lessons Learned Log
1 2 3
F ACILITATING F ACTORS H INDERING F ACTORS L ESSONS L EARNED

N OTE : U SE ADDITIONAL PAGES IF NEEDED


7. M ONTHLY M&E R EPORT O F S CHOOL QMT
M ONTH AND Y EAR :

I NTRODUCTION :

F INDINGS
A. SIP-AIP IMPLEMENTATION
A.1. P HYSICAL O UTPUTS
1.
2.
A.2. F INANCIAL R EPORT
1.
2.
A.3. B ALANCE AND GAPS
1.
2.

B. OTHER SCHOOL PROJECTS (IF APPLICABLE)


B.1. T RAINING & D EVELOPMENT
1.
2.
B.2. L EARNING R ESOURCES
1.
2.
B.3. O THERS
1.
2.

C. QUALITATIVE INFORMATION
C.1. I SSUES AND C ONCERNS
1.
2.
C.2. S USTAINABILITY M EASURES APPLIED
1.
2.
C.3. L ESSONS L EARNED
1.
2.
R ECOMMENDATIONS
8. Q UARTER M&E R EPORT O F S CHOOL QMT

Q UARTER AND Y EAR :

I NTRODUCTION :

FINDINGS
A. SIP-AIP IMPLEMENTATION
A.1. P HYSICAL O UTPUTS
1.
2.

A.2. F INANCIAL R EPORT


1.
2.

A.3. B ALANCE AND GAPS


1.
2.

B. OTHER SCHOOL PROJECTS (IF APPLICABLE)


B.1. T RAINING & D EVELOPMENT
1.
2.

B.2. L EARNING R ESOURCES


1.
2.

B.3. O THERS
1.
2.
C. QUALITATIVE INFORMATION
C.1. I SSUES AND C ONCERNS
1.
2.

C.2. S USTAINABILITY M EASURES


A PPLIED
1.
2.
C.3. L ESSONS L EARNED
1.
2.

D. PROGRESS ON INTERMEDIATE RESULTS


D.1. E NROLMENT
1.
2.

D.2. D ROP -O UT D URING T HE


Q UARTER
1.
2.

D.3. F AILURES D URING T HE


Q UARTER
1.
2.

R ECOMMENDATIONS

Prepared By:
N AMES P OSITION / U NIT S IGNATURES
D ATE : ____________________________