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Issue #744 Harrisburg, PA Oct.

1, 2018

PA Environment Digest Blog​ ​Twitter Feed​ ​PaEnviroDigest Google+

CBF-PA Urges Passage Of Keystone Tree Fund After Legislation Is Voted Out Of House
Committee

Harry Campbell, Executive Director for the


Chesapeake Bay Foundation in Pennsylvania​,
applauded a unanimous vote by the House
Transportation Committee Monday to report out
House Bill 2486​ (Everett-R-Lycoming) creating
the Keystone Tree Fund that could lead to the
planting of more trees along streams and streets in
the Commonwealth.
The Keystone Tree Fund creates a voluntary $3
check-off box on Pennsylvania’s driver’s license
and vehicle registration online applications to buy, plant, and maintain more trees across the
Commonwealth.
These voluntary donations will support the existing ​Tree Vitalize​ and ​Riparian Forest
Buffer Grant Programs​ through the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
“Passing the Keystone Tree Fund is a positive step for the Commonwealth’s communities
and creeks by giving Pennsylvanians the opportunity to invest in the future of cleaner rivers and
streams,” said Campbell.
“Roughly ​19,000 miles of our rivers and streams are damaged by pollution​ and trees are
one of the most cost-effective tools for improving local water quality,” Campbell explained.
“Along streams, trees filter and absorb polluted runoff, stabilize streambanks, improve soil
quality, and cleanse drinking water sources. Along streets they help cleanse and reduce runoff
going into storm drains, beautify communities, and improve air quality.
“Additional resources through the Keystone Tree Fund can accelerate efforts to reach the
Commonwealth’s ​Clean Water Blueprint​ goal of 95,000 acres of forested buffers in
Pennsylvania’s portion of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. It is a goal shared by DCNR and CBF.
“The ​Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership​, coordinated by CBF, was launched earlier
this year and intends to plant 10 million trees in the Commonwealth by the end of 2025,” said
Campbell. “CBF appreciates efforts by House members to pass the Keystone Tree Fund and

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urges the legislature as a whole to do the same.”
Senate Bill 1208​, the companion bill in the Senate, was introduced by Senators Gene
Yaw (R-Lycoming) and John Yudichak (D-Luzerne), Majority and Minority Chairs of the Senate
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
Visit DEP’s ​PA Chesapeake Bay Plan​ webpage for more information on cleaning up
Pennsylvania’s rivers and streams.
NewsClips:
Greene Twp, Franklin County To Improve Conococheague Creek
Your Street, Park Could Get Free Trees Thanks To $1.1M Expansion In Philly Program
Op-Ed: As Philly Development Booms, What Happens To All Our Trees?
Green Infrastructure Related Stories:
New Statewide Partnership Launches Major Effort To Plant 10 Million Trees To Cleanup
Pennsylvania’s Streams, Rivers
Renew The State's Commitment To Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Meeting The Challenge Of Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Agriculture, Forestry Workgroups Present Key Recommendations To Meet PA’s Chesapeake
Bay Pollution Reduction Obligations
PA Chesapeake Bay Steering Committee Readies Information For 39 Counties On Water
Pollution Reduction Planning Process
Emma Creek Restoration Project Reduced Flood Damage, Sediment & Nutrient Pollution In
Huntingdon County
Another Green Infrastructure Project Reduces Flooding In Manheim, Lancaster County
Green Infrastructure Offers Triple Benefits, Cost Effective Solutions To Stormwater Pollution,
Reducing Flood Damage
Op-Ed: Of Pennsylvania Floods And Our Future
LancasterOnline: Lancaster Farmland Provides $676M In Annual Environmental Benefits
Estimated $939.2 Million Return On Investment In Protecting, Restoring Dauphin County’s
Natural Resources
Carbon County Has $800 Million Return On Investment From Natural Resources
Related Stories This Week:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners To Release Draft Nutrient, Sediment Reduction Plan At Oct. 3
Meeting
Penn State Extension: Green Stormwater Infrastructure - What's It All About?
Tree Pittsburgh, Partners To Give Away 1,000 Free Trees In Allegheny County Oct. 13, Nov. 3
PASA: Free Soil Health Clinic: Field Sampling & Assessment Techniques Oct. 3 In Juniata
County
Lebanon County Grazing Network Hosts Soil Pit/Soil Health Field Day Oct. 12
How You Can Help In Your Area
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act

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[Posted: Sept. 28, 2018]

Lancaster Clean Water Partners To Release Draft Nutrient, Sediment Reduction Plan At
Oct. 3 Meeting

Lancaster Clean Water Partners​ is inviting the


public to attend an October 3 meeting where
they will release a draft plan to reduce nutrient
and sediment pollution in Lancaster County to
help meet Chesapeake Bay pollution reduction
commitments.
The Lancaster Clean Water Partners have
pulled together experts and community
members from across the county to write a plan
for how Lancaster will reduce the nutrient and
sediment loads entering our waterways.
On October 3 the Partners will share a draft of
the plan and facilitate discussions to get feedback. The final draft of the plan is due at the end of
November to DEP.
Come to this meeting ready for 2 things:
1. To see the draft plan, hear about the research that went into creating it, and what it will inform
at the state level
2. To offer your comments and feedback for revisions to the plan about big ideas regarding what
is realistic for Lancaster to tackle in the next 8 years.
Lancaster needs your voice so that we speak with an authentic and collective leadership
for clean and clear water. This is an opportunity to lead the state in implementing changes to see
real improvements in our local creeks and rivers.
Participate in two ways right now:
1. ​Send your comments via our online form​. The Partners are collecting comments until the end
of October.
2. ​Register to attend this event​, the release of the draft plan
The meeting will be held at the ​Farm & Home Center​, 1383 Arcadia Road, Lancaster
from 1:00 to 2:30.
To register or for more information, visit the​ Lancaster Clean Water Partners​’ ​October 3
Public Meeting​ webpage. Questions about this event should be directed to Allyson Gibson by
sending email to: ​agibson@lancastercleanwaterpartners.com​.
1 Of 4 Pilots
Lancaster is ​one of four counties that are piloting​ DEP’s ​County Clean Water Toolbox​-- a
county-based planning process​ for identifying clean water issues and tools they could use to
address these problems and meet Chesapeake Bay nutrient and sediment reduction targets.
The other counties are Adams, Franklin and York. ​Click Here​ for more.
About The Partners
Lancaster Clean Water Partners is a program of the ​Conservation Foundation of
Lancaster County​ whose mission is to promote, support, and sustain the stewardship, education
and conservation activities undertaken by the ​Lancaster County Conservation District​ and other

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local partners.
The Foundation shares staff and office space with Lancaster County Conservation
District and relies on the Conservation District for all administrative and backbone support.
LCWP’s mission is to coordinate efforts and expand the impact of our partners working
to improve the health and viability of our local streams. Their vision is to make Lancaster
County’s streams clean and clear within our generation.
NewsClips:
Crable: Public Invited to Review Plans To Reduce Soil, Manure Runoff In Lancaster County
Greene Twp, Franklin County To Improve Conococheague Creek
Your Street, Park Could Get Free Trees Thanks To $1.1M Expansion In Philly Program
Op-Ed: As Philly Development Booms, What Happens To All Our Trees?
Related Stories:
PA To Pilot County-Level Chesapeake Bay Clean Water Planning Process In 4 Counties This
Summer
LancasterOnline: Lancaster Farmland Provides $676M In Annual Environmental Benefits
Agriculture, Forestry Workgroups Present Key Recommendations To Meet PA’s Chesapeake
Bay Pollution Reduction Obligations
PA Chesapeake Bay Steering Committee Readies Information For 39 Counties On Water
Pollution Reduction Planning Process
Related Stories This Week:
CBF-PA Urges Passage Of Keystone Tree Fund After Measure Is Voted Out Of House
Committee
Penn State Extension: Green Stormwater Infrastructure - What's It All About?
Tree Pittsburgh, Partners To Give Away 1,000 Free Trees In Allegheny County Oct. 13, Nov. 3
PASA: Free Soil Health Clinic: Field Sampling & Assessment Techniques Oct. 3 In Juniata
County
Lebanon County Grazing Network Hosts Soil Pit/Soil Health Field Day Oct. 12
How You Can Help In Your Area
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Penn State Extension: Green Stormwater Infrastructure - What's It All About?

By: Thomas McCann, Extension Educator

Have you been seeing terms like Green


Infrastructure, Green Stormwater Infrastructure,
rain garden, stormwater management,
infiltration basin, swale, bump out, raised
dropped inlet or tree trenches?
There are so many terms out there now, and they
are all generally describing a similar scenario

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that are innovative approaches to water management. But what does it all mean?
Well, one aspect that I think we can all relate to is the volume of impervious surfaces that
exist in virtually every landscape in the United States, and around the world.
When we discuss impervious surfaces, we are referring to areas where water cannot drain
and include: macadam, concrete, roofing materials, sidewalks, or generally most paved surfaces.
Every time it rains, the areas that are now impervious, that once allowed water to drain
through them (before the concrete for example), additional burden is placed on every location
where water is still able to drain.
For a long time, since the industrial revolution or so (circa 1880), our landscapes have
been able to absorb that additional burden relatively easily.
Fast forward to say the 2000s, and two things are happening, we are seeing more and
more areas being covered by surfaces that do not allow water to penetrate, and we are observing
more intense volumes and frequency of rain events. So, the big question becomes, where does
the water go?
In virtually every major city in the United States, cities historically constructed
infrastructure to accommodate the volume of rain they typically saw, and then some. The older
the city, the older that infrastructure.
The first thinking of sewer systems combined both water from the streets with water
from toilet discharges, to then eventually treating all of this water at a localized sewage treatment
plant as technologies progressed.
The first vestiges of sewage treatment plants began in the United State as far back as
1890, and slowly progressed into the complicated systems we see today.
These systems are able to use a combination of technologies to take and remove
contaminants and clean water from the sewer systems for reuse by each city or municipality.
This is an amazing step forward towards a goal of sustainability.
This is not as easy as it all sounds however.
Every sewage treatment plant is built with a maximum capacity. These systems have
been built over a 100-year period and all have varying capacities for the volume of water that
they can accommodate.
As we discussed above, it was difficult to predict in the late 1800s what water capacity
needs would be in 2017. The same can be said from say 1950 to 1990, and of course, upgrades
are made to improve and repair systems over time, but it is still a constant issue of balancing
water volumes.
We also discussed the idea that the number and frequency of major storm events has
increased over this period as well.
With the increase of surfaces where water cannot penetrate along with larger and more
frequent storms comes an increased burden on existing sewage treatment plants. Then, the old
piping systems have been constructed over that long period of time where all water from streets,
roofs and toilets go through the same pipes.
Although this is not the entire story, to break the movement on Green Stormwater
Infrastructure (GSI) down to its simplest terms, engineers and designers are looking at alternative
technologies to reduce the impact that large storm events have on existing sewerage
infrastructure.
Not only are these professionals seeking a cost-effective solution, but also looking at the
longer-term community benefits as well.

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Combined Sewer Overflows
The EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) recognizes the difficulty that these large
storm events pose on the vast sewer systems around the country and are constantly seeking ways
to support cities and municipalities to reduce this burden as well.
As part of this recognition of capacity issues of these plants, the EPA allows, or permits
systems to be put in place for the extra volume of water in large events to overflow into major
water bodies.
These permits are called CSOs, or Combined Sewer Overflows. The EPA reports that
there are over 850 municipalities across the nation that have issues related to CSOs.
The bigger issue of CSO events during major storms, is that the contaminates collected
from streets, toilets and rooftops get directly expelled into major water bodies. The consequence
of which can affect wildlife, downstream communities, erosion, sedimentation and more.
With the allowance of these permits, however, also come fees that are significant enough
to encourage cities and municipalities to reduce the occurrence of CSO events.
This is the crux of where the whole GSI (Green Stormwater Infrastructure) movement
comes in. The need is to reduce CSO events.
The issue is that at peak times, there is too much water flowing into sewer systems, which
needs to be released when the systems are taxed beyond capacity. One approach that has been
looked at is to separate toilet pipes from surface water pipes, which would reduce the burden.
This would be a monumental hurdle for any city to achieve, however.
Green Stormwater Infrastructure
Then comes the discussion of, ‘How else do we reduce the volume of water entering the
treatment plants’? The answer that is gaining national and global attention, is to go green, and
collect water anywhere you can, and detain it for approximately 72 hours.
This detainment gives the sewage treatment plants enough time to accommodate the
additional volume, and not cause CSO events. This was a major change in traditional thinking
and is leading towards a whole new industry.
In this thinking, the goals are multifaceted and layered, however. The overarching goal is
to reduce the amount of water entering sewage treatment plants, and ultimately reducing the
amount of untreated drainage entering major water bodies during high volume storm events.
By going ‘green’, there are added benefits that include the reduction of contaminants
entering water treatment plants, lower cost than traditional piping or gray infrastructure, the
direct site containment with zero or very little discharge to conventional sewers during smaller
rain events and the aesthetic and social benefits to local communities which are often more
difficult to quantify.
Traditionally, you may be used to detention basins in a housing development. These
basins were created to detain all of the water associated with a particular development, and then
slowly release that water into the ground. These structures are often very large and can look
unsightly if not maintained well.
What is happening now is to try and collect water in any location possible. So, no longer
is the focus solely on finding large detention, but also seeking small areas, particularly in cities,
to detain water.
All of these small areas are adding up and making an impact on reducing the burden on
the sewer systems.
Philadelphia Water​, the organization that is in charge of stormwater issues for the city, is

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now seen as a leader in this field across the country and internationally.
They are 5 years into a 25-year plan where $2 billion is being spent to reduce the volume
of water that is detained prior to entering sewer systems during rain events.
To raise these funds, the city of Philadelphia has enacted a Stormwater fee for
commercial properties. The fee is based on the impermeable square footage of a particular
property.
There are now over 700 of these GSI units throughout the city.
For more information contact Tommy McCann, ​Penn State Extension Green Industry
Team​, by sending email to: ​tjm161@psu.edu​.
NewsClips:
Greene Twp, Franklin County To Improve Conococheague Creek
Your Street, Park Could Get Free Trees Thanks To $1.1M Expansion In Philly Program
Op-Ed: As Philly Development Booms, What Happens To All Our Trees?
Green Infrastructure Related Stories:
New Statewide Partnership Launches Major Effort To Plant 10 Million Trees To Cleanup
Pennsylvania’s Streams, Rivers
Renew The State's Commitment To Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Meeting The Challenge Of Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Agriculture, Forestry Workgroups Present Key Recommendations To Meet PA’s Chesapeake
Bay Pollution Reduction Obligations
PA Chesapeake Bay Steering Committee Readies Information For 39 Counties On Water
Pollution Reduction Planning Process
Emma Creek Restoration Project Reduced Flood Damage, Sediment & Nutrient Pollution In
Huntingdon County
Another Green Infrastructure Project Reduces Flooding In Manheim, Lancaster County
Green Infrastructure Offers Triple Benefits, Cost Effective Solutions To Stormwater Pollution,
Reducing Flood Damage
Op-Ed: Of Pennsylvania Floods And Our Future
LancasterOnline: Lancaster Farmland Provides $676M In Annual Environmental Benefits
Estimated $939.2 Million Return On Investment In Protecting, Restoring Dauphin County’s
Natural Resources
Carbon County Has $800 Million Return On Investment From Natural Resources
Related Stories This Week:
Applications Now Being Accepted For Next Penn State Master Well Owner Course
Penn State Extension Watershed Winds Newsletter Now Available
CBF-PA Urges Passage Of Keystone Tree Fund After Measure Is Voted Out Of House
Committee
Lancaster Clean Water Partners To Release Draft Nutrient, Sediment Reduction Plan At Oct. 3
Meeting
Tree Pittsburgh, Partners To Give Away 1,000 Free Trees In Allegheny County Oct. 13, Nov. 3
PASA: Free Soil Health Clinic: Field Sampling & Assessment Techniques Oct. 3 In Juniata
County
Lebanon County Grazing Network Hosts Soil Pit/Soil Health Field Day Oct. 12
How You Can Help
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed

7
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

Senate Environmental Committee OKs Bill To Weaken Conventional Oil & Gas Drilling
Standards

The ​Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ Tuesday approved and reported out
House Bill 2154​ (Causer-R-Cameron) which would weaken environmental standards for
conventional (not Shale) oil and gas drilling in a party line vote (Republicans supporting).
The bill now goes to the full Senate for action.
On Monday, DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell ​wrote to members​ of the Senate
Environmental Committee urging them to oppose House Bill 2154.
“DEP has repeatedly offered to engage with the regulated community to craft a solution
that addresses the conventional industry’s concerns while remaining protective of public health
and safety and the environment, including an offer to convene a summer workgroup to draft a
new piece of legislation.
“Unfortunately, instead, leadership from the community has continued to press forward
with a piece of legislation which is so badly flawed it does not present a starting point for
discussions.
“As written, the bill presents environmental and public health risks and loosens current
environmental protections to the point, in some cases, of nullification.”
Click Here​ for a copy of Secretary McDonnell’s letter.
The PA Environmental Council and Environmental Defense Fund also expressed their
opposition to the bill, saying “It is our position that common-sense, practical solutions exist to
address the concerns of small company operators. However, HB 2154 is a wholesale unraveling
of protections that were established with the bipartisan enactment of Act 13 of 2012.
“In fact, this legislation would result in a law even weaker than the 1984 Oil and Gas Act
in many important respects.
“Considering that the Department of Environmental Protection’s recent 2017 Oil and Gas
Report findings that the number of ​conventional oil and gas well violations more than tripled
between 2015 (1,024) and 2017 (3,273), the timing and design of this legislation is ill-advised.
“If this legislation were to pass, Pennsylvania would have the discreditable distinction of
being the only state to significantly reduce environmental protection, best practices and the use
of new technology related to oil and gas development in the modern era, walking back
decades-old protections and operating standards that are accepted by both the industry at large
and other oil and gas producing states.”
Click Here​ for a copy of the letter by PEC and EDF.
Other Action
The Committee also reported out ​Senate Resolution 214​ (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery)
urging Pennsylvania natural gas producers to export gas to European countries in an effort to
curtail the monopoly that Russia has on supply to that region (​sponsor summary​).
Sen. Gene Yaw (R-Lycoming) serves as Majority Chair of the ​Senate Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-787-3280 or sending email to:

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gyaw@pasen.gov​. Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7105 or sending email to: ​yudichak@pasenate.com​.
NewsClip:
Legere: General Assembly Advances Bills On Conventional Drilling, Pipeline Vandalism
Related Stories:
DEP: Conventional Oil & Gas Well Violations More Than Triple Between 2015-17
Senate Environmental Committee Holds Sept. 25 Hearing On Foreign Influence On Natural Gas
Development In PA
Waning Days Of Senate, House: Environmental Bills We’re Watching, Good And Bad
Related Stories This Week:
Senate Environmental Committee Hearing: Witnesses Outline What They See As Attempts By
Foreign Entities To Stand In The Way Of PA’s Gas Development
House Environmental Committee Amends Critical Infrastructure Security Bill To Set Penalties
For Intentional Vandalism
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: No Mandatory Physical Or Cyber Security Standards Exist For
Natural Gas Pipelines
Scranton Times-Tribune: State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County
Landowner Lawsuit On Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban
Penn State Extension: Oct. 23 Webinar On Addressing Orphan & Abandoned Wells From DEP,
Industry Perspectives
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

House Environmental Committee Amends Critical Infrastructure Security Bill To Set


Penalties For Intentional Vandalism

The ​House Environmental Resources and Energy


Committee​ amended and reported out ​Senate Bill 652
(Regan-R-Cumberland) which deals with the security of
rights-of-way for pipelines, electric power lines, railroad
tracks, refineries and the property on which of any of 21
other “critical infrastructure facilities” are located.
The goal of the amendment, said Rep. John Maher
(R-Allegheny), Majority Chair of the Committee, is to
remove the provisions in the bill related to setting criminal
penalties for simple trespass and replacing it with felony
penalties for the offense of critical infrastructure vandalism “if the person intentionally or
recklessly damages, destroys, vandalizes, defaces or tampers with equipment in a critical
infrastructure facility.”
Click Here​ for a copy of the Senate Bill 652 amendment.
Minority Chair Rep. Mike Carroll (D-Luzerne) said the amendment ameliorates many of
the concerns with the bill as it came from the Senate, but it may need more work.
The amendment was approved by the Committee by largely a party line vote
(Republicans supporting).
Several Democratic members of the Committee expressed concerns about the potential

9
impact of the bill on free speech rights of those protesting pipelines and other energy facilities,
even with the amendment.
A motion by Rep. Stephen McCarter (D-Montgomery) to Table the bill so the Committee
can do further work on bill language was defeated by a party line vote (Republicans opposing).
The bill was then reported out of Committee by largely a party line vote (Republicans
supporting) and now goes to the full House for action
Twenty-one types of facilities are included in the definition of “Critical Infrastructure
Facility”--
-- Natural gas or natural gas liquids transmission, distribution facility or pipeline, pipeline
interconnection, metering station, pipeline compressor station, terminal or storage facility, gas
processing, treatment or fractionation of natural gas or natural gas liquids;
-- Oil and gas production facilities, well sites, separation and dehydration facilities, storage and
meter stations;
-- Electric power generating facility, substation, switching station, or electrical power lines and
any energy facility involved in the production, storage, transmission or distribution of electricity,
fuel or other form or source of energy or research, development, or demonstration facilities
regardless of whether the facility is still under construction or is otherwise not functioning,
except a facility subject to the jurisdiction of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (18 USC
Section 1366(c));
-- Water intake structure, water treatment and distribution structure or wastewater treatment and
collection infrastructure;
-- Dam regulated by the state or federal government;
-- Petroleum or alumina refinery; crude oil or refined products storage and distribution facility,
chemical, polymer or rubber manufacturing facility, a facility identified and regulated by the
Department of Homeland Security Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Program;
-- Telecommunications switching station, remote terminal, wireless telecommunications
infrastructure, radio or television transmission facilities;
-- Port, railroad switching yard, railroad tracks, trucking terminal;
-- Steelmaking facility using an electric arc furnace; and
-- Any equipment and machinery stored on location or at a storage yard used to construct critical
infrastructure.
Previous Senate Action
When the Senate passed the bill in May, Republicans generally supported the bill (with 6
exceptions) and Democratic members opposed.
Democratic members expressed concerns that it would limit the First Amendment rights
of people to express their opinions about a facility. In other cases, the bill language was noted as
overly broad to the point of being unworkable, like in the case of “trespassing” on electric power
line or railroad track rights-of-way.
Sen. Larry Farnese (D-Philadelphia) compared the proposal to ​his efforts to outlaw
SLAPP suits​ where developers and others file lawsuits against citizens and community groups in
hopes of intimidating them to drop their opposition. Sen. Farnese’s bill-- ​Senate Bill 95​-- passed
the Senate overwhelmingly 42 to 8 in April of last year.
Other Committee Action
The Committee also reported out ​House Bill 2640​ (Mako-R-Lehigh) requiring DEP to
forward notices of noncompliance issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for

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violation of the Toxic Substances Control Act or state Solid Waste Management Act to the
municipality where the violation occurred (​sponsor summary​).
Click Here​ for a video of the meeting.
Rep. John Maher (R-Allegheny) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1522 or sending email to:
jmaher@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Mike Carroll serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by
calling 717-787-3589 or sending email to: ​mcarroll@pahouse.net​.
NewsClip:
Legere: General Assembly Advances Bills On Conventional Drilling, Pipeline Vandalism
Sisk: Lawmakers Consider Tougher Penalties For Vandalizing Pipelines, Power Plants
Sen. Dinniman: Efforts Underway To Silence Pipeline Critics
Hurdle: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Incidents, Fines, Shutdowns Fuel Residents’ Safety Concerns
Sisk: First Responders Near Mariner East 2 Pipeline Prep For Unlikely One Hell Of A Boom
Cusick: Wired To Be Wary Of Certain Things: Why Pipelines Are Among Them
Frazier: In PA, No Oversight Of Where Some Pipelines Can Be Built
Op-Ed: Pipeline Construction Moratorium Would Make PA Less Safe
Allegheny Front: Want To Know If There Are Pipelines Near You? Good Luck With That
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion​ - Andrew
Williams, Environmental Defense Fund
Editorial: Map Natural Gas Pipelines
Editorial: Answers Needed In Removal Of Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Stormwater Basin, Flooding
Related Stories:
Senate Environmental Committee OKs Bill To Weaken Conventional Oil & Gas Drilling
Standards
Senate Environmental Committee Hearing: Witnesses Outline What They See As Attempts By
Foreign Entities To Stand In The Way Of PA’s Gas Development
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: No Mandatory Physical Or Cyber Security Standards Exist For
Natural Gas Pipelines
Scranton Times-Tribune: State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County
Landowner Lawsuit On Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban
Penn State Extension: Oct. 23 Webinar On Addressing Orphan & Abandoned Wells From DEP,
Industry Perspectives
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: No Mandatory Physical Or Cyber Security Standards


Exist For Natural Gas Pipelines

The ​House-Senate Nuclear Energy Caucus​ Tuesday


heard testimony from energy and security experts
who said there are “no mandatory physical or cyber
security standards exist for natural gas systems” in
contrast to the nuclear energy industry that has to
meet “demanding security requirements.”
Paul Stockton​,​ Current Managing Director and

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Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas’ Security Affairs,
Sonecon, LLC​, outlined what he sees as threats to the electric grid and fuel supplies to power
generators and why nuclear generation is more resilient against attack.
He pointed out that the nuclear energy sector has stringent physical and cyber security
standards and “no mandatory physical or cyber security standards exist for natural gas systems.”
“While China, Russia, and other nations are developing increasingly sophisticated cyber
weapons to attack U.S. energy infrastructure, the two key components of the energy sector
[nuclear power and the Oil and Natural Gas] are taking radically different approaches to
defending against that threat.
‘The electricity subsector must comply with increasingly stringent, mandatory standards
for both cyber and physical risks. Nuclear power plants must meet especially demanding security
requirements – and therefore offer extraordinary value for resilient electric service.
“But the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) subsector lacks mandatory standards.
“Moreover, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) provides nuclear plants with a
design basis threat (DBT) to help plant owners and operators understand the scale and severity of
the attacks they must be prepared to counter.
“Natural gas systems have no such DBT to undergird their own security efforts.”
Stockton said critical electric distribution facilities like substations and natural gas
compression facilities are vulnerable to physical attacks by truck bombs or other means to create
massive physical damage.
As an example, he pointed to a 2013 attack on the Metcalf electric substation in San Jose,
California which knocked out 17 or its 23 transformers.
“Nuclear power plants are heavily protected against all such cyber and physical threats.
Nuclear power plants, under NRC regulation, have mandatory physical and cyber standards.
These standards are in part derived from the NRC’s design basis threat (DBT) for nuclear power
plants and related facilities.
“A successful attack on natural gas utilities in regions of the U.S. that are particularly
reliant on this source of fuel would immediately hinder the electricity subsector’s ability to
generate power and could cause electric outages – potentially exacerbated by physical damage to
gas infrastructure.
“In contrast, nuclear power plants rely on onsite fuel for power generation and can
generate electricity for many months between refueling operations.
“Natural gas explosions in Massachusetts on September 13 highlight the potential risks of
adversary intrusions into natural gas system control networks.
“While there is no evidence to suggest that these explosions or the over-pressurization in
pipelines that caused them were the result of malicious intervention, these actions exemplify the
type of actions that adversaries could take to disrupt natural gas supplies for power generation
and cause kinetic damage in the U.S.
“If an adversary were able to infect a natural gas utility’s industrial controls they could
similarly cause gas lines to over-pressurize and explode, leading to both structural damage to
customers and destruction of the pipeline infrastructure that allows gas to flow to power
generators.
“Despite the severity of threats to the ONG [oil and natural gas] subsector, no mandatory
physical or cyber security standards exist for natural gas systems.”
Stockton said the U.S. Transportation Security Agency must adopt mandatory security

12
standards for the oil and natural gas sector.
"Cyber and physical protections in the ONG subsector remain voluntary despite repeated
pressures to introduce mandatory standards. Both TSA and the pipeline industry defend this
voluntary approach by arguing that many companies currently exceed the voluntary guidelines,
and that setting general standards would create requirements less stringent than what is common
practice across much of the subsector.
“Others suggest that government-issued standards, by nature, cannot keep pace with the
evolving threat. This rationale may no longer be sufficient for a threat landscape in which the
consequences of a lapse in security could cascade across multiple critical infrastructure sectors,
nationwide.
“Mandatory standards – paired with an effective enforcement mechanism and sufficient
TSA resources to ensure compliance – could bolster the defenses of companies who do not
currently meet the voluntary measures.
“I [also] recommend that you take steps to halt the premature retirement of nuclear power
plants and ensure that energy market prices compensate nuclear plants for the resilience and
environmental benefits they bring to customers – and value for national security they provide as
a result.
“I believe that regulators need to immediately update their pricing rules to reflect these
considerations, as current public policies that encourage low-carbon generation tend to
discriminate against nuclear energy and fail to properly price its climate benefits.”
Edward McGinness​,​ Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Nuclear Energy,
U.S. Department of Energy, said nuclear energy is one of the most reliable source of electric
generation working 24/7 without refueling.
In Pennsylvania it accounts for more than 40 percent of the electricity generated in the
state and 93 percent of the carbon-free electric generation.
The generation capacity of just the three nuclear power plants scheduled for shutdown in
Pennsylvania is equal to the all the wind and solar energy generation in the regional PJM
Interconnection.
McGinness said DOE is working on a number of initiatives on nuclear power, including
accident tolerant fuels, extending the life of number plants to 80 years and advanced nuclear
power plant designs, including “walk-away” safe designs.
Amy Roma​, Partner, ​Hogan Lovells​ and Co-Author, ​Back from the Brink: A Threatened
Nuclear Energy​, noted several connections between U.S. military nuclear programs and the
commercial industry.
One major connection is that personnel trained in the military often seek job
opportunities in the commercial nuclear industry. If the commercial industry is not there, it
represents a significant loss of expertise and opportunities to the economy.
Sen. Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster), one of four co-chairs of the Caucus, said the group will
be publishing a report outlining possible options for the General Assembly to take to prevent the
premature closure of nuclear power plants based on what the Caucus has learned in its hearings.
In response to a question from Sen. Aument about federal versus state roles in dealing
with this issue, Amy Roma said states have a “huge role to play” in helping to keep nuclear
plants from closing. She cited the example of Illinois which adopted a zero emission credit
program to properly value the benefits of power from nuclear power plants.
McGinness added, although there is a federal-state partnership working to keep nuclear

13
plants open, “states are determining whether these plants stay open.”
Click Here​ for a copy of written testimony and a video of the hearing.
Senators Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster) and John Yudichak (D-Luzerne) along with
Representatives Becky Corbin (R-Chester) and Rob Matzie (D-Allegheny) serve as co-chairs of
the Nuclear Energy Caucus.
For more information on this and past hearings, visit the ​Nuclear Energy Caucus
webpage.
(​Photo:​ Three Mile Island, Dauphin County.)
NewsClips:
Three Mile Island Closure Looms, Prompting Rally To Save Jobs, Protect Clean Energy
Employees, Officials Rally Lawmakers To Save Three Mile Island
State Lawmakers Asked To Take Action On Potential Nuclear Plant Closures
Three Mile Island: One Group Asks To Save Plant, Another Calls This A Bailout
Op-Ed: Keeping Nuclear Power Plants Running Vital To Meeting Climate Goals
Fuel Removed, Stored At From Shuttered Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant In NJ
Federal Court Again Upholds State Nuclear Subsidies, This Time In NY
Exelon On Federal Court Upholding New York’s Zero Emissions Credits Program
Legere: General Assembly Advances Bills On Conventional Drilling, Pipeline Vandalism
Sisk: Lawmakers Consider Tougher Penalties For Vandalizing Pipelines, Power Plants
Sen. Dinniman: Efforts Underway To Silence Pipeline Critics
Hurdle: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Incidents, Fines, Shutdowns Fuel Residents’ Safety Concerns
Sisk: First Responders Near Mariner East 2 Pipeline Prep For Unlikely One Hell Of A Boom
Cusick: Wired To Be Wary Of Certain Things: Why Pipelines Are Among Them
Frazier: In PA, No Oversight Of Where Some Pipelines Can Be Built
Op-Ed: Pipeline Construction Moratorium Would Make PA Less Safe
Allegheny Front: Want To Know If There Are Pipelines Near You? Good Luck With That
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion​ - Andrew
Williams, Environmental Defense Fund
Editorial: Map Natural Gas Pipelines
Editorial: Answers Needed In Removal Of Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Stormwater Basin, Flooding
Related Stories:
Nuclear Energy Caucus: Testimony Highlights Environmental Impacts Of Premature Shutdown
Of Nuclear Power Plants
PA Environmental Council: Putting A Price On Carbon Would Spur Energy Competition, Help
Nuclear Power Plants
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hears Testimony On Jobs, Environmental Impacts Of Closing Nuclear
Power Plants
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: The Federal Government Is Not Going To Act In Time To
Save Nuclear Power Plants
Related Stories This Week:
Senate Environmental Committee OKs Bill To Weaken Conventional Oil & Gas Drilling
Standards
Senate Environmental Committee Hearing: Witnesses Outline What They See As Attempts By
Foreign Entities To Stand In The Way Of PA’s Gas Development
House Environmental Committee Amends Critical Infrastructure Security Bill To Set Penalties

14
For Intentional Vandalism
Scranton Times-Tribune: State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County
Landowner Lawsuit On Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban
Penn State Extension: Oct. 23 Webinar On Addressing Orphan & Abandoned Wells From DEP,
Industry Perspectives
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

19 PA Counties Now Have Confirmed 55 Human Cases Of West Nile Virus

The Department of Health said Friday in an online


report there are now 55 human cases of West Nile
Virus in 19 counties in Pennsylvania and as
LancasterOnline.com​ reported last Friday 2 deaths
have been confirmed from ​West Nile Virus​ so far
this season-- one each in Lancaster and Lebanon
counties.
The counties with human cases this year
include-- Allegheny 1, Berks 3, Bucks 5, Cambria 1,
Centre 2, Chester 2, Dauphin 1, Delaware 3, Fayette
1, Franklin 8, Lancaster 4, Lebanon 4, Lehigh 1, Monroe 1, Montgomery 4, Montour 1,
Philadelphia 11, Tioga 1 and York 1 (​Saint Louis Enchephalitis ​(SLE) illness). ​(​Click Here​ for
latest list.)
In 2017, the Department of Health reported 20 human cases of West Nile and 3 deaths.
Certain mosquito species carry the West Nile virus, which can cause humans to contract
West Nile encephalitis, an infection that can result in an inflammation of the brain. According to
the Department of Health, all residents in areas where virus activity has been identified are at
risk of contracting West Nile encephalitis.
Weeks of unusually wet weather this summer has led to almost perfected conditions for
mosquito breeding, and breeding season will not be over until the first, hard killing frost.
Individuals can take a number of precautionary measures around their homes to help
eliminate mosquito-breeding areas, including:
-- Dispose of cans, buckets, plastic containers, ceramic pots, or similar containers that hold
water.
-- Properly dispose of discarded tires that can collect water. Stagnant water is where most
mosquitoes breed.
-- Drill holes in the bottom of outdoor recycling containers.
-- Have clogged roof gutters cleaned every year as the leaves from surrounding trees have a
tendency to plug drains.
-- Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use.
-- Turn over wheelbarrows and don't let water stagnate in birdbaths.
-- Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish.
-- Clean and chlorinate swimming pools not in use and remove any water that may collect on
pool covers.
If a resident has stagnant pools of water on their property, they can buy Bti (short for

15
Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis) products at lawn and garden, outdoor supply, home
improvement and other stores. This naturally occurring bacterium kills mosquito larvae, but is
safe for people, pets, aquatic life and plants.
Additionally, these simple precautions can prevent mosquito bites, particularly for people
who are most at risk:
-- Make sure screens fit tightly over doors and windows to keep mosquitoes out of homes.
-- Consider wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks when outdoors, particularly when
mosquitoes are most active at dawn and dusk, or in areas known for having large numbers of
mosquitoes.
-- When possible, reduce outdoor exposure at dawn and dusk during peak mosquito periods,
usually April through October.
-- Use insect repellents according to the manufacturer's instructions. An effective repellent will
contain DEET, picardin, or lemon eucalyptus oil. Consult with a pediatrician or family physician
for questions about the use of repellent on children, as repellent is not recommended for children
under the age of two months.
For more information about West Nile virus and the state's surveillance and control
program, please visit the ​West Nile Virus​ website. [Note: Unfortunately this website is not being
updated.]
NewsClips:
Murphy: Report: West Nile Virus Blamed For 2 Human Deaths In PA
2 People Died Of West Nile Virus In Central PA This Year
Allegheny County Reports 3rd Human Case Of West Nile Virus
West Nile Virus Cases Rise In Erie County
Mosquito Spraying Planned For Blair Bedford Counties
Editorial: Take Easy Steps To Help Reduce Threat Of West Nile Virus
Perry County Community Buzzing About Plague Of Flies
[Posted: Sept. 28, 2018]

Week 1 - Fall Foliage Report: Trees Starting To Change Along PA’s Northern Border

The Department of Conservation and Natural


Resources Thursday released its ​first Fall Foliage
Report​ showing some leaves are just starting to change
ever so slightly along Pennsylvania’s northern border.
Foresters have noted some localized areas of early leaf
drop on maple, cherry, and oak species due to the
excessively wet summer and related outbreaks of fungi.
Despite these setbacks, Commonwealth forests are still
well-stocked with leaves of over 100 tree, shrub, and
vine species. With cooler, seasonal temperatures in the
forecast, Penn’s Woods remain poised to deliver some
great fall color!
Click Here​ for this week’s map and all the details! Visit DCNR’s ​Fall Foliage Report
webpage for more information.
Visitors can get suggestions about the best spots to view fall foliage on the ​Penn's Woods

16
Fall Foliage story map​ and on the ​Pennsylvania Tourism Office​ website.
NewsClips:
Get Ready Leaf Peepers: PA’s Fall Foliage Reports Start Today
Prime Locations To See Fall Colors In The Lehigh Valley
Despite Rain, Fungi, Fall Foliage In PA Should Be ‘Awesome’
How To Track Progress On PA’s Fall Foliage
Online Fall Foliage Maps Track Seasonal Leaf Change
Rains, Warmth Threaten Autumn Colors, But Fall Won’t Be A Washout
Make Most Of Erie Area’s Fall Spendor Outdoors
With First Spotting Of Spotted Lanternfly Eggs, Let Eradication Begin
Crable: Spotted Lanternflies March Through Lancaster, Feds Make County Battleground
Get A Free Tree If You Live In Allegheny County
Your Street, Park Could Get Free Trees Thanks To $1.1M Expansion In Philly Program
Op-Ed: As Philly Development Booms, What Happens To All Our Trees?
Maple Syrup Producers Receive A Sweet Lesson In Northeast
Op-Ed: Nearly 200-Year-Old Tree Falls In The City Of Erie
Related Stories:
DCNR Blog: My Path To Fighting Wildlands Fires: A DCNR Firefighter's Journey
DCNR Blog: Producing The Show: Pennsylvania Fall Foliage Factors
DCNR: Additional State Forest Roads Opening For Hunting Seasons, Other Outdoor Activities
Delaware River Basin Commission Now Accepting Entries For Fall Photo Contest
Vote Now Through Oct. 1 In PA Parks & Forests Foundation Photo Contest
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Senate/House Bills Moving Last Week

The following bills of interest saw action last week in the House and Senate--

House

Natural Gas Line Extension:​ ​House Bill 107​ (Godshall-R- Montgomery) providing a
mechanism to cover costs of extending natural gas distribution systems was amended on the
House Floor and referred to the House Appropriations Committee.

Military Installation Cleanup:​ ​House Bill 2638​ (Stephens-R-Montgomery) establishes the


Military Installation Remediation Authority to address cleanup costs at the former Willow Grove
Naval Air Station funded by redirecting Sales Tax revenue from the redevelopment of the facility
(​sponsor summary​) was amended and reported from the House Commerce Committee and is
now on the House Calendar for action.

Keystone Tree Fund: ​House Bill 2486​ (Everett-R-Lycoming) providing a voluntary check off
on drivers licenses and vehicle registrations for contributions to the Keystone Tree Fund
(​sponsor summary​) was amended and reported from the House Transportation Committee and
Tabled.

17
Critical Infrastructure Security: ​Senate Bill 652​ (Regan-R-Cumberland) which deals with the
security of rights-of-way for pipelines, electric power lines, railroad tracks, refineries and the
property on which of any of 21 other “critical infrastructure facilities” are located was amended
to remove the provisions in the bill related to setting criminal penalties for simple trespass and
replacing it with felony penalties for the offense of critical infrastructure vandalism “if the
person intentionally or recklessly damages, destroys, vandalizes, defaces or tampers with
equipment in a critical infrastructure facility” and was reported from the House Environmental
Resources and Energy Committee and Tabled.

Notices Of Noncompliance:​ ​House Bill 2640​ (Mako-R-Lehigh) requiring DEP to forward


notices of noncompliance issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for violation of
the Toxic Substances Control Act or state Solid Waste Management Act to the municipality
where the violation occurred (​sponsor summary​) ​was reported from the House Environmental
Resources and Energy Committee and Tabled.

Abolishing Boards, Commissions:​ ​House Bill 2105​ (Fritz-R-Susquehanna) eliminating certain


boards and commissions as obsolete ​was amended and reported from the House State
Government Committee and Tabled.

Lyme Disease Vaccinations:​ ​House Resolution 943​ (Tallman-R-Adams) urging the federal
Food And Drug Administration to promptly consider candidates for Lyme disease vaccinations
was reported from the House Health Committee and is now on the House Calendar for action.

Public Lands Day:​ ​House Resolution 860​ (Daley-D-Montgomery) designating September 22


Public Lands Day in Pennsylvania (​sponsor summary​) was adopted by the House.

Drive Electric Week:​ ​House Resolution 1035​ (Marshall-R-Beaver) designating the week of
September 8-16 as National Drive Electric Week (​sponsor summary​) was adopted by the House.

World Habitat Day:​ ​House Resolution 1069​ (Culver-R-Northumberland) recognizing October


2 as World Habitat Day in Pennsylvania (​sponsor summary​) was adopted by the House.

Energy Awareness Month:​ ​House Resolution 1071​ (Mackenzie-R-Berks) recognizing the


month of October as Energy Awareness Month in Pennsylvania (​sponsor summary​) was adopted
by the House.

Senate

Lead Service Line:​ ​House Bill 2075​ (Charlton-R-Delaware) authorizing rate recovery for
customer-owned lead water service lines was amended and reported from the Senate Consumer
Protection and Professional Licensure Committee and was referred to the Senate Appropriations
Committee.

Tailpipe Testing: ​House Bill 86​ (Lawrence-R-Chester) eliminating tailpipe emissions testing for
1992-1995 vehicles in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia areas (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was

18
reported from the Senate Transportation Committee and was referred to the Senate
Appropriations Committee.

Planting Native Species​: ​House Bill 2131​ (Quigley-R-Montgomery) requiring PennDOT to


plant native species of vegetation along highways (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was
reported from the Senate Transportation Committee and was referred to the Senate
Appropriations Committee.

Leaf Waste: ​ ​House Bill 927​ (Rader-R-Monroe) amends Act 101 Municipal Waste Planning and
Recycling Act to eliminate the mandate on smaller municipalities to have a leaf waste collection
program (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was referred to the Senate Appropriations
Committee.

Conventional Drilling:​ ​House Bill 2154​ (Causer-R-Cameron) which would weaken


environmental standards for conventional (not Shale) oil and gas drilling was reported from the
Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee and is on the Senate Calendar for
action.

Natural Gas Exports:​ ​ ​Senate Resolution 214​ (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) urging Pennsylvania


natural gas producers to export gas to European countries in an effort to curtail the monopoly
that Russia has on supply to that region (​sponsor summary​) was reported from the Senate
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee and is on the Senate Calendar for action.

End Drilling Moratorium:​ ​Senate Resolution 104​ (Bartolotta-R- Washington) resolution urging
the Governor to end the moratorium on new non-surface disturbance natural gas drilling on state
forest land (​sponsor summary​) was Tabled.

Clean Energy Week:​ ​Senate Resolution 420​ (Browne-R-Lehigh) designating September 23-28
Clean Energy Week (​sponsor summary​) was adopted by the Senate.

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule/ Bills Introduced

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (Oct. 1)​: ​House Bill 1401​ (DiGirolamo-R-Bucks) which amends Title 58 to impose a
sliding scale natural gas severance tax, in addition to the Act 13 drilling impact fee, on natural
gas production (NO money for environmental programs) and includes provisions related to
minimum landowner oil and gas royalties; ​House Bill 1446​ (Quinn-R- Bucks) encouraging
infrastructure for electric and natural gas fueled vehicles; ​House Bill 2638​ (Stephens-R-
Montgomery) establishes the Military Installation Remediation Authority to address cleanup
costs at the former Willow Grove Naval Air Station funded by redirecting Sales Tax revenue
from the redevelopment of the facility (​sponsor summary​); ​House Resolution 284
19
(Moul-R-Adams) urging Congress to repeal the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s MS4
Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program (​sponsor summary​)​; ​House Resolution 943
(Tallman-R-Adams) urging the federal Food And Drug Administration to promptly consider
candidates for Lyme disease vaccinations;​ ​Senate Bill 1172​ (Vulakovich-R-Allegheny) further
providing for enforcement of price gouging provisions during an emergency declaration (​Senate
Fiscal Note​ and summary). ​<> ​Click Here​ for full House Bill Calendar.

Senate (Oct. 1): ​Senate Bill 820 ​(Aument-R- Lancaster) providing liability protection for
owners and operators of on-farm agritourism activities (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 917
(Dinniman-R-Chester) amends Act 101 Municipal Waste Planning and Recycling Act to include
spent mushroom compost under the definition of “compost materials to encourage its reuse
(​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 930​ (Dinniman-D- Chester) sets notification requirements
related to pipeline emergencies (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 931​ (Dinniman-D-Chester)
requires the installation of automatic or remote controlled safety values in natural gas pipelines
in densely populated areas; ​Senate Bill 1199​ (Rafferty-R- Montgomery) providing for a
landowners’ bill of rights in cases of eminent domain, including by private entities like pipeline
companies (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Resolution 214​ (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) urging
Pennsylvania natural gas producers to export gas to European countries in an effort to curtail the
monopoly that Russia has on supply to that region (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Resolution 373
(Rafferty-R-Montgomery) is a concurrent Senate-House resolution to ​establish a Senate-House
legislative Commission to Study Pipeline Construction and Operations and to recommend
improvements for the safe transport of oil, natural gas and other hazardous liquids through
pipelines;​ ​House Bill 544​ (Moul-R-Adams) further providing for liability protection for
landowners opening their land for public recreation; ; ​House Bill 1550​ (Klunk-R-York)
amending the Agricultural Area Security Law to allow for a residence for the principal
landowner (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary); ​House Bill 2154​ (Causer-R-Cameron) which
would weaken environmental standards for conventional (not Shale) oil and gas drilling​.
<> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

House:​ the ​Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee ​meets to consider ​Senate Bill 1171
(Brooks-R- Crawford) changing the membership of the Nutrient Management Advisory Board;
the ​Tourism & Recreation Development Committee​ holds a Roundtable Discussion of tourism
issues affecting the Laurel Highlands in Fayette County. <> ​Click Here​ for full House
Committee Schedule.

Senate:​ the ​Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee​ holds a hearing on invasive and native
species. <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Committee Schedule.

Other:​ the ​Joint House-Senate Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and Conservation
Committee​ holds a Roundtable Discussion on the status and future of anthracite coal in
Pennsylvania in Schuylkill County.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

20
Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Bills Introduced

The following bills of interest were introduced last week--

Act 129 Update:​ ​House Bill 2662​ (C.Quinn-R-Delaware) updating the Act 129 energy
efficiency, conservation program for electric utilities (​sponsor summary​). Companion to ​Senate
Bill 1236​ (McGarrigle (R-Delaware). ​Click Here​ for more.

DRBC Regulatory Authority:​ ​House Bill 2670​ (Fritz-R-Susquehanna) addresses the authority
of the Delaware River Basin Commission to enact a fracking ban and to regulate onlot septic
systems and address “mission creep” (​sponsor summary​).

Clean Energy Week:​ ​Senate Resolution 420​ (Browne-R-Lehigh) designating September 23-28
Clean Energy Week (​sponsor summary​) was adopted by the Senate.

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
October 1, 2, 3, 15, 16, 17
November 14

House
October 1 (Non-Voting), 2 (Non-Voting), 9, 10, 15, 16, & 17.
November 13

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

Senate Environmental Committee Hearing: Witnesses Outline What They See As Attempts
By Foreign Entities To Stand In The Way Of PA’s Gas Development

The ​Senate Environmental Resources and Energy


Committee​ Tuesday heard from witnesses who outlined
what they see as attempts by Russia and foreign entities
21
to hinder natural gas development nationally and in Pennsylvania.
Thomas B. Murphy​, one of the directors of the ​Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach
and Research​, provided the Committee with a general overview of shale gas development in the
state and noted the surge in natural gas production in Pennsylvania and the United States has had
an impact on global markets.
In particular, Murphy noted, eastern Europe is attempting to diversify its energy
resources because it has been solely dependent on Russia for energy resources due to historical
political connections and the pipeline infrastructure in place.
“This [gas development in the United States and Pennsylvania] has challenged Russia for
instance, which has over 40 percent of its national budget dependent on the sales of O&G [oil
and gas],” he said. “On a competitive basis, any new U.S. supply offsets quantities previously
delivered by Russia.”
Kevin J. Mooney​, Reporter, ​The Daily Signal​ (a news platform from the conservative
Heritage Foundation​), said the San Francisco-based ​Sea Change Foundation​ is believed by a
Congressional investigator to be associated with Vladimir Putin’s Russian government and has
been giving grants to groups in New York and other areas in the U.S. to support its “Keep It In
The Ground” initiative.
Mooney said the ​Sierra Club​, ​Natural Resources Defense Council​, ​League of
Conservation Voters​ and the ​Energy Foundation​ have received significant grants from the Sea
Change Foundation.
He noted the ​Sierra Club​, NRDC and the ​League of Conservation Voters​ have “an active
presence in Pennsylvania.”
Thomas J. Shepstone​, ​Shepstone Management Company, Inc​. and publisher of ​Natural
Gas Now​, said he believes nonprofit foundations have been influencing Pennsylvania’s energy
sector in a negative way to prevent the development of natural gas and related infrastructure.
“The Heinz Endowments has funded one radical anti-gas initiative after another,” said
Shepstone. “It is behind the ​Southwest Pennsylvania Environmental Health Clinic​, for example,
which is a purely junk science outfit intended to generate anti-gas headlines.
“It has funded ​PennFuture​, the ​Clean Air Council​, the ​NRDC​, the ​Delaware Riverkeeper
and even the online journal ​StateImpactPA​, which serves as an echo chamber for stories ginned
up by the former.”
[​Note: ​StateImpact Pennsylvania editor Scott Blanchard sent a letter to the Committee in
reaction to Shepstone's comments saying-- "StateImpact Pennsylvania is an independent public
media news collaboration that covers the state’s energy economy. It receives funding in part
from the Heinz Endowments. Neither Heinz, nor any of StateImpact Pennsylvania’s other
funders, nor any groups or organizations funded by the foundations Mr. Shepstone cites, have
any say or influence over our news coverage."]
“We learned something about the Heinz family and one of the Heinz Endowments
directors recently, though, that tells us there’s a lot more than altruism going on here,” said
Shepstone. “We learned Chris Heinz is heavily invested in ​Burisma​, a Ukrainian oil and gas
company that brags it “operates the largest modern rig and hydraulic fracking fleet…in Ukraine
and across the region.”
“Burisma clearly hopes to supply Europe with natural gas as a competitor to Gazprom,
the Russian natural gas company, said Shepstone.
“Burisma will also be competing with LNG from the US; Pennsylvania LNG that initially

22
comes out of the ground in Bradford, Lycoming and Washington Counties, is then converted to
LNG and finally shipped out of Cove Point to import terminals all of the world.”
After outlining several other possible connections, Shepstone said, “There’s but one
antidote to all of this; sunlight. Pennsylvania can and should be requiring nonprofit tax returns in
the Commonwealth to include disclosure of all donors giving such organizations more than
$5,000 per year.
“It should also request the Auditor General investigate the unholy alliance between these
organizations and foreign actors,” said Shepstone. “What we need is what you’re doing today;
exposing of the foreign special interests behind so much of what passes as frackivism.”
Additional written testimony was provided to the Committee by ​Kenneth L. Stiles​, who
teaches at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia and was an employee of the Central Intelligence
Agency.
Click Here​ for a copy of written testimony and a video of the hearing (when posted).
​More Background
In ​June, The Caucus/LancasterOnline.com​ published a lengthy article on allegations
Russia, which depends on natural gas exports to Europe for cash, tried to preserve its dominance
by sowing discord and opposition to the development of natural gas in the United States,
Pennsylvania and to specific projects like the Dakota Access Pipeline.
The article follows a ​report by the Republican staff on the U.S. House Committee on
Science, Space And Technology​ released in March of this year that concluded, “Russian agents
were exploiting American social media platforms in an effort to disrupt domestic energy
markets, suppress research and development of fossil fuels, and stymie efforts to expand the use
of natural gas.”
The Caucus/LancasterOnline.com article pointed to a series of stories published by the
RT website, which is owned by RTTV America, Inc. a registered foreign agent with the U.S.
Department of Justice, that highlighted protests to natural gas development in the state.
The example articles included “​Pipeline To Move Fracked Gas Across Pennsylvania As
Critics Cry Foul​” and “​Protesters Resisting Mariner East 2 Pipeline In Pennsylvania Feeling
Intimidated​.”
Caucus/LancasterOnline.com also cited the ​story by Amy Sisk, a reporter for StateImpact
PA​, as she recounted how a photo she took at the Dakota Access Pipeline demonstrators site was
used by Russia’s Internet Research Agency to illustrate a story on the U.S. House Committee
staff report on Russian influence in the energy sector.
Sisk’s found out about the use of the photo from a ​story in the Washington Post​ on how
Russian Internet trolls sought to inflame the debate over climate change, fracking and the Dakota
Pipeline.
David Masur from PennEnvironment was quoted in the Lancaster article as saying,
“Certainly the case against fracking is clearly supported by the facts and doesn’t need ‘fake
news’ or any foreign interference to know that dirty drilling is bad for our air, water, health and
environment.”
He added he hadn’t heard of Russian interference in the energy debate before a reporter
emailed him.
Click Here​ to read the Caucus/LancasterOnline.com story.
Sen. Gene Yaw (R-Lycoming) serves as Majority Chair of the ​Senate Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-787-3280 or sending email to:

23
gyaw@pasen.gov​. Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7105 or sending email to: ​yudichak@pasenate.com​.
(​Photo:​ Mariner East 2 Pipeline construction in Lancaster County, ​LancasterOnline.com.​ )
Background NewsClips:
PA Natural Gas Boom Falls In Russia’s Crosshairs, Amplifies Discord In American Politics,
Energy Sector
How A Reporter’s Photo Wound Up In The Russia Investigations
National Republicans Brewing Russian Scandal To Target Greens
Russian Trolls Sought To Inflame Debate Over Climate Change, Fracking, Dakota Pipeline
The Connection Between Russia And 2 Green Groups Fighting Fracking In US
Russia Secretly Working With Environmentalists To Oppose Fracking
Russian Money Suspected Behind Fracking Protests
Related Stories This Week:
Senate Environmental Committee OKs Bill To Weaken Conventional Oil & Gas Drilling
Standards
House Environmental Committee Amends Critical Infrastructure Security Bill To Set Penalties
For Intentional Vandalism
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: No Mandatory Physical Or Cyber Security Standards Exist For
Natural Gas Pipelines
Scranton Times-Tribune: State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County
Landowner Lawsuit On Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban
Penn State Extension: Oct. 23 Webinar On Addressing Orphan & Abandoned Wells From DEP,
Industry Perspectives
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

Senate Agriculture Committee Holds Oct. 2 Hearing On Invasive, Native Species

The ​Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee​ is scheduled to hold a hearing October 2 on
invasive and native species.
The hearing will be held in Room 8E-B East Wing of the Capitol Building in Harrisburg
​ lick Here​ to watch the hearing online.
starting at 9:30.​ C
Sen. Elder Vogel (R-Beaver) serves as Majority Chair of the ​Senate Agriculture
Committee​, and can be contacted by sending email to: ​evogel@pasen.gov​. Sen. Judy Schwank
(D-Berks) serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by sending email to:
SenatorSchwank@pasenate.com​.
NewsClips:
With First Spotting Of Spotted Lanternfly Eggs, Let Eradication Begin
Crable: Spotted Lanternflies March Through Lancaster, Feds Make County Battleground
[Posted: Sept. 28, 2018]

News From Around The State

Mercer Conservation District Recognizes Dr. Fred Brenner, Lexie Arkwright As Pioneers
In Conservation
24
Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition​ participant and Grove City College Professor of Biology Dr.
Fred Brenner and his student Lexie Arkwright were recently honored by the ​Mercer County
Conservation District​ with Pioneers in Conservation awards.
Dr. Brenner​ was given a Lifetime Achievement Award for his work with the
Conservation District dedication to education, a massive body of research, and a commitment to
ecology and conservation.
He has been on the Grove City College faculty for 49 years and is recognized as a
certified senior ecologist, wildlife biologist, and environmental inspector and a professional
wetland scientist.
Arkwright, a Conservation Biology major from Mercer, has worked with and for the
Conservation District since she was in high school, and was honored for her enthusiasm and
efforts to advance environmental education.
The awards recognize those who have made a significant investment in the idea of natural
resource conservation. Dr. Brenner and Arkwright were among those recognized at the
Conservation District’s annual dinner on April 27.
Grove City College alumnae and Conservation District staffers Larissa
Cassano-Hamilton ’12, a watershed specialist, and Jacqueline L. McCullough ’10, environmental
education coordinator, presented the awards.
“It was an honor to present Dr. Brenner with an award, especially because I had him as a
professor,” Cassano-Hamilton said.
Beyond his professional and educational qualifications, “Dr. Brenner has donated his
time and served on the Mercer County Conservation District Board of Directors for almost 50
years. His dedication is truly inspiring,” she said.
She also noted that Brenner invests in future generations by being involved with Boy
Scouts of America and sharing his love and respect for the outdoors, has shaped Munnell Run
Farm, the outdoor educational complex where the Conservation District is headquartered, by
overseeing wetlands construction and best management practices, and advocates for
environmental education in our schools and communities.
Related Stories:
Call For Papers For Joint 2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation/ National Abandoned Mine
Lands Program Conference
DEP Invitation To Submit Act 181 Mine Reclamation Proposals For A Project In Clearfield
County
September Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition

(Reprinted from the ​September Catalyst newsletter​ from the S​ lippery Rock Watershed Coalition.​ )
[Posted: Sept. 24, 2018]

PASA: Free Soil Health Clinic: Field Sampling & Assessment Techniques Oct. 3 In Juniata
County

The ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture


will host a free ​Soil Health Clinic: Field
Sampling and Assessment Techniques​ on

25
October 3 in Mifflintown, Juniata County.
This Clinic will show you how to collect precise soil samples that accurately represent
your fields and how to submit those samples for testing through the ​Cornell Comprehensive
Assessment of Soil Health​ (CASH).
CASH provides you with a soil analysis that goes beyond its nutrients—it also assesses
your soil’s biological and physical components, such as microbial activity and aggregate
stability.
In addition, there will be demonstrations of other fun, hands-on assessments you can
conduct on your farm to further explore the health of your soil ecosystem. These will include a
ring infiltration test, percent-cover measurements, earthworm counts, and a decomposition index
using red and green tea bags.
This event is designed for farmers who have participated in our Soil Health Benchmark
Study in 2017 and are planning to contribute data again this fall. However, any other current
farmers interested in soil health are welcome to attend!
The facilitator for this event will be Dr. Franklin Egan, PASA Education Director.
The Clinic will be held at the ​Village Acres Farm and Foodshed​, 229 Cuba Mills Road in
Mifflintown from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m.
Click Here​ to register or for more information. Questions should be directed to Franklin
Egan, by sending email to: ​franklin@pasafarming.org​ or call 814-349-9856 x707.
Save The Date
The ​2019 Sustainable Agriculture Conference​ will be held in Lancaster February 6-9.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other education opportunities, visit the
PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for their newsletter
(bottom of page)​. ​Click Here​ to join them.
NewsClips:
Dairy Farmers See Low Profit From Milk, Face Rising Costs
Editorial: State Must Support Farmers to Ensure The Health Of All
Oct. 10 Pittsburgh Workshop Will Cover Farmland Preservation Strategies
Farm-To-Table Dinner Highlights Erie Region’s Bounty
Crable: Spotted Lanternflies March Through Lancaster, Feds Make County Battleground
With First Spotting Of Spotted Lanternfly Eggs, Let Eradication Begin
Related Stories:
Lebanon County Grazing Network Hosts Soil Pit/Soil Health Field Day Oct. 12
CBF-PA Urges Passage Of Keystone Tree Fund After Measure Is Voted Out Of House
Committee
Lancaster Clean Water Partners To Release Draft Nutrient, Sediment Reduction Plan At Oct. 3
Meeting
Penn State Extension: Green Stormwater Infrastructure - What's It All About?
Tree Pittsburgh, Partners To Give Away 1,000 Free Trees In Allegheny County Oct. 13, Nov. 3
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Lebanon County Grazing Network Hosts Soil Pit/Soil Health Field Day Oct. 12

The ​Lebanon County Grazing Network​ invites anyone


interested in learning about the “underground herd” of

26
animals living under your field to join us for a soil pit field day at ​Sandy Springs Farm​, 130
Sinclair Road in Newmanstown on October 12 from 9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
What's a soil pit field day, you ask? A soil pit is a walk-in hole dug into a field or pasture
that has living cover. Attendees will have the opportunity to see root growth, earthworm holes,
soil structure and other soil health qualities.
The field day will include other features, such as a Rainfall Simulator Demonstration,
hands-on infiltration tests and other activities designed to get the discussion going about how to
improve water infiltration, root growth and microbiology working for the farmer, just as the
livestock do.
Soil health affects plant production and vegetative composition as well as benefits
erosion and infiltration, so that every bit of sunlight and each drop of water coming onto the field
is captured for the plants.
This is a unique opportunity for working farmers to see and touch the soil profile in an
interactive setting then discuss how soil properties such as structure, texture, aggregate stability,
and temperature can improve their bottom line.
The day’s agenda will feature Penn State Extension forage specialists and NRCS soil
health specialists leading the activities and demonstrations, along with a producer panel after
lunch talking about their own experiences with forage quality as it relates to soil health on their
farms.
Many thanks to Sandy Springs Farm, operated by Andy Kline as an organic grass-fed
dairy farm, for hosting this event.
The field day is sponsored in part by the ​PA Grazing Lands Coalition​ and the ​National
Wildlife Federation's Cover Crop Champions Program​.
Registration cost is $15.00 for the day’s event including refreshments, payable by check
mailed ​with the web form​ to the Capital RC&D, 401 East Louther St., Ste. 307 Carlisle, PA
17013 or payable in person the day of the event.
For more information, please contact Matt Bomgardner at 717-222-0059. Please join us
to talk with others about how we all benefit from nature’s gift of soil!
Check out the ​Lebanon County Grazing Network's Facebook​ page to stay up to date on
this and other events in your area!
NewsClips:
Dairy Farmers See Low Profit From Milk, Face Rising Costs
Editorial: State Must Support Farmers to Ensure The Health Of All
Oct. 10 Pittsburgh Workshop Will Cover Farmland Preservation Strategies
Farm-To-Table Dinner Highlights Erie Region’s Bounty
Crable: Spotted Lanternflies March Through Lancaster, Feds Make County Battleground
With First Spotting Of Spotted Lanternfly Eggs, Let Eradication Begin
Related Stories:
PASA: Free Soil Health Clinic: Field Sampling & Assessment Techniques Oct. 3 In Juniata
County
CBF-PA Urges Passage Of Keystone Tree Fund After Measure Is Voted Out Of House
Committee
Lancaster Clean Water Partners To Release Draft Nutrient, Sediment Reduction Plan At Oct. 3
Meeting
Penn State Extension: Green Stormwater Infrastructure - What's It All About?

27
Tree Pittsburgh, Partners To Give Away 1,000 Free Trees In Allegheny County Oct. 13, Nov. 3
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Call For Presenters: 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River

The organizing committee of the ​2019 Watershed


Congress Along The Schuylkill River​ has ​issued a
call for presentation proposals​. The deadline for
submissions is October 31.
The Watershed Congress will be held on
March 9 at the Montgomery County Community
College ​campus in Pottstown​.
The objective of the Watershed Congress is to
advance the best available information and
techniques for protecting and restoring
watersheds. The focus on networking across
disciplines means that the Congress melds science, policy and practical applications into one
program.
The committee has recommended presentations on nearly 40 possible topics, but all
suggestions will be considered. Among the recommended topics are--
-- Green Infrastructure
-- Climate Change And Watershed Impacts
-- MS4 Stormwater Pollution
-- Riparian Buffers
-- Carbon Credits
-- Volunteer Building
-- Funding Options
The Congress is organized by the ​Delaware Riverkeeper Network​ and its partner
organizations as well as private individuals.
Current organization partners represent: ​Berks County Conservation District​; ​Berks
Nature​; ​Cadastral Consulting, LLC​; ​Center in the Park/Senior Environment Corps​; ​Chester-
Ridley-Crum Watersheds Association​; ​Delaware Nature Society​; Delaware Valley University;
A.D. Marble & Company​; ​Montgomery County Community College​; ​Montgomery County
Conservation District​; ​Outdoor Design & University of Maryland Environmental Finance
Center​; ​Partnership for the Delaware Estuary​; Penn State University, ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant​;
Department of Conservation & Natural Resources; ​Reading Area Community College​;
Schuylkill River Greenways NHA​; ​Stroud Water Research Center​; ​Sustainable Choices, LLC
and ​Philadelphia Water​; Temple University; ​The Write Beat​; and ​Yellow Springs Farm​.
Click Here​ to submit a proposal online. ​Click Here​ for additional guidance on submitting
a proposal.
For more information, visit the ​Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River
webpage. Questions should be directed to Chari Towne by sending email to:
chari@delawareriverkeeper.org​.
NewsClips:
Wide Range Of Groups Gather To Talk About Protecting Delaware Watershed

28
Delaware RiverKeeper Sept. 28 RiverWatch Video Report
Related Story:
Delaware River Basin Commission Now Accepting Entries For Fall Photo Contest
[Posted: Sept. 24, 2018]

Delaware River Basin Commission Now Accepting Entries For Fall Photo Contest

The ​Delaware River Basin Commission​ is accepting


entries for its ​Fall Photo Contest​ through November 15.
The contest highlights amateur and professional
photography that conveys the beauty, diversity, function,
and significance of the water resources of the Delaware
River Basin, a 13,539-square mile watershed.
In the Fall, the basin comes alive with color, as nature
begins to transition to the colder months ahead, and we
are interested in seeing and sharing photographs that
celebrate the season and the water resources that nearly 15
million people depend on for drinking, agriculture, and
industrial use.
The winning image will be chosen by a panel of judges at DRBC. It will be published in
the commission’s annual report, on its social media pages, and will also be featured on its
website. All entrants will receive a certificate of appreciation from the Commission.
More information on the contest and submitting entries is available at DRBC’s ​Fall Photo
Contest​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Delaware
River Basin Commission​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regulator updates. ​Follow DRBC
on Twitter​. ​Visit them on YouTube​.
(​Photo:​ Last year’s Fall winner - not from Pennsylvania.)
NewsClips:
Wide Range Of Groups Gather To Talk About Protecting Delaware Watershed
Delaware RiverKeeper Sept. 28 RiverWatch Video Report
Related Stories:
Photo Of PA's Neshaminy Creek Winner Of Delaware River Basin Commission Summer Photo
Contest; Fall Contest Starts
Joint Conservation Committee Members Discover The Delaware River Aboard The Schooner AJ
Meerwald
Study: Riparian Buffers Provide Over $10,000/Year/Acre In Benefits - Reducing Erosion,
Flooding, Increased Water Purification, Habitat, Property Values, More
Delaware River Watershed Initiative: Clean Water, Healthy Fish, Happy Kids In Chester County
Related Stories This Week:
Call For Presenters: 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River
Week 1 - Fall Foliage Report: Trees Starting To Change Along PA’s Northern Border
DCNR Blog: Producing The Show: Pennsylvania Fall Foliage Factors
DCNR: Additional State Forest Roads Opening For Hunting Seasons, Other Outdoor Activities
[Posted: Sept. 28 2018]

29
Call For Papers For Joint 2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation/ National Abandoned
Mine Lands Program Conference

The ​PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conference​ is


partnering with the ​National Association of
Abandoned Mine Lands Programs Conference​ to
issue a call for papers to be presented at the combined
2019 conference. The deadline for proposals is May
10.
The joint conferences with the theme-- Restore,
Transform, Revitalize-- will be held September 8-11
at the Wyndham Grand in Pittsburgh.
Suggested topics include: AMD Characterization and
Treatment, AML or AMD Case Studies, AML Pilot
Program Case Studies, Beneficial Use of Waste Materials, Coal Combustion Byproducts, Coal
Mining Heritage/Historic Preservation, Coal Refuse Reprocessing/Capping, Economic
Development and Reclamation, AML Emergency Projects, Endangered Species, Geophysical
Methods or Investigations, Grayfields and/or Brownfields, Innovative/Unique Reclamation
Techniques, Integration of GPS/GIS/Drone Techniques, Mine Fire Restoration Techniques, Mine
SubsidenceNEPA and/or Public Participation, Non-Coal/Hard Rock Issues, Partnerships,
Permitting Issues, Program Policy Issues/Reauthorization, Property Acquisition/Access Issues,
Regulatory Issues, Remining and Reclamation, Resource, Recovery and Reuse of AMD
Impaired Water, Revegetation/Reforestation Techniques, Slopes/Shafts Reclamation Techniques,
Stream Restoration Techniques, Water Supply Replacements and Wetlands Wildlife Habitat
Enhancements.
In an effort to facilitate scheduling, anyone interested in presenting should consider
sending notification with anticipated topic early. Presentations are anticipated to be 20 minutes
with a five‑minute Q and A to follow.
Abstract proposals should be submitted in PDF format. Abstracts should be 300 words or
less, Times New Roman – 12 font, and should include the presentation title, along with the
presenter’s name, title, organization or company, business address, phone number and email
address.
In addition, please identify if you are presenting as part of the NAAMLP/AMR/NASLR
technical session. Video presentations are welcome as well. Please keep video presentations to
20 minutes. All abstracts should be emailed to: ​CallforPapers@NAAMLP2019.com​.
Selected presenters will be notified by June 28, 2019, and final presentation material will
be due on or before August 16, 2019. Details pertaining to the final presentation format, speaker
guidelines and other presentation information will be provided to authors and/or presenters at the
time of abstract acceptance.
For more information or for questions, please contact Tom Malesky, Environmental
Program Manager, by sending email to: ​CallforPapers@NAAMLP2019.com​ or by telephone at
814-472-1818.
For more information on the conference, visit the ​National Association of Abandoned
Mine Lands Programs Conference​ webpage.

30
Related Stories:
DEP Invitation To Submit Act 181 Mine Reclamation Proposals For A Project In Clearfield
County
Mercer Conservation District Recognizes Dr. Fred Brenner, Lexie Arkwright As Pioneers In
Conservation
September Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition
[Posted: Sept. 24, 2018]

DEP Invitation To Submit Act 181 Mine Reclamation Proposals For A Project In
Clearfield County

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the September 29 PA Bulletin


(​page 6336​) inviting proposals under ​Act 181 of 1984​ from landowners, mine operators and
reclamation contractors to reclaim an abandoned coal preparation plant in Chest Township,
Clearfield County.
A pre-proposal on-site meeting will be held October 17. Read the entire PA Bulletin
notice for all the details (​page 6336​) . Questions should be directed to Aaron Pontzer, DEP
Moshannon District Office, 814-342-8200.
Related Stories:
Call For Papers For Joint 2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation/ National Abandoned Mine
Lands Program Conference
Mercer Conservation District Recognizes Dr. Fred Brenner, Lexie Arkwright As Pioneers In
Conservation
September Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition
[Posted: Sept. 28, 2018]

September Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition

The ​September edition of the Catalyst


newsletter is now available from the ​Slippery
Rock Watershed Coalition​ in Butler County
featuring articles on--
-- ​SRWC Helps Celebrates 20th Anniversary
Of PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation
Conference​ (photo)
-- ​Mercer County Pioneers In Conservation
Awards Go To Dr. Fred Brenner, Lexie
Arkwright
-- ​KIDS Catalyst Corn Maze Challenge
-- ​Click Here ​to sign up for your own copy.
The Catalyst newsletter is distributed to over 1,200 individuals in over a dozen countries
including: Brazil, Peru, South Korea, Mexico, England, Wales, Venezuela, South Africa, New
Zealand, Australia and Germany.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Slippery
Rock Watershed Coalition​ website. Also visit ​Clean Creek Pottery​ to help mine reclamation

31
efforts.
(Photo:​ Previous Mayfly award winners gather for a group photo at the 20th Annual PA Mine
Abandoned Conference. From Left to Right are Louise Dunlap, Joe Pizarchik, Andy McCallister
(presenter), Margaret Dunn, Tom Grote, Pam Milavec, John Dawes, Russ Wagner, Dave
Mankamyer, Art Rose, Bob Hedin, Craig Morgan and Robert Hughes (Presenter)
Related Stories:
Call For Papers For Joint 2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation/ National Abandoned Mine
Lands Program Conference
DEP Invitation To Submit Act 181 Mine Reclamation Proposals For A Project In Clearfield
County
Mercer Conservation District Recognizes Dr. Fred Brenner, Lexie Arkwright As Pioneers In
Conservation
[Posted: Sept. 24, 2018]

Tree Pittsburgh, Partners To Give Away 1,000 Free Trees In Allegheny County Oct. 13,
Nov. 3

Tree Pittsburgh​, in partnership with ​Duquesne


Light​, the ​Arbor Day Foundation​, ​TruGreen​ and
FedEx​, will be giving away 1,000 trees to
residents of Allegheny County at two events--
-- October 13:​ ​Pittsburgh Zoo​ parking lot, 7370
Baker Street in Pittsburgh from 10:00 a.m. to
2:00 p.m. ​Click Here to register;​ and
-- November 3:​ ​North Park Ice Rink​, 1200
Pearce Mill Road, Wexford from 10:00 a.m. to
2:00 p.m. ​Click Here to register​.
500 trees will be distributed at each event in 2 or
3 gallon containers and will range from 2 to 7 feet all. The trees will be able to fit in a car or
truck.
Species include river birch, sycamore, cherry dogwood, black gum, tulip poplar and
others. You cannot guarantee the species you receive. 1 tree per person (no more than 2 per
household please).
Registration is strongly encouraged​ to ensure you receive a tree, but we generally
accept walk-ins while supplies last.
The free tree giveaway is part of the Community Tree Recovery Campaign by Tree
Pittsburgh and its partners to help re-establish the tree canopy lost in Allegheny County.
For more information on community tree programs, visit DCNR’s ​TreeVitalize,
Community Tree Management​ webpage.
NewsClip:
Get A Free Tree If You Live In Allegheny County
Related Stories:
CBF-PA Urges Passage Of Keystone Tree Fund After Measure Is Voted Out Of House
Committee
Lancaster Clean Water Partners To Release Draft Nutrient, Sediment Reduction Plan At Oct. 3

32
Meeting
Penn State Extension: Green Stormwater Infrastructure - What's It All About?
PASA: Free Soil Health Clinic: Field Sampling & Assessment Techniques Oct. 3 In Juniata
County
Lebanon County Grazing Network Hosts Soil Pit/Soil Health Field Day Oct. 12
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Applications Now Being Accepted For Next Penn State Master Well Owner Course

Interested in learning more about and educating


others in the proper management of private water
systems? Consider applying for the Master Well
Owner online course being offered by Penn State
Extension!
The ​Penn State Master Well Owner Network
(MWON) will provide free, online training for the
first 30 volunteers who submit an application and
meet the following criteria:
-- You must not be employed by any company that
provides paid services to private water supply
owners (i.e. water testing companies, water treatment companies, water well drillers, etc.)
-- You must be willing to pass along basic private water system management knowledge to other
private water system owners.
Each volunteer who applies and is accepted into the program will receive details on how
to access the new, online MWON online course at no cost.
The course includes six chapters covering private water system basics, well and spring
construction, water testing, water supply protection, water treatment, water conservation, and
outreach strategies.
Each chapter includes a mixture of short videos and text along with links to additional
resources and a short quiz. Volunteers must answer 70 percent of the online quiz questions
correctly to be certified as a volunteer.
The course can be completed at your own pace but must be finished within 60 days from
the starting date. A computer with a high speed internet connection is recommended to view all
of the course materials and videos.
Volunteers who successfully complete the training course and pass a short exam will
receive a free copy of the 80 page publication - ​A Guide to Private Water Systems in
Pennsylvania​, discounted water testing through the Penn State water testing lab, and access to
various MWON educational materials.
In return, MWON volunteers are asked to pass along what they have learned to other
private water supply owners and submit a simple, one-page annual report of their educational
accomplishments.
Pennsylvania is home to over one million private water wells and springs but it is one of
the few states that does not provide statewide regulations to protect these rural drinking water
supplies.
In 2004, Penn State Extension and several partner agencies created the Master Well

33
Owner Network (MWON); trained volunteers who are dedicated to promoting the proper
construction, testing, and maintenance of private water wells, springs and cisterns throughout
Pennsylvania.
Since its inception, hundreds of MWON volunteers have provided education to over
50,000 private water supply owners throughout the state. Volunteers who recently completed the
online course said:
"The course was very educational and included items that I had not given any thought or
concern to. Thank you for the opportunity to get more educated."
"I have had water wells for over 35 years and had found it difficult to get good
information on care and maintenance of existing wells."
To fill out an application for the MWON program, visit the ​Pennsylvania MWON
Application​ webpage.
For more information on the citizen program, visit the ​Penn State Master Well Owner
Network​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Experts Tell Officials To Be Cautious About Buying Pittsburgh Water Authority
Pittsburgh Water Authority To Begin Adding Lead Reduction Chemical By February
10 Things To Know About Orthophosphate Coming To Pittsburgh Drinking Water Treatment
Pittsburgh Water Authority OKs $158 Million In System Improvements
Pittsburgh Water Authority Will Continue Moratorium On Winter Shutoffs
Court: Allentown Water Rate Hike Can Move Forward
Boil Water Advisory Continues Through Thursday In Parts Of Beaver County
#UtilityCareers Initiative Aims To Draw Attention To Utility Sector Jobs
Related Stories:
Penn State Extension: Green Stormwater Infrastructure - What's It All About?
Penn State Extension Watershed Winds Newsletter Now Available

(Reprinted from the ​Watershed Winds newsletter​ from Penn State Extension.)
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

Penn State Extension Watershed Winds Newsletter Now Available

The latest edition of the ​Watershed Winds


newsletter ​from Penn State Extension is now
available featuring articles on--
-- ​Green Stormwater Infrastructure - What’s It
All About?
-- ​Street 2 Creek: Storm Drain Art Project In
York County​ ​(photo)
-- ​Bank Pins: Bucks County Bank Erosion
Monitoring Project
-- ​Protect Your Groundwater, Protect Your
Well!
-- ​Applications Now Being Accepted For Next
Penn State Master Well Owner Course

34
-- ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own copy.
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

How You (And Your Phone) Can Improve Philadelphia's Flood Response

The ​Philadelphia Water Department


Wednesday announced a ​new program that
invites Philadelphia​ residents to send in photos
and information about flooding in their areas to
improve the City's response to flooding.
"We are entering the core of the 2018
hurricane season, and this year you have a
chance to make our city safer. All it takes is the
camera on your phone and a minute of your
time.
"As members of ​Philadelphia’s Citywide Flood Risk Management Task Force​, we are
teaming up with the ​Office of Emergency Management​ to ask residents for photos and info that
will improve how we respond to flooding threats.
"While local, state and federal officials use a variety of tools—from flood gauges
submerged in the Schuylkill River to satellites beaming down live weather data—eyewitness,
on-the-ground and real-time information from people like you can greatly enhance what we
know about flooding in Philadelphia.
This effort is part of a partnership with the ​National Weather Service​ aimed at fine-tuning
the City’s ability to direct resources during emergency weather and improving the alerts that
warn residents about dangerous local conditions."
What They Want from You​--
-- Photos of “riverine” flooding: overflowing creeks, rivers, and local waterways
-- Photos of “surface” flooding: inundated streets, parking lots, and other public areas
-- Exact time, date, and location of your flood photos
Stay Safe!
It is extremely important to note that residents should never seek out flooded roadways or
other areas impacted by floodwaters.
Never place yourself in a dangerous situation to record flood conditions, and never drive
or walk through flooded areas.
Heed all warnings from officials, including evacuation orders, and practice the tips for
staying safe during and after storms found in the City’s flooding guide for residents.
Click Here​ for all the details.
NewsClips:
Heavy Rain Causes Flash Flooding, Water Rescues In Southeast
Chanceford Twp Family Facing Bankruptcy After Flood Damage
Planning: $1M First Step Toward Levee Recertification In Lycoming County
Southwestern Energy Helps Flood Victims In Bradford County
Editorial: Occupancy In Flood Zone Shows Insurance Need
Solomon Creek Project Gets OK To Use Prefabricated Flood Wall In Wilkes-Barre
Philadelphia Already Has Had A Year’s Worth Of Rain

35
September Closing In As One Of Wettest On Record For Pittsburgh
Hurricanes
PA National Guard Unit Ready, Locked, Loaded To Support Victims Of Florence
Luzerne County Group Sending Relief To Victims Of Hurricane Florence
Puerto Rico’s Eroding Beaches Spell Trouble For Coastal Dwellers
AP: New Florence, South Carolina Flooding Forecasts Are Good News
Florences’ Slow-Motion Havoc Continues To Leave 1,000s Of Evacuees In Limbo
It’s Been More Than A Week Since Florence, Rivers Are Still Rising In The Carolinas
Thousands Of Dead Fish Add To Unique Devastation By Hurricane Florence
We’re Moving To Higher Ground: America’s Era Of Climate Mass Migration Is Here
Meet The Climate Refugees Who Already Had to Leave Their Homes
Where Should You Move To Save Yourself From Climate Change?
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County Landowner Lawsuit
On Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban

Terrie Morgan-Besecker of the Scranton Times-Tribune Monday​ reported three state Senators
have again ​filed a motion in U.S. District Court on September 17​ in an attempt to intervene in a
lawsuit by Wayne County landowners challenging the ​2010 Delaware Watershed ban​ on oil and
gas fracking.
The Senators included Senate President President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati
(R-Jefferson), Gene Yaw (R-Lycoming), Majority Chair of the Senate Environmental Resources
and Energy Committee, and Lisa Baker (R-Luzene).
On July 3, the U.S. Third Circuit Court of Appeals ​overturned the dismissal​ of the Wayne
County landowners’ lawsuit on the ​2010 Delaware River Watershed ban​ in March 2017 and
remanded the case back to the U.S. District Court for additional hearings.
The Appeals Court did not take a position on the issue of fracking, but remanded the case
on the narrow issue of the meaning of the word “project” in the case Wayne Land Mineral Group
V. DRBC & Delaware Riverkeeper Network.
The Appeals Court said, “Because we conclude that the meaning of the word “project” as
used in the [DRBC] compact is ambiguous, we will vacate the order of dismissal and remand the
case for fact-finding on the intent of the compact’s drafters.”
In March of 2017 U.S. Federal District Court threw out​ the lawsuit by the group of
Wayne County landowners who said the Delaware River Basin Commission lacks the authority
to review and approve natural gas facilities on land owned by the group.
These same three Pennsylvania Senators-- Joe Scarnati, Gene Yaw and Lisa Baker--
attempted to intervene on the side of the landowners​ last October, however, their request ​was
denied by Federal Court in January 2017​.
DRBC is now considering a formal ban on fracking in the Delaware River Watershed,
but has ​no fixed timetable for bringing the ban to a vote​. It is now reviewing some 8,687
comments it received on the proposed ban.
The 2010 moratorium remains in effect.
Legislation Requiring Reimbursement Of Landowners
In June, the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee reported out

36
legislation-- ​Senate Bill 1189​ (Baker-R-Luzerne)-- requiring landowner compensation if the
Delaware River Basin Commission adopts a permanent fracking ban.
The legislation is in the Senate Appropriations Committee. ​Click Here​ for more.
Fee On Everyone In Delaware Watershed
At a House State Government Committee hearing in June, Wayne County Commissioner
Joseph Adams proposed a $20/month/person fee on all residents of the Delaware River
Watershed to pay landowners for lost property value if a fracking ban is permanently adopted.
Click Here​ for more.
NewsClip:
State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County Landowner Lawsuit Over
Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban
Related Stories:
Federal Court Overturns Dismissal Of Wayne County Landowner Challenge To DRBC’s Shale
Gas Drilling Moratorium
Judge Throws Out Landowner Challenge To DRBC De-Facto Moratorium On Oil & Gas
Drilling
Senate Committee OKs Bills Requiring Compensation For DRBC Fracking Ban, To Form
Pipeline Commission
Related Stories This Week:
Senate Environmental Committee OKs Bill To Weaken Conventional Oil & Gas Drilling
Standards
Senate Environmental Committee Hearing: Witnesses Outline What They See As Attempts By
Foreign Entities To Stand In The Way Of PA’s Gas Development
House Environmental Committee Amends Critical Infrastructure Security Bill To Set Penalties
For Intentional Vandalism
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: No Mandatory Physical Or Cyber Security Standards Exist For
Natural Gas Pipelines
Penn State Extension: Oct. 23 Webinar On Addressing Orphan & Abandoned Wells From DEP,
Industry Perspectives
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion
[Posted: Sept. 24, 2018]

Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion

By: ​Andrew Williams​, Environmental Defense Fund

The follow op-ed was ​published on PennLive.com Monday


dealing with the September 10 natural gas ​pipeline explosion
in Beaver County​.

Residents of Ivy Lane in Center Township in Beaver County,


Pa., awoke on Sept. 10 to a deafening boom and fireball that
lit up the dawn sky.
Residents of Ivy Lane in Center Township in Beaver County,
Pa., awoke on Sept. 10 to a deafening boom and fireball that

37
lit up the dawn sky.
Equally important is addressing pipeline safety before a pipeline is even built.
We need to forge bipartisan support in the state Legislature for a better plan for natural
gas infrastructure development that will lower the potential for catastrophic events.
A ​co-sponsorship memo recently circulated by state Sen. John Rafferty​, R-Montgomery,
charts a sensible course that supports the state Department of Environmental Protection's (DEP)
permitting authority over new lines.
Improving pipeline oversight is critically important. As the development of natural gas
grows exponentially across the U.S., so has the network of onshore gas gathering lines.
The federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) estimates
that it regulates only 11,000 out of the more than 250,000 miles of onshore gas gathering lines as
of 2016. Mileage of onshore gas gathering lines is rapidly expanding with sizable new capacity
being added every year.
Pipelines today aren't just more plentiful, they are also much larger and carry a greater
volume of high pressured gas. According to the federal government, the expansion of natural gas
drilling is leading to new gathering lines with diameters exceeding that of traditionally larger
transmission lines.
The 24-inch ETP pipeline that exploded just off Ivy Lane is one of these larger gathering
lines.
But because these rural gathering lines are not being regulated, states and communities
lack data regarding where they are, and the risks they present. As one example, PHMSA does not
collect incident data or report the number and consequences of major events like last week's
explosion.
PHMSA proposed a rulemaking for pipeline safety in 2016 but progress has been slow,
and the PUC has not stepped in to fill the gap.
In lieu of federal regulations, the American Petroleum Institute initiated a voluntary effort
to address pipeline risk. Unfortunately, that effort is failing, in part due to operators who cannot
identify the locations of all gathering lines under management.
While there are many responsible operators who support enhanced safety standards and
regulation, it appears that they are being drowned out by those that do not. Pennsylvania must do
more to improve oversight of these pipelines because inaction could be deadly.
Last year in Colorado, a tragic and deadly home explosion caused by a poorly managed
gas line pushed the state to start requiring operators to report their pipeline locations. At a
minimum, Pennsylvania should enact similar measures.
Gov. Tom Wolf has already recognized the need to address harmful impacts of natural
gas development, as his administration recently ​finalized controls that will reduce methane leaks
and emissions from new and modified natural gas infrastructure, protections which should soon
extend to existing sources of natural gas infrastructure in the state.
The Wolf administration would also be well served to echo Colorado's call for critical
safety information for the gathering line network.
Routine inspection and integrity management rules of these pipelines should be the goal.
Disclosure represents the first, measured, essential step toward standards that keep pace with
new technologies, new pipelines, and new risks.
(​Photo:​ Beaver County pipeline explosion site, ​Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.​)

38
Andrew Williams​ is Director of Regulatory and Legislative Affairs for the ​Environmental
Defense Fund​. ​Click Here​ to contact him.
NewsClip:
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion
Op-Ed: Pipeline Construction Moratorium Would Make PA Less Safe
Legere: General Assembly Advances Bills On Conventional Drilling, Pipeline Vandalism
Sisk: Lawmakers Consider Tougher Penalties For Vandalizing Pipelines, Power Plants
Sen. Dinniman: Efforts Underway To Silence Pipeline Critics
Hurdle: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Incidents, Fines, Shutdowns Fuel Residents’ Safety Concerns
Sisk: First Responders Near Mariner East 2 Pipeline Prep For Unlikely One Hell Of A Boom
Cusick: Wired To Be Wary Of Certain Things: Why Pipelines Are Among Them
Frazier: In PA, No Oversight Of Where Some Pipelines Can Be Built
Allegheny Front: Want To Know If There Are Pipelines Near You? Good Luck With That
Editorial: Map Natural Gas Pipelines
Editorial: Answers Needed In Removal Of Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Stormwater Basin, Flooding
Related Story:
PUC Pipeline Safety Division Working To Investigate Beaver County Pipeline Explosion
Related Story This Week:
Senate Environmental Committee OKs Bill To Weaken Conventional Oil & Gas Drilling
Standards
Senate Environmental Committee Hearing: Witnesses Outline What They See As Attempts By
Foreign Entities To Stand In The Way Of PA’s Gas Development
House Environmental Committee Amends Critical Infrastructure Security Bill To Set Penalties
For Intentional Vandalism
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: No Mandatory Physical Or Cyber Security Standards Exist For
Natural Gas Pipelines
Scranton Times-Tribune: State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County
Landowner Lawsuit On Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban
Penn State Extension: Oct. 23 Webinar On Addressing Orphan & Abandoned Wells From DEP,
Industry Perspectives
[Posted: Sept. 24, 2018]

Penn State Extension: Oct. 23 Webinar On Addressing Orphan & Abandoned Wells From
DEP, Industry Perspectives

Penn State Extension will host a webinar on October 23 on


Addressing Orphan And Abandoned Wells From DEP,
Industry Perspectives​ starting at 1:00 p.m.
The webinar will provide an overview of what orphan and
abandoned wells are, what the issues are in the state
regarding these wells, and DEP initiatives and programs for
handling these well.
An industry perspective regarding issues in
decommissioning these wells, what a company must
consider in doing this, the process for a company, and general costs for plugging a well will also

39
be discussed.
Click Here​ to register or for more information on the webinar.
For more information on abandoned wells, visit DEP’s ​Abandoned & Orphan Well
Program​ webpage.
NewsClip:
Litvak-Legere: Gas Driller Expects To Push Idle Well-Plugging Liabilities Decades Into The
Future
Related Stories:
DEP Orders Well Operators To Plug 1,058 Abandoned Oil & Gas Wells
DEP’s Good Samaritan Program Encourages Proposals To Plug Abandoned Oil & Gas Wells,
Treat Mine Drainage
DEP Takes More Steps To Identify Abandoned, Leaking Oil & Gas Wells
Related Stories This Week:
Senate Environmental Committee OKs Bill To Weaken Conventional Oil & Gas Drilling
Standards
Senate Environmental Committee Hearing: Witnesses Outline What They See As Attempts By
Foreign Entities To Stand In The Way Of PA’s Gas Development
House Environmental Committee Amends Critical Infrastructure Security Bill To Set Penalties
For Intentional Vandalism
Nuclear Energy Caucus Hearing: No Mandatory Physical Or Cyber Security Standards Exist For
Natural Gas Pipelines
Scranton Times-Tribune: State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County
Landowner Lawsuit On Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

Keep Blair Beautiful, Keep Philadelphia Beautiful Receive National Grants From Lowes

Keep America Beautiful and ​Lowe’s​ awarded a total of


$30,000 in grants to Keep Blair Beautiful and ​Keep
Philadelphia Beautiful​ as part of the national 2018 Keep
America Beautiful/Lowe’s Community Partners Grant
Program.
The 2018 Keep America Beautiful/​Lowe’s
Community Partners Grant Program​ engages local
volunteers, working alongside Lowe’s Heroes
volunteers, to take action on projects that focus on
critical, local needs. Pennsylvania funded projects are:
Keep Blair Beautiful - $20,000
The closure of the county recycling department and recycling drop-off system has left
many residents without access to convenient recycling options.
Keep Blair Beautiful will establish a drop-off program that addresses the need of
convenient access and helps to relieve the funding difficulties by creating a revenue stream.
Residents will have the opportunity to purchase a key card/pass allowing them unlimited
access to the recycling drop-off. The monies raised with the purchase of the key cards will help

40
cover the operating costs related to the drop-off, therefore making it more sustainable.
This key card system will increase the access residents have to recycling and can be used
as a model for other locations.
Keep Blair Beautiful can be contacted through John Frederick at 814-942-7472 or send
email to: ​jfrederick@ircenvironment.org​.
Keep Philadelphia Beautiful – $10,000
Keep Philadelphia Beautiful​ and the ​Philadelphia Parks Alliance​ will use this funding to
establish cleanup tool libraries at five strategic recreation centers in Philadelphia.
The goal is to build capacity for residents, civic organizations and recreation center staff
to keep their neighborhoods litter free while reimagining these community hubs as sites for
collective civic action.
“We are grateful for Keep America Beautiful and Lowe’s for providing Pennsylvania
affiliates this opportunity to improve our local communities,” said Shannon Reiter, President of
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful​. “These grants provide an opportunity for the community to engage
in activities that improve the quality of life for everyone.”
Keep Philadelphia Beautiful can be contacted by calling 617-259-7401.
In addition to the initiatives of Keep Blair Beautiful and Keep Philadelphia Beautiful,
Lowe’s is supporting more than 40 other Keep America Beautiful grant-funded community
service projects in 2018 as well as Keep America Beautiful’s Great American Cleanup.
Since the partnership began in 2011, Lowe’s has contributed nearly $8 million; with more
than 2,100 Lowe’s Heroes volunteers helping Keep America Beautiful improve local
communities.
“These targeted grant projects will provide significant benefits in many areas of the
country, both urban and rural, that often are neglected,” said Keep America Beautiful President
and CEO Helen Lowman. “Our network of affiliates has been particularly creative in using these
grassroots grants to develop and deliver programs that embrace their community members, while
transforming often neglected public spaces into beautiful places.”
“At Lowe’s, we want to help people love where they live in the communities where our
employees and customers live and work,” said Julie Yenichek, Lowe’s director of community
relations. “Our commitment to community investment doesn’t stop at charitable giving. We’re
proud of our Lowe’s Heroes volunteer involvement and the difference they have made
nationwide. Loving where you live extends beyond walls and fences, and we applaud Keep
America Beautiful’s vision.”
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
(​Photo​: Example of a recycling drop-off by the ​Cambria County Solid Waste Authority.​ )
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Volunteers Found 29 TVs, Fridge During Garbage Olympics
Schuylkill River Dumpsite Cleanup In Philadelphia
1,000s And 1,000s Of Tires Are Being Dumped Along Philadelphia’s Rivers
Cumberland County Ready To Collect Your Old Tires Sept. 29

41
Pittsburgh Has An Anti-Litter Specialist Opening
Related Stories:
Clinton County CleanScapes Greater Jersey Shore Beautification Cleanup Oct. 6 In Lycoming
County
PRC Holds Hard-To-Recycle, Household Chemical, Drug Take-Back Events In Western PA
During October
Penn State Tailgaters Recycled 16 Tons Of Plastic, Glass Bottles, Steel, Aluminum Cans At First
Home Games
DEP: Nov. 7 Meeting/Hearing On Stormwater Permit For Biosolids Facility In Northampton
County
EPA Removes Dorney Road Landfill Superfund Site From Superfund National Priorities List
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Penn State Tailgaters Recycled 16 Tons Of Plastic, Glass Bottles, Steel, Aluminum Cans At
First Home Games

The ​Centre County Recycling and Refuse Authority


Wednesday reported Penn State tailgaters at the Kent
State football game recycled 6 tons of plastic and glass
bottles and just over 1 ton of steel and aluminum cans.
Tailgaters recycled 8.5 tons of bottles and cans at the first
home game bringing the total to over 16 tons of
recyclables so far this year.
The Authority and its partners implemented the Recycle
Right initiative for home games at Penn State to make it
easier for fans to do more recycling.
Fans are encouraged to grab a blue bag for recycling and
a clear bag for trash. Bag dispensers are found in every
tailgating field and parking lot.
Blue bags are for recyclables and limited to plastic and glass bottles and metal cans.
Everything else should be placed in clear trash bags. Full bags should be secured closed and left
at each tailgate spot for Physical Plant crews to collect the morning after each home game.
Clear bags go to the landfill, while the blue bags are delivered to the Centre County
Recycling & Refuse Authority for sorting and recycling.
Remember: Blue bags are for bottles and cans only – Clear bags are for trash.
Fans are asked to leave their tailgate area cleaner than it was found. The fields are
multi-use by students, faculty, staff, visitors, as well as agriculture. It is integral for the safety of
all users that the fields are clean of debris.
The Authority would like to thank all fans for their efforts in sorting their trash and
recycling, and keeping their tailgate areas clean.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Centre County Recycling and Refuse Authority​ website.
NewsClips:
Allegheny County Hires Uber-Like Haulers To Pick Up Recycling
Millcreek Twp Curbside Recycling Remains Unchanged

42
Lackawanna County Tire Recycling Returns Sept. 26
Household Hazardous Waste Difficult To Dispose Of In Lehigh Valley
Column: Don’t Take Away Our Trash Cans In Philly, No Need For Study
Pittsburgh Volunteers Found 29 TVs, Fridge During Garbage Olympics
Schuylkill River Dumpsite Cleanup In Philadelphia
1,000s And 1,000s Of Tires Are Being Dumped Along Philadelphia’s Rivers
Cumberland County Ready To Collect Your Old Tires Sept. 29
Pittsburgh Has An Anti-Litter Specialist Opening
Related Stories:
Clinton County CleanScapes Greater Jersey Shore Beautification Cleanup Oct. 6 In Lycoming
County
PRC Holds Hard-To-Recycle, Household Chemical, Drug Take-Back Events In Western PA
During October
Keep Blair Beautiful, Keep Philadelphia Beautiful Receive National Grants From Lowes
DEP: Nov. 7 Meeting/Hearing On Stormwater Permit For Biosolids Facility In Northampton
County
EPA Removes Dorney Road Landfill Superfund Site From Superfund National Priorities List
[Posted: Sept. 26, 2018]

Clinton County CleanScapes Greater Jersey Shore Beautification Cleanup Oct. 6 In


Lycoming County

Clinton County CleanScapes​ and its partners will hold a


Greater Jersey Shore Beautification and Cleanup Event
on October 6 from 9:30 to Noon in Piatt Township,
Lycoming County.
The cleanup will remove litter and tires from a
forested hillside adjacent to Stewart Run Creek just
north of Jersey Shore Borough and Route 220.
Directions will be given to you when you register.
A shuttle bus will also be available from Lock
Haven University for student volunteers. Students
should register by contacting Morgan Capobianco at
LHU’s Student Activities Office (PUB) by sending email to: ​mpc7999@lockhaven.edu​ or call
570-484-2499.
Click Here​ for all the details. All other volunteers should register by contacting
Elisabeth Lynch McCoy by sending email to: ​clintoncountycleanscapes@yahoo.com​ or call
570-726-3511.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Clinton County CleanScapes​ (Facebook) or the ​Clinton County CleanScapes​ website.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Volunteers Found 29 TVs, Fridge During Garbage Olympics
Schuylkill River Dumpsite Cleanup In Philadelphia
1,000s And 1,000s Of Tires Are Being Dumped Along Philadelphia’s Rivers
Cumberland County Ready To Collect Your Old Tires Sept. 29

43
Pittsburgh Has An Anti-Litter Specialist Opening
Related Story:
Clinton County CleanScapes Completes 120th Cleanup With Many Partners, Volunteers
Related Stories This Week:
PRC Holds Hard-To-Recycle, Household Chemical, Drug Take-Back Events In Western PA
During October
Keep Blair Beautiful, Keep Philadelphia Beautiful Receive National Grants From Lowes
Penn State Tailgaters Recycled 16 Tons Of Plastic, Glass Bottles, Steel, Aluminum Cans At First
Home Games
DEP: Nov. 7 Meeting/Hearing On Stormwater Permit For Biosolids Facility In Northampton
County
EPA Removes Dorney Road Landfill Superfund Site From Superfund National Priorities List
[Posted: Sept. 28, 2018]

PRC Holds Hard-To-Recycle, Household Chemical, Drug Take-Back Events In Western


PA During October

The ​PA Resources Council​ and its partners will hold several
Hard-To-Recycle, Household Chemical and Drug
Take-Back Collection events in Western Pennsylvania
during October.
These are PRC’s last collection events of 2018 where
residents have one last chance to clean out basements,
garages, garden sheds and medicine cabinets.
Hard-To-Recycle Oct. 6 - Allegheny County
The event will be held at Settlers Cabin Park Wave Pool in
Allegheny County from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. To register,
visit PRC’s​ ​Hard To Recycle Events Schedule​ webpage.
Individuals can drop off electronics waste such as computer towers and peripheral
equipment, cell phones, printer/toner cartridges, CFLs and expanded polystyrene packaging
material at no cost.
For a fee, individuals can drop off televisions and computer monitors, alkaline batteries,
fluorescent tubes, printers, small Freon appliances and tires.
Household Chemicals Oct. 13 - Beaver County
The event will be held at Bradys Run Park Recycling Center in Beaver County from 9:00
a.m. to 1:00 p.m. To register, visit PRC’s​ ​Household Chemical Collection Events Schedule
webpage.
Individuals can drop off automotive fluids, household cleaners, pesticides, paints and
other household chemicals for a cost of $3/gallon (a few exceptions apply), cash only. NEW IN
2018: collections accept smoke detectors ($3/each).
Drug Take Back Oct. 27 - Allegheny County
The event will be held with partner ​PA American Water​ at 3 locations in Allegheny
County from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.--
-- Green Tree Borough Building, 10 W. Manila Ave.
-- Medical Rescue Team South, 315 Cypress Way, Mt. Lebanon

44
-- The Mall At Robinson (parking lot near Dick’s Sporting Goods), 100 Robinson Centre Dr.
This event will enable patients, caregivers and pet owners to properly dispose of
unwanted prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications at no cost.
All events are held rain or shine. For complete collection event information, visit the ​PA
Resources Council​ website or call PRC at 412-488-7452.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Resources
Council​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates, follow ​PRC on Twitter​ or ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ for PRC’s Events Calendar. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Volunteers Found 29 TVs, Fridge During Garbage Olympics
Schuylkill River Dumpsite Cleanup In Philadelphia
1,000s And 1,000s Of Tires Are Being Dumped Along Philadelphia’s Rivers
Cumberland County Ready To Collect Your Old Tires Sept. 29
Pittsburgh Has An Anti-Litter Specialist Opening
Allegheny County Hires Uber-Like Haulers To Pick Up Recycling
Millcreek Twp Curbside Recycling Remains Unchanged
Lackawanna County Tire Recycling Returns Sept. 26
Household Hazardous Waste Difficult To Dispose Of In Lehigh Valley
Column: Don’t Take Away Our Trash Cans In Philly, No Need For Study
Related Stories:
Clinton County CleanScapes Greater Jersey Shore Beautification Cleanup Oct. 6 In Lycoming
County
Keep Blair Beautiful, Keep Philadelphia Beautiful Receive National Grants From Lowes
Penn State Tailgaters Recycled 16 Tons Of Plastic, Glass Bottles, Steel, Aluminum Cans At First
Home Games
DEP: Nov. 7 Meeting/Hearing On Stormwater Permit For Biosolids Facility In Northampton
County
EPA Removes Dorney Road Landfill Superfund Site From Superfund National Priorities List
[Posted: Sept. 28, 2018]

DEP: Nov. 7 Meeting/Hearing On Stormwater Permit For Biosolids Facility In


Northampton County

The Department of Environmental Protection will hold a public meeting/hearing November 7 on


a proposed NPDES Stormwater Permit a biosolids (sewage sludge) processing facility to be
constructed on Pen Argyle Road in Pen Argyle, Northampton County. ​(P ​ A Bulletin page 6335​)
The meeting/hearing will be held a the Wind Gap Middle School, 1620 Teels Road, Pen
Argyle from 6:00 to 9:30 p.m.
The Department requests that individuals wishing to testify at the hearing notify Colleen
Connolly, Community Relations Coordinator, ​coconnolly@pa.gov​.
​ A Bulletin page 6335)​ .
Read the entire PA Bulletin notice for all the details ​(P
NewsClips:
Allegheny County Hires Uber-Like Haulers To Pick Up Recycling
Millcreek Twp Curbside Recycling Remains Unchanged
Lackawanna County Tire Recycling Returns Sept. 26

45
Household Hazardous Waste Difficult To Dispose Of In Lehigh Valley
Column: Don’t Take Away Our Trash Cans In Philly, No Need For Study
Related Stories:
Clinton County CleanScapes Greater Jersey Shore Beautification Cleanup Oct. 6 In Lycoming
County
PRC Holds Hard-To-Recycle, Household Chemical, Drug Take-Back Events In Western PA
During October
Keep Blair Beautiful, Keep Philadelphia Beautiful Receive National Grants From Lowes
Penn State Tailgaters Recycled 16 Tons Of Plastic, Glass Bottles, Steel, Aluminum Cans At First
Home Games
EPA Removes Dorney Road Landfill Superfund Site From Superfund National Priorities List
[Posted: Sept. 28, 2018]

EPA Removes Dorney Road Landfill Superfund Site From Superfund National Priorities
List

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday announced the ​Dorney Road Landfill
Superfund Site​ located in Berks and Lehigh Counties is being deleted from the Superfund
National Priorities List.
“Completing Superfund cleanups continues to be a priority at EPA as we work to create a
safer and healthier environment for all communities affected,” said EPA Mid-Atlantic Regional
Administrator Cosmo Servidio. “Removing the Dorney Road site from the list represents an
important step toward achieving this goal.”
The Dorney Road site is located in Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County, with a
small parcel extending into Longswamp Township in Berks County.
The site was originally an open-pit iron mine, before it was operated as a 27-acre
municipal and industrial landfill from 1952 to 1978. During operation of the landfill, industrial
sludge, batteries and barrels of petroleum products were dumped on site, resulting in impacts to
soil and groundwater.
On March 28, 2018, EPA issued the Final Close Out Report for the site, documenting that
all performance standards have been achieved and that no additional Superfund response actions,
other than operation and maintenance and Five-Year Reviews, are necessary to protect human
health and the environment.
Cleanup work included the installation of a multi-layered cap over the landfill and
groundwater and residential well monitoring. The site is surrounded by rural residences and
farmland, although many housing developments have been constructed in recent years.
Monitoring of residential wells in the vicinity of the site will continue on a quarterly basis
to ensure the long-term protection of human health.
Click Here​ for more information on this former Superfund site.
Related Stories:
EPA Removes Recticon/Allied Steel Corp. Superfund Site In Chester County From Priorities
List
EPA Removes C&D Recycling Site In Luzerne County From Superfund List
EPA Partially Eliminates Montgomery County Superfund Site From National Priority List
Related Stories This Week:

46
Clinton County CleanScapes Greater Jersey Shore Beautification Cleanup Oct. 6 In Lycoming
County
PRC Holds Hard-To-Recycle, Household Chemical, Drug Take-Back Events In Western PA
During October
Keep Blair Beautiful, Keep Philadelphia Beautiful Receive National Grants From Lowes
Penn State Tailgaters Recycled 16 Tons Of Plastic, Glass Bottles, Steel, Aluminum Cans At First
Home Games
DEP: Nov. 7 Meeting/Hearing On Stormwater Permit For Biosolids Facility In Northampton
County
[Posted: Sept. 26, 2018]

PA's Weis Markets Receives Platinum EPA Greenchill Certification For Reducing
Refrigerant Emissions

Sunbury-based ​Weis Markets'​ Randolph, NJ store has


received a platinum level ​GreenChill certification​ from the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for reducing
in-store refrigerant usage.
This is Weis Markets first store to utilize an innovative
CO2 refrigerant system.
The store’s CO2 refrigerant system helps it avoid annual
refrigerant emissions equivalent to an estimated 673 tons of
carbon dioxide versus using traditional refrigerants, which
have a significantly higher global warming potential.
The Company now has 11 GreenChill certified stores.
GreenChill is an EPA partnership with food retailers to
reduce refrigerant emissions and decrease their impact on
the ozone layer and climate change.
“Over the past decade, we have steadily upgraded our in-store sustainability program
which has helped us reduce our company’s overall carbon footprint by 20 percent,” said R.
Kevin Small, Weis Markets’ Vice President, Construction and Store Development. “Our new
CO2 refrigerant system will help our Randolph store annually avoid emitting the equivalent of
673 tons of carbon dioxide –comparable to removing 142 passenger vehicles from the road.
Working with GreenChill has been a key part of our program. This GreenChill certification also
highlights the contributions of our store and development associates who help us implement and
monitor our program to reduce refrigerant usage.”
"Weis Markets continues with GreenChill Partnership leadership through a commitment
to consistent store certifications," said Tom Land, manager of the EPA's GreenChill Partnership
Program. "The team at Weis Markets is demonstrating that a focus on responsible refrigerant
management is good for the environment and helps reduce operating costs."
The Randolph store’s other sustainable features include: demand response programs to
reduce power load during peak days and the store’s load on the power grid; LED lighting which
reduces energy usage and has lower maintenance costs; low-flow devices to support water
conservation efforts; enclosed refrigeration cases to reduce energy use; and polished concrete
floors which do not require chemical cleaning solvents.

47
For more information on its environmental initiatives, visit the ​Weis Markets
Sustainability​ webpage and review ​Weis Sustainability 2017: Together We Make a Difference​.
NewsClips:
Bradford Woods Recognized As Certified Gold Sustainable Municipality
Phipps Conservatory Is Nationally Recognized Leader In Sustainability
Crable: Study: Earlier Springs From Climate Change May Harm Migrating Birds
Op-Ed: Keeping Nuclear Power Plants Running Vital To Meeting Climate Goals
We’re Moving To Higher Ground: America’s Era Of Climate Mass Migration Is Here
Meet The Climate Refugees Who Already Had to Leave Their Homes
Where Should You Move To Save Yourself From Climate Change?
What Happens When You Buy A House In A Disaster Zone And No One Told You?
Climate Gentrification: The Rich Can Afford To Move, What About The Poor?
AP: California Urges Trump To Drop Plan For Weaker Fuel Mileage Standard
Utilities, Carmakers Launch Campaign To Cut U.S. Transportation Energy Use 50% By 2050
World Nowhere Near On Track To Avoid Warming Beyond 1.5C Target
[Posted: Sept. 26, 2018]

Gov. Wolf: First Round Of Grants Awarded From EPA Volkswagen Settlement To Reduce
Diesel Pollution

Gov. Tom Wolf Friday announced the first round of


grant approvals through his ​Driving PA Forward
initiative​, funded by Pennsylvania’s share of the
settlement with Volkswagen​ Group of America for
cheating on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
emissions tests.
Six transportation projects designed to improve air
quality in Pennsylvania are expected to permanently
reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions statewide by 27
tons by accelerating the replacement of older, polluting diesel engines with cleaner technologies.
The projects include--
-- Allegheny County
-- The City of Pittsburgh received $170,000 to replace two older diesel trash trucks with new
trucks fueled by compressed natural gas.
-- Elizabeth Township received $38,639 to replace an older diesel-powered construction vehicle
with a new diesel-powered model.
-- Allegheny Transportation Services, Inc. received $22,286 to replace an older diesel school bus
with a newer diesel-powered bus. This family-owned business provides transportation for the --
City of Pittsburgh, two school districts, and community organizations.
-- Lackawanna County
-- The City of Scranton received $128,723 to replace two older diesel-powered street sweepers
with two newer diesel-powered street sweepers.
-- Lancaster County
-- Shultz Transportation, which services four school districts, received $200,000 to replace 10
older diesel-powered school buses with 10 newer diesel school buses.

48
-- Northampton County
-- Lehigh Valley Rail Management LLC received $30,086 to install idling-reduction units in six
locomotives. The short-line railroad operates 20 hours daily over 40 miles of track in Bethlehem.
“We are making strategic investments that will bolster our continued efforts to improve
air quality throughout the Commonwealth with the funding awarded from the VW emissions
cheating scandal,” said Gov. Wolf. “The projects announced today are only the first wave of
projects that will be funded to build the next generation of cleaner transportation options.”
Over 25 percent of NOx pollution in Pennsylvania comes from diesel engines in trucks,
buses, forklifts, and other mobile sources. The emissions contribute to ground-level ozone, or
smog, which the EPA has shown can have negative health impacts, including asthma attacks and
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
“Through these first projects, old diesel-powered school buses, locomotives, and
municipal vehicles will be replaced or updated with newer, cleaner transportation technologies
for a sizable reduction in nitrogen oxide,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell.
“Hydrocarbons, fine particulate matter, and carbon monoxide will also be reduced. All of this
will help improve air quality in communities across Pennsylvania.”
The projects are the first for the governor’s Driving PA Forward initiative, launched in
May with the goal of permanently reducing NOx pollution by 27,700 tons by supporting clean
transportation projects with funding from Pennsylvania’s $118 million settlement with
Volkswagen.
The VW settlement will also support the roll out of grant and rebate programs for electric
vehicle and hydrogen fuel cell equipment; shore-based electric power systems for ocean-going
vessels; and replacement or repowering of heavy-duty trucks and transit buses; medium-duty
trucks, school buses, shuttle buses, and port drayage trucks; and forklifts, airport ground support
equipment, port cargo handling equipment, ferries, tugboats, and freight switcher locomotives.
Other Driving PA Grants Open
These other Driving PA Grant/Rebate Programs are now accepting applications--
-- ​Electric and Hydrogen Fuel Cell Charging Project Rebate Program​: Deadlines-- January 15,
July 15 and December 16.
-- ​Level 2 Charging Station Rebate Program​: March 31 ​(first-come, first-served)
Click Here​ for information on upcoming webinars on October 9 and 25 on these
programs.
For more information on programs related to the Volkswagen Settlement, visit DEP’s
Driving PA Forward ​webpage.
Other Alternative Fuel Grant Programs
These other grant and rebate programs are now open for applications--
-- December 14:​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
-- December 14: ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
NewsClips:
Northampton County Railroad Gets Volkswagen Settlement Money To Reduce Air Pollution
Pittsburgh Leaders, Citizens Attack Trump’s Proposal Clean Vehicle Emissions Rollback
AP: California Urges Trump To Drop Plan For Weaker Fuel Mileage Standard
Pittsburgh Leaders, Citizens Attack Trump’s Proposal Clean Vehicle Emissions Rollback
Op-Ed: Can America’s Power Grid Support All Those Electric Cars?
Utilities, Carmakers Launch Campaign To Cut U.S. Transportation Energy Use 50% By 2050

49
Related Story:
DEP Now Accepting Applications For Level 2 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Rebates;
Webinars Set On All Charging Station Grant Programs
[Posted: Sept. 28, 2018]

DEP Now Accepting Applications For Level 2 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Rebates;
Webinars Set On All Charging Station Grant Programs

The Department of Environmental Protection is now


accepting applications for Level 2 Electric Vehicle
Charging Rebate Program Grants as part of the
Driving PA Forward Initiative​. ​(​formal notice)​
DEP will accept applications for $3 million in grants
through March 31 or until funding runs out.
The Department is seeking applications for projects
that will install Level 2 EV charging equipment in
publicly accessible locations (government or
nongovernment owned), workplaces and multi-unit dwellings.
Funding is available for public and private entities that own one or more of these location
types in this Commonwealth.
These entities may include school districts, municipal authorities, political subdivisions,
other state agencies, nonprofit entities, corporations, limited liability companies or partnerships
incorporated or registered in this Commonwealth, air quality or transportation organizations, and
metropolitan or rural planning organizations.
This program is funded by Pennsylvania’s share of the ​settlement with Volkswagen
Group of America for cheating on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emissions tests.
Six transportation projects designed to improve air quality in Pennsylvania are expected
to permanently reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions statewide by 27 tons by accelerating the
replacement of older, polluting diesel engines with cleaner technologies.
Oct. 9 Webinar
DEP will hold a webinar on October 9 at 10:30 on the ​Level 2 Charging Station Rebate
Program​ ​(under Types of Projects).​ ​Click Here​ for registration information.
More information on this grant program is available on the ​Driving PA Forward​ webpage
or by contacting DEP’s Bureau of Air Quality at 717-787-9495 or send email to:
epvwmitigation@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice)​
Oct. 25 Webinar
DEP will hold a webinar on October 25 at 10:30 on the previously announced rebate
program for $3 million in grants for ​Electric and Hydrogen Fuel Cell Charging Project Rebate
Program​ ​(under Types of Projects).​ ​Click Here​ for registration information.
Applications for the previously announced program will be accepted through January 15,
July 15 and December 16.
More information on this grant program is available on the ​Driving PA Forward​ webpage
or by contacting DEP’s Bureau of Air Quality at 717-787-9495 or send email to:
epvwmitigation@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice)​
Other Alternative Fuel Grants/Rebates

50
These other grant and rebate programs are now open for applications--
-- December 14:​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ (First-Come)
-- December 14: ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
(​Photo​: ​Tesla electric vehicle charging station​ at the Weis Market on Union Deposit Road in
Harrisburg.)
NewsClips:
Northampton County Railroad Gets Volkswagen Settlement Money To Reduce Air Pollution
Pittsburgh Leaders, Citizens Attack Trump’s Proposal Clean Vehicle Emissions Rollback
AP: California Urges Trump To Drop Plan For Weaker Fuel Mileage Standard
Pittsburgh Leaders, Citizens Attack Trump’s Proposal Clean Vehicle Emissions Rollback
Op-Ed: Can America’s Power Grid Support All Those Electric Cars?
Utilities, Carmakers Launch Campaign To Cut U.S. Transportation Energy Use 50% By 2050
Related Story:
Gov. Wolf: First Round Of Grants Funded By EPA Volkswagen Settlement To Reduce Pollution
[Posted: Sept. 28, 2018]

DEP Blog: With Solar Panels, Barbour Family Farm Is Shining Example Of Conservation

By: Megan Lehman, ​DEP Northcentral Regional Office

Any farmer can tell you the sun is crucial for


growing crops, but few can claim to harvest the sun
itself.
The ​Barbour Family Farm​​ in Lycoming County is
doing just that, with operators Ted and Tracey
Barbour using solar panels on the roof of their
100-year-old barn to get clean power and bolster the
bottom line of their small beef cattle operation.
Members of the public, staff from DEP’s
Northcentral Regional Office, and representatives
from community organizations viewed the solar panels during a ​recent visit to the farm​.
The tour was part of ​DEP Connects​, a new program inviting the public to engage with
DEP in their communities through events hosted by the department’s six regional offices.
The choice to go solar fit nicely with the farm’s philosophy. “Our mission is to serve as
healthy land stewards while providing high-quality, ethically-raised, grass-fed beef,” said Ted
Barbour. “Our cattle are raised free-range on nature’s basics of mother’s milk, fresh water, and
forage. What’s more basic and more natural than sunshine?”
Barbour said using solar energy supports the farm’s bottom line in three ways:
-- The farm has a source of clean, renewable energy for use on the property.
-- When the solar panels produce more energy than the farm can use, the Barbours sell electricity
back into the power grid.
-- Generating renewable energy credits provides a supplemental income source of about $300 per
month for the farm.
“Profits preserve passion; using solar has to make economic sense,” said Barbour. “From
a long-term perspective, solar panels are good for your wallet and good for the environment; it’s

51
a win-win investment.”
The family recouped their initial investment in just over four years.
“The total cost was $53,000, including some necessary electrical upgrading; but after a
rebate from the PA Sunshine Program and a 30 percent federal tax credit, the final out-of-pocket
cost was $20,000,” he said.
Barbour determined that a roof-mounted solar array was more efficient and cost-effective
than a ground-mounted array, which would remove the area from future grazing and require
lawn care and fencing to keep cattle out.
He had a new roof put on the barn at a cost of $20,000 prior to installation of the solar
panels because he views them as a lifetime investment and wanted to ensure they wouldn’t
outlive the old barn roof.
Barbour encourages other farmers who are considering going solar to keep three
guidelines in mind: Do your homework, get multiple quotes, and consider it a major capital
investment.
Guests toured the farm’s other conservation practices as well and learned how they have
improved soil and water quality, wildlife habitat, and cattle health.
“The Barbour Farm is a great example of taking voluntary, incremental, achievable steps
that we hope others will emulate,” said DEP Northcentral Regional Director Marcus Kohl.
“These best management practices add up to create monumental change in the landscape.
“The Barbours show how even our small and medium-sized family farms can access a
variety of resources to increase their environmental and economic sustainability, supporting the
farm operation’s viability for future generations,” added Kohl.
The ​Barbour Family Farm​ was recognized by the Lycoming County Conservation
District in 2013 as their “Cooperator of the Year” for their environmental stewardship efforts.
Visit DEP’s website to read ​Frequently Asked Questions about solar electricity​, learn
more about solar ​for homes​ and ​businesses​,​ and find out how DEP is working to find
Pennsylvania’s Solar Future​​.
For more information on environmental programs in Pennsylvania, visit ​DEP’s website​,
Click Here​ to sign up for DEP’s monthly newsletter, sign up for ​DEP Connects​ events, sign up
for ​DEP’s eNotice​, visit ​DEP’s Blog​, ​Like DEP on Facebook​, ​Follow DEP on Twitter​ and visit
DEP’s YouTube Channel​.
Related Stories:
DEP Highlights Farm Conservation Practices To Improve Water Quality In Lycoming County
Gov. Wolf Issues Proclamation To Declare Sept. 24-28 Clean Energy Week
Related Stories This Week:
Next Wave Of Green Jobs: Business Opportunities In Philly's Green Energy Sector Oct. 4
PUC Launches Utility Careers Campaign Encourages Young People To Consider Opportunities
With Utilities
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Next Wave Of Green Jobs: Business Opportunities In Philly's Green Energy Sector Oct. 4

The ​Philadelphia Energy Authority​, ​Clean


Air Council​ and the ​American Association
of Blacks In Energy-Philadelphia Chapter

52
will hold a ​Next Wave Of Green Jobs: Business Opportunities In Philly's Green Energy Sector
Workshop​ in Philadelphia On October 4.
This Workshop will discuss opportunities for minority-owned businesses to get involved
in energy efficiency and renewable energy on October 4 in Philadelphia.
Presenters will discuss how Philadelphia is working to implement the Mayor's
commitment to ​100 percent renewable energy​ and multiple City plans to reduce greenhouse
gases.
Representatives of minority-owned businesses will present about their current work and
opinions about future opportunities in clean energy.
The panelists will share information about the energy efficiency and solar industries, the
demand for various types of suppliers and services, and the projected growth in clean energy
jobs.
This session will include interactive dialog between the panelists and audience. The
panelists include--
-- ​Sabrina Brooks​: Marketing Director, PECO
-- ​Michael Brown​: President and Chief Executive Officer of Environmental Construction
Services, Inc.
-- ​Allison Dunn​: Area General Manager Energy Solutions at Johnson Controls
-- Benito Martinez: President of ​Martin Bean Renovation and Associates
-- ​Spencer Wright​: Owner, Harness the Sun
Speakers include-- Adam Agalloco: Energy Manager, City of Philadelphia's Office of
Sustainability and Philadelphia Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown
The Workshop will be held at Philadelphia City Hall, Council Chambers Room 400,
1400 John F. Kennedy Boulevard from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Click Here​ to register for this free workshop or for more information.
Related Stories:
PUC Launches Utility Careers Campaign Encourages Young People To Consider Opportunities
With Utilities
DEP Blog: With Solar Panels, Barbour Family Farm Is Shining Example of Conservation
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

PUC Launches Utility Careers Campaign, Encourages Young People To Consider


Opportunities With Utilities

Public Utility Commission Chairman Gladys


M. Brown and Commissioner David W. Sweet
Tuesday joined with leaders from state agencies
and utilities from across the Commonwealth to
encourage more skilled candidates to consider
career opportunities in the utility sector.
“There are numerous ​#UtilityCareers
opportunities all around us – offering good
wages, growth opportunities and the chance to
make a difference in our communities – but
they can often ‘hide in plain sight’ because students and other job-seekers are unaware of the

53
options available to them,” said Chairman Brown.
Chairman Brown and Commissioner Sweet were joined by consumer affairs leaders from
the Senate and House, including Sen. Tommy Tomlinson (R-Bucks) and Sen. Lisa Boscola
(D-Lehigh), who Chair the Senate Consumer Protection & Professional Licensure Committee,
and Rep. Bob Godshall (R-Montgomery) and Rep. Tom Caltagirone (D-Berks), who Chair the
House Consumer Affairs Committee; along with Deputy Secretary for Workforce Development
Eileen Cipriani from the Department of Labor and Industry; Maj. Gen. Anthony Carrelli from the
Department of Military and Veterans Affairs; and leadership from numerous utilities across the
state including Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania and Maryland, Duquesne Light, FirstEnergy,
PECO, Pennsylvania American Water, Peoples Gas, PPL Electric Utilities, PJM Interconnection
and UGI Utilities.
The PUC #UtilityCareers initiative is intended to help shine a spotlight on the types of
careers available for Pennsylvania’s talented individuals of all ages and backgrounds to consider
careers in the utility sector.
“Borrowing from the opening of a new ​PUC #UtilityCareers video​ – utilities power our
lives; they quench our thirst and clean our water; they heat our house and connect our calls; and
they move us,” noted Chairman Brown. “We depend on our utilities to power and connect our
lives and keep us safe and warm – but utilities won’t work without the diverse group of women
and men who conceive, design, build, operate and repair these essential systems.”
As part of a unified effort to increase aware, Gov. Wolf has proclaimed ​September to be
#UtilityCareers Month​, and the House adopted a ​House Resolution 1066
(Godshall-R-Montgomery) highlighting this important workforce development issue.
“Labor & Industry is proud to support PUC in their efforts to encourage individuals to
consider careers in the utilities field,” said Labor & Industry Secretary Gerard Oleksiak. “We’ve
partnered previously to make veterans aware of the many family-sustaining jobs available in this
field, and we are excited to broaden that effort, to connect qualified, experienced job seekers
with employers to fill vacant positions, particularly as almost a third of utility workers are
nearing retirement age.”
“American veterans are highly-trained in numerous job specialties that make them an
ideal match for civilian public utility careers,” said Maj. Gen. Tony Carrelli, Pennsylvania’s
adjutant general and head of Department of Military and Veterans Affairs. “These high-tech jobs
include satellite/telecommunications operations, cable/fiber line installers, electrical systems,
engineering and logistics. The DMVA is thankful that the PUC is working to connect those who
have served our country with utility sector jobs where they can serve Pennsylvania
communities.”
Strong Need for Skilled Workers
Chairman Brown noted that across Pennsylvania, and throughout the country, there is a
strong anticipated need for skilled utility workers, driven by a combination of factors – including
an aging current workforce as well as the growth of new systems and technologies.
In Pennsylvania, utility employment is growing faster and wages are substantially higher
than statewide averages.
The number of jobs in the utility sector has increased by more than 11 percent over the
past five years, which is five times the job growth for all industries across the state – and the
average utility wage in Pennsylvania is just over $93,000 per year, which is nearly twice the
average wage for all industries.

54
“For a new generation searching for opportunities to start their careers – as well as other
skilled candidates, like our returning veterans looking for new possibilities – utilities represent
tens-of-thousands of community-oriented jobs, combining good wages with the satisfaction of
knowing that you are serving your neighbors,” said Chairman Brown.
Nationally, utilities are expected to hire an additional 70,000 workers by 2020, and
growth in the energy sector alone is expected to create an estimated 1.5 million jobs by 2030.
The statewide and national appetite for utility skills includes:
-- Engineers;
-- Field operations, including the people who maintain existing systems and build-out new
systems;
-- Plant operators, who keep the energy and water flowing to our communities; and,
-- Various technical positions, including relatively new areas of concern, like Cybersecurity.
PUC #UtilityCareers Campaign
Today’s event is part of a broader collaborative effort by the PUC, public utilities and
educational institutions to increase public awareness about career opportunities in the utility
sector.
The PUC is working with institutions and agencies statewide to spotlight the options
available for young people still considering careers, and for those searching for new
opportunities.
As part of the effort to increase access to information, the PUC has established a new
#UtilityCareers​ microsite to highlight information about job opportunities and provide access to
information about the spectrum of utility jobs across the state.
“This is an issue that goes far beyond one agency or utility. It’s an issue that has the
potential to impact us all, in terms of the reliability and cost of utility service,” said Chairman
Brown. “These are systems and people we depend upon to keep our communities safe and
healthy, and it is important that we do what we can to ensure that our utilities have the skilled
personnel they need to meet the needs of today and tomorrow.”
NewsClip:
#UtilityCareers Initiative Aims To Draw Attention To Utility Sector Jobs
Related Story:
Next Wave Of Green Jobs: Business Opportunities In Philly's Green Energy Sector Oct. 4
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

Pittsburgh Hosts SHALE INSIGHT 2018 Conference Oct. 23 - 25

This year’s ​SHALE INSIGHT Conference​, with


the theme “Natural Gas: America’s Pipeline to
Power Generation and Emerging Opportunities,”
will be held at the ​David L. Lawrence Convention
Center​ in Pittsburgh October 23 -25.
Network with the nation’s foremost leaders
on shale development, power generation
distribution, pipeline capital investment, energy
driven manufacturing and alleviating energy
poverty.

55
Learn from innovative thought leaders during three days of pre-conference workshops,
technical and public affairs sessions, national keynote addresses, and a dynamic exhibit hall
integrated with general and breakout session programming including new networking lounges
featuring the major shale players.
The opening keynote address will be given by Acting EPA Administrator Andrew
Wheeler and the closing keynote by Admiral Michael Rogers, recently retired Director and
Commander of the U.S. National Security Agency and U.S. Cyber Command.
For more information and to register, visit the ​SHALE INSIGHT Conference​ website.
NewsClips:
Legere: General Assembly Advances Bills On Conventional Drilling, Pipeline Vandalism
Litvak-Legere: Gas Driller Expects To Push Idle Well-Plugging Liabilities Decades Into The
Future
Natural Gas Accidentally Released From Washington County Well Site At Safe Level
State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County Landowner Lawsuit Over
Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban
WV’s Largest Coal Operator Fighting Back Against Growing Natural Gas Industry
Op-Ed: Bill Just Cash Pipeline For Gas Companies
Proposed Allegheny County Ordinance Would Create Oil & Gas Lease Registry
Allegheny County Councilwoman Proposes Registry Of Natural Gas Drilling
UGI Gets Conditional OK To Merge 3 Natural Gas Companies
Acting EPA Administrator To Speak At 2018 SHALE INSIGHT Conference
AP: California Urges Trump To Drop Plan For Weaker Fuel Mileage Standard
[Posted: Sept. 26, 2018]

DCNR Blog: My Path To Fighting Wildlands Fires: A DCNR Firefighter's Journey

By: Todd Breininger, Forest Fire Protection Program Specialist, DCNR's Bureau of Forestry

My career path to DCNR began in high school. I was


involved with the local volunteer fire company, and one day
there was a large wildfire on the mountain within our
coverage area.
I was really impressed by the response from the fire
companies and the ​DCNR Bureau of Forestry​, and I knew
then that fighting wildfires would be a great job with lots of
excitement.
That feeling never left me, so I majored in forestry in college.
I hoped to land a job with DCNR after graduation, because I
respected many of the forestry people with which I worked in
the wildland firefighting community.
Endless Education, Training
Wildland firefighting training is almost endless as you move up through positions in the
system.
Basic wildland firefighters must complete four classes totaling 46 hours, as well as an
eight-hour refresher course every year.

56
To be eligible for an out-of-state assignment, you also must pass the pack test: carry a
45-pound backpack for three miles in less than 45 minutes -- walking, no running allowed!
These requirements are the bare minimum for wildland firefighters, but you need a lot of
additional training as you progress and take on more responsibility.
Wildland classes are nationally certified, so the class you take in Pennsylvania will be the
same as one taught in California.
Helping Other States
Pennsylvania DCNR is frequently called upon to assist other states and federal agencies
by fighting wildfires, as well as responding to other natural disasters.
We’ve sent crews out west since 1973, and in more recent years, we’ve begun sending
engines and single resources (specially-trained personnel assigned to a specific position, other
than a member of a 20-person crew).
At the time of writing this, Pennsylvania has sent 228 people to assist other states this
year, including three engines and eight crews.
Expecting The Unexpected
Heading west on a fire assignment is different every time. You learn early on to remain
flexible because plans always change.
For example, a few years ago, I left my house for Harrisburg thinking I was headed to
Alaska. When I arrived in Harrisburg, I discovered Fairbanks was smoked in (heavy smoke
around the airport caused issues with flights coming in), and our crew was now heading to Utah.
Well, after a few days in Utah, the fire was under control, and we ended up in California.
In short, you never know what to expect. You could get on a wildfire where you spend
two weeks witnessing extreme fire behavior. Or you could end up on a cold section of the fire,
making sure it’s out and not seeing much fire at all.
Experiences pretty much run the whole spectrum when you’re out there -- some trips
really get the adrenaline flowing, and others are simply not as exciting.
But there are two things you know for sure:
1. You’ll be working long days (usually about 15 hours)
2. You’re going to get dirty
It’s worth it though. Because even if your assignment isn’t exciting, it is important --
especially to the people affected by the fire. Also, the experience is great, and you’ll return with
a lot of knowledge that’ll help us fight fire at home.
Pennsylvania’s fire program has improved tremendously over the years, because of the
knowledge and experience people have gained on western fire assignments.
A Job Of Opportunity, Sacrifice
Although being a wildland firefighter is great, it doesn’t come without its downside. It
can be very stressful and lack of sleep on an assignment is common. The “on-the-go” lifestyle
can take its toll in the long run.
Addressing Everyday Needs
When fighting a fire out west or in Pennsylvania, we eat bagged lunches or MREs (meals
ready to eat). When at bigger fires out west, there typically is a base camp that has supplies and
food. A caterer cooks the breakfast, dinners, and makes the bagged lunches.
Showers don’t happen too often. Out west, there are shower trailers, but the lines can be
very long. And if you shower, you won’t get to sleep until very late, so it’s not uncommon to
only take a few showers on a two-week fire deployment.

57
Instead, many firefighters use “bath in a bag,” which is a large baby wipe you use to
clean yourself.
As far as sleeping’s concerned, I carry a sleeping bag and tent with me when I’m
deployed.
My Family's Support
It can take a toll on your family while you’re gone. Your spouse and kids may constantly
worry about you, and they must pick up the slack while you’re gone. I’ve missed a few family
vacations and kids’ games over the years because I was out on a wildfire.
Luckily, I have a great wife who is very understanding of me leaving for two weeks with
little notice. She knows that I really love fighting wildfires and supports me 100 percent, even
though it’s hard on her while I’m gone.
People constantly tell me that I have a great job, and they are correct. I’ve been to every
state in the west, including Alaska, and I’ve seen country that most people will never see while I
was on fires.
As the Prescribed Fire Specialist in Pennsylvania, I get to travel around the state working
on prescribed fires and responding to wildfires -- basically doing something new and exciting
every day.
I’m out in the woods, beholding nature, and working with great people. When I walk in
my house in the evening, I’m happy knowing I followed that feeling of excitement, choosing the
right job so many years ago.
Learn More
To learn more about wildfires and community resources, explore ​DCNR’s Wildfire
webpage.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Wyoming Wildfire Destroys 40+ Homes, Highway Closed
Get Ready Leaf Peepers: PA’s Fall Foliage Reports Start Today
Prime Locations To See Fall Colors In The Lehigh Valley
Despite Rain, Fungi, Fall Foliage In PA Should Be ‘Awesome’
How To Track Progress On PA’s Fall Foliage
Online Fall Foliage Maps Track Seasonal Leaf Change
Rains, Warmth Threaten Autumn Colors, But Fall Won’t Be A Washout
Make Most Of Erie Area’s Fall Spendor Outdoors
With First Spotting Of Spotted Lanternfly Eggs, Let Eradication Begin
Crable: Spotted Lanternflies March Through Lancaster, Feds Make County Battleground
Get A Free Tree If You Live In Allegheny County
Your Street, Park Could Get Free Trees Thanks To $1.1M Expansion In Philly Program
Op-Ed: As Philly Development Booms, What Happens To All Our Trees?
Maple Syrup Producers Receive A Sweet Lesson In Northeast
Op-Ed: Nearly 200-Year-Old Tree Falls In The City Of Erie
Related Stories:
Week 1 - Fall Foliage Report: Trees Starting To Change Along PA’s Northern Border

58
DCNR Blog: Producing The Show: Pennsylvania Fall Foliage Factors
DCNR: Additional State Forest Roads Opening For Hunting Seasons, Other Outdoor Activities
Vote Now Through Oct. 1 In PA Parks & Forests Foundation Photo Contest
Delaware River Basin Commission Now Accepting Entries For Fall Photo Contest
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Vote Now Through Oct. 1 In PA Parks & Forests Foundation Photo Contest

Voting is now open through Noon on October 1 for


the PA Parks and Forests Foundation Facebook page
for the 2018 Photo Contest. Vote now in each of the
6 categories-
-- ​Off The Beaten Path
-- ​Fun In The Outdoors
-- ​Dogs In The Outdoors
-- ​Young Photographers​ (age 12-17)
-- ​Built Environment
-- ​Beauty All Around
You vote by “liking” your favorite photo.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Parks &
Forests Foundation​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Foundation,
Like them on Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to become a member of the
Foundation.
(​Photo:​ 6 of the 15 photos you can vote for in the Young Photographers category.)
Related Stories:
DCNR Blog: My Path To Fighting Wildlands Fires: A DCNR Firefighter's Journey
Week 1 - Fall Foliage Report: Trees Starting To Change Along PA’s Northern Border
DCNR Blog: Producing The Show: Pennsylvania Fall Foliage Factors
DCNR: Additional State Forest Roads Opening For Hunting Seasons, Other Outdoor Activities
Delaware River Basin Commission Now Accepting Entries For Fall Photo Contest
[Posted: Sept. 26, 2018]

DCNR Blog: Producing The Show: Pennsylvania Fall Foliage Factors

​With the fall season comes several favorites for


Pennsylvanians, including some of the best
hiking due to the arrival of crisp air and
stunning fall foliage!
The cheery display of fall colors that adorn the
commonwealth every year result from several
key factors:
-- Species diversity
-- Temperate climate
-- Day length
-- Weather

59
We have a richness of fall colors because we have so many deciduous woody species --
more than 140!
Forest species diversity lends itself to variations in pigment production, which produce
the array of fall colors we often enjoy.
Pigments are substances within leaf tissue that absorb and reflect certain types of light.
Some trees make more red-reflecting pigments (like red oaks), while others make more
yellow-reflecting pigments (like poplars).
Early Changers And Seasonal Slowpokes​
In general, the early changers are: Black gum; Aspens; Dogwoods; Black walnut;
Virginia creeper vine; and Spicebush.
Mid-season changers are: Maples; Hickories; Sassafras; Black cherry; Birches; and
American hornbeam.
Late-season changers:Oaks and American beech.
There can be some variability to the timing of the change of colors due to microclimate
influences throughout the state (for example, altitude or whether the tree is situated on a south or
north facing slope.
Impacts Of Temperature Change
Our temperate climate also plays a vital role. Pennsylvania happens to be situated in an
advantageous zone, where special types of forests intermingle -- like the northern and Allegheny
hardwoods (such as sugar maple, black cherry, and yellow poplar) with mixed oak and hickory
communities.
Our cold winters also make it necessary for broad-leafed trees to drop their leaves -- an
adaptation trees rely upon to conserve water and energy.
Producing The Colorful Show!
During the few weeks prior to leaf drop, trees undergo a series of physiological changes
that conspire to create the wondrous palette of colors we see every autumn. During this process,
green pigments (chlorophylls) decompose, exposing the more vibrant pigments that remain.
The gradually decreasing day length of late summer and early fall signal to trees that the
time for making energy (and hence, growing) is coming to an end. Production of chlorophyll
ceases and fall foliage season begins anew.
A few weeks later, warm days and cool (but not freezing) nights can snap fall foliage
season into an outright show.
Are the trees around you showing signs of the coming fall? Look for those deep and vivid
greens to begin fading, and perhaps a few peeks of yellow here and there in the forest, and you’ll
know fall foliage season has begun!
Learn More
Starting September 27, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources will begin
its ​weekly Fall Foliage Reports​, updated every Thursday, to help residents and travelers
experience Autumn as it unfolds across the Commonwealth.
Fall foliage typically peaks for several weeks near the beginning of October across
Pennsylvania.
Visitors can get suggestions about the best spots to view fall foliage on the ​Penn's Woods
Fall Foliage story map​ and on the ​Pennsylvania Tourism Office​ website.
Find a trail to enjoy the changing leaves at the updated ​Explore PA Trails​ website!
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit

60
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Get Ready Leaf Peepers: PA’s Fall Foliage Reports Start Today
Prime Locations To See Fall Colors In The Lehigh Valley
Despite Rain, Fungi, Fall Foliage In PA Should Be ‘Awesome’
How To Track Progress On PA’s Fall Foliage
Online Fall Foliage Maps Track Seasonal Leaf Change
Rains, Warmth Threaten Autumn Colors, But Fall Won’t Be A Washout
Make Most Of Erie Area’s Fall Spendor Outdoors
With First Spotting Of Spotted Lanternfly Eggs, Let Eradication Begin
Crable: Spotted Lanternflies March Through Lancaster, Feds Make County Battleground
Get A Free Tree If You Live In Allegheny County
Your Street, Park Could Get Free Trees Thanks To $1.1M Expansion In Philly Program
Op-Ed: As Philly Development Booms, What Happens To All Our Trees?
Maple Syrup Producers Receive A Sweet Lesson In Northeast
Op-Ed: Nearly 200-Year-Old Tree Falls In The City Of Erie
Wildfires
Wyoming Wildfire Destroys 40+ Homes, Highway Closed
Related Story:
DCNR: Pennsylvania Offers Fall Foliage Reports For Residents, Travelers Starting Sept. 27
Related Stories This Week:
Week 1 - Fall Foliage Report: Trees Starting To Change Along PA’s Northern Border
DCNR Blog: My Path To Fighting Wildlands Fires: A DCNR Firefighter's Journey
DCNR: Additional State Forest Roads Opening For Hunting Seasons, Other Outdoor Activities
Vote Now Through Oct. 1 In PA Parks & Forests Foundation Photo Contest
Delaware River Basin Commission Now Accepting Entries For Fall Photo Contest
[Posted: Sept. 24, 2018]

DCNR: Additional State Forest Roads Opening For Hunting Seasons, Other Outdoor
Activities

Hunters and other outdoors enthusiasts heading into


Pennsylvania’s state-owned woodlands this autumn
will find additional roads open in 18 of the 20 state
forest districts, the Department of Conservation and
Natural Resources announced Thursday.
“This improved accessibility, coupled with DCNR’s
promotion of deer hunting, benefits forest
regeneration and the overall ecosystem,” said DCNR
Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn. “As a result, the
Bureau of Forestry is opening more than 540 miles of
state forest roads normally open only for administrative use. They again will be available to
hunters, hikers, foliage viewers, and others visiting state forestlands this fall.”

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More than 3,000 miles of state forest roadways will be open during the statewide archery
deer season, which opens September 29, and closes November 12. They will continue to stay
open through other hunting seasons continuing into January 2019.
“Regardless of whether they seek deer, bear, turkey or small game, hunters in our state
forests will find more than 90 percent of that land now is within one-half mile of an open road,”
said Dunn.
With the hunter in mind, DCNR and the Game Commission continue to ​update a new
interactive map of state forestlands and game lands​ across Pennsylvania.
The map offers information on the Deer Management Assistance Program (DMAP) and
Disease Management Areas, and details on newly opened roads, timber harvesting activity,
forestry office contacts, and more.
Meanwhile, top-quality hunting is offered at many state parks -- especially those in the
12.5-county ​Pennsylvania Wilds​ region -- where state forestland often surrounds them.
Inexpensive camping can be found at many of those parks.
Primitive camping on state forestlands is also an option, giving hunters a backcountry
camping or hunting experience. Camping permits, issued by the managing forest district, are
required when camping on state forest lands on designated sites.
Many of these campsites are close to state parks and forestlands enrolled in the Game
Commission’s Deer Management Assistance Program, permitting hunters to take one antlerless
deer or more when properly licensed.
Click Here​ for more information about hunting in state forests and parks.
Shale Gas Areas
Hunters traveling to some north central areas of the state are reminded some hunting
areas and travel routes may be impacted by Marcellus Shale-related activities. Some state forest
roads may be temporarily closed during drilling operations or other peak periods of heavy use to
reduce potential safety hazards.
Some state forest roads only will be opened for the second week of the traditional rifle
season because they cannot withstand the expected heavy traffic of the first week of that season.
Two- or three-month long openings will be in effect only where there is minimal threat of
damage or deterioration to road surfaces or forest surroundings.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(​Photo:​ Deer hunters in ​Michaux State Forest.​)
NewsClips:
Get Ready Leaf Peepers: PA’s Fall Foliage Reports Start Today
Prime Locations To See Fall Colors In The Lehigh Valley
Despite Rain, Fungi, Fall Foliage In PA Should Be ‘Awesome’
How To Track Progress On PA’s Fall Foliage
Online Fall Foliage Maps Track Seasonal Leaf Change
Rains, Warmth Threaten Autumn Colors, But Fall Won’t Be A Washout
Make Most Of Erie Area’s Fall Spendor Outdoors
Related Stories:
Week 1 - Fall Foliage Report: Trees Starting To Change Along PA’s Northern Border

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DCNR Blog: Producing The Show: Pennsylvania Fall Foliage Factors
DCNR Blog: My Path To Fighting Wildlands Fires: A DCNR Firefighter's Journey
Vote Now Through Oct. 1 In PA Parks & Forests Foundation Photo Contest
Delaware River Basin Commission Now Accepting Entries For Fall Photo Contest
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Brandywine Conservancy: 3rd Annual Bike The Brandywine A Sunny Success

Greeted with sunny skies and crisp fall weather, nearly 500
cyclists joined the ​Brandywine Conservancy’s​ third annual
Bike the Brandywine event on September 22 in Chester
County.
Featuring routes of 25, 45 and 80 miles along the
Brandywine Creek Greenway​, Bike the Brandywine took
riders along a scenic journey with stunning views of rural
landscapes, rich history and active farmland-- much of which
the Brandywine Conservancy has helped permanently protect
and conserve for future generations.
All three routes concluded at the ​Chadds Ford Historical
Society​ as cyclists were welcomed back to the sounds of
cheers and cowbells, as well as celebratory drinks from Victory Brewing Company and a
complimentary lunch.
“Bike the Brandywine is a fun way for cyclists to enjoy the scenic beauty of the
Brandywine Valley and to get a sense of our decades-long efforts to conserve and protect the
land, the river and the historic sites of this area,” said Ellen Ferretti, director of the Brandywine
Conservancy. “Thanks to the generous support of the William Penn Foundation and our many
sponsors, as well as our incredible staff and volunteers, we were grateful for another successful
year.”
“After months of preparation and planning for the ride, nothing is better than seeing all of
our work come to fruition with almost 500 cyclists enjoying a beautiful ride through some
amazing countryside," said Susan McCreadie, Brandywine’s coordinator of volunteers and
events.
Each route began and ended at the Chadds Ford Historical Society, with options for both
the recreational and more seasoned cyclist. Following both the east and west branches of the
historic Brandywine River, the 80-mile loop guided riders from Chadds Ford all the way to the
river’s headwaters in bucolic Honey Brook Township.
Cyclists on the 45-mile loop followed the west branch of the river through the
magnificent King Ranch area in Unionville before winding past the historic village of
Marshallton.
Closely mirroring the early routes of both the 80- and 45-mile options, the 25-mile loop
followed the west branch of the river through open farmland and scenic river valleys, providing a
trip through the historic village of Marshallton and its neighboring equestrian and farming
landscapes.
“Bike the Brandywine offered riders a taste of the Brandywine Creek Greenway and the
beautiful surrounding countryside,” said Sheila Fleming, manager for municipal assistance at the

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Brandywine Conservancy. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to support the Conservancy and
highlight the Greenway, especially as we continue to work with our partners and municipalities
to expand and enhance it for all communities to enjoy.”
Bike the Brandywine was generously sponsored by the ​William Penn Foundation​,
Willowdale Town Center​, ​Victory Brewing Company​, ​L.L.Bean​, ​Chadds Ford Historical
Society​, ​Western Chester County Chamber of Commerce​, ​Main Line Health Fitness & Wellness
Center​, ​Trek Bicycle​, ​For Fox Sake and The Whip Tavern​, ​Highland Orchard​s, ​Starbucks​ and
Herr Foods​.
The ​Brandywine Creek Greenway​ is a regional planning initiative of the Brandywine
Conservancy-- and 26 municipal partners in Chester and Delaware counties—to create a 30-mile
conservation and recreation corridor along both branches of the Brandywine.
It stretches from the Delaware state line just south of Chadds Ford to the Pennsylvania
Highlands Mega-Greenway at the northern border of Honey Brook Township.
The Brandywine River and its network of parks and trails form the western limit of ​The
Circuit​, a regional trail network of the greater Philadelphia region.
The vision of the Brandywine Creek Greenway is to build healthier, more sustainable
communities, by emphasizing the natural and cultural resources of the area; preserving and
protecting the Brandywine River; and creating connections among open space, parks, river
access points and area attractions.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Brandywine
Conservancy​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Conservancy (middle
of the webpage.) Visit the ​Conservancy’s Blog​, ​Like the Conservancy​ on Facebook and ​Follow
them on Instagram​.
[Posted: Sept. 24, 2018]

Bay Journal: PA Officials Delay Plan To Shut Largest Shad Hatchery In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed

By Karl Blankenship, ​Chesapeake Bay Journal

Pennsylvania fishery officials have put on hold, at least for now, plans to close the Chesapeake
Bay region’s largest remaining shad hatchery as part of a budget-cutting move.
The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission at its July meeting deferred the decision it
made last year to cut $2 million from its budget for this year.
That cut would have closed three hatcheries, including its Van Dyke Research Station
along the Juniata River, which has reared more than 281 million American shad and released
them in the Susquehanna River over the last 42 years.
The reversal came after leaders of the House and Senate Game and Fisheries Committee
said they would seek additional funding for the commission next year.
Although the Fish and Boat Commission is an independent state agency, it cannot
unilaterally approve a hike in its primary source of revenue: general fishing licenses. Those
increases must be approved by the General Assembly, which has not done so since 2005.
But legislative leaders were angered last year when the Commission proposed budget
cuts that would close the three hatcheries, including two trout hatcheries. Some introduced
legislation to limit the term of the commission’s executive director to eight years, which would

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have put current director John Arway out of a job.
Prior to the Commission’s July meeting, though, the chairs of the House and Senate
committees issued a statement pledging they would pursue a fee increase early next year.
In the meantime, the Commission said it would help plug its budget shortfall by raising
the price on a variety of fees and permits over which it has direct control, which would raise
about $1.2 million.
Because the Commission operates on a July-through-June fiscal year, the delay ensures
that the Van Dyke facility would be funded through next spring’s spawning season, though its
fate for future years could change based on whether the General Assembly acts.
Meanwhile, Arway, announced that he would retire in November, after serving 38 years
with the commission, including eight as its executive director.
NewsClip:
Bay Journal: PA Officials Delay Plan To Shut Largest Shad Hatchery In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Related Stories:
Bay Journal: PA Shad Hatchery’s 42-Year Run May Be Coming To An End, Unless PA General
Assembly Acts
John Arway, Executive Director Of The Fish & Boat Commission, To Retire In November
Related Stories This Week:
Game Commission Proposes To Reclassify 3 Bat Species As Endangered, Make Other Changes
To Threatened, Endangered List
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Supports PA Project To Track Species In Decline
Partnership To Protect Ospreys From Power Lines Expands In Pennsylvania

(Reprinted from the ​Chesapeake Bay Journal​)


[Posted: Sept. 24, 2018]

Game Commission Proposes To Reclassify 3 Bat Species As Endangered, Make Other


Changes To Threatened, Endangered List

The Board of Game Commissioners Tuesday took


preliminary action to update the state’s list of ​threatened
and endangered species​, which includes downgrading
three protected cave bat species and reclassifying them as
state endangered species.
The three bat species, all of which have been decimated
by white-nose syndrome since it appeared in
Pennsylvania in 2008, are the ​northern long-eared bat​,
tri-colored bat​ and ​little brown bat​ ​(photo)​.
Additionally, the board voted preliminarily to upgrade the
peregrine falcon’s​ status from endangered to threatened;
upgrade the ​piping plover​ from extirpated to endangered, and list the red knot – a federally
threatened species – as a threatened species within Pennsylvania, as well.
Bats
The northern long-eared bat was listed as a federal threatened species in April 2015. In

65
addition, tri-colored bats and little brown bats currently are being considered for protection under
the U.S. Endangered Species Act.
A state listing allows for the Game Commission to work with industry that might have
projects affected by the presence of endangered or threatened species.
While projects will continue to be reviewed by the ​Pennsylvania Natural Diversity
Inventory​ (PNDI), regarding bats, the proposal would affect projects only if they’re within 300
meters of a recent maternity roost, hibernacula or capture location for threatened or endangered
bats.
Sites that held these bats prior to the arrival of white-nose syndrome, but not since, won’t
affect projects.
If the preliminarily approved measure is adopted, only 34 new hibernation sites and 112
maternity sites statewide would be added into the PNDI.
Through a state-endangered listing, the Game Commission will coordinate with
developers to resolve conflicts, pointed out Dan Brauning, Game Commission Wildlife Diversity
Division Chief. For little brown and tri-colored bats, the Game Commission will be the lead
agency in determining potential impacts. However, for northern long-eared bats, coordination by
both the Game Commission and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will be necessary.
“These cave bats teeter on the brink of state extirpation; extinction is not yet out of the
question,” Brauning noted. “Their need for additional protections is obvious and overdue. For the
Game Commission to do anything less would be recklessly irresponsible.”
The Game Commission had moved to list these bats in 2012, but concerns about
unnecessary oversight and job loss heard from representatives of timber, oil, coal and gas
industries and legislators prompted additional discussion.
“The Game Commission strives to work whenever possible with industry, to save jobs,
and be a part of sound state government,” emphasized agency Executive Director Bryan
Burhans. “But we cannot look the other way as bats tumble toward extinction. This agency has
statutory and state constitutional commitments to represent and conserve all wildlife for today
and tomorrow.”
Because bats have lost upward of 97 percent of their historic populations in Pennsylvania,
every remaining bat matters, Brauning said.
What works against these cave bats is their annual reproduction provides limited
replacement. Most female cave bats have one pup per year, a rate that would place their potential
recovery more than a century away.
There’s no doubt a state-endangered listing of these cave bat species will require the
implementation of additional protective measures. But given the mammoth collapse of these
winged mammals, there’s no doubt they need more help; the sooner, the better.
​Click Here​ for more on bats.
But some of the proposals for status change represent better news.
Peregrine Falcons
The ​peregrine falcon​ has seen a steady statewide recovery, which qualifies its status to be
upgraded to threatened under the agency’s Peregrine Falcon Management Plan.
Piping Plover
Upgrading the ​piping plover’s​ status to endangered recognizes its return to breeding in
Pennsylvania. After more than 60 years of absence, piping plover pairs successfully nested at
Presque Isle State Park in 2017 and 2018.

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And changing the status of the red knot – a rare migrant bird found in Pennsylvania
mostly at ​Presque Isle State Park​ – recognizes its vulnerability to further declines.
The status changes will be brought back to the January meeting for a final vote.
For more information on this program, visit the Game Commission’s ​Threatened and
Endangered Species​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Bats Gain Protection After Being Nearly Wiped Out In PA
Hayes: Endangered Status Proposed For 3 Pennsylvania Bats
Related Stories:
Bay Journal: PA Officials Delay Plan To Shut Largest Shad Hatchery In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Supports PA Project To Track Species In Decline
Partnership To Protect Ospreys From Power Lines Expands In Pennsylvania
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Supports PA Project To Track Species In Decline

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has agreed


to support a proposal for further expansion of
the ​Motus Wildlife Tracking System​ in
Pennsylvania and four other states to monitor
eight migratory species of greatest conservation
and other wildlife.
The Pennsylvania Game Commission will lead
a team involving the Maryland Department of
Natural Resources, ​Northeast Motus
Collaboration​ and other partnering
organizations to collect life-cycle information
of 7 migratory birds and one bat that have been in serious declines for at least years, and in some
cases, decades.
The Northeast Motus Collaboration is a partnership of the ​Willistown Conservation
Trust​, ​Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art​, ​Project Owlnet​ and the Carnegie Museum of
Natural History’s ​Powdermill Nature Reserve​.
The collaboration is housed under the Motus Wildlife Tracking System, established in
2013 by ​Bird Studies Canada​. The network currently tracks wildlife from more than 500 stations
around the world.
The USFWS is providing $497,929 to help underwrite this wildlife surveillance, which
tracks migrating animals with nanotags – radio transmitters so small, they can be fitted to
monarch butterflies.
Collaboration member organizations and others are providing more than $225,000 to
meet federal matching funding requirements.
The Pennsylvania species being targeted by this fieldwork are Swainson’s thrush, wood
thrush, blackpoll warblers, Canada warblers, rusty blackbirds, American woodcock and northern
long-eared bats. Other priority species, such as New England’s Bicknell’s thrush, also are
targeted by this research.

67
“This project embodies contemporary wildlife conservation: state and federal government
agencies working with private conservation organizations and universities to help species that
demand more attention than traditional wildlife management can provide,” explained Game
Commission Executive Director Bryan Burhans. “The agency is indebted to partner
organizations, such as the Willistown Conservation Trust and the Ned Smith Center for Nature
and Art, for their commitment to wildlife. Today, conservation counts on partners more than ever
before.”
Nanotags are the innovation that makes this research possible. They weigh as little as
one-eighth the weight of a penny and can accomplish what much heavier telemetry gear couldn’t
do as recently as 10 years ago. Almost overnight they have helped strengthen the science used in
wildlife conservation.
Nanotags transmit a signal that can reach out about 10 miles. This project aims to provide
more receiver stations to collect those nanotag transmissions. Currently, there are more than 40
in Pennsylvania. The expectation is that about 12 more receiving stations would be added under
this proposal.
“Pennsylvania already is well equipped with receiving stations in western and southern
counties,” explained Dan Brauning, who supervises the Game Commission’s Wildlife Diversity
Division. “Clusters of new receiver stations will be established on the Pocono Plateau, as well as
across the northern tier, and along the Kittatinny Ridge/South Mountain system.”
But this proposal covers more than Pennsylvania. It will work to establish more receiving
stations in four other states: New York, Maryland, New Jersey and Delaware.
Receiver stations already are collecting information that has been pondered by
ornithologists and bat biologists since the dawn of American wildlife conservation. Soon, they
will know more about the specifics of migration than ever before.
“Riding on the back of a migrating bird is the best way to collect migration information,”
Brauning noted. “And now nanotag transmitters can do that. It’s like a new chapter in migratory
bird behavior opening before us, and we all are eager to see what those transmitters continue to
detect.”
Other objectives of the telemetry surveillance project include:
-- ​Northern long-eared bats​ will be tagged at a Centre County maternity colony and tracked to
establish their migratory routes and use of hibernacula during the summer and winter of 2019.
-- ​American woodcock and wood thrushes​, captured at banding stations and rescued from
window collisions will be tagged and their movements and survival will be tracked.
-- ​Swainson’s thrushes ​will be tagged to measure their migratory movements and use of
hemlock habitat in Forest and Warren counties with an aim to protect critical thrush habitat.
Overall, the project intends to shed more details on bird migration routes, timing, even
post-breeding dispersal movements. It also has the potential to provide life-cycle data that would
help protect currently unrecognized important habitat, such as high-use migratory stop-overs.
“This work has the potential to increase our knowledge of one of North America’s most
important inland migratory corridors,” Brauning explained. “Little is really known about
migratory stopover and staging of birds. Migration also is believed to cause an estimated 85
percent of annual adult bird mortality.”
For these reasons, and many more, the Game Commission looks forward to the expansion
of the Motus Wildlife Tracking System. It truly offers the right stuff at a time when migratory
birds – particularly neotropical birds – need all the help they can get.

68
(​Photo: ​The Motus Network​ now.)
NewsClip:
Crable: Study: Earlier Springs From Climate Change May Harm Migrating Birds
Related Stories:
Bay Journal: PA Officials Delay Plan To Shut Largest Shad Hatchery In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Game Commission Proposes To Reclassify 3 Bat Species As Endangered, Make Other Changes
To Threatened, Endangered List
Partnership To Protect Ospreys From Power Lines Expands In Pennsylvania
[Posted: Sept. 26, 2018]

Partnership To Protect Ospreys From Power Lines Expands In Pennsylvania

Rep. Parke Wentling (R-Crawford), a member of


the ​Joint Legislative Conservation Committee​,
recently attended the Great Lakes Legislative
Caucus meeting held in Erie to discuss
environmental issues impacting the region.
During the site visit, Rep. Wentling
presented an issue he has been working on for
many years – protecting ospreys from the
dangers of nesting on power lines which can
fatally harm the raptor and their young and cause
power outages to communities.
Ospreys, which were once registered on the endangered and threatened species list in
Pennsylvania, are found along large rivers and lakes and tend to build their nests on top of
man-made structures such as power lines.
In order to remedy this issue, Rep. Wentling has worked to form a partnership among
various companies and organizations in the Northwest region to help find a safer place for
ospreys to reside.
Through the collaborative efforts of FirstEnergy and the ​Erie Bird Observatory​, the
construction of osprey nesting boxes on utility poles located near power lines came to fruition.
To date, several nesting boxes have already been erected in the region.
“Building these nesting boxes is beneficial not only to ospreys who will be protected
from electrocution by power lines, but to residents in communities who would otherwise put
themselves at risk for frequent episodes of disruptive power outages,” said Rep. Wentling. “I am
thrilled that our efforts continue to be successful and our partnership is growing across the
region.”
At the GLLC meeting, Rep. Wentling and a number of individuals representing utility
power companies and conservation groups met at the ​Tom Ridge Environmental Center​ at
Presque Isle to view an osprey nesting box.
Recently, the partnership expanded with ​Northwestern Rural Electric Cooperative
Association​ joining in this endeavor to protect the osprey population.
“Our co-op understands the detrimental consequence that occurs when ospreys nest on
power lines – both to the birds and to the consumer members confronted with lengthy power

69
outages – so it made perfect sense to team up with this effort that is beneficial to ospreys and to
our co-op,” said Mary Grill, president and CEO of Northwestern Rural Electric.
Sarah Sargent, executive director of ​Erie Bird Observatory​ noted her enthusiasm about
this collaborative effort. “We are excited to continue our partnership with FirstEnergy and our
newest affiliate, Northwestern Rural Electric, to help ospreys nest safely while preventing
service disruptions. We see this project as a win for the birds and a win for the customers in areas
with lots of ospreys.”
Click Here​ to learn more about osprey nesting platforms from the Erie Bird Observatory.
Residents in the Northwest who see birds nesting atop power lines are encouraged to
contact the ​Erie Bird Observatory​ at 814-580-8311 to report the pole number.
For more information on osprey statewide, visit the​ Game Commission’s Osprey
webpage.
(​Photo: ​Ospreys nesting on electric poles can cause damage and is a threat to the birds -
FirstEnergy.)
Related Story:
FirstEnergy Uses Drones To Inspect Protected Bird Nests On Utility Poles, Equipment
Related Stories This Week:
Bay Journal: PA Officials Delay Plan To Shut Largest Shad Hatchery In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Game Commission Proposes To Reclassify 3 Bat Species As Endangered, Make Other Changes
To Threatened, Endangered List
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Supports PA Project To Track Species In Decline
[Posted: Sept. 26, 2018]

Help Wanted: 3 Positions: Jacobs Creek Watershed Assn.; Chester County; Audubon

The Jacobs Creek Watershed Association in Westmoreland County is looking for an AmeriCorps
Program Manager, Chester County is looking for a Director of Open Space Preservation and
National and PA Audubon are looking for a Delaware River Watershed Program Director.

Help Wanted: Jacobs Creek Watershed Association AmeriCorps Program Manager

The ​Jacobs Creek Watershed Association​ based in Westmoreland County is seeking qualified
candidates for an ​AmeriCorps Program Manager​ position. The deadline for applications is
October 5.
The position involves working with the Association’s Education and Recreation
Committees to plan and schedule events through the 2019 school year and other responsibilities.
Click Here​ for all the details.
[Posted: Sept. 25, 2018]

Help Wanted: Chester County Director Of Open Space Preservation

Chester County is seeking qualified candidates to fill the position of ​Director of Open Space
Preservation​.
The Director will advise the Commissioners on policy, operational and funding matters

70
pertaining to the County's open space preservations initiatives; Implement and coordinate the
County's open space preservation initiatives, including agricultural preservations and community
revitalization; Administer the preservation partnership and municipal grant components of the
County's open space preservation program; Serve as the Commissioners' liaison to open space
preservation-related organizations such as conservancies, land trusts, agricultural preservation
organizations, and the appropriate units of federal, state and local government.
Click Here​ for all the details.
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Help Wanted: National Audubon Delaware River Watershed Program Director

The National Audubon Society and ​Audubon Pennsylvania​ are seeking qualified candidates for
their first ​Delaware River Program Director​ to organize and expand our work across the
watershed, and leverage our partnerships and assets to advance a comprehensive restoration and
protection plan for the entire basin.
Reporting to the Vice President and Executive Director of Audubon Pennsylvania and
closely collaborating with our Vice President for Water Conservation, the Program Director is
charged with overseeing and strengthening existing programs within the four watershed states,
leveraging them for maximum mission impact, creating innovative strategic partnerships that
diversifies funding sources, and executing a comprehensive strategy.
Click Here​ for all the details.
[Posted: Sept. 27, 2018]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​, ​Twitter Feed​ and ​add ​PaEnviroDigest Google+​ to your Circle.

Air
Northampton County Railroad Gets Volkswagen Settlement Money To Reduce Air Pollution
Pittsburgh Leaders, Citizens Attack Trump’s Proposal Clean Vehicle Emissions Rollback
AP: California Urges Trump To Drop Plan For Weaker Fuel Mileage Standard
Alternative Fuels
Pittsburgh Leaders, Citizens Attack Trump’s Proposal Clean Vehicle Emissions Rollback
Op-Ed: Can America’s Power Grid Support All Those Electric Cars?
Utilities, Carmakers Launch Campaign To Cut U.S. Transportation Energy Use 50% By 2050
Awards & Recognition
25 Years, 25 Green Buildings In Western PA, See Them All Here
Phipps Conservatory Is Nationally Recognized Leader In Sustainability
Sen. Fontana Receives Clean Water Action Award For Environmental Work
Bradford Woods Recognized As Certified Gold Sustainable Municipality
Memorial Honoring Coal Miners To Be Unveiled Next Month In Scranton
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Dr. Robert Wolensky, Anthracite Mining Historian, Wins National Honor
Editorial: Great Lakes Researcher Earns Honor
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
With First Spotting Of Spotted Lanternfly Eggs, Let Eradication Begin
Crable: Spotted Lanternflies March Through Lancaster, Feds Make County Battleground
Budget
Letter: PA Wildlife, Parks Depend On Reauthorization Of Federal Land & Water Conservation
Fund
Chesapeake Bay
What This Summer’s Rainfall Could Mean For The Chesapeake Bay
Williamsport Approves Joint Water Pollution Reduction Plan With Township
Williamsport Puts Hold On Proposed Joint Chesapeake Bay Pollution Reduction Plan
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Climate
Crable: Study: Earlier Springs From Climate Change May Harm Migrating Birds
Op-Ed: Keeping Nuclear Power Plants Running Vital To Meeting Climate Goals
We’re Moving To Higher Ground: America’s Era Of Climate Mass Migration Is Here
Meet The Climate Refugees Who Already Had to Leave Their Homes
Where Should You Move To Save Yourself From Climate Change?
What Happens When You Buy A House In A Disaster Zone And No One Told You?
Climate Gentrification: The Rich Can Afford To Move, What About The Poor?
AP: California Urges Trump To Drop Plan For Weaker Fuel Mileage Standard
Utilities, Carmakers Launch Campaign To Cut U.S. Transportation Energy Use 50% By 2050
World Nowhere Near On Track To Avoid Warming Beyond 1.5C Target
Coal Mining
Beaver County Residents Face Uncertain Future As Little Blue Run Coal Burning Waste
Landfill Closes
Shamokin Dam 400 MW Coal-Fired Power Plant To Be Demolished
Memorial Honoring Coal Miners To Be Unveiled Next Month In Scranton
Dr. Robert Wolensky, Anthracite Mining Historian, Wins National Honor
Coal CEO Murray Reflects On Trump’s Impact On The Coal Industry
WV’s Largest Coal Operator Fighting Back Against Growing Natural Gas Industry
Appeals Court Hears WV Coal Miners’ Black Lung Lawsuit
Delaware River
Wide Range Of Groups Gather To Talk About Protecting Delaware Watershed
Delaware RiverKeeper Sept. 28 RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
Experts Tell Officials To Be Cautious About Buying Pittsburgh Water Authority
Pittsburgh Water Authority To Begin Adding Lead Reduction Chemical By February
10 Things To Know About Orthophosphate Coming To Pittsburgh Drinking Water Treatment
Pittsburgh Water Authority OKs $158 Million In System Improvements

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Pittsburgh Water Authority Will Continue Moratorium On Winter Shutoffs
Court: Allentown Water Rate Hike Can Move Forward
Boil Water Advisory Continues Through Thursday In Parts Of Beaver County
#UtilityCareers Initiative Aims To Draw Attention To Utility Sector Jobs
Economic Development
AP: Rainfall Dampens Summer For Pocono River Rental Companies
Lancaster County Businesses Committed To Promoting STEM-Related Careers
#UtilityCareers Initiative Aims To Draw Attention To Utility Sector Jobs
Education
Phipps Conservatory Is Nationally Recognized Leader In Sustainability
Point Park U. Watershed Documentary To Premiere On WQED Oct. 11
Discovery Center Brings Nature Trail, Exhibits, Zip Lines To Fairmount Park Reservoir
General McLane Student Finishes 3rd In National Welding Competition
Lancaster County Businesses Committed To Promoting STEM-Related Careers
Energy
PUC Sharpens Focus On Cybersecurity Threats
Sisk: Lawmakers Consider Tougher Penalties For Vandalizing Pipelines, Power Plants
#UtilityCareers Initiative Aims To Draw Attention To Utility Sector Jobs
Shamokin Dam 400 MW Coal-Fired Power Plant To Be Demolished
Op-Ed: Can America’s Power Grid Support All Those Electric Cars?
State Lawmakers Asked To Take Action On Potential Nuclear Plant Closures
Employees, Officials Rally Lawmakers To Save Three Mile Island
Three Mile Island: One Group Asks To Save Plant, Another Calls This A Bailout
Op-Ed: Keeping Nuclear Power Plants Running Vital To Meeting Climate Goals
Federal Court Again Upholds State Nuclear Subsidies, This Time In NY
Altoona Authority Considers Energy Generating Potential Of Sewage Plants
U.S. Chamber Official Talks Energy Regulation Reform In Reading
PUC Urges Philadelphia To Get Rid Of Duplicative Gas Commission
PPL Trims Technology Jobs Amid Restructuring Moves
Op-Ed: How FERC Can Protect Customers, Respect State Energy Authority In Its PJM Capacity
Market Proceeding
WV’s Largest Coal Operator Fighting Back Against Growing Natural Gas Industry
Energy Conservation
Penn State: Smart Systems To Improve Efficiency, Resilience, Performance Of Buildings
Environmental Heritage
PHMC: Johnny Appleseed Ran A Nursery Near Warren
Dr. Robert Wolensky, Anthracite Mining Historian, Wins National Honor
Farming
Dairy Farmers See Low Profit From Milk, Face Rising Costs
Editorial: State Must Support Farmers to Ensure The Health Of All
Oct. 10 Pittsburgh Workshop Will Cover Farmland Preservation Strategies
Farm-To-Table Dinner Highlights Erie Region’s Bounty
Crable: Spotted Lanternflies March Through Lancaster, Feds Make County Battleground
With First Spotting Of Spotted Lanternfly Eggs, Let Eradication Begin
Flooding

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Heavy Rain Causes Flash Flooding, Water Rescues In Southeast
Chanceford Twp Family Facing Bankruptcy After Flood Damage
Planning: $1M First Step Toward Levee Recertification In Lycoming County
Southwestern Energy Helps Flood Victims In Bradford County
Editorial: Occupancy In Flood Zone Shows Insurance Need
Solomon Creek Project Gets OK To Use Prefabricated Flood Wall In Wilkes-Barre
Philadelphia Already Has Had A Year’s Worth Of Rain
September Closing In As One Of Wettest On Record For Pittsburgh
Hurricanes
PA National Guard Unit Ready, Locked, Loaded To Support Victims Of Florence
Luzerne County Group Sending Relief To Victims Of Hurricane Florence
Puerto Rico’s Eroding Beaches Spell Trouble For Coastal Dwellers
AP: New Florence, South Carolina Flooding Forecasts Are Good News
Florences’ Slow-Motion Havoc Continues To Leave 1,000s Of Evacuees In Limbo
It’s Been More Than A Week Since Florence, Rivers Are Still Rising In The Carolinas
Thousands Of Dead Fish Add To Unique Devastation By Hurricane Florence
We’re Moving To Higher Ground: America’s Era Of Climate Mass Migration Is Here
Meet The Climate Refugees Who Already Had to Leave Their Homes
Where Should You Move To Save Yourself From Climate Change?
Forests
Get Ready Leaf Peepers: PA’s Fall Foliage Reports Start Today
Prime Locations To See Fall Colors In The Lehigh Valley
Despite Rain, Fungi, Fall Foliage In PA Should Be ‘Awesome’
How To Track Progress On PA’s Fall Foliage
Online Fall Foliage Maps Track Seasonal Leaf Change
Rains, Warmth Threaten Autumn Colors, But Fall Won’t Be A Washout
Make Most Of Erie Area’s Fall Spendor Outdoors
With First Spotting Of Spotted Lanternfly Eggs, Let Eradication Begin
Crable: Spotted Lanternflies March Through Lancaster, Feds Make County Battleground
Get A Free Tree If You Live In Allegheny County
Your Street, Park Could Get Free Trees Thanks To $1.1M Expansion In Philly Program
Op-Ed: As Philly Development Booms, What Happens To All Our Trees?
Maple Syrup Producers Receive A Sweet Lesson In Northeast
Op-Ed: Nearly 200-Year-Old Tree Falls In The City Of Erie
Wildfires
Wyoming Wildfire Destroys 40+ Homes, Highway Closed
Geologic Hazards
Sinkhole Shuts Down Mechanicsburg H.S. Tennis Courts
Green Buildings
25 Years, 25 Green Buildings In Western PA, See Them All Here
Penn State: Smart Systems To Improve Efficiency, Resilience, Performance Of Buildings
Green Infrastructure
Greene Twp, Franklin County To Improve Conococheague Creek
Your Street, Park Could Get Free Trees Thanks To $1.1M Expansion In Philly Program
Op-Ed: As Philly Development Booms, What Happens To All Our Trees?

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Lake Erie
Great Lakes Conference Explores Adapting To Warmer Climate
Editorial: Great Lakes Researcher Earns Honor
Land Conservation
Crable: Historic Soldiers Field In Mount Gretna Purchased By Group To Prevent Development
Letter: PA Wildlife, Parks Depend On Reauthorization Of Federal Land & Water Conservation
Fund
Land Recycling
Lycoming County Accepts $800,000 EPA Brownfields Grant
Litter/Illegal Dumping
Pittsburgh Volunteers Found 29 TVs, Fridge During Garbage Olympics
Schuylkill River Dumpsite Cleanup In Philadelphia
1,000s And 1,000s Of Tires Are Being Dumped Along Philadelphia’s Rivers
Cumberland County Ready To Collect Your Old Tires Sept. 29
Pittsburgh Has An Anti-Litter Specialist Opening
Oil & Gas
Legere: General Assembly Advances Bills On Conventional Drilling, Pipeline Vandalism
Litvak-Legere: Gas Driller Expects To Push Idle Well-Plugging Liabilities Decades Into The
Future
Natural Gas Accidentally Released From Washington County Well Site At Safe Level
State Senators Again Seek To Intervene To Support Wayne County Landowner Lawsuit Over
Delaware Watershed Fracking Ban
WV’s Largest Coal Operator Fighting Back Against Growing Natural Gas Industry
Op-Ed: Bill Just Cash Pipeline For Gas Companies
Proposed Allegheny County Ordinance Would Create Oil & Gas Lease Registry
Allegheny County Councilwoman Proposes Registry Of Natural Gas Drilling
UGI Gets Conditional OK To Merge 3 Natural Gas Companies
Acting EPA Administrator To Speak At 2018 SHALE INSIGHT Conference
AP: California Urges Trump To Drop Plan For Weaker Fuel Mileage Standard
Pipelines
Legere: General Assembly Advances Bills On Conventional Drilling, Pipeline Vandalism
Sisk: Lawmakers Consider Tougher Penalties For Vandalizing Pipelines, Power Plants
Sen. Dinniman: Efforts Underway To Silence Pipeline Critics
Hurdle: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Incidents, Fines, Shutdowns Fuel Residents’ Safety Concerns
Sisk: First Responders Near Mariner East 2 Pipeline Prep For Unlikely One Hell Of A Boom
Cusick: Wired To Be Wary Of Certain Things: Why Pipelines Are Among Them
Frazier: In PA, No Oversight Of Where Some Pipelines Can Be Built
Op-Ed: Pipeline Construction Moratorium Would Make PA Less Safe
Allegheny Front: Want To Know If There Are Pipelines Near You? Good Luck With That
Op-Ed: How PA Leaders Can Help Prevent Another Major Gas Pipeline Explosion​ - Andrew
Williams, Environmental Defense Fund
Editorial: Map Natural Gas Pipelines
Editorial: Answers Needed In Removal Of Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Stormwater Basin, Flooding
Radiation Protection
Three Mile Island Closure Looms, Prompting Rally To Save Jobs, Protect Clean Energy

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Employees, Officials Rally Lawmakers To Save Three Mile Island
State Lawmakers Asked To Take Action On Potential Nuclear Plant Closures
Three Mile Island: One Group Asks To Save Plant, Another Calls This A Bailout
Op-Ed: Keeping Nuclear Power Plants Running Vital To Meeting Climate Goals
Fuel Removed, Stored At From Shuttered Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant In NJ
Federal Court Again Upholds State Nuclear Subsidies, This Time In NY
Exelon On Federal Court Upholding New York’s Zero Emissions Credits Program
Army Corps Lifts Stop-Order On $350M Contract For Nuclear Waste Cleanup In Westmoreland
Recreation
Get Ready Leaf Peepers: PA’s Fall Foliage Reports Start Today
Prime Locations To See Fall Colors In The Lehigh Valley
Despite Rain, Fungi, Fall Foliage In PA Should Be ‘Awesome’
Canal Boat Back On The Water After Canal Closure In Easton
Court: Cyclist Can’t Sue City, County Over Crash On Recreational Trail
Sept. 28 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Sauro: Governor’s Panel Backs Raystown Plan Critics Opposing Development Of Hawn’s
Peninsula
AP: Rainfall Dampens Summer For Pocono River Rental Companies
Schneck: Legends Of The Appalachian Trail: 70 Years Of 2,000 Milers
Army Corps Warns Of Lower Water Levels On Allegheny River
Lakemont Park To Reopen Memorial Day 2019 In Hollidaysburg After Renovations
Scranton Hopes For Spring 2020 Opening Of Pocket Park
What 3 Centre County Outdoor Parks Are Doing To Improve
Altoona Foots Bill To Equip Playgrounds
Your Street, Park Could Get Free Trees Thanks To $1.1M Expansion In Philly Program
Letter: PA Wildlife, Parks Depend On Reauthorization Of Federal Land & Water Conservation
Fund
Recycling/Waste
Allegheny County Hires Uber-Like Haulers To Pick Up Recycling
Millcreek Twp Curbside Recycling Remains Unchanged
Lackawanna County Tire Recycling Returns Sept. 26
Household Hazardous Waste Difficult To Dispose Of In Lehigh Valley
Column: Don’t Take Away Our Trash Cans In Philly, No Need For Study
Stormwater
Blair Regional Stormwater Body To Keep 1 Vote Per Member
Williamsport Approves Joint Water Pollution Reduction Plan With Township
Sustainability
Bradford Woods Recognized As Certified Gold Sustainable Municipality
Phipps Conservatory Is Nationally Recognized Leader In Sustainability
Waste Facilities
Beaver County Residents Face Uncertain Future As Little Blue Run Coal Burning Waste
Landfill Closes
Employees Of Wheelabrator Falls Facility Smuggled Pills To Drug Dealers
Wastewater Facilities
Upper Allegheny Expects To Meet Deadline For Long-Term Sewage Plans

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Altoona Authority Considers Energy Generating Potential Of Sewage Plants
Penn Hills To Get $530K Grant For Sewer, Water Infrastructure
#UtilityCareers Initiative Aims To Draw Attention To Utility Sector Jobs
Tentative Agreement To Release Sewer Sale Money To Scranton Pensions
Watershed Protection
Point Park U. Watershed Documentary to Premiere On WQED Oct. 11
Op-Ed: Gov. Wolf, Please Help Clean Up The Ohio River
Op-Ed: Designations Serve To Protect Our Streams In The Poconos
Greene Twp, Franklin County To Improve Conococheague Creek
Blair Regional Stormwater Body To Keep 1 Vote Per Member
Williamsport Approves Joint Water Pollution Reduction Plan With Township
Williamsport Puts Hold On Proposed Joint Chesapeake Bay Pollution Reduction Plan
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Wildlife
Bats Gain Protection After Being Nearly Wiped Out In PA
Hayes: Endangered Status Proposed For 3 Pennsylvania Bats
Discovery Center Brings Nature Trail, Exhibits, Zip Lines To Fairmount Park Reservoir
Sportsmen, Conservation Groups To Discuss Common Issues In Lebanon County Oct. 5
Bassmaster: Fish & Boat Commission Getting Habitat Work Done
Crable: Is It Okay To Stock Hatchery Brook Trout Over Wild Trout? No Clear Answers
Few Hatchery Brook Trout Genes Found In Wild Fish
Bay Journal: PA Officials Delay Plan To Shut Largest Shad Hatchery In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Crable: Fish Kill In Columbia Traced To Firefighter Training
2nd Rabid Raccoon Found In Mt. Lebanon
Pennsylvania Sounding The Alarm On Chronic Wasting Disease
Lab Results Confirm EHD Cause Of Deer Deaths In Berks, Chester
EHC Cause Of Deer Deaths In Berks, Chester Counties
Young: Pennsylvania’s Elk Herd Presents A Special Treat
DCNR Blog: National Observance Salutes Those Who Hunt And Fish
Hunting And Fishing Day At Middle Creek Wildlife Area A Success
Sen. Laughlin’s Case For Sunday Hunting
Sauro: Governor’s Panel Backs Raystown Plan Critics Opposing Development Of Hawn’s
Peninsula
Crable: Why Removal Of Cougars, Wolves From PA Means More Lyme Disease
Schneck: Where Are Susquehanna Twp Rattlesnakes Coming From?
Not The First Time A Wallaby Has Run Wild In York County
Monarch Mania: Fans Of Popular Butterfly Work To Help Them Survive In Lancaster
Crable: Study: Earlier Springs From Climate Change May Harm Migrating Birds
Letter: PA Wildlife, Parks Depend On Reauthorization Of Federal Land & Water Conservation
Fund
West Nile/Zika Virus

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Murphy: Report: West Nile Virus Blamed For 2 Human Deaths In PA
2 People Died Of West Nile Virus In Central PA This Year
Allegheny County Reports 3rd Human Case Of West Nile Virus
West Nile Virus Cases Rise In Erie County
Mosquito Spraying Planned For Blair Bedford Counties
Editorial: Take Easy Steps To Help Reduce Threat Of West Nile Virus
Perry County Community Buzzing About Plague Of Flies
Other
Michael DiBerardinis To Step Down As Philly’s Managing Director, Accepts Penn Fels Post

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

September 29--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Backyard Composting Workshop​. ​Construction


Junction​, Point Breeze, Allegheny County. 11:00 to 12:30.

September 29--​ ​PA CleanWays, Vector Control Of Cumberland County Tire Collection Event​.
East Pennsboro Township Public Works​, 645 Tower Road in Enola. 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
NOTE: Pre-registration, Prepayment are requested.

September 29--​ ​Independence Conservancy Community Tire Collection​. Brighton Township


Road Department, 1250 Brighton Road, Beaver, Beaver County. 9:00 to Noon.

September 29--​ ​Gifford Pinchot’s Grey Towers. Free Ice Cream, Magic & Open House​.
Milford, Pike County. 11:00 to 4:00.

September 29--​ ​Penn State Extension Rain Barrel Workshops (3)​. Hanover Township
Community Center, 3660 Jacksonville Road, Bethlehem. 9:00 to 10:00 a.m., 10:15 to 11:15 a.m.
and from 11:30 to 12:30.

October 1--​ ​NEW​. ​House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee ​meets to consider ​Senate
Bill 1171​ (Brooks-R-Crawford) changing the membership of the Nutrient Management Advisory
Board. Room 60 East Wing. Off the Floor.

October 1--​ ​DEP Hearing On Penneco Environmental Solutions Drilling Waste Injection Well
In Allegheny County​. Plum Borough School District’s Oblock Junior High School Auditorium,
440 Presque Isle Drive, Pittsburgh. 6:00.

October 1-2--​ ​2018 Eastern PA Greenways & Trails Summit​. ​SteelStacks​, 101 Founders Way in
Bethlehem.
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October 1-3--​ ​Engineers’ Society of Western PA​. ​PA Brownfield Conference​. Sands Bethlehem
Casino, Bethlehem.

October 2-- ​NEW​. ​Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee​ holds a hearing on invasive
and native species. Room 8E-B East Wing. 9:30. ​Click Here​ to watch the hearing.

October 3--​ ​NEW.​ ​Lancaster Clean Water Partners. Public Meeting On Draft Nutrient, Sediment
Reduction Plan​. ​Farm & Home Center​, 1383 Arcadia Road, Lancaster. 1:00 to 2:30.

October 3-​- ​NEW​. ​PA Assn. For Sustainable Agriculture​. ​Soil Health Clinic: Field Sampling
And Assessment Techniques​. Mifflintown, Juniata County. 5:00 to 6:00.

October 3--​ ​PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference In Harrisburg​.

October 4--​ ​Joint House-Senate Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and Conservation
Committee​ Roundtable Discussion on the status and future of anthracite coal in Pennsylvania.
Coaldale Complex, 150 W. Phillips Street. Coaldale, Schuylkill County. 10:00.

October 4--​ ​NEW​. ​Philadelphia Energy Authority​, ​Clean Air Council​, ​American Assn. Of
Blacks In Energy-Philadelphia Chapter​. ​Next Wave Of Green Jobs: Business Opportunities In
Philly’s Green Energy Sector​. ​Philadelphia City Hall, Council Chambers Room 400, 1400 John
F. Kennedy Boulevard. 5:30 to 7:30.

October 5--​ ​House Tourism & Recreation Development Committee​ Roundtable Discussion of
tourism issues affecting the Laurel Highlands. ​State Theatre For The Arts​, 37 E. Main Street,
Uniontown, Fayette County. 9:00.

October 5--​ ​Berks Conservation District Farm Conservation Tour​. ​Deep Roots Valley Farm,
1047 Irish Creek Creek Road, Mohrsville. 11:00 to 2:30.

October 5--​ ​Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay​. ​2nd Annual Sportsmen’s Forum​. ​Middle Creek
Wildlife Area​, Lebanon County. 8:00 to 6:00.

October 6--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Hard-To-Recycle Collection Event​. ​Settlers Cabin Park,
Robinson Township​, Allegheny County. 9:00 to 1:00.

October 6--​ ​Independence Conservancy Community Tire Collection​. Ambridge Borough


Building, 600 11th Street, Ambridge, Beaver County. 9:00 to Noon.

October 6--​ ​PA Forestry Association Annual Conference - Managing & Conserving
Pennsylvania’s Forested Waters​. Toftrees Resort, State College, Centre County.

October 6-- ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. ​Richland Community
Library, 111 East Main Street in Richland, Lebanon County. 10:00 to 11:00

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October 7--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Backyard Composting Workshop​. Blueberry Hill Park,
Franklin Park, Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

October 7-- ​Manada Conservancy​. ​A Walk In Penn’s Woods At DeHart Dam, Dauphin County​.
Participants will meet in the gravel parking lot at the DeHart Dam entrance, approximately 12
miles northeast of Dauphin PA and accessed from Rt. 325 (Clarks Valley Road). Google Maps
will identify the parking location as "Dehart Dam, Halifax, PA." 1:00.

October 9--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Webinar On Level 2 Charging Station Grant Program​. 10:30.

October 9-11-- ​PA Association of Conservation Districts​. ​Annual Watershed Specialists


Meeting​. State College.

October 10--​ ​DEP Technical Advisory Committee On Diesel Powered (Mining) Equipment​.
DEP New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Road, New Stanton. 10:00. DEP Contact: Peggy
Scheloski, 724-404-3143 or ​mscheloske@pa.gov​.

October 10- ​DEP Hearing (If Needed) On Georgia Pacific Plant RACT II Air Quality Plan in
Sergeant Township, McKean County​. DEP Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street,
Meadville. 9:00.

October 10--​ ​Western PA Conservancy​. ​Affordable Farmland Protection Strategies Workshop​.


Mattress Factory Museum​, 500 Sampsonia Way, Pittsburgh. 9:30 to 5:00

October 10-- ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. ​Park Street Complex,
648 West Park Street, Honesdale, Wayne County. 6:00 to 7:30

October 11--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Next
scheduled meeting is December 13. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to:
kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

October 11--​ ​DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board​ Regulation, Legislation and
Technical Committee conference call. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden 717-783-8846 or
send email to: ​dsnowden@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

October 11--​ ​Stroud Water Research Center​. ​Premiere Of Lay Of The Land: Healthy Soils,
Healthy Waters Film​. ​Community Mennonite Church Of Lancaster, 328 West Orange Street,
Lancaster 6:00.

October 11--​ ​Pike County Conservation District Local Road Maintenance Workshop​. Dingman
Township Fire Hall, 680 Log Tavern Road, Milford. 9:00 to Noon.

October 12--​ ​NEW​. ​Lebanon County Grazing Network Soil Pit/Soil Health Field Day​. ​Sandy
Springs Farm​, 130 Sinclair Road, Newmanstown. 9:30 - 2:30.

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October 13--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. Ross Township Community
Center, Allegheny County. 12:30 to 2:00.

October 13--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Household Chemical Collection Event​. Bradys Run Park,
Beaver County. 9:00 to 1:00.

October 13--​ ​NEW​. ​Tree Pittsburgh​. ​Free Tree Give Away In Allegheny County​. ​Pittsburgh
Zoo​ parking lot, 7370 Baker Street in Pittsburgh. 10:00 to 2:00. ​Click Here to register.​

October 15--​ Environmental Issues Forum by ​Joint House-Senate Legislative Air and Water
Pollution Control and Conservation Committee​ on biogas and bioenergy. Room 8E-A, East
Wing Capitol Building. Noon. ​Click Here​ for more.

October 16-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

October 16-- ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Keith Saladar, Executive Director, ​ksalador@pa.gov​ or call 717-787-8171.

October 17--​ ​DEP State Board For Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Edgar
Chescattle, ​echescattie@pa.gov​.

October 17--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Buchanan State Forest District​,
District Office, 25185 Great Cove Road, McConnellsburg, Fulton County. 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
Click Here​ for more.

October 17--​ ​PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference In Mars, Butler County​.

October 17-21--​ ​Passive House Western PA​. ​North American Passive House Network 2018
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

October 18--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​ meeting


rescheduled to November 15. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic 717-783-9730 or send email to:
jmelnic@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

October 18-- ​DEP Small Water Systems Technical Assistance Center Board​ meeting. DEP
Southcentral Regional Office, Susquehanna Room, 909 Elmerton Avenue, Harrisburg. 9:00.
DEP Contact: Dawn Hissner 717-787-9633 or send email to ​dhissner@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

October 18--​ ​PA State Assn. Of Township Supervisors​.​ PA Stormwater Conference​ [Western].
Butler County.

October 18-- ​PA Resources Council​. ​Recycling Awareness Workshop​. Sewickley Public

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Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:00 p.m.

October 18--​ ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission Small Water System Finances, Funding
Preparing For Emergencies, Regulatory Updates Workshop​. ​SRBC offices, 4423 North Front
Street, Harrisburg. 8:40 to 3:15.

October 20--​ ​Eastern PA Coalition For Abandoned Mine Reclamation​. ​Fall Cleanup In
Centralia, Columbia County​.

October 20-- ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. ​Lebanon Community
Library, 125 North 7th Street, Lebanon, Lebanon County. 10:00 to 11:00

October 23-​- ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Next scheduled
meeting is December 4. DEP Contact: John Krueger, 717-783-9264, ​jkrueger@pa.gov​.

October 23--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Montgomery County
Fire Academy, 1175 Conshohocken Road, Conshohocken. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for more.

October 23-​- ​NEW​. ​Penn State Extension Webinar On Addressing Orphan & Abandoned Wells
From DEP, Industry Perspectives​. 1:00.

October 24--​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 1:00. ​Click Here​ to register to join the meeting by webinar.
Participants also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 643 952 548.

October 24--​ ​DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee​ meeting. 12th Floor
Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Nancy Herb, 717-783-9269,
nherb@pa.gov​.

October 24--​ ​CANCELED​. DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Clear Creek State
Forest District​. Scheduled for October 30.

October 24--​ ​Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Drexel University Hosts Voting For The
Environment Program​. ​Academy, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia. 6:30 to 8:00.

October 24-25--​ ​Penn State Extension: Biochar & Torrefied Biomass Short Course​. ​Penn State
University Agricultural Engineering Building, Shortlidge Road, University Park.

October 25--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: ​Daniel Snowden 717-783-8846 or send email to:
dsnowden@pa.gov​.

October 25-​- ​NEW​. ​DEP Webinar On Electric and Hydrogen Fuel Cell Charging Projects Grant
Program​. 10:30.

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October 25--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Luzerne County
Community College, Educational Conference Center (Building #10), 1333 South Prospect Street,
Nanticoke. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for more.

October 27-- ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council​, ​PA American Water​. ​Drug Take-Back Event - 3
Locations in Allegheny County​. 10:00 to 2:00--
-- Green Tree Borough Building, 10 W. Manila Ave.
-- Medical Rescue Team South, 315 Cypress Way, Mt. Lebanon
-- The Mall At Robinson (parking lot near Dick’s Sporting Goods), 100 Robinson Centre Dr.

October 30--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Clear Creek State Forest District​.
District Office, 158 South Second Ave., Clarion, Clarion County. 6:30 to 8:00. ​Click Here​ for
more.

October 30--​ ​PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference In King of Prussia​.

October 30-31--​ ​Northeast Recycling Council Fall Conference​. Sheraton Hartford South Hotel,
Rocky Hill, Connecticut.

October 31--​ ​DEP State Board for Certification of Sewage Enforcement Officers​ meeting.
Conference Room 11B, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Kristen Szwajkowski,
717-772-2186, ​kszwajkows@pa.gov​.

November 1--​ ​U.S. Green Building Council Central PA Chapter Forever Green Awards
Ceremony.​ Civic Club of Harrisburg.

November 1--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Giant Food Store
Community Room, 3301 Trindle Road, Camp Hill, Cumberland County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click
Here​ for more.

November 1--​ ​Pike County Conservation District Celebrates Natural Resources Annual Dinner.
The Waterfront Room at​ ​Silver Birches Resort​, Lake Wallenpaupack. 6:00 to 8:00.

November 1-2--​ ​PA Water And Wastewater Technology Summit​. ​Penn Stater Conference
Center Hotel, State College.

November 3--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. ​Construction Junction​,


Point Breeze, Allegheny County. 11:00 to 12:30.

November 3--​ ​NEW​. ​Tree Pittsburgh​. ​Free Tree Give Away In Allegheny County​. ​North Park
Ice Rink​, 1200 Pearce Mill Road, Wexford. 10:00 to 2:00.​ ​Click Here to register​.

November 5--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ Act 101 Workgroup meets. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713 or send email to:
lahenry@pa.gov​.

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-- Finalizing recommendations on Act 101

November 5--​ ​Penn State Extension Protect Your Springs, Wells, Septic Systems & Cisterns
Workshops (2)​. ​Terre Hill Community Center​, 131 West Main Street, Terre Hill, Lancaster
County . 2:00 to 4:00 and 6:00 to 8:00

November 6--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. North Park Rose Barn,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

November 7--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Aggregate Advisory Board​ meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room,
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden 717-783-8846 or send email to:
dsnowden@pa.gov​.

November 7--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​.

November 7-- ​DEP Hearing (If Needed) on RACT II Air Quality Plan for a Tennessee Gas
Pipeline Compressor Station In Howe Township, Forest County​. ​DEP Northwest Regional
Office, 230 Chestnut Street in Meadville, Crawford County. 9:00

November 7--​ ​NEW​. D​EP Meeting/Hearing On Proposed NPDES Stormwater Permit For A
Biosolids (sewage sludge) processing facility In Pen Argyle, Northampton County​. ​Wind Gap
Middle School, 1620 Teels Road, Pen Argyle. 6:00 to 9:30.

November 7--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Unitarian


Universalist Fellowship of Centre County, 780 Waupelani Drive Ext., State College, Centre
County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 8--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Rothrock State Forest District​,
Shaver’s Creek CFD Community Building, 8707 Firemans Park Ln, Petersburg, Huntingdon
County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 8--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Weiser State Forest District​,
District Office, 16 Weiser Lane, Aristes, Columbia County. 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here​ for
more.

November 13-- ​NEW​. ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

November 13-- ​NEW​. ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. Contact: Keith Saladar, Executive Director, ​ksalador@pa.gov​ or call
717-787-8171. [​Note: ​The last meeting of 2018]

November 13--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Pinchot State Forest District​.
District Office, 1841 Abington Road, North Abington Township, Lackawanna County. 6:00 to

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8:00. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 13--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Trinity Point
Church of God, 180 W. Trinity Drive, Clarion, Clarion County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for
more.

November 14--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting.


Rescheduled to November 29. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.

November 14--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. South Park Buffalo Inn,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

November 14--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Collier township
Community Center, 5 Lobaugh Street, Oakdale, Allegheny County . 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here
for more.

November 15-- ​ ​DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson. 9:00. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic 717-783-9730 or send email to: ​jmelnic@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

November 16--​ ​PA State Assn. Of township Supervisors​.​ PA Stormwater Conference​ [Eastern].
Montgomery County.

November 20--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Trails Workshop - Building Strong Community
Connections​. ​Shippensburg University​, Cumberland County. 8:30 to 5:00.

November 29--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:30. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.

November 29-- ​Academy Of Natural Sciences of Drexel University​. ​Delaware Watershed


Research Conference​. Academy Offices in Philadelphia.

December 4-​- ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: John Krueger, 717-783-9264, ​jkrueger@pa.gov​.

December 4--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Ebensburg Office, 286
Industrial Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143,
mscheloske@pa.gov​.

December 5-- ​DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. ​DEP Contact: Kris Shiffer 717-772-5809 or send email to: ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

December 6--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Michael Maddigan, 717-772-3609,

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mmaddigan@pa.gov​.

December 6--​ ​10,000 Friends Of Pennsylvania Commonwealth Awards Dinner​. ​ArtsQuest​,


Bethlehem.

December 12--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP State Board for Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems
Operators​ meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact:
Edgar Chescattie, 717-772-2814, ​eshescattie@pa.gov​.

December 12--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ & Recycling Fund Advisory
Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry,
717-772-5713, ​lahenry@pa.gov​.

December 13--​ ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to:
kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)
-- Draft regulations setting methane emission limits for oil and gas operations

December 17--​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 1:00. ​Click Here​ to register to join the meeting by webinar.
Participants also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 644 895 237.

December 18-- ​NEW​. ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

January 27-30--​ ​Partnership For The Delaware Estuary​. ​2019 Delaware Estuary Science &
Environmental Summit​. Cape May, NJ.

March 9--​ ​NEW​. ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River​. Montgomery County
Community College​ ​campus in Pottstown​.

April 29 to May 2--​ ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National Watershed and Stormwater
Conference​. South Carolina.

May 8-10--​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.

Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.

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Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel

DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events

Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule

You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

October 1--​ ​DEP Small Business Advantage Grants-Water Quality Projects​ ​(First-come)
October 15-- ​DEP Coastal Zone Grants
October 15-- ​NRCS-PA Emergency Watershed Protection Assistance Grants
October 19--​ ​NRCS-PA Farm, Forest Conservation Assistance (EQIP, AMA)
October 31--​ ​PA Resources Council Gene Capaldi Lens On Litter Photo Contest
October 31--​ ​Axalta, Philadelphia Eagles All-Pro Teachers Program
October 31--​ ​Dept. of Agriculture Spotted Lanternfly Student Calendar Contest
November 9-- ​Chesapeake Bay Land And Water Initiative Grants
November 15--​ ​NEW​. ​Delaware River Basin Commission Fall Photo Contest
November 16-- ​PA Housing Finance Agency RFP For Housing Proposals
November 20--​ ​PA Visitors Bureau Scenic Beauty Photo Contest In 5 Counties
December 1-- ​USDA Rural Community Water Infrastructure Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
December 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
December 14--​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
December 14--​ ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
December 15--​ ​Coldwater Heritage Partnership Grants
December 21--​ ​ORSANCO Ohio River Sweep Student Poster Contest
December 31--​ ​DEP County Act 101 Waste Planning, HHW, Education Grants
January 25--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 31--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
July 15--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
December 16--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
June 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
December 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.

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-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

The Department of Labor and Industry ​published formal notice​ in the September 29 PA Bulletin
of updates to the PA Uniform Construction Code.

Pennsylvania Bulletin - September 29, 2018

Technical Guidance -------------------

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice​ in the September 29 PA Bulletin


of a final minor revision in the Technical Guidance on Cryptosporidia, E. coli and turbidity (DEP
ID: 390-3301-001) and a rescinding of Technical Guidance on the Quality Management Plan
for Toxics (DEP ID: 391-3200-006) and the Quality Management Plan for the Bureau of Water
Standards and Facility Regulation (DEP ID: 383-0830-001).

Permits ------------

Note:​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 54 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the September 29 PA Bulletin -
pages 6281 to 6335​.

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the September 29 PA Bulletin


on ​proposed actions under the Nutrient Credit Trading Program​ and a ​certification request under
the Nutrient Credit Trading Program​.

Related Tools ----------------------

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System

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Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

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