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Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Hannah Rose

18215452

Reconstruction of Blacktown Girls High School’s unit

‘Thematic Poetry Unit – Looking at Identity’

o

Stage 4

o

Year 7

o

English

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Table of Contents

Executive Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………

Background Information……………………………………………………………………………………… Comparative………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6-8

3-4

5

Evidence based recommendations …………………………………………………………………

9-14

Scope and sequence…………………………………………………………………………………………….

15

Concept………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16

Assessment task ………………………………………………………………………………………………….

17

Marking criteria …………………………………………………………………………………………………

18

Redesigned outline………………………………………………………………………………………………

19-27

References…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 28-29

30-34

Appendices…………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Executive Summary

During this study, a unit of work was redesigned and an assessment task, marking criteria,

scope and sequence and concept map were created. The objective of this study is to

redesign a unit that aligns with the Understanding by Design (UbD) model to create a

program where all students irrespective of their academic ability can effectively achieve,

and engage with the desired learning, opposed to just covering content and a series of

learning activities (Trapani, 2016). The original teaching unit ‘Thematic Poetry Unit – Looking

at Identity’ was executed during Professional Practice 1 in 2017. This unit was taught to a

stage 4, top year 7 class (not selective) at Blacktown Girls High School (BGHS), located in

Western Sydney. The single-sex class consisted of students from a range of ethnic, cultural

and religious backgrounds, all with high academic achievement abilities. This unit has been

redesigned with the goal of catering for a range of abilities, including lower ability classes,

with an additional focus on students with diverse linguistic, cultural and religious

backgrounds. There will be a sharp focus on greater and more successful differentiation in

all activities, and a range of texts will be selected from a variety of cultures to encourage an

inclusive learning environment and allow students to develop a clear sense of identity. The

recommendations are designed to increase student’s critical and creative thinking, improve

cross-curriculum areas such numeracy and literacy, and improve their personal and social

capabilities. The recommendations for the English poetry unit will be made in alignment

with evidence-based research that support the suggested changes.

It is recommended that:

o The teacher explicitly deconstructs major terms and techniques throughout the unit

and guides students in creating a glossary for major terms and literary technique. This

works as a differentiation strategy and focuses on improving student’s literacy.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

o

Students are encouraged to interpret and evaluate the social value of already existing

texts through activities such as ‘think, pair, share’ and ‘feedback carousel’ and create

their own short texts.

o

Study a range of multicultural texts by authors from a range of ethnic, cultural and

religious backgrounds.

o

Increased group/pair work.

o

Complete a project-based assessment.

The goals for the redesign of this unit are namely:

o

Make increased and relevant connections to literacy and numeracy.

o

Provide effective differentiation through scaffolded teaching and learning activities.

o

Ensure that teaching and learning activities are accessible to all students regardless of

their linguistic background.

o

Ensure that teaching and learning activities are accessible to all students regardless of

their academic ability.

o

Ensure that teaching and learning activities tightly align with the assessment task.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Background Information

According to the My School website, in 2017 there were 742 enrolments at Blacktown Girls

High School, with 15% of students achieving in the top quarter of students in NSW and 33%

achieving in the bottom quarter, with the remaining students achieving in the middle two

quarters (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting authority (ACARA), 2017). The

single-sex school has 2% Indigenous students and 83% of students who speak another

language other than English, ‘a large number of whom are refugees’ (ACARA, 2017). The

school ‘embraces and celebrates cultural diversity’ (ACARA, 2017) through the employment

of equity programs that aim to support Refugees, students from a language background

other than English and Indigenous students; as well as offering a selective stream and

comprehensive strands. Therefore, the process of redesigning this unit will utilise the UbD

framework to effectively and efficiently ensure the program aligns with the school’s focus

on the inclusion of all students regardless of their academic ability, linguistic and cultural

background.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Comparative Table

Area of

Strengths of the area of consideration

Concerns of the area of consideration

 

Suggested changes to counteract concerns

 

consideration

Research support for the changes suggested

 

The unit outlines a clear Literacy Cluster that students are to achieve throughout the unit. This ensures students are achieving a satisfactory level of literacy in the areas of comprehension, writing and knowledge.

There is no explicit literacy strategies or differentiation of

Students will create:

Students develop a deeper understanding of terms and definitions when they generate their own sentences (Csillag, 2016) and glossary. Having access to major vocabulary terms provides students with the opportunity for oral practice and remind students to use these terms when writing. It also assists students whose second language is English with writing in English (Buttner, 2013) and placing vocabulary terms in the correct context (Waring, Creider, Box, 2013).

o

Glossary of major terms.

Literacy

 

o

Definition of techniques sheet.

literacy for low-ability or students whose second language is English.

o

Explicit deconstruction of major terms by teacher.

Numeracy

 

There are no specific links to numeracy throughout the program. Therefore, students are unable to consider or understand the importance and relevance of numeracy across a range of contexts.

o

Provide/display timeline of the unit for students.

Bennison suggests that displaying a timeline in the classroom with major stages/events of a unit allows students to see what their learning leads on from and what they’re currently learning (Bennison, 2015).

Critical and

Students create their own small poem and share their thoughts on the poems studied. Students discuss stereotypes presented in some poems.

There is not equal time allocated to analysing each poem in depth for students to develop critical and creative thoughts on the texts. Students do not discuss their poems in depth, respond to other student’s poems or thoughts and responses to texts.

o

Create their own poems based on real or imaginary situations.

Providing students with the opportunity to create their own texts sparks new insights, novel approaches and fresh perspectives (Khuana, Khuana & Santiboon, 2017). It encourages originality, inventiveness and tests the limits of their ideas (Moeller, Cutler, Fielder & Weir, 2013). It embeds critical thinking skills into a student’s intellectual repertoire as they share their

Creative

o

Write PEEL paragraphs which compare, interpret and evaluate the social value of a text, studied through examining biases and stereotypes in texts. These justify

Thinking

6

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

       

their opinions and respond to others.

personal responses and preferences to texts, (ACARA, n.d) through discussing certain beliefs as well as biased and distorted statements (Karlin, as cited in, McPeck, 2016). D’Angelo (as cited in McPeck, 2016) highlights that critical thinking skills are reinforced through evaluation which leads to interpretation which is necessary for critical thinking. This occurs in the writing of PEEL paragraphs which is a way of analysing texts and extending knowledge (Jackson, 2015).

 

There are range of texts embedded in this unit of work that focus on ‘identity.’ The

The school this unit is taught in is made up of students from a range of cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds. The texts included in the unit do not cater to all students. The unit has scope for improved text selection that will allow all students to develop a sense of ‘social and self- awareness, as well as articulate their own opinions, beliefs and sense of identity.

o

Embedding a range of multicultural texts throughout the unit by authors from a wide range of cultures and religions.

Studying texts ‘that represent each student in a classroom is a great way to show them that we are all equal and worthy to be recognized and celebrated’ (Rouse, 2017, p.7). Exposing students to multicultural texts promotes appreciation for diversity and encourages the embracing and dynamic understanding of cultural differences (Rouse, 2017). It is designed for students to be able to relate to different cultures, gain confidence and validate their sense of identity. Studying these texts through group work will provide greater access to learning and deepen opportunities to learn content, (Cohen & Lotan, 2014) ‘allow students to value the opinions and attitudes of different groups…, compare their own point of view’ (ACARA, n.d) and become effective communicators who can articulate their opinions and beliefs through collaboration (ACARA, n.d).

Personal and

Social

Capabilities

 

texts chosen for this unit explicitly relate to developing students notion of identity.

o

Group work such as think, pair, share;’ ‘feedback carousel,’ and ‘final word protocol’ will be incorporated to force students to consider how language is central to personal and social identity and how exploring experiences and characters from a range of social contexts affects their own sense of identity.

Understanding

The final assessment task for this unit is a summative unseen examination

One was not provided with the assessment task and therefore, it is unclear if the unit was backward mapped and if the teaching and

o

The assessment will be changed to a project-based assessment.

Understanding by Design (UbD) has a sharp focus on meaningful performance tasks and focuses on what students should know by the end of the course (Minbiole, 201). Project based

by Design

o

Students will be aware of exactly what they are being assessed on to

7

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

incorporating aspects learnt throughout the unit.

learning activities tightly align with the final assessment.

provide them with the opportunity to see the bigger picture about learning.

o The overall unit has been redesigned utilising UbD to ensure it is backward mapped from the assessment ask.

assessments are meaningful performance tasks which will help students to make learning a life- long skill and to experience a learning process in line with their own needs; opposed to a standardised test (Yurtseven & Altun, 2017).

8

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Recommendations

Redesigning the original unit ‘thematic poetry unit looking at identity’ has allowed for a

greater focus on Understanding by Design (UbD) framework. UbD is a pedagogical framework

that allows the curriculum to be delivered in a more comprehensive, overarching and

thorough way (Wiggins & Mctighe, 2005 as cited in Davila, 2017), where backward planning

is utilised to ensure our goals and standards are clear; and assessment tasks are designed to

tightly align with the desired results (Mangelsdorf, 2013). The redevelopment of the unit has

included the injection of appropriate literacy and numeracy strategies and a reassessment of

the texts utilised, to better accommodate and differentiate for low ability students, and

students from a range of cultural and religious backgrounds. The use of the UbD is practical,

as students are made aware of the information that is required for their assessment from the

beginning of the unit, and a methodical process is followed through a planned learning

sequence. Redeveloping the unit has also generated a sharp Inquiry Based Learning (IBL)

approach. Teaching and learning strategies have been implemented into the unit outline to

ensure stronger links to Personal and Social Capabilities, Creative and Critical thinking,

literacy and numeracy as well as strengthening the focus on UbD. Developing this unit with

an emphasis on UbD will enrich the student experience as there is an increased emphasis on

student communication, interaction and student driven learning where knowledge and

information is constructed rather than transmitted (Preston, Harvie & Wallace, 2015).

Students are actively involved in constructing understandings and communicating their

opinions through class discussions and written tasks. This process also included the design of

an assessment task, scope and sequence, concept map and marking criteria, which were not

provided with the original unit.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

An important recommendation for the unit outline pertains to literacy. While there is a strong

focus on literacy in the original unit, there is little differentiation, scaffolding or strategies

implemented to support students who are low-ability or speak English as a second language.

It is recommended that creating a class glossary of major terms and literary techniques, as

well as having the teacher explicitly focus on deconstructing difficult terms and techniques,

will improve the experience for low ability and students whose first language is not English.

Students will develop a nuanced understanding of major terms and definitions through

generating

their

own

sentences/definitions

(Csillag,

2016).

The

benefits

of

this

recommendation include providing students with the opportunity for oral practice, and

reminds students to use these sophisticated terms when writing (Csillag, 2016). It also assists

those students whose second language is English with writing in English (Buttner, 2013) and

learning how to place vocabulary terms in the correct context (Waring, Creider, Box, 2013).

This recommendation has been backward mapped utilising the UbD framework as the use of

literary techniques and language is expected and required in their assessment.

There were no links to numeracy throughout the original unit outline. Therefore, it is

recommended to provide students with a timeline to display in the classroom during the unit.

This numeracy strategy provides students with a sense of organisation as they have a visual

reminder of the major stages/events of the unit and students are able to see what their

learning is leading on from, what they’re currently learning (Bennison, 2015) and what they

are going to learn, reinforcing the use of the UbD backward design (Mangelsdorf, 2013).

Critical and creative thinking was highlighted as one of the major learning focuses in the

original unit outline; however, it became apparent that there was limited scope for ‘creating

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

and presenting texts, interacting with others…and discussing the aesthetic or social value of

the text’ (ACARA, n.d). To deepen students learning and to generate new ideas (ACARA, n.d)

it is recommended that students create their own poems based on real or imaginary

situations. Providing students with the opportunity to create their own texts utilising poetic

forms and devices sparks new insights, novel approaches and fresh perspectives (Khuana,

Khuana & Santiboon, 2017). It also encourages originality, inventiveness and tests the limits

of their ideas (Moeller, Cutler, Fielder & Weir, 2013). Additionally, it is recommended that

students compare, interpret and evaluate the social value of texts studied, through

examining biases and stereotypes in texts (Karin, as cited in, McPeck 2016). Students will do

so through the writing of PEEL paragraphs which is a method of analysing texts and extending

knowledge

(Jackson,

2015).

Writing PEEL

paragraphs

allows

students

to ‘develop

an

argument, use evidence to support the argument and draw reasoned conclusions’ (ACARA,

n.d) necessary in critical and creative thinking. This strategy is reinforced by D’Angelo (as

cited in, McPeck, 2016) who contends that critical thinking skills are developed through

evaluation and interpretation. This is evidenced in the writing of PEEL paragraphs as students

evaluate and interpret texts by ‘sharing personal responses, expressing preferences for

specific texts, stating and justifying their points of view and responding to the views of others’

(ACARA, 2018, p.1). It is advised that these activities are embedded into the unit, as critical

thinking skills become entrenched into a student’s intellectual repertoire by critically reading

and comparing texts, discussing whether a story is plausible through seeking confirmation of

certain beliefs and selecting biased and distorted statements (Karlin as cited in Mcpeck,

2016). These strategies draw on UbD as it is a learning task that is needed to achieve the

desired result (Mangelsdorf, 2013) in their assessment.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Personal and social capabilities was an area for concern in the original unit outline as it was

not addressed as an area of learning. Focusing the unit on identity provided a large scope for

‘self-management, self-awareness, social management and social awareness’ (ACARA, 2018,

p.1) required in a personal and social approach. The recommendation for this learning area

is employing multicultural literature and increased group work. Exposing students to

multicultural texts promotes an appreciation for diversity and encourages the embracing and

dynamic understanding of cultural differences (Rouse, 2017), whilst group work provides

greater access to learning tasks and increases student’s opportunities to learn content and a

wider range of academic skills (Cohan & Lotan, 2014). Students will develop a sense of self

and social awareness by articulating their opinions on a range of personal and social

behaviours and perspectives (ACARA, n.d), through group activities such as ‘think, pair,

share.This requires students read a text, compare their thoughts through discussion with a

partner and then seek confirmation on their thoughts by sharing with the class. This activity

allows students to articulate their opinion through collaboration and interaction with others

(ACARA, n.d). Engaging students in multicultural literature is designed for students to be able

to relate to different cultures, gain confidence and validate their sense of identity (Rouse,

2017) which in turn encourages students to learn about their own ‘emotions, values,

strengths and capacities’ (ACARA, n.d). Responding to these texts through activities such as

‘final word protocol’ (NSRF, 2015) where each student communicates to their group what

resonated with them from a text, and then collectively deciding on one example from the

group to share with the class; and ‘feedback carousel’ where students respond to a text and

then receive feedback from each peer in their group, (NSRF, 2014) highlights that language

sparks different interpretations and responses in readers (ACARA, n.d). It also encourages

students to value the opinions and attitudes of different groups within society and compare

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

their own point of view’ (ACARA, n.d). According to Rouse (2017) providing students with

texts ‘that represents each student in a classroom… shows them that we are all equal and

worthy to be recognized and celebrated’ (Rouse, 2017, p.7). These recommendations are

relevant to the UbD framework as students reflect on their own identity which is a desired

result (Yurtseven & Altun, 2017) for their assessment.

Additionally, it is recommended that UbD is utilised to ensure the assessment tightly aligns

with the teaching and learning activities. The UbD has been utilised through the redesign of

the unit, evidenced in the transformation of pedagogical practice (Trapani, 2016), as all

teaching and learning activities centre on what students should understand by the end of the

course (Minbiole, 2017). Opposed to implementing the original unseen exam, the unit will

include a more specific project-based assessment that directly responds to the learning goals

and outcomes in the unit (Minbiole, 2016). Project based assessments are meaningful

performance tasks which assist students to make learning a life-long skill and to experience

a learning process in line with their own needs (Yurtseven & Altun, 2017). Changing the form

of assessment provides a strong base for backward mapping, as it allows students to

understand the relevance of the activities and they will be aware of the concepts in the unit

required for the assessment (Minbiole, 2016).

The redesign of this unit will provide students with an enhanced learning experience. Utilising

the UbD framework in the design structure of the unit to ensure the teaching and learning

strategies are tightly aligned with the summative assessment task; and sharpening the focus

on the implementation of literacy, numeracy, critical and creative thinking and personal and

social capabilities has allowed for an inquiry based and student focused learning approach to

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

develop. With increased scaffolding, differentiation, group and pair activities, and a larger

focus on student’s interpretation and creation of their own texts; it is advised that these

recommendations will enhance students overall experience in the classroom, particularly low

ability students and students from diverse ethnic, cultural and religious background.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452 15

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Concept Map

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452 Concept Map 16

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Assessment Task Notification

Topic: Poetry/Identity

Due: 06/09/2018

You are required to complete a project-based assessment which you will submit during class on the 06/09/2018. For this assessment, you will:

o

Create a poem in relation to something that is significant to YOUR sense of identity. You can write this poem in any form of your choice covered in class (e.g. song, slam poetry, anthology of haikus or limericks, etc). You must use at least three literary techniques in your poem which were discussed/deconstructed during the unit.

o

Select ONE poem studied in class and write a two PEEL paragraph comparison between the two texts. You must discuss how the techniques in each poem assist in representing/communicating a sense of identity.

Steps - tick off as you go

Select the form that you are going to write in and make sure you understand the structure.

Decide what you are going to represent about yourself. You might like to focus on one aspect of your life or one experience that has shaped who you are today.

Convey your ideas clearly with your own language choices.

Follow the structure of PEEL by starting with a TEE table when writing your paragraph to ensure your writing is clear and concise.

Ensure your PEEL paragraph reflects what you have written in your poem and compares it to your selected poem.

Outcomes being assessed

1. EN4-4B - makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence.

2. EN4-5C - thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information, ideas and arguments to respond to and compose texts.

3. EN4-7D - demonstrates understanding of how texts can express aspects of their broadening world and their relationships within it.

4. EN4-9E uses, reflects on and assesses their individual and collaborative skills and learning.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Marking Criteria

o

Makes outstanding choices in their writing using appropriate poetic devices and language features that work to engage the audience and present a sophisticated insight into their sense of identity.

16-20

o

Presents an exceptional understanding of the PEEL structure that comprehensively explains how both poems communicate their sense of identity.

o

Makes highly relevant and engaging comparisons between texts using a range of literary techniques.

o

Makes highly developed choices in their writing using suitable poetic devices and language features that work to engage the audience and present a sophisticated insight into their sense of identity.

12-16

o

Presents a successful understanding of the PEEL structure that comprehensively explains how their poem communicates their sense of identity.

o

Makes relevant and engaging comparisons between texts using a variety of literary techniques.

o

Makes adequate choices in their writing using acceptable poetic devices and language features that work to engage the audience and present a clear insight into their sense of identity.

8-12

o

Presents a sound understanding of the PEEL structure that explains how their poem communicates their sense of identity.

o

Makes appropriate comparisons between texts using some literary techniques.

o

Makes limited or misinformed choices in their writing with poetic devices and language features that hinder their ability to engage the audience and/or present a basic insight into their sense of identity.

4-8

o

Presents a shallow understanding of the PEEL structure that does not effectively explain how their poem communicates their sense of identity.

o

Makes basic comparisons between texts with a literary technique.

o

Makes inadequate or incomplete choices in their writing that does not use poetic devices or language features to engage the audience or present an insight into their sense of identity.

1-4

o

Presents an inadequate understanding of the PEEL structure that does not explain or communicate their sense of identity.

o

Presents incomplete or unsatisfactory comparisons between texts with no literary techniques.

Teacher’s comments:

Student evaluation List the areas you did well in and the areas that you believe need improvement:

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

KEY:

o

Literacy

o

Numeracy

o

Critical and creative thinking

o

Personal and social capabilities

o

Understanding by Design

Redesigned Unit Outline

BLACKTOWN GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH PROGRAM: Thematic Poetry Unit-Looking at Identity

YEAR: 7

DURATION:

5 weeks

UNIT DESCRIPTION/SYNOPSIS: Identity and Poetry

 

LEARNING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:

Students will study the required skills needed to analyse a poem that relate to the theme of ‘Identity.’ The main focus of this unit is to have a deep understanding of the notion of identity and how it can be an important aspect of society and individuals. In this unit students will also improve their knowledge of poetic techniques and look at how these play a part in expressing a perspective of identity through poetry and songs. Students will be expected to write a poetic analytical response in class in preparation for their project based assessment.

o

Literacy

o

Numeracy

o

Critical and

o

Intercultural

creative

o

Understanding

thinking

Aboriginal and

o

Personal and

Torres Strait

social

Islander Histories

capabilities

and Cultures

OUTCOMES:

Literacy Continuum (cluster 13 end of year 7) Comprehension (L.C.C.) L.C.C Applies comprehension strategies and skills including predicting, visualising, summarising, monitoring, questioning and making connections, to make meaning in subject contexts. L.C.C Explores analyses and responds to ideas in imaginative, informative and persuasive texts. L.C.C Judges the value or effectiveness of texts according to their purpose and subject matter. L.C.C Interprets and responds to points of view in texts with an awareness of underlying social, cultural and/or historical values. L.C.C Identifies different interpretations of and perspectives in texts. L.C.C Identifies and infers the meaning of imagery and symbolism in spoken,

o

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts.

o

4B Makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence.

o

5C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information, ideas and arguments to respond to and compose texts.

o

7D - demonstrates understanding of how texts can express aspects of their broadening world and their relationships within it.

o

9E Uses, reflects on and assesses their individual and collaborative skills for learning.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

ASSESSMENT: Formal assessment in exam, term 4. Students will create their own poem on their identity and select a poem that they have studied together in class to write a comparative analysis. In two PEEL paragraphs students will write a comparative analysis on how the techniques in each text work to portray a sense of identity.

METALANGUAGE:

simile,

metaphor,

extended

metaphor,

personification,

imagery,

tone,

alliteration,

onomatopoeia,

speaker,

mood,

theme

audience

Imagery

written, visual and multimodal texts. L.C.C Analyses and evaluates the impact of visual images on the meaning of texts. Writing (L.C.W.) L.C.W Creates well structured and sequenced texts for imaginative and persuasive purposes. L.C.W Creates and develops ideas to explore a concept or theme. L.C.W Uses paragraphing to structure information and partition events and ideas. L.C.W Intentionally constructs a variety of sentence types including complex sentences for effect. L.C.W Self-regulates spelling and applies spelling knowledge and strategies to spell complex, subject specific vocabulary. L.C.W Uses correct and appropriate punctuation to support meaning. L.C.W Uses a range of editing strategies to improve clarity and consistency of style. Knowledge (L.C.V.) L.C.V Applies knowledge of root words and word origins to understand the meaning of new subject specific words. L.C.V Uses technical vocabulary to explain a complex concept or phenomenon. L.C.V Selects appropriate vocabulary in response to context, purpose and audience. L.C.V Uses a combination of effective strategies to work out the meaning of unknown words.

 

LESSON CONTENT

OUTCOMES

 

RESOURCES

Week 1- Introduction to Identity

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts.

o

PowerPoint: Identity

o

Teacher provides students with a copy of the timeline for the unit and displays a large copy in the classroom for students to refer to.

o

Bio poem ‘formula’ and models/examples

 

o

A Mix of Many Things - by Alyssa Murray

o

Do Now: How would you define your identity and what does it mean to you?

5C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information, ideas and arguments to respond to and compose texts.

o

List of techniques

o

Powerpoint - Teacher to Introduce the topic of Identity with an overview on the different levels of identity, such as personal or individuality, community/culture/relationships, multiple layers of identity, loss/search for/confusion about identity.

 

7D demonstrates understanding of how texts can express aspects of their broadening world and their relationships

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

o

Students have a group discussion on what resonated with them regarding identity and write down two points.

within it.

o

Teacher explicitly explains the concept of identity and students write the term in their glossary to refer to.

o

Students create a digital collage of pictures that connect to their identity. Students then create a bio poem using the ‘formula’ to compose their own personal bio poem (a poem that describes themselves in 11 lines). Option to share poems with class, discuss etc (teacher provides scaffold/example for students).

o

Extension/differentiation: Students compose a Biopoem for a fictional character, pet, mythological character etc.

o

A Mix of Many Things: Teacher provides students with a cut up version of the poem - In groups students recreate the poem. What is the composer telling us about identity?

o

Read correct version of the poem.

o

Group discussion- Compare by discussing first and second interpretation of the poem. How does your interpretation differ to someone in your group?

o

Think, pair, share- students compare their interpretation of the poem and write how their opinion about identity may have changed after reading the poem/discussing the poem with a pair.

o

Techniques provide a list of techniques with definitions. Students to identify and match terms in poem.

o

Explore the techniques in the poem, identify the main ones that will be considered this unit: Simile, metaphor, rhetorical question, tone, persona, rhyme, alliteration, personification.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

o

Create class glossary of the techniques explored so far.

   

o

Scaffold how to answer questions about poetry. (ie, using evidence, how to read poetry and find the main idea) Powerpoint can be used to support this.

o

Explore Teacher poses the question ‘does this text enhance your sense of self-worth and personal identity?’ Students write their answers independently.

o

Students answer question.

Week 2 and 3 Exploring Poetry and Personal Identity

5C Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information, ideas and arguments to respond to and compose texts.

 
 

o

Teacher directs students to where they are on the timeline highlight what they have learnt.

o

‘I Am Proud’ – Oddgeroo Noonuccal

o

Oddgeroo Noonuccal’s ‘I Am Proud’ given to students as a cloze passage. Students fill what they believe to be the missing words. In groups discuss the meaning of the poem.

Read correct version of ‘I Am Proud’1964 – Oddgeroo Noonuccal.

o

Post-it notes (either in colours for teams or use team-colour markers when writing on them)

o

7D - demonstrates understanding of how texts can express aspects of their broadening world and their relationships within it.

o

Unpack/explain major terms in the poem.

 

o

As a class calculate old this poem is and discuss how and why the message is still relevant in 2018.

o

In groups - Discuss/brainstorm issues related to identity raised in the poem.

 

1. What does this poem say about identity?

2. How does it relate to your own sense of identity?

3. How has Noonuccal used language to communicate their personal and social identity?

 

o

Think pair share- In pairs students share their personal response, justify their P.O.V and respond to the view of their pair.

o

Students label structural features on their poem.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

o

‘Pin the technique on the poem’ game Post-it notes activity

   

o

In groups - challenged to correctly identify techniques and features annotate A3 team copy of the poem within time limit.

o

Evaluation of results discussion Deconstruct terms students struggled with.

o

Provide model/scaffold of an annotated poem.

o

Model/scaffold a TEE table explore how to fill in a TEE table. Explicitly teach, focus on providing detail in the effect column (eg. Repetition emphasises that the poet is changing her ideas about love, rather than just repetition emphasises an idea)

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts

o

Model a PEEL paragraph.

o

Students write a PEEL paragraph on their interpretation of Noonuccal’s ‘I Am Proud’ and how it represents Noonuccal’s sense of identity.

4B Makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence.

o

Students conduct feedback carousel and then rewrite their PEEL taking into consideration their peers feedback and interpretations.

Week 4 Exploring Cultural Identity

 

o

‘Inclusion and Diversity’ - commercial

 

o

Teacher draws student’s attention to where they are on the timeline reminds students what they have learnt and what they are still to learn in the next three weeks.

 

o

‘It’s a 10 hair care’ - commercial

 

o

Students provided with transcripts from both commercials. Students draw the most important image from each commercial that comes to mind when they read it.

 

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

 

2.

Watch - Apple’s commercial on ‘Inclusion and Diversity’ and ‘It’s a 10 hair care’ (Super Bowl Commercial 2017).

9E Uses, reflects on and assesses their individual and collaborative skills for learning. 7D Demonstrates understanding of how texts can express aspects of their

broadening world and their relationships within it.

 

o

Independently write down your interpretation.

1. What Resonated with you from the two commercials? Did it change when you watched Vs. read the commercial?

2. Do you believe they accurately conveyed a sense of cultural identity without the use of stereotypes? Or do they embrace stereotypes?

o

Students ‘think, pair, share’ – compare their responses and share with class.

 

o

Scaffold/Differentiation - Teacher deconstructs the term ‘stereotype’ and any other terms in the commercial that students do not understand students add this term to their glossary.

o

Evaluate/interpret - Students write an analysis (100 words) on how one of the commercials represents cultural identity. Explore the use of stereotypes to present cultural identity, and how it embraces or breaks stereotypes.

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts.

o

Feedback Carousel in groups students conduct feedback carousel on student’s analysis.

5C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information, ideas and arguments to respond to and compose texts.

o

Annotate commercials with techniques.

o

Students use their information from their analysis and combine with techniques to create a TEE table and PEEL paragraph.

 

Week 5 Slam poetry (social, person and cultural identity)

 

o

‘Imagine’ – Zohab Khan

o

Teacher draws student’s attention to where they are on the timeline reminds students what they have

o

‘Here I am’ – Hani Abdile

o

Scaffold for slam poem

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learnt and what they are still to learn in the next two

 

weeks.

 

o

Teacher provides students with the titles of the poems. Students write two sentences predicting what each is going to be about/focus on.

o

Watch/Listen – Imagine ‘Zohab Khan’

7D Demonstrates understanding of how texts can express aspects of their broadening world and their relationships within it.

 

o

Watch/Listen – ‘Here I am’ Hani Abdile

 
 

o

Students write down their immediate reaction to the poem (write or draw) and the three most important points in the poem. Students conduct final word protocol and decide on the most important section of the poem that represents the intersection of social, personal and cultural identity. Students then share with class and compare answers with other groups.

9E Uses, reflects on and assesses their individual and collaborative skills for learning.

o

Read transcript A as a class and identify techniques

 

used.

 

o

Teacher deconstructs major/difficult terms used (students add to glossary).

o

Think, pair share’ – select one of the above texts. After thorough analysis:

 

5. How it has challenged/reinforced your perception on how ones social and cultural experiences shape their identity?

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts.

6. Two techniques that add to the message

4B Makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence.

embedded in the text.

o

Teacher provides a scaffold for students to follow to

create their own short slam poem.

5C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information, ideas and arguments to

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

o

Students create their own short 30 second slam poem introducing themselves (their languages, where they were born, their religion and family).

own short 30 second slam poem introducing themselves (their languages, where they were born, their religion

respond to and compose texts.

Week 6 Writing About Poetry

 

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and context

 

o

Teacher draws student’s attention to where they are on the timeline reminds students what they have learnt and what they are still to learn in the next week

o

Students are presented with the two first lines of Macklemore’s ‘Same Love’ and discuss in pairs:

 

1.

What it is saying about identity in general

2.

How it relates to their sense of identity

7D Demonstrates understanding of how texts can express aspects of their broadening world and their relationships within it.

3.

How their interpretations differ

 

4.

Present their thoughts to the class

o

Listen to Macklemore’s ‘Same Love’

 

o

Read as a class and highlight any techniques. In pairs select two techniques and discuss how they help to reinforce Macklemore’s beliefs and sense of identity.

o

How does this song reinforce or challenge your sense of identity? Students answer independently.

o

Model and guide the way that poems are written about and explored.

o

Include a scaffold of a TEE table and PEEL

o

Students write their own PEEL paragraph on Macklemore’s ‘Same Love.’ Students then conduct a Feedback Carousel to gain feedback on their writing from their peers before editing and rewriting taking on the feedback from their peers.

4B Makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence.

o

Extension: Students writing their own poem,- using a poem studied as a model and adapting the words to fit their own ideas. Poem should focus on the idea of identity.

5C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information, ideas and arguments to

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respond to and compose texts.

 

Extension Teacher draws students attention to the timeline They have now completed each section and what follows is extension work for those students who are interested in furthering their poetry. Japanese poetry Tanka and Haiku

4B Makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence

Two examples of Haiku and two

of Tanka; both exploring the theme of identity.

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts.

o

Read poems

Students compose

their own Haiku - reflecting on the theme

of identity using the structure of Tanka or Haiku.

Students incorporate at least two literary devices, such as alliteration, onomatopoeia, simile, metaphor, personification, imagery etc. Note: number of stanzas is flexible as teacher sees fit.

o

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Reference

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2017). Blacktown Girls High School. My School. Retrieved from https://www.myschool.edu.au/school- search?FormPosted=True&SchoolSearchQuery=blacktown+girls+high+school.

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (n.d). Critical and Creative Thinking. Australian Curriculum. Retrieved from

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (n.d). Personal and Social Capability. Australian Curriculum. Retrieved from

Bennison, A. (2015). Supporting teachers to embed numeracy across the curriculum: a sociocultural approach. ZDM Mathematic Education, 47, 561-573. doi:

10.1007/s11858-015-0706-3

Buttner, A. (2013). Activities, games assessment strategies and rubrics for the foreign language classroom. Eye on Education, Routledge, NY USA.

Cohen, E., & Lotan, R. (2014). Designing Groupwork: Strategies for the Heterogeneous Classroom Third Edition. New York and London, Teacher’s College Press.

Csillag, J. (2016). Differentiation Reading Instruction: Strategies and Technology Tools to Help All Students Improve, Routledge, New York and London.

Davila, A. (2017). Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005) Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development ASCD. Colomb. Appl. Linguist. J., 19(1), pp. 140-142.

Jackson T. (2015). English teaching and learning: a mult-theoretical approach? The STeP Journal Student and Teacher Perspectives, 2(4), 38,46.

Khuana, K., Khuana, T., & Santiboon, T. (2017). An instructional design model for cultivating research-based learning strategies for fostering teacher student’s creative thinking abilities. Educational Research Reviews, 12(15), 712-724. doi:

10.5897/ERR2017.3239.

Mangelsdorf, N. (2013). Understanding by Design, TLN Journal, 20(1), 38-39.

McPeck, J. (2013). Critical Thinking and Education. Routledge, London and New York.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Minbiole, J. (2017). Improving Course Coherence and Assessment Rigor: ‘Understanding by Design’ in a Nonmajor Biology Course. National American Biology Teacher, 78(6),

463-470.

Moeller, M. Cutler, K., Fielder, D., & Weier, L. (2013). Visual thinking strategies = creative and critical thinking. Kappan Magazine, 95(3), 56-65. doi:

10.1177003172171309500312.

National School Reform Faculty (NSRF). (2014). The Feedback Carousel. Harmony Education Centre. Retrieved 01/09/18 https://www.nsrfharmony.org/wp-

National School Reform Faculty (NSRF). (2015). Save the Last Word for Me. Harmony Education Centre. Retrieved 01/09/18 https://www.nsrfharmony.org/wp-

NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA). (2017). English Sample Stage 4 Scope and Sequence. Retrieved from

Preston, L., Harvie, K., & Wallace, H. (2015). Inquiry-based Learning in Teacher Education: A Primary Humanities Example. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 40(12), 73-

85.

Rouse, B. (2017). Improving Student Engagement and Acceptance Using Multicultural Texts. Rowan University, ProQuest Dissertation Publishing, 1-56.

Tripani, B. (2016) Efficacy of Understanding by Design implementation plan: Evaluated through teacher perceptions and practices. St John’s University (New York), School of Education and Human Services, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 1-181.

Waring, Z, H., Creider, C, S., & Box, D, C. (2013). Explaining Vocabulary in the second language classroom: A conversation analytic account. Learning, Culture and Social Interation, 2(2013), 249-2.

Yurtseven, N & Altun, S. (2017). Understanding by Design (UbD) in EFL teaching: Teacher’s professional Development and Student’s achievement. Education Sciences: Theory and Practice, (17)2, 437-461.

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Appendices

The assessment task, marking rubric and concept map outline above have been designed for the purpose of this task and were not provided in the teaching of this unit and therefore are absent from the appendix.

BLACKTOWN GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH PROGRAM: Thematic Poetry Unit-Looking at Identity

YEAR: 7

DURATION:

5 weeks

UNIT DESCRIPTION/SYNOPSIS: Identity and Poetry Students will study the required skills needed to analyse a poems that relate to the theme of ‘Identity’. The main focus of this unit is to have a deep understanding of the notion of identity and how it can be an important aspect of society and individuals. In this unit students will also improve their knowledge of poetic techniques and look at how these play a part in expressing a perspective of identity through poetry and songs. Students will be expected to write a poetic analytical response in class in preparation for their exams.

LEARNING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:

o

Literacy

o

Critical and Creative Thinking

o

Intercultural

o

Understanding Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders

o

Histories & cultures

OUTCOMES:

Literacy Continuum (cluster 13 end of year 7) Comprehension (L.C.C.) L.C.C Applies comprehension strategies and skills including predicting, visualising, summarising, monitoring, questioning and making connections, to make meaning in subject contexts. L.C.C Explores analyses and responds to ideas in imaginative, informative and persuasive texts. L.C.C Judges the value or effectiveness of texts according to their purpose and subject matter. L.C.C Interprets and responds to points of view in texts with an awareness of underlying social, cultural and/or historical values. L.C.C Identifies different interpretations of and perspectives in texts. L.C.C Identifies and infers the meaning of imagery and symbolism in spoken, written, visual and multimodal texts. L.C.C Analyses and evaluates the impact of visual images on the meaning of texts.

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts

4B Makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence.

9E Uses, reflects on and assesses their individual and collaborative skills for learning

ASSESSMENT: Formal assessment in exam, term 4.

Short answer questions responding to an unseen poem: My Identity Helen Bell

Students complete a TEE table of two techniques for a poem they have studied in class. Students compose a PEEL paragraph: ‘How has the composer of the poem communicated their interpretation of identity?’

Writing (L.C.W.) L.C.W Creates well structured and sequenced texts for imaginative and persuasive purposes. L.C.W Creates and develops ideas to explore a concept or theme. L.C.W Uses paragraphing to structure information and partition events and ideas.

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L.C.W Intentionally constructs a variety of sentence types including complex sentences for effect. L.C.W Self-regulates spelling and applies spelling knowledge and strategies to spell complex, subject specific vocabulary. L.C.W Uses correct and appropriate punctuation to support meaning. L.C.W Uses a range of editing strategies to improve clarity and consistency of style. Knowledge (L.C.V.) L.C.V Applies knowledge of root words and word origins to understand the meaning of new subject specific words. L.C.V Uses technical vocabulary to explain a complex concept or phenomenon. L.C.V Selects appropriate vocabulary in response to context, purpose and audience. L.C.V Uses a combination of effective strategies to work out the meaning of unknown words.

METALANGUAGE:

personification,

speaker,

Imagery

simile,

imagery,

mood,

metaphor,

tone,

theme

extended

alliteration,

audience

 

metaphor,

onomatopoeia,

LESSON CONTENT

OUTCOMES

RESOURCES

Week 1- Introduction to Identity

o

o

Do Now: How would you define your identity and what does it mean to you?

Powerpoint - Teacher to Introduce the topic of Identity with an overview on the different levels of identity, such as personal or individuality, community/culture/relationships, multiple layers of identity, loss/search for/confusion about identity

o Students can complete activities from the PowerPoint and take notes from it.

o Bio poem: composing. Students follow the ‘formula’ to compose their own personal bio poem (a poem that describes themselves in 11 lines). Option to share poems with class, discuss etc.

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts

PowerPoint: Identity (resource 1)

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

o

Extension: Students compose a Biopoem for a fictional character, pet, mythological character etc.

 

Bio poem ‘formula’ and models/examples A Mix of Many Things by Alyssa Murray

o

Explore the techniques in the poem, identify the main ones that will be considered this unit: Simile, metaphor, rhetorical question, tone, persona, rhyme, alliteration, personification.

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts

o

Model how to answer questions about poetry. (ie, using evidence, how to read poetry and find the main idea) Powerpoint can be used to support this.

 

Week 2 and 3 Exploring Poetry and Personal Identity

9E Uses, reflects on and assesses their individual and collaborative skills for learning

Miss Independent By Kelly Clarkson

5.

Miss Independent

a. Do Now: Listen to the song. Complete a listening log on the song. Discuss: what does this song say about identity? b. Read the lyrics as a class. c. Students label structural features on their lyrics. d. .

 

e. ‘Pin the technique on the lyrics’ game Post-it notes activity

 

f. In teams (teams issued post-it notes) challenged to correctly identify techniques and features annotate A3 team copy of song lyrics within time limit.

Post-it notes (either in colours for teams or use team-colour markers when writing on them)

g. Evaluation of results discussion

A3 copies of Miss Independent lyrics (1 per team)

h. Model an annotation of the song.

i. Model a TEE table explore how to fill in a TEE table. Explicitly teach, focus on providing detail in the effect column (eg. Repetition emphasises that the poet is changing her ideas about love, rather than just repetition emphasises an idea)

 

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j. Model a PEEL paragraph.

   

k. Copy correct annotations onto their smaller version of lyrics pasted into their books.

Week 4 Exploring Cultural Identity

.

 
 

6.

Watch I Believe (Fosters Advert from the 2000 Olympics (stop video before it mentions the beer only in the last

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts

I Believe words and questions.

 

line of the video).

a. Annotate poem.

Fallen Star By Ian Seraillier

b. Guided TEE table and PEEL paragraph. (this may

 

be done as a cloze teacher discretion about how to approach)

TEE table: cloze of 6 techniques Son of mine By Oodgeroo Noonuccal

 

7.

Choose another poem, and explore the ideas about identity presented there. Suggestions could include Son of Mine, My Heart’s in the highlands, In Summer Heat

 

My Heart’s in the Highlands By Robert Burns

In Summer Heat By Anne Stewart Galwey

Week 5 Writing About Poetry

   

o

Choose a poem appropriate to the class ability (it may be one already completed, or a new poem)

3B Uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts

o

Model and guide the way that poems are written about and explored.

o

Include TEE tables and PEEL paragraphs, as well as short answer questions.

4B Makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence

Hannah Rose - Contemporary Teacher Leadership - 18215452

Extension Japanese poetry Tanka and Haiku

4B Makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence

Two examples of Haiku and two of Tanka; both exploring the theme of identity.

o

Read poems

Students compose their own extended metaphor poem (3 stanzas) reflecting on the theme of identity using the structure of Tanka or Haiku.

 

o

Students incorporate at least two literary devices, such as alliteration, onomatopoeia, simile, metaphor,

personification, imagery etc. Note: number of stanzas is flexible as teacher sees fit.