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Issue #745 Harrisburg, PA Oct.

8, 2018

PA Environment Digest Blog​ ​Twitter Feed​ ​PaEnviroDigest Google+

Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of
Pollution From County Streams

Nearly 90 people attended the ​Lancaster Clean


Water Partners​ meeting Wednesday as they
released a draft Strategy For Restoring Our Local
Water Quality​ to cleanup up 11 million pounds of
pollution going into streams all over Lancaster
County.
Lancaster Conservation District Manager
Chris Thompson said water quality “is our local
issue,” noting half of the county’s 1,400 miles of
streams have their water quality impaired by
agricultural runoff.
“Everyone benefits from clean water, and everyone has a role to play in cleaning it up,”
Thompson added.
The draft plan is a product of a writing committee made up of a variety of stakeholders in
the county, including agriculture, municipalities, the conservation district and the City and
county of Lancaster and many others.
The meeting Wednesday was the first opportunity the public had to review the plan,
although the writing committee held 3 previous public meetings and met with groups all over the
county with an interest in the plan to gather input for the draft.
The committee started its work in June and has had meetings about every two weeks to
put together the draft Strategy for public discussion.
Plan Recommendations
The draft Strategy​ makes a series of recommendations in 6 areas-- Data Management,
Agriculture, Stormwater, Stream Buffers, Stream Restoration and Land Use and Preservation.
Thompson noted the Strategy represents an opportunity to make suggestions to the
Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for how
to change programs and regulations to better address achieving nutrient and sediment reductions
in the real world.

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Among the recommendations in the Strategy are--
-- Data Management
-- Gather data related to water quality improvements in one place and make sure all current
conservation and pollution reduction practices are documented.
-- Establish more in-stream monitoring to define a baseline condition and develop new tools to
measure progress
-- Agriculture
-- The presentation at the meeting noted the agricultural sector needs to account for about 80
percent of the 11 million pounds of pollution reductions. They also noted Lancaster County has
more farms than all the other Chesapeake Bay Watershed states combined. As a result of this
“heavy lift,” the strategy recommends a 5 to 8 year implementation period for several of their
recommendations. Among the recommendations made were--
-- Reduce overall manure application by 25 percent
-- End winter spreading of manure and identify, promote alternative practices in priority
locations
-- Build new manure storage and implement barnyard management in priority areas
-- Establish a recording system for manure transport in/out of the county
-- Increase the number of farms who do livestock stream access management by 50 percent
-- Support state efforts to ensure all farms meet baseline requirements, including developing
2,400 new farm conservation plans in the county
-- Increase cover crops by 40 percent
-- Increase no-till and/or conservation tillage
-- Increase buffers and stream restorations (see specific recommendations in Strategy)
-- Increase Plain sect outreach and engagement
-- Education and outreach has to be integrated throughout the Strategy focused on flood control,
public health benefits, herd health, building legacy options for families, economics and achieving
compliance to ensure sustainability and avoid new regulations.
-- Stormwater
-- Identify alternative sources for projects that could incorporate stormwater BMPS and result in
reduction credit, including: hazard mitigation (flooding), municipal capital improvement plans,
local, county, state infrastructure improvements and watershed plans
-- Develop and encourage adoption of local land use ordinances to address stormwater and water
quality more efficiently: Smart/Green corridor concept, green infrastructure, conservation
overlay (County has a model ordinance), riparian corridors, floodplains, stormwater BMPs,
flooding and extreme weather events, rezone for higher densities to allow large scale stream
restoration.
-- Implement state-level changes to permitting and design and enabling legislation in these
areas--
-- Multi-municipal watershed level stormwater permits
-- Public/private partnerships outside limited use in transportation projects
-- Offsets and credit program to promote market-driven solutions, for example providing credit
for projects toward MS4 stormwater obligations from outside the MS4 areas
-- Education and outreach has to be integrated throughout the Strategy focused on flood control,
public health benefits, herd health, building legacy options for families, economics and achieving
compliance to ensure sustainability and avoid new regulations.

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-- Stream Buffers
-- Outreach to private landowners to install 5,000 to 7,500 acres of new stream buffers (the
county does about 580 acres per year now), priorities are on agriculture lands and headwaters
streams
-- Examine how municipalities could be encouraged by model ordinances and other methods to
require stream buffers with all new development
-- Outreach to all public and nonprofit groups to install stream buffers on their school, park,
preserve, protected or other lands under their management
-- Create a Lancaster County Buffer Program to complement ​CREP​ to provide incentives for the
installation of buffers and, importantly, to provide maintenance services
-- Establish a system to measure progress
-- Education and outreach (like previous recommendations)
-- Stream Restoration
-- Accomplish 50 new stream restoration projects, including floodplain (legacy sediment),
wetland and in-stream restoration projects in priority watersheds
-- Work with developers to incorporate Best Management Practices into their projects like has
been done by ​Rock Lititz​ and in ​Lime Spring​. [See: ​Triple Benefits of Green Infrastructure​]
-- Improve notification process for dam removals to better coordinate restoration activities on a
stream
-- Land Use & Preservation
-- Work with municipalities to consider water resources as a key component of all planning and
decision making
-- Better growth management through the County’s ​Places2040​, ​Blueprints Integrated Water
Resources Plan​ and ​Lancaster Greenscape​ initiatives
-- Preserve large, contiguous areas of natural lands, restore ecological connections
-- Increase parks, greenways and trails
-- Increase the county’s tree canopy in rural and urban areas
Click Here​ for a copy of the draft Strategy.
Next Step
Allyson Gibson, Coordinator of ​Lancaster Clean Water Partners​, invited the public to
submit comments and recommendations on the Strategy over the next few weeks to the Partners
through an ​online comment form​.
She also said the plan writing committee will be meeting October 23 and November 5 to
go over comments on the Strategy and invited the public to attend the meetings to offer
suggestions.
Gibson also offered to attend meetings of local groups to discuss the Strategy.
She noted the Strategy is due to be submitted to DEP the end of November.
Updates on the progress of the Strategy have been posted on the ​Lancaster Clean Water
Partners​ Facebook page. Questions should be directed to Allyson Gibson by sending email to:
agibson@lancastercleanwaterpartners.com​.
About The Partners
Lancaster Clean Water Partners is a program of the ​Conservation Foundation of
Lancaster County​ whose mission is to promote, support, and sustain the stewardship, education
and conservation activities undertaken by the ​Lancaster County Conservation District​ and other
local partners.

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The Foundation shares staff and office space with Lancaster County Conservation
District and relies on the Conservation District for all administrative and backbone support.
LCWP’s mission is to coordinate efforts and expand the impact of our partners working
to improve the health and viability of our local streams. Their vision is to make Lancaster
County’s streams clean and clear within our generation.
1 Of 4 Pilots
Lancaster is ​one of four counties that are piloting​ DEP’s ​County Clean Water Toolbox​-- a
county-based planning process​ for identifying clean water issues and tools they could use to
address these problems and meet Chesapeake Bay nutrient and sediment reduction targets.
The other counties are Adams, Franklin and York. ​Click Here​ for more.
Lancaster County alone is responsible for making 21 percent of the pollution reductions
needed to meet Chesapeake Bay cleanup goals, primarily because of its significant concentration
of agricultural operations.
The 39 other counties in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed will also have the opportunity to
develop water pollution reduction plans like Lancaster County.
NewsClips:
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
DEP Tours Wyoming County Farms
Scranton Still Evaluating Stormwater Management Plan Fee
Editorial: ORSANCO Scheme To Deregulate Ohio River Cannot Be Justified
AP: Ohio River Agency Holds Off Vote On Dropping Pollution Rules
Study: Economic Benefits Of Great Lakes Restoration Benefit Erie
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct. 5 RiverWatch Video Report
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
PA To Pilot County-Level Chesapeake Bay Clean Water Planning Process In 4 Counties This
Summer
LancasterOnline: Lancaster Farmland Provides $676M In Annual Environmental Benefits
Agriculture, Forestry Workgroups Present Key Recommendations To Meet PA’s Chesapeake
Bay Pollution Reduction Obligations
PA Chesapeake Bay Steering Committee Readies Information For 39 Counties On Water
Pollution Reduction Planning Process
Related Stories This Week:
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program

4
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
How You Can Help In Your Area
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices


Reducing Pollution To The Susquehanna River

Department of Environmental Protection Secretary


Patrick McDonnell Wednesday took a tour of 2
Wyoming County farms to illustrate how agriculture
and conservation can work hand-in-hand to prevent
pollution from flowing into the Susquehanna River.
One farm switched to an all-organic operation and
the other utilizing stream bank fencing to protect
wetlands.
The Henningstead Holstein Farm in Mehoopany
switched to an organic operation in 2011, beginning
with organically growing the grain used by the farm
to feed the animals.
The farm, which houses 50 cows and 30 younger stock, relies mainly on compost for
fertilizer. The farm is also a “no-till” operation that preserves the soil and limits its chances of
becoming part of runoff pollution.
Last year, the Henningstead Holstein Farm built a roofed manure storage facility using a
grant from DEP and private donations.
“DEP partners with local farmers to promote best-management practices that will
ultimately benefit the farm”, said Secretary McDonnell. “This type of operation not only protects
and preserves the soil on the farm, it also protects local waterways that feed into the
Susquehanna River.”
Over the years the farmers have reduced runoff from the farm in several different ways:
In the 1960s, the owners began installing drain tile and diversion ditches in crop fields to control
runoff.
In the 1980s, they began installing contour strips and practicing no-till planting.
In 2000, with the help of the DEP Chesapeake Bay program, they installed a concrete
barnyard, manure storage, and milk house waste system.
Secretary McDonnell also toured a stream bank fencing project on the nearby Faux

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Family farm.
The fencing protects a large wetland on the property that has a stream running through it.
The fencing helps prevent polluted runoff which would contain nitrogen and phosphates from
animal manure from entering the water.
“Stream bank fencing is an important tool that farmers can use to protect water resources
on their properties,” said Secretary McDonnell. “When local waterways are preserved, the river
and ultimately the Bay are protected from runoff.”
Since 1995, the DEP Stream Bank Fencing program has protected 613.75 acres from the
impacts of 6,047 animals. There have been more than 59 miles of fence built along with
numerous crossings, ramps, and water troughs in the DEP Northeast Region.
For more information on cleaning up watersheds in the Susquehanna River Basin, visit
DEP’s ​Pennsylvania’s Chesapeake Bay Plan​ webpage.
NewsClips:
DEP Tours Wyoming County Farms
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
Scranton Still Evaluating Stormwater Management Plan Fee
Editorial: ORSANCO Scheme To Deregulate Ohio River Cannot Be Justified
AP: Ohio River Agency Holds Off Vote On Dropping Pollution Rules
Study: Economic Benefits Of Great Lakes Restoration Benefit Erie
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct. 5 RiverWatch Video Report
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Green Infrastructure Related Stories:
New Statewide Partnership Launches Major Effort To Plant 10 Million Trees To Cleanup
Pennsylvania’s Streams, Rivers
Renew The State's Commitment To Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Meeting The Challenge Of Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Emma Creek Restoration Project Reduced Flood Damage, Sediment & Nutrient Pollution In
Huntingdon County
Another Green Infrastructure Project Reduces Flooding In Manheim, Lancaster County
Green Infrastructure Offers Triple Benefits, Cost Effective Solutions To Stormwater Pollution,
Reducing Flood Damage
Related Stories:
CBF-PA Urges Passage Of Keystone Tree Fund After Legislation Is Voted Out Of House
Committee
Penn State Extension, Tree Pittsburgh Offering 5 More Tree Tender Classes This Fall
PA Horticultural Society, Penn State Extension, Tree Pittsburgh Offer Fall Tree Tender Classes
Related Stories This Week:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers

6
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
How You Can Help In Your Area
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty
Mountain Farm, Lycoming County

By: B.J. Small, ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA

The beef brisket on restoration specialist Frank


Rohrer's plate was two slices of succulent reward
after a scorching summer day spent on a
Lycoming County farm [August 29], and the
product of quality water and soil that nurture the
land.
After lunch, ​Misty Mountain Farm​ co-owner
Dave Albert detailed family history and used a
chalkboard to show guests that successful direct
marketing stems from understanding the "who"
and "why" of business. For the Alberts, success is selling tender beef you can cut with a spoon.
Earlier in the day, Yuri Plowden of the Natural Resources Conservation Service stood in
a pit in a hillside cornfield and explained the virtues of un-tilled earth.
The free field day for about 100 guests was presented by the ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation
(CBF), ​Chesapeake Conservancy​, and ​Regional Conservation Partnership Program​. State Rep.
Garth Everett (R-Lycoming and Union) made opening remarks.
Co-hosts Dave and Holly Albert are sixth generation farmers and work 175 acres of
owned and leased land near the town of Trout Run, about 100 miles north of Harrisburg.
Murray Run is a headwater of Loyalsock Creek, the Susquehanna River, and the
Chesapeake Bay. Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Carol Parenzan talked about water quality
and mentioned that the Loyalsock is the 2018 Pennsylvania River of the Year.
During the day, Dr. Mel Zimmerman and a group of students and interns from ​Lycoming

7
College's Clean Water Institute​, made their way up the babbling west branch of Murray Run,
electroshocking the water to raise signs of aquatic life that might reflect the health of the narrow
creek. In moments, Dr. Zimmerman was holding a brown trout.
The riparian forest buffer that protects 1,400 feet of stream bank along Murray Run has
regenerated naturally. In 1999 it was one of the first buffers for Lycoming County.
The buffer was younger when Dr. Zimmerman assessed the stream eight years ago. The
water was warmer and there were no trout. Earlier this summer they found three brook trout and
water was almost two degrees cooler within the buffer area than outside of it.
"Today we found a 10-inch brown trout," Dr. Zimmerman said of the survey on field day.
"Trout are obviously moving up and utilizing this area."
David Albert, Dave's father, remembers catching only chubs there as a boy. "Now, the
temperature has dropped and now, I'm gonna tell my grandchildren that, By Golly, there's gonna
be fishin' up here," the older Albert said.
Trees in forest riparian buffers improve the quality of nearby waterways by filtering and
reducing the amount of polluted runoff that enters them. Shade from the tree canopy also lowers
water temperatures and creates better habitat for creatures that live in or near the water.
CBF is coordinating the statewide ​Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership​, with a goal of
planting that many trees before the end of 2025.
The Alberts protected the stream further by adding a stabilized stream crossing and
fencing cattle out of it.
"The idea of fresh water to cattle, we see increased rates of gain on our calves," Dave
Albert added. "The stream is extremely important to us in terms of rate of gain and overall health
in the cow herd."
"They are continuing to take steps to move forward to better their operation and improve
their conservation," Frank Rohrer said of the Alberts after leading a segment about the buffer.
"The bottom line is to be more successful with their farm."
Elsewhere on the farm, the Alberts believe no-till and cover crop techniques improve soil
and water quality, which leads success.
"All of our agricultural farmlands are no-till," Dave Alberts said. "We don't have near the
fuel costs. No-till passes are simple. We basically have three days in our no till fields: a day to
spray; a day to plant; and a day to harvest. Beyond that you have freed yourself up to do what
you do best somewhere else."
From her post in the cornfield pit, Yuri Plowden explained to visitors that, "The key to
soil health is, if your micro-organisms are doing all these things to create an ideal environment,
you don't want to disrupt them. They are secreting substances that aggregate the soil. This creates
pore spaces and as you increase this porosity you increase infiltration and reduce runoff. You
also get good water and air exchange where a lot of your nutrients hang out. The other secret
ingredient is live plant roots."
Dave McLaughlin told of how planting cover crops has worked for him.
"In 2017 it was four years that I seeded cover crops and I've seen more changes in my
soil in those four years, than the previous 16 years of straight no till," the Perry County farmer
told visitors. "Erosion control was always a major issue."
Cover crops can reduce nutrients leaching from farm fields, increase soil organic matter,
improve soil structure, reduce soil erosion, and promote more comprehensive pest management.
Stable forms of organic nitrogen may decrease fertilizer usage and costs, and in turn, reduce

8
nutrient loading to the waterways.
Planting cover crops goes against the grain of thinking for some farmers.
"It's a big hurdle," Dave Albert admitted. "Because what you believe is that you are
putting a weed back onto your field that shouldn't be there. With cover crops you gotta believe
that diversity is a good thing."
Direct marketing of Misty Mountain Farm beef gives the Alberts the highest return per
acre from high plateau soils that have been in pasture production since the beginning of the farm
in 1854. Their beef has earned a following in the local restaurant trade in Williamsport.
"Why you are doing it is the root to being successful," Dave Albert said. "They don't buy
what you do, they buy why you do it. Our passion for and in the stewardship of family-owned
and community neighboring land, livestock, and water sources speaks to our core beliefs. As
powerful as ‘Why' is unto itself, combining it with ‘who' our target market is becomes the
ultimate reason why we sell beef!"
Last year, the Alberts sold 55,000 pounds of product.
In summing up the day, Lisa Feldt, CBF Vice President of Environmental Protection &
Restoration said, "It speaks a thousand words when a farmer can engage with other farmers and
tell them why something is good. The win-win situation is not only for the farmer, but for the
environment, soil health, and water as well."
"It's pretty amazing that the Alberts invited everyone to the farm to share this and
hopefully get some additional landowners to adopt some practices like these, and to keep
spreading the word about what forest riparian buffers can do," added Adrienne Gemberling of
the Chesapeake Conservancy.
"Farmers talking to farmers is meaningful and impactful," said Bill Chain, CBF Senior
Agriculture Program Manager in Pennsylvania.
"Today was about partnerships," Harry Campbell, CBF Executive Director in
Pennsylvania said. "Individual landowners, conservationists, agriculture specialists, soil
scientists, and others coming together to demonstrate how we can have clean and healthy soils,
water, and food."
For more information on efforts to plant more trees in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Keystone
10 Million Trees Partnership​ website.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
(​Photo:​ Stream bank fencing on Faux Farm.)
NewsClips:
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
DEP Tours Wyoming County Farms
Scranton Still Evaluating Stormwater Management Plan Fee
Editorial: ORSANCO Scheme To Deregulate Ohio River Cannot Be Justified
AP: Ohio River Agency Holds Off Vote On Dropping Pollution Rules
Study: Economic Benefits Of Great Lakes Restoration Benefit Erie
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct. 5 RiverWatch Video Report
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal

9
Green Infrastructure Related Stories:
New Statewide Partnership Launches Major Effort To Plant 10 Million Trees To Cleanup
Pennsylvania’s Streams, Rivers
Renew The State's Commitment To Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Meeting The Challenge Of Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Emma Creek Restoration Project Reduced Flood Damage, Sediment & Nutrient Pollution In
Huntingdon County
Another Green Infrastructure Project Reduces Flooding In Manheim, Lancaster County
Green Infrastructure Offers Triple Benefits, Cost Effective Solutions To Stormwater Pollution,
Reducing Flood Damage
Related Stories:
CBF-PA Urges Passage Of Keystone Tree Fund After Legislation Is Voted Out Of House
Committee
Penn State Extension, Tree Pittsburgh Offering 5 More Tree Tender Classes This Fall
PA Horticultural Society, Penn State Extension, Tree Pittsburgh Offer Fall Tree Tender Classes
Related Stories This Week:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
How You Can Help In Your Area
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
(Reprinted from the ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation Blog​.)
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To


Support Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers

Department of Conservation and Natural

10
Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn and the ​PA Urban and Community Forestry Council​,
Monday announced the approval of $100,000 in funding through the ​TreeVitalize Program​ to
support 25 tree planting, community forestry, and urban riparian buffer projects statewide.
“TreeVitalize efforts continue to grow since the program first was launched on Arbor
Day 2004 in Philadelphia, with more some 400,000 shade trees planted in communities
statewide,” Dunn said. “The funding announced today extend benefits to be enjoyed by even
more residents and will allow for more almost 1,000 trees to be planted across the state.”
Funds will provide opportunities for municipalities and non-profit organizations to create
more sustainable community and urban foresting networks through coordinated tree plantings,
volunteer engagements, and municipal support.
Tree planting grant recipients include:
-- Brentwood, Allegheny County, $4,250 for 40 trees
-- Leechburg Shade Tree Commission, Armstrong County, $3,000, 20 trees
-- Darlington, Beaver County, $1,500, eight trees
-- Bloomsburg, Columbia County, $6,464, 47 trees
-- Titusville Shade Tree Commission, Crawford County, $1,952, 15 trees
-- North East, Erie County, $5,647, 49 trees
-- Forest County Historical Society, Forest County, $1,755, 10 trees
-- Mansfield Shade Tree Commission, Tioga County, $3,439, 29 trees
-- Westfield, Tioga County, $2,640, 22 trees
-- Lititz, Lancaster County, $6,800, 34 trees
-- Kingston, Luzerne County, $4,250, 34 trees
-- Williamsport, Lycoming County, $8,281, 80 trees
-- Easton, Northampton County, $7,920, 48 trees
-- Rotary Club of York, York County, $12,102, 200 trees
Community forestry grant recipients, accentuating the value of local woodland tracts,
include:
-- Jim Thorpe, Carbon County, $5,000.
-- Lancaster, Lancaster County, $6,000
-- Riverfront North Partnership, Philadelphia, $5,900
-- Awbury Arboretum, Philadelphia, $8,100
Urban riparian buffer grants recipients, designed to protect city and community
waterways, include:
-- Moon, Allegheny County, $5,145
-- Bernville, Berks County, $2,700
-- YMCA of Greater Brandywine, Chester County, $4,4858
-- Willistown Conservation Trust, Delaware County, $5,638
-- Pottstown, Montgomery County, $2,500
-- Hatboro, Montgomery County, $1,500
-- McDonald, Washington County, $3,032
TreeVitalize​ is a public-private partnership established by DCNR to help build capacity
within communities to plan for, plant, and care for trees. Educational training is also offered to
help citizens understand the diverse benefits of trees and the importance of properly planting and
maintaining them.
For more information, visit DCNR’s ​Community Tree Management​ webpage and the ​PA

11
Urban and Community Forestry Council​ website.
Green Infrastructure Related Stories:
New Statewide Partnership Launches Major Effort To Plant 10 Million Trees To Cleanup
Pennsylvania’s Streams, Rivers
Renew The State's Commitment To Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Meeting The Challenge Of Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Emma Creek Restoration Project Reduced Flood Damage, Sediment & Nutrient Pollution In
Huntingdon County
Another Green Infrastructure Project Reduces Flooding In Manheim, Lancaster County
Green Infrastructure Offers Triple Benefits, Cost Effective Solutions To Stormwater Pollution,
Reducing Flood Damage
Related Stories:
CBF-PA Urges Passage Of Keystone Tree Fund After Legislation Is Voted Out Of House
Committee
Penn State Extension, Tree Pittsburgh Offering 5 More Tree Tender Classes This Fall
PA Horticultural Society, Penn State Extension, Tree Pittsburgh Offer Fall Tree Tender Classes
Related Stories This Week:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
How You Can Help In Your Area
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Oct. 1, 2018]

Op-Ed: Is It Time To Recycle Recycling?

By: David M. Sanko, Executive Director, ​PA State Association of Township Supervisors

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What happens when something you have done for decades looks like it’s over?
It could be good news or bad news depending on your perspective. People will debate
whether it was just a habit or a conscious practice. Or maybe it was just a cycle… you know the
kind… bull and bear markets, droughts and floods, wins and loses.
Recycling started in Pennsylvania in the late ‘80s with a goal of reducing landfill capacity
and saving our environment. It was pretty basic back then with a focus on glass, paper, cans and
plastic-- the “Big 4” so they were called.
Over time, more and more items were added to the recyclables list.
First, it was other metals, such as aluminum and bimetal cans, stainless steel, copper,
brass, lead and even wire.
Then we had to recycle household chemicals and hazardous wastes, batteries, electronics,
oil, tires and asphalt.
And we haven’t even gotten to solar panels yet!
Somewhere in there, programs began to allow for commingling, or mixing, products to
make it easier for residents to recycle.
Soon, people began to think you could recycle almost anything, and that led to
contamination of the waste stream. When that happens, EVERYTHING winds up back in the
landfill.
And, unfortunately, the very thing that was to be fixed was being made worse.
Why am I talking about this? Under state law, recycling became a mandate on most local
governments. It was socially responsible and, in the short term, would reduce landfill costs, but
recycling has become increasingly more expensive over time.
The reduction in state recycling performance grants from the Department of
Environmental Protection in the past several years has not made things any easier on local
governments.
Now, communities are facing angry residents who want to do the “right thing” and
recycle, only to find that international market constraints and contamination make it unaffordable
and possibly unsustainable.
What to do? Education is part of the solution.
Check out these examples of contamination: Did you know (I didn’t) that the grease
stains in a pizza box make the cardboard non-recyclable? How about the packing tape that holds
boxes together? Not recyclable either.
And that doesn’t even begin to touch on the many things that just wind up in the
recycling bin, such as disposable diapers because they are plastic or syringes because they are
glass.
“Wishful recycling” has become devastatingly costly. Separating trash from recyclables
costs money for the local government, or the haulers, and that eventually means the taxpayers.
While communities are being told it is their responsibility to collect recyclables at all cost
due to the state mandate, we must recall the other part of the law that requires the
Commonwealth to identify and create markets for recyclables.
Like so many other issues of today, recycling is a joint problem that requires joint
solutions.
Maybe local governments should go back to recycling basics, like Lancaster County is
doing, by only collecting the “Big 4.”
And maybe as the state makes economic development investment decisions, it should

13
prioritize funding companies that use recyclables as source materials.
Whatever the answer is, we are all in this together and face some tough choices ahead.
We look forward to bringing you some great educational sessions at the ​2019 Annual
[Township Supervisors] Conference​, including some on recycling. Stay tuned!

David M. Sanko​ is Executive Director of the ​PA State Association of Township Supervisors​.
This column appears in the October 2018 issue of ​PA Township News​. He can be contacted by
calling 717-763-0930 ext. 187.

[​Editor’s Note:​ DEP’s ​Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ and Recycling Fund Advisory
Committee will hold a special meeting on November 5 to wrap up discussions by its Act 101
(1988 Recycling law) Workgroup to finalize recommendations on updating the state’s recycling
law. Stay tuned for more details.]
NewsClip:
Lackawanna County Hosting Tire Recycling Events Oct. 6, 13
Related Stories:
PA Township News: The Recycling Crash, Foreign Markets Take A Toll On Local Recycling
Programs
Professional Recyclers Of PA Offering Recycling Professional Certification Courses
[Posted: Oct. 3, 2018]

PA Township News: The Recycling Crash, Foreign Markets Take A Toll On Local
Recycling Programs

The October issue of ​PA Township News​ highlights


the impact China’s ban on certain recycled materials
has had on local recycling programs.
“​The Recycling Crash​,” by Assistant Editor Amy
Bobb details how China’s ban on accepting 24
recyclables upended markets forcing recycling
programs to find other outlets for their materials and
make other adjustments.
The story details the success of local recycling and
how the program has grown since 1988 to cover 94
percent of Pennsylvanians as well as expanded from collecting just a few materials to many more
in single stream recycling.
Techniques for combating contamination, the markets for plastics, what to do with the
glut of recycled TVs, curbside separation versus single stream collection are all discussed in how
communities are responding to these market changes.
Click Here​ to read the full article, courtesy of PA Township News.
For information on how you can get your own copy, visit the PSATS ​PA Township News
webpage.
[​Editor’s Note:​ DEP’s ​Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ and Recycling Fund Advisory
Committee will hold a special meeting on November 5 to wrap up discussions by its Act 101
(1988 Recycling law) Workgroup to finalize recommendations on updating the state’s recycling

14
law. Stay tuned for more details.]
NewsClip:
Lackawanna County Hosting Tire Recycling Events Oct. 6, 13
Related Stories:
Op-Ed: Is It Time To Recycle Recycling?
Professional Recyclers Of PA Offering Recycling Professional Certification Courses
[Posted: Oct. 3, 2018]

DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations

Department of Conservation and Natural


Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn
Friday joined Bureau of State Parks
officials in dedicating an electric car
charging station at ​Prince Gallitzin State
Park​.
The event at the Cambria County
park signaled the department’s future
commitment to similar installations at more
than 40 state parks and forests throughout
the state to help reduce greenhouse gases,
lessens smog, and improve air quality
statewide.
“Our state parks and forests will emerge as key to helping increase the network of
publicly available charging stations in the Pennsylvania,” Dunn said. “We know thousands of
state residents own electric or plug-in hybrid vehicles. We also know many parks and forest
destinations are in remote locations, and the ability to travel to and from them in electric vehicles
has been limited by charging availability.
“With DCNR’s plans to install 40 new charging stations across our system, visitors will
be able to re-energize both themselves, and their batteries during their visits.”
The charging station at Prince Gallitzin is the second to be installed in the state parks
system. Another was installed at ​Kinzua Bridge​, McKean County, a focal point of the
Pennsylvania Wilds​.
Installation of other charging stations, capable of fully charging vehicles in 2.5 to 7
hours, is expected by 2020.
Electric car charging stations will be installed at the following locations:
• Beaver County:​ ​Raccoon Creek State Park
• Bedford County:​ ​Shawnee State Park
• Berks County:​ ​French Creek State Park​, ​Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center
• Bucks County: ​Delaware Canal State Park​, ​Nockamixon State Park
• Butler County:​ ​Jennings Environmental Education Center​, ​Moraine State Park
• Carbon County:​ ​Hickory Run State Park
• Centre County:​ ​Black Moshannon State Park​, ​Bald Eagle State Park
• Chester County:​ ​Marsh Creek State Park
• Clarion County:​ ​Cook Forest State Park

15
• Crawford County:​ ​Pymatuning State Park
• Cumberland County:​ ​Pine Grove Furnace State Park​, ​Colonel Denning State Park​; ​Kings Gap
Environmental Education Center
• Delaware County:​ ​Ridley Creek State Park
• Elk County:​ ​Elk Country Visitor Center
• Erie County:​ ​Presque Isle State Park
• Fayette County:​ ​Ohiopyle State Park
• Franklin County: ​Caledonia State Park
• Fulton County:​ ​Cowans Gap State Park
• Huntingdon County:​ ​Greenwood Furnace State Park
• Lackawanna County:​ ​Lackawanna State Park
• Lawrence County:​ ​McConnells Mill State Park
• Luzerne County:​ ​Ricketts Glen State Park
• Lycoming County:​ ​Tiadaghton State Forest District​, Pine Creek Trail
• Montgomery County:​ ​Washington Crossing State Park
• Perry County:​ ​Little Buffalo State Park
• Pike County:​ ​Promised Land State Park
• Potter County:​ ​Pennsylvania Lumber Museum​, ​Cherry Springs State Park
• Schuylkill County:​ ​Weiser State Forest District​ Resource Management Center
• Sullivan County:​ ​Worlds End State Park
• Tioga County:​ ​Leonard Harrison State Park​; ​Tioga State Forest District​, Pine Creek Trail
• Venango County:​ ​Oil Creek State Park
• Westmoreland County:​ ​Keystone State Park
• York County:​ ​Codorus State Park​, ​Gifford Pinchot State Park
Statewide
There are now about ​562 electric vehicle charging stations​ in Pennsylvania of various
types, according to the Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Association. ​Click Here​ to visit DEP’s
Electric Vehicles in PA webpage. ​Click Here​ to visit the Drive Electric PA Coalition webpage
that is developing a plan to expand electric vehicle use in Pennsylvania.
House Bill 1446 (Quinn-R-Bucks) which would expand the infrastructure​ for electric and
natural gas fueled vehicles in the state, is now on the House Calendar for action.
DEP Grants
DEP is now accepting applications for several grant and rebate programs related to
alternative fuel vehicles--
-- January 25:​ ​Driving PA Forward Electric Vehicle Charging Station Rebates
-- March 31:​ ​Level 2 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Rebates
-- ​December 14:​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
-- December 14: ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
DCNR Sustainability Tour
Dunn’s visit to Prince Gallitzin State Park closed a three-stop “Sustainability Tour” by
the secretary to announce DCNR’s extensive, long-term investment in energy conservation at
state parks.
Speaking ​Wednesday at Ohiopyle State Park​ in Fayette County, she announced energy
conservation investments designed to save $7.5 million over 20 years.
Appearing Thursday at Moraine State Park, Butler County, the secretary dedicated a solar

16
panel system that will power the park’s sewage treatment system.
DCNR oversees more than 4,500 buildings in its parks system, more than a hundred
wastewater treatment facilities, and thousands of vehicles, and spends millions of dollars a year
in electricity.
As the state’s leading conservation agency, DCNR strives to follow practices that
conserve and sustain natural resources.
Through its ​Green and Sustainable Initiative​, DCNR exemplifies best practices through
its buildings, vehicle fleet, purchases, land management and business operations.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
PA State Parks To Host Electric Car Charging Stations
Erie’s Presque Isle To Get Electric Car Charging Station
Grant From VW Settlement Helps Fund Greener School Buses In Lancaster County
Harrisburg Biofuels Firm Exec Pleads Guilty In $4.1M Federal Tax Fraud
Related Stories:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 5, 2018]

Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour

Department of Conservation and Natural Resources


Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn Wednesday joined
officials from the Department of General Services
and Bureau of State Parks in highlighting major

17
energy efficient upgrades at ​Ohiopyle State Park’s​ visitor center.
The heavily visited Fayette County facility is the first in a three-stop “Sustainability
Tour” planned by the Secretary to announce DCNR’s extensive, long-term investment in energy
conservation.
“We have upgraded our lighting and HVAC systems in a building that already is at the
highest efficiency standards,” said Dunn. “With these improvements to its LEED Gold visitor
center, DCNR signals a commitment to sustainability that will see less electricity consumed in
state park and forest buildings throughout Pennsylvania.
“Here at Ohiopyle, we expect an annual CO2 reduction of over 2,000 tons, that is the
equivalent of planting 600 acres of forest every year. And, that is just the first step. Looking
ahead to mid-2019, DCNR will begin infrastructure improvements benefitting about 50 state
parks and 12 forest districts.”
Working in cooperation with the Department of General Services, and using the
Guaranteed Energy Savings Act (GESA) program, DCNR contracted with ​Energy Systems
Group of Portersville​, Butler County., to provide infrastructure investments that will save $7.5
million over 20 years, the secretary said.
“Under the Wolf Administration, we have made significant strides in revising and
revitalizing our energy savings and sustainability programs,” Department of General Services
Deputy Secretary for Property and Asset Management Julien Gaudion said. “Through our work
with agencies, including DCNR, we have reduced our overall energy consumption, while at the
same time investing in $87 million in new construction and generating savings of $4.6 million
annually.”
The Commonwealth currently has nine GESA projects underway. Once they are all
complete, the energy savings from those projects will be the equivalent of planting more than
37,000 trees annually or removing more than 3,100 cars from the road for a year.
Secretary Dunn noted DCNR oversees more than 4,500 buildings in its parks system,
more than a hundred wastewater treatment facilities, and thousands of vehicles, and spends
millions of dollars a year in electricity.
“When we started DCNR’s Sustainability Initiative in 2015, we knew there were many
opportunities to save money and reduce our carbon footprint,” Dunn said. “I am proud to say our
team has gotten off to a fast start and is already making a big impact. These improvements here
at Ohiopyle are a key part of this important work in sustainability -- a major beginning if you
will, in bigger and better things to come.”
Over $200,000 in LED lighting upgrades and building insulation/weatherization
improvements have been installed at the visitor center to replace high-efficiency fluorescent
lighting, further enhancing efficiency/sustainability. Additionally, park-wide LED upgrades
include barns, cottages, maintenance facilities, residences and yurts.
Continuing her “Sustainability Tour,” Dunn was to visit ​Moraine State Park​ on Thursday
to help dedicate a solar power installation that will save the Butler County park $25,000 annually
by providing enough energy to operate its sewage treatment plant.
On Friday, she will visit ​Prince Gallitzin State Park​, where an electric charging station
has been installed to service the Cambria County park and its visitors.
As the state’s leading conservation agency, DCNR strives to follow practices that
conserve and sustain natural resources.
Through its ​Green and Sustainable Initiative​, DCNR exemplifies best practices through

18
its buildings, vehicle fleet, purchases, land management and business operations.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Schneck: Beautiful PA: Farmlands Offer Early Color Ahead Of Fall Foliage
Schneck: Fall Foliage Season In PA: Wait For It
Official: Warm, Wet Temps Dim Fall Glow
Fall Colors Expected To Be Later, Duller Than Usual
Seven Super Autumn Hikes In Eastern PA
Slow Start To Fall Foliage In Erie, Crawford Counties
Sunday Walks Will Explore Penn’s Woods
Koval: Hike In The Thomas Darling Nature Preserve Near Wilkes-Barre
Erie County Master Gardeners Grow Pumpkin Walk
Philadelphia Is About To Get More Bike Friendly
What Does It Take To Build A Bike Lane In Philadelphia
PA Fall Road Trip: 10 Scenic Towns You Should Visit This Season
11 Breathtaking Overlooks You Can Drive To In PA For Fall Foliage
Frye: Homemade Fire Starters Can Really Help Get That Campfire Going
Final Phase Of Wilkes-Barre Levee Trail Repairs Start Wednesday
Oil Region Alliance Acquires Standard Oil Mansion In Titusville
Oct. 5 Take Five Friday Without Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Missing Young Man’s Body Found In Linn Run State Park
Congress Debates Fix After Land & Water Conservation Fund Lapses
Letter: Protect The Federal Land And Water Conservation Fund
Editorial: Revive, Fully Fund Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests

19
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In
And Near Ohiopyle State Park

Department of Conservation and Natural Resources


Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn Wednesday
recognized Boy Scout Peter Livengood with a
Conservation Award for projects he organized in and
around ​Ohiopyle State Park​ in Fayette County.
Livengood completed 4 conservation projects
this year as part of an effort to qualify for the Boy
Scout’s ​William T. Hornaday Silver Award​. The
projects included--
-- ​Restoring Blooming Bioswales For A Better
Youghiogheny River In Ohiopyle Borough
-- ​Restoring The Understory At Ohiopyle State Park’s Kentuck Campground
-- ​Setting Up A Raptor Observation Area On Chestnut Ridge Near Uniontown
-- ​Saving Cranberry Glade Lake
Livengood, a 12th grade, homeschooled student from near Ohiopyle,​ h​ as been a Boy
Scout since 2013 in Troop #687 in Farmington and lives on a small family farm.
He has been a certified ​Conservation Ambassador​ by the PA Wildlife Leadership
Academy since 2015, attended the ​Penn State Conservation Leadership School​ in 2016 and
2017, is a member of the ​Allegheny Plateau Audubon Society​ and was appointed to the
Governor's Youth Advisory Council on Hunting, Fishing and Conservation​.
He can be contacted by sending email to: ​PeterE.Livengood@gmail.com​.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Beveridge: Floating Student Science Lab Docks In Monongahela
Buffalo Creek Watershed Assn. Holds Oct. 11 Meet Reptiles, Amphibians In Washington
County
EPCAMR Grant Will Help Wilkes-Barre Area Students Grow
STEAM Education Program Expanding In Scranton Schools
Agreement Between Easton, Da Vinci Science City Expected Next Month
With Opening Of The Discovery Center, Public Can Explore Hidden Reservoir In East
Fairmount Park
Related Stories:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects

20
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects

On September 27, local nonprofits, municipalities and


other officials celebrated the 25th Anniversary of the
Keystone Fund​ and its support of local recreation, land
conservation, university and other projects in Clinton
County.
Clinton County has received over $6,890,663 from the
Keystone Fund to support local projects.
The celebration was held in the lobby of Ulmer Hall
on the campus of ​Lock Haven University​. The State
System for Higher Education is one of the state agencies
who administers money from the Keystone Fund and
Lock Haven University President Robert Pignatello welcomed the assembled group.
President Pignatello said, “Lock Haven University is honored to have been selected as the
location to help celebrate this important milestone. The University has received more than $4.5
million from Keystone funding since 1994 to allow us to address a large backlog of deferred
maintenance projects for nearly every building on campus, including the lobby of this building.
We’ve also been able to replace roofs and chillers, make upgrades to the fire alarm systems, and
undertake abatement of hazardous materials for example. These funds have allowed Lock Haven
University to preserve and maintain the integrity of buildings that house services vital to our
community, lessening the burden to those who use our services.”
Also speaking about the Fund’s impact in the community were County Commissioner
Pete Smeltz, Lock Haven City Manager Gregory Wilson, Clinton County Historical Society
Board President Jo Ann Bowes, and Rep. Mike Hanna.
Rep. Hanna noted his sponsorship of the enabling legislation in 1993 to establish the
Keystone Recreation, Park and Conservation Fund (Act 50 of 1993).
Since Rep. Hanna and his colleagues passed the legislation the Department of

21
Conservation and Natural Resources has awarded $1,898,200 in Keystone Funds to Clinton
County projects; PA Historic and Museum Commission has awarded $134,618 in Keystone
Funds to Clinton County’s museums; Department of Education has awarded $140,275 in
Keystone Funds to Clinton County’s libraries; the State System of Higher Education has
awarded Lock Haven University $4,717,570 of Keystone Funds.
Several speakers noted the Bald Eagle Valley Trail now being developed in the County
has already benefited from the Fund. In addition to planning grants for the county’s open space
and greenway plan several of the community parks the Trail will pass through have been
acquired and developed using money from the Keystone Fund.
Back in the Spring, the County applied for a grant to begin work on the next phase of the
Trail. Commissioner Smeltz commented that they County looks forward to continuing to utilize
monies from the Keystone Fund as the Trail is developed.
For more information on this program, visit the ​Keystone Fund​ website. Questions
should be directed to Renee’ Carey, 570-323-6222 or send email to: ​rcarey@npcweb.org​.
DCNR Grants
To learn more about other available grant opportunities to support trail and recreation
projects, attend one of the upcoming workshops on DCNR’s Community Conservation Grant
Program. ​Click Here​ for more.
(​Photo:​ Lock Haven University President Robert Pignatello.)
NewsClips:
Congress Debates Fix After Land & Water Conservation Fund Lapses
Letter: Protect The Federal Land And Water Conservation Fund
Editorial: Revive, Fully Fund Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund
Related Story:
PA Recreation & Park Society, DCNR To Hold Community Conservation Grant Workshops In
Oct., Nov.
Related Stories This Week:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR

22
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Stroud Water Research Center To Recognize American Rivers & CEO Bob Irvin With
Freshwater Excellence Award Nov. 29

The ​Stroud Water Research Center​ in Chester


County will recognize ​American Rivers​ and its
CEO Bob Irvin with the Freshwater Excellence
Award at its ​Water's Edge gala​ on November 29 at
the ​Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library​ in
Winterthur, Delaware.
The Stroud Award for Freshwater Excellence is a
prestigious award for outstanding achievement in
freshwater-related activities. Honorees represent
regions and watersheds from around the world and
a broad range of activities, professions, and scientific disciplines.
American Rivers​ was founded in 1973 by a group of river runners and conservationists.
They first met in Denver, Colorado to discuss concerns about unnecessary dams destroying
rivers and lack of action to protect rivers since the previously passed National Wild and Scenic
Rivers Act and Clean Water Act.
For the last 45 years, American Rivers has combined national advocacy with fieldwork in
key river basins to protect freshwater.
The mission of American Rivers is to protect healthy rivers, restore damaged rivers and
conserve clean water. They currently have more than 275,000 members, supporters, and
volunteers.
In the previous year alone, the organization has restored 407.5 miles of rivers, removed
2.58 million pounds of trash through their National River Cleanup, and granted $1.24 million to
local river conservation projects.
American Rivers uses advocacy, science, partnerships, and expertise to ensure the future
of healthy rivers.
Bob Irvin became President and CEO of American Rivers in 2011. Previous to taking on
this role, he held the position of Senior Vice President for Conservation Programs at Defenders
of Wildlife.
He has also served as Director of U.S. Conservation for World Wildlife Fund, Vice
President for Marine Wildlife Conservation and General Counsel for the Center for Marine
Conservation, Senior Counsel for Fish and Wildlife on the Majority Staff of the U.S. Senate
Committee on Environment and Public Works, and Counsel and Director of the Fisheries and
Wildlife Division, National Wildlife Federation.
Irvin holds a degree in law as well as a B.S. in Forest Science and his expertise is
biodiversity conservation, wildlife law, and the endangered species act. He has written and
lectured extensively on biodiversity conservation issues.
He was a member of the IUCN’s Red List Criteria Review Working Group, which
revised the standards for listing threatened species globally. He has taught Biodiversity
Protection at Vermont Law School for nearly 20 years and has also taught at the University of

23
Maryland School of Law.
Among previous winners of Stroud’s Freshwater Excellence Award include His Serene
Highness ​Prince Albert II of Monaco​, the ​National Park Service and its director Jonathan Jarvis
and ​Alexandra Cousteau​,
For more information on attending and support this event, visit Stroud’s ​Water's Edge
gala​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Stroud Water
Research Center​ website, ​Click Here​ to subscribe to UpStream. ​Click Here​ to subscribe to
Stroud’s Educator newsletter. ​Click Here​ to become a Friend Of Stroud Research, ​Like them on
Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, include them in your ​Circle on Google+​ and visit their ​YouTube
Channel​.
[Posted: Oct. 1, 2018]

Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species Ecologically Castrating The


Landscape, But There Is A Solution

The ​Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs


Committee​ Tuesday heard from a series of
presenters covering issues related to invasive
and native species.
One highlight of the hearing was a
presentation by ​Dr. Doug Tallamy​ of the
Department of Entomology & Applied
Ecology at the University of Delaware who
outlined how homeowners and landowners
have a major role to play in strengthening natural diversity in our landscapes so they can better
support wildlife, pollinators and humans.
“We have a basic problem, not just here in Pennsylvania but everywhere. As we have
expanded the human footprint, we’re destroying the natural world. We used to think that was
OK because there was a lot of nature, but there’s not a lot of nature any more.
“If we destroy the natural world, humans will not persist on this planet. We absolutely
need it, but there is a solution,” said Tallamy. “We have to learn how to coexist with nature
where we live, work and farm.
“Nature is a series of specialized relationships, especially as it relates to food sources and
it always starts with plants,” he said.
Tallamy used the Carolina Chickadees as an example of these specialized relationships.
He said most people believe they are seed eaters and that is part of their relationship with
plants, but when they are reproducing they feed their young insects because young Chickadees
cannot eat seeds.
He explained most of those insects are caterpillars and reproducing Chickadees are not
the exception. Most of the bird species feed their young insects and most of those insects are
caterpillars.
“The point here is you cannot have breeding birds in a landscape that does not have
enough caterpillars,” said Tallamy. “96 percent of birds in North America are rearing their
young on insects and not seeds.”

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He said it’s simple-- no insects, no baby birds.
Based on a 3-hour survey in his backyard, Tallamy documented Chickadees bringing
back 17 species of caterpillars to a nest to feed their young. They foraged the caterpillars within
50 meters of their nest in his yard.
He has counted up to 877 species of caterpillars in his yard to support bird reproduction
there.
“The point is diversity creates stability in the ecosystem” and the food web, so that
regardless of the weather or drought conditions, there will be enough caterpillars to support
breeding birds.
A Chickadee pair brings 390-570 caterpillars to the nest per day to feed their young and
they do that for 16 days before the young fledge which means 6,240 to 9,120 caterpillars per
season per nest.
“If we want to have birds where humans are we have to have the landscapes that generate
the insect life and caterpillars to support them,” said Tallamy.
He noted Chickadees are tiny birds-- about a third of an ounce, 4 pennies worth-- and
bigger birds and the diverse mixture of species people prefer require much more food.
Taking the specialized relationships one step further, Tallamy explained, 90 percent of
the insects that eat plants can develop and reproduce only on the plants with which they share an
evolutionary history because they have developed the techniques and adaptations to eat those
plants.
To explain this kind of relationship, he used the Monarch butterfly as an example.
Tallamy said the Monarch caterpillar is a milkweed specialist. The milkweed plant is
protected from being eaten by its white, latex sap. Monarch caterpillars, however, developed a
specialized approach to eating the milkweed leaves without having its mouth glued shut by the
sap.
The down side of specialization, he said, is now milkweeds are all Monarchs can eat. If
we take milkweeds out of our landscapes, like we have in so many places, we lose the Monarchs.
There has been a 96.4 percent decline in Monarchs since 1976 because we have eliminated their
food supply, Tallamy explained.
Because pound for pound there is twice as much protein in insects as there is in beef,
insects are critical parts of most of the food webs in nature, including wildlife as diverse as toads
and frogs, red foxes and even black bears which rely on insects for a major part of their diet.
Tallamy said we are losing insects species populations around the world, so it is not just a
local problem. Insect populations have already declined 45 percent globally since 1974.
He said because we have lost insect populations, 432 species or one-third of North
American birds are at risk of extinction and 46 species have lost half of their population.
Estimates are there are 1.5 billion fewer breeding birds compared to 40 years ago.
“We have 3,300 species of plants that have come from someplace else invading our
landscape,” said Tallamy. A third of the plants in our fields and yards are invasive species and
they simply do not support the insects and caterpillars needed to support wildlife and us. They
haven’t developed the specialize relationships they need.
As an example, he counted 19 species and 410 caterpillars around the base of a native
white oak (not even the entire tree) on one day in July. Black cherry, same thing-- 14 species
and 239 caterpillars.
He said this is the natural relationship between native trees and insects and there is no

25
damage to the tree.
Compare that to the Asian Callery pear tree of about the same age that many people plant
because they look nice-- there was 1 species of caterpillar and 1 caterpillar. Same thing for
non-native burning bush-- 1 species, 2 caterpillars.
Tallamy said another issue with non-native and invasive species is “biological pollution”
where these species “ecologically castrate” all the land around them by spreading beyond their
initial planting sites to neighboring areas.
Tallamy said we don’t have to guess any more what kinds of trees and plants we should
populate our landscapes with to support insects, wildlife and diversity.
He helped develop a tool with the National Wildlife Federation property owners can plant
to support wildlife -- ​Native Plant Finder​ or the Audubon Society’s ​Plants for Birds​ webpages.
Tallamy said there are real consequences from the way we landscape our yards.
“How many species do we need to preserve? We need all of them because they produce
the ecosystem services that support humans,” said Tallamy. “We have already degraded the
ability of the planet to support humans by 60 percent. That’s the same as taking planet Earth and
shrinking it by 60 percent.”
Tallamy said we can’t just rely on parks and preserves to maintain our diversity because
they are too isolated. “That’s where nature is huddling right now, but they are not sustainable,
they are too small. This has got to happen on private property.
“To restore nature’s relationships, we must raise the bar for what we ask our landscapes
to do: support life, sequester carbon, clean and manage water, enrich soil, support pollinators by
planting the right plants,” said Tallamy. “They can’t just be pretty.”
“We are not talking about good land stewardship, we are talking about essential land
stewardship,” added Tallamy. If we lose our pollinators, it will not only hurt agriculture, but also
the 80 to 90 percent of the plants that depend on pollinators to survive.
“If we think about plants only as decorations that equals ecological destruction,” said
Tallamy. We need to think about plants as supporting nature and protecting our watershed so
they contribute to ecological restoration.
Dr. Tallamy has published a book-- ​Bringing Nature Home​-- on native gardening and
biodiversity outlining similar points made in his presentation only in more detail.
Click Here ​to watch a video of the hearing. Dr. Tallamy’s presentation is first. Also
making presentations were--
-- ​Dr. John Wallace​, Penn State Extension Weed Crop Specialist;
-- ​Ruth Welliver​,​ Director ​Bureau of Plant Industry, PA Dept. of Agriculture​;
-- ​Lydia Martin​, Director of Education, ​Lancaster County Conservancy​;
-- Wendy Brister,​ Owner/Operator ​Harvey’s Garden​; and
-- Greg Wilson​, Conservationist, Lancaster County, who pointed out Warwick Township
adopted an ordinance requiring property owners to landscape with 75 percent native species.
Sen. Elder Vogel (R-Beaver) serves as Majority Chair of the ​Senate Agriculture
Committee​, and can be contacted by sending email to: ​evogel@pasen.gov​. Sen. Judy Schwank
(D-Berks) serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by sending email to:
SenatorSchwank@pasenate.com​.
(​Photo:​ Monarch caterpillar, Chickadee.)
Native Plant Resources
There are lots of resources available to help property owners landscape with native

26
plants, including--
-- ​DCNR Landscaping With Native Plants
-- Game Commission: ​Common Beneficial Plants Found In Wildlife Habitat
-- U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: ​Native Plants For Wildlife Habitat And Conservation
Landscaping
-- ​Chesapeake Bay Sustainable Landscape Professional Directory
-- Brandywine Conservancy: ​Forested Riparian Buffer Planting Guide
-- Audubon PA: ​Bird Habitat Recognition Program
-- National Audubon: ​Native Plants Database
-- ​Xerces Society For Invertebrate Conservation
-- ​Gardening For Butterflies: Penn State Extension
-- ​Planting For Pollinators: Penn State Extension
-- ​Center For Pollinator Research, Penn State
-- ​Pennsylvania Pollinator Protection Plan ​- ​Learn Why Pollinators Are At Risk In PA
-- ​Ernst Seeds - Pollinator Habitat Restoration
-- ​Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
You can also check with ​land trusts​, ​watershed groups​, ​PA Audubon​ and ​Trout Unlimited
Chapters, ​county conservation district​ or other groups near you to see how they can help.
For example, the Manada Conservancy in Dauphin County has a ​Native Plant Landscape
Design Service​ to help landowners.
NewsClips:
Officials Plan To Vaccinate Raccoons In Pittsburgh Neighborhoods
AP: 2 More Rabid Raccoons Found In Pittsburgh Area
Changing Weather Will Influence Erie-Area Bird Migration
Philadelphia’s Glass Skyline Is Killing Birds, New Fairmount Park Building Has A Solution
3 Bat Species Could Be Listed As Endangered
Related Stories:
Feature: Recognizing The Value Of Native Plants For Pollinators​ - Dr. Doug Tallamy
Agriculture, Penn State Release PA Pollinator Protection Plan Recommendations
Pollinator Population Is Going Down In PA Due To Pesticides, Parasites And Pathogens
Related Stories This Week:
Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service
Dept. Of Agriculture Issues General Quarantine Order To Address Rabies In Domestic Animals,
217 Cases In Animals This Year
Attention Drivers! Be Alert For Deer This Fall, Crashes And Fatalities Rose In PA
[Posted: Oct. 3, 2018]

Dept. Of Agriculture Issues General Quarantine Order To Address Rabies In Domestic


Animals, 217 Cases In Animals This Year

The Department of Agriculture ​published notice​ of a


Rabies​ General Quarantine Order under the state
Domestic Animal Act ​covering domestic animals in the
October 6 PA Bulletin.
One of the primary purposes of issuing the

27
quarantine order was to change the quarantine period for unvaccinated domestic animals exposed
to rabies from six months to 120 days based on the latest science, according to Dr. Kevin
Brightbill, Assistant Director of the Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostics Services at the
Department of Agriculture.
The quarantine period for vaccinated domestic animals was changed to an observation
period from 90 to 45 days.
One concern about the distribution of rabies cases so far this year is the higher number of
cases in Allegheny County, said Dr. Brightbill, where there is an ​active raccoon rabies
vaccination baiting program​ to help prevent rabies in the state’s number one carrier of the
disease.
The Department of Agriculture reports there have been ​217 cases of rabies this year
through August in domestic and wild animals. The counties with the highest number of cases are
Lancaster (16), Allegheny (15), York (15) and Montgomery (10). ​Click Here f​ or a map.
In ​2017, 347 animals tested positive for rabies​ in Pennsylvania, just over 50 percent were
racoons, according to the Department of Health. The annual average of animal cases is 392.
Following racoons in frequency of positive tests are cats, bats, skunks, foxes,
groundhogs, cows, dogs, horses and coyotes.
The ​state Rabies Act​ requires dogs and cats to be vaccinated against rabies within 4
weeks after the date the dog or cat attains 12 weeks of age, and maintain a current rabies
immunity as prescribed by rabies vaccine manufacturers.
The counties in the Southeast area of the state reported higher numbers of rabid animals
than other areas, according to the ​PA Animal Rabies 2017 Report​.
The last human rabies case reported in Pennsylvania was in 1984, according to the
Report.
Quarantine Order
Rabies is designated a ''dangerous transmissible disease'' of animals under § 2321(a)(7)
of the Act (relating to dangerous transmissible diseases).
The Department has broad authority under the Act to regulate the keeping and handling
of domestic animals to exclude, contain or eliminate dangerous transmissible diseases. This
includes the authority at § 2329(d) (relating to quarantine) to establish and enforce this General
Quarantine Order.
The Quarantine Order says in part--
-- Establishes a General Quarantine applicable to the entire Commonwealth
-- Dogs, cats and other domestic animal bites, as well as other potential rabies virus exposure of
humans are required to be reported to the Department of Health or local health authority
-- A veterinarian, public health official, or official representative of the Department of
Agriculture, the Department of Health, or the Game Commission who suspects that a dog, cat or
other domestic animal is exhibiting clinical signs consistent with rabies shall report the suspicion
to the Department's Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Services.
-- A dog, cat, or other domestic animal which, prior to exposure to a confirmed rabid or
suspected rabid animal, was never vaccinated against rabies or where the owner or keeper can
produce no proof of a prior vaccination shall be quarantined by the Department for a minimum
of 120 days, unless euthanized.
-- A dog, cat, or other domestic animal which has been exposed to a confirmed or suspected
rabid animal and has a valid and current vaccination against rabies at the time of exposure, shall

28
be observed for clinical signs of rabies by the owner or keeper for 45 days. Any suspicion of
rabies shall be reported to the Department.
The Quarantine Order remains in effect until rescinded or modified by the Department of
Agriculture.
Click Here​ to read the entire Order.
For more information on rabies related to domestic animals, visit the Department of
Agriculture’s ​Rabies​ webpage. Questions should be direct to 717-772-2852 or send email to:
ra-ahds@pa.gov​.
For information on rabies in wild animals, visit the Game Commission’s ​Rabies
webpage.
Information on rabies in people can be found at the Department of Health’s ​Rabies
webpage. ​Click Here​ for a rabies fact sheet.
NewsClips:
Officials Plan To Vaccinate Raccoons In Pittsburgh Neighborhoods
AP: 2 More Rabid Raccoons Found In Pittsburgh Area
Related Stories:
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species Ecologically Castrating The Landscape, But
There Is A Solution
Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service
Attention Drivers! Be Alert For Deer This Fall, Crashes And Fatalities Rose In PA
[Posted: Oct. 5, 2018]

Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition

Above-average temperatures last week slowed the


foliage transition throughout the Commonwealth,
according to the latest ​Fall Foliage Report​ from the
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
Foresters in northern and southwestern Pennsylvania
are reporting localized defoliations of some maples,
cherries, and oaks due to heavy wind, rain, and fungi.
Most foliage in southern Pennsylvania is unchanged
from last week, but most of the state’s forests are
showing signs of the season.
Northeastern counties continue to boast the best color
in the state, however substantial foliage progress has
been noted from Mercer eastward through Clearfield counties.
Long-range weather forecasts call for a considerable cooldown in roughly one week,
which should accelerate the foliar transition throughout the majority of Pennsylvania.
With most of the state’s forests still various shades of green, it is clear the best of fall
foliage season is yet to come!
Click Here​ for this week’s map and all the details! Visit DCNR’s ​Fall Foliage Report
webpage for more information.
Visitors can get suggestions about the best spots to view fall foliage on the ​Penn's Woods
Fall Foliage story map​ and on the ​Pennsylvania Tourism Office​ website.

29
NewsClips:
Schneck: Beautiful PA: Farmlands Offer Early Color Ahead Of Fall Foliage
Schneck: Fall Foliage Season In PA: Wait For It
Fall Colors Expected To Be Later, Duller Than Usual
Official: Warm, Wet Temps Dim Fall Glow
PA Fall Road Trip: 10 Scenic Towns You Should Visit This Season
11 Breathtaking Overlooks You Can Drive To In PA For Fall Foliage
Related Stories:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Senate/House Bills Moving Last Week

The following bills of interest saw action last week in the House and Senate--

House

Abolishing Boards/Commissions:​ ​House Bill 2105​ (Fritz-R-Susquehanna) abolishing certain


“obsolete” boards and commissions was removed from the Table and is now on the House
Calendar for action.

Nutrient Management Board:​ ​Senate Bill 1171​ (Brooks-R-Crawford) changing the


membership of the Nutrient Management Advisory Board was amended to provide detailed
procedures for DEP to consult with the existing Agricultural Advisory Board on the adoption of
technical guidance, changes to permits affecting agriculture and regulations and was reported out
of the House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee and Tabled.

30
Senate

Tailpipe Testing: ​House Bill 86​ (Lawrence-R-Chester) eliminating tailpipe emissions testing for
1992-1995 vehicles in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia areas (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was
reported out of the Senate Appropriations Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for
action.

Pipeline Commission:​ ​Senate Resolution 373​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) establishing a


commission to study pipeline construction and operations was removed from the Table and is
now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Recreation Liability:​ ​House Bill 544​ (Moul-R-Adams) further providing for liability protection
for landowners opening their land for public recreation was referred to the Senate Appropriations
Committee.

Mushroom Compost:​ ​Senate Bill 917​ (Dinniman-R-Chester) amends Act 101 Municipal Waste
Planning and Recycling Act to include spent mushroom compost under the definition of
“compost materials to encourage its reuse (​sponsor summary​) was Tabled.

Fuel Cell Day:​ ​Senate Resolution 459​ (Mensch-R-Montgomery) recognizing October 8 as


National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day in Pennsylvania was adopted by the Senate.

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule/ Bills Introduced

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (Oct. 9)​: ​House Bill 1401​ (DiGirolamo-R-Bucks) which amends Title 58 to impose a
sliding scale natural gas severance tax, in addition to the Act 13 drilling impact fee, on natural
gas production (NO money for environmental programs) and includes provisions related to
minimum landowner oil and gas royalties; ​House Bill 1446​ (Quinn-R- Bucks) encouraging
infrastructure for electric and natural gas fueled vehicles; ​House Bill 2105​ (Fritz-R-
Susquehanna) abolishing certain “obsolete” boards and commissions; ​House Bill 2638
(Stephens-R- Montgomery) establishes the Military Installation Remediation Authority to
address cleanup costs at the former Willow Grove Naval Air Station funded by redirecting Sales
Tax revenue from the redevelopment of the facility (​sponsor summary​); ​House Resolution 284
(Moul-R-Adams) urging Congress to repeal the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s MS4
Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program (​sponsor summary​)​; ​House Resolution 943
(Tallman-R-Adams) urging the federal Food And Drug Administration to promptly consider
candidates for Lyme disease vaccinations;​ ​Senate Bill 1172​ (Vulakovich-R-Allegheny) further
providing for enforcement of price gouging provisions during an emergency declaration (​Senate
Fiscal Note​ and summary). ​<> ​Click Here​ for full House Bill Calendar.

31
Senate (Oct. 15): ​Senate Bill 820 ​(Aument-R- Lancaster) providing liability protection for
owners and operators of on-farm agritourism activities (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 930
(Dinniman-D- Chester) sets notification requirements related to pipeline emergencies (​sponsor
summary​); ​Senate Bill 931​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requires the installation of automatic or
remote controlled safety values in natural gas pipelines in densely populated areas; ​Senate Bill
1199​ (Rafferty-R- Montgomery) providing for a landowners’ bill of rights in cases of eminent
domain, including by private entities like pipeline companies (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate
Resolution 214​ (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) urging Pennsylvania natural gas producers to export
gas to European countries in an effort to curtail the monopoly that Russia has on supply to that
region (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Resolution 373​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) is a concurrent
Senate-House resolution to ​establish a Senate-House legislative Commission to Study Pipeline
Construction and Operations and to recommend improvements for the safe transport of oil,
natural gas and other hazardous liquids through pipelines; ​House Bill 86​ (Lawrence-R-Chester)
eliminating tailpipe emissions testing for 1992-1995 vehicles in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia
areas (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary); ​House Bill 1550​ (Klunk-R-York) amending the
Agricultural Area Security Law to allow for a residence for the principal landowner (​House
Fiscal Note​ and summary); ​House Bill 2154​ (Causer-R-Cameron) which would weaken
environmental standards for conventional (not Shale) oil and gas drilling​. <> ​Click Here​ for full
Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

House:​ the ​Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ meets to consider​ ​Senate Bill
138​ (Yaw-R-Lycoming) providing oil and gas royalty interest landowners access to records of
drilling companies to verify proper payment of royalties (​sponsor summary​); the ​Veterans
Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee​ meets to consider ​House Resolution 1112
(Barrar-R-Delaware) calling on federal government to recognize the importance of durable,
flood-resilient infrastructure (​sponsor summary​). <> ​Click Here​ for full House Committee
Schedule.

Senate:​ <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Committee Schedule.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Bills Introduced

The following bills of interest were introduced last week--

Universal Lead Testing: ​Senate Bill 1270​ (Yudichak-D-Luzerne, Baker-R-Luzerne) providing


for universal testing of children for lead (​sponsor summary​).

Fuel Cell Day:​ ​Senate Resolution 459​ (Mensch-R-Montgomery) recognizing October 8 as

32
National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day in Pennsylvania was adopted by the Senate.

Community Solar:​ ​House Bill 2681​ (Santora-R-Delaware) authorize community solar project to
allow individuals and businesses to participate in project even though the project may not be
located on their property (​sponsor summary​). ​Click Here​ for more.

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
October 15, 16, 17
November 14

House​ [​Updated​]
October 9, 10, ​11,​ 15, 16, & 17.
November 13

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

Senators To Introduce Bipartisan Pipeline Siting Bill, 4 Other Pipeline-Related Bills Now
On Senate Calendar

Senators John Rafferty (R-Montgomery), Andy


Dinniman (D-Chester) and Tom Killion
(R-Delaware) recently ​announced plans to introduce
bipartisan legislation​ requiring the Department of
Environmental Protection to develop clear pipeline
siting guidelines and permit conditions to reduce the
dangers associated with new natural gas-related
pipeline construction.
The legislation follows up on recommendations
made by Andrew Place, Vice Chair of the Public
Utility Commission, and DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell that there ​needs to be a “serious
conversation” in the General Assembly​ on how state government can have a meaningful role in
siting pipelines like the Mariner East 2.
Both Place and McDonnell noted other states have already taken on this role.
In a memo to their colleagues​ asking for their support, the Senators said, “Today, more
than 1 million Pennsylvanians live or work near oil and gas infrastructure. A clear commitment
33
to require transparent safety management and siting plans will signal to communities that
Pennsylvania is taking steps to reduce potential risks while working to make Pennsylvania
energy development as safe as possible by requiring advanced leak detection that will not only
reduce community impacts, but will also cut down on the waste of precious American natural gas
or otherwise known as methane.”
The legislation they, said would, require, “the Department of Environmental Protection to
develop clear permit conditions and siting guidelines to increase the focus on pipeline safety and
pipeline infrastructure siting to reduce the dangers of improper siting, improper safety
management and wasted American resources—ensuring that as a state we are, at a minimum,
ensuring the pipelines are built and operated in the safest way possible that minimizes the
impacts to communities and sensitive environmental areas.
“Public policy leadership is essential to ensuring that Pennsylvania puts in place an
oversight framework that is consistent with the pace and scale that science demands to avoid the
worst effects of bad pipeline management – a framework flexible enough to adapt to technology
innovation and advanced leak detection.
“The purpose of the legislation is to catalyze leadership-- reducing the risks pipelines
pose to communities while allowing for the responsible development only the most essential and
safest pipelines for the Commonwealth that can benefit all citizens.”
Other Pending Bills
On Monday, the Senate removed ​Senate Resolution 373​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery)-- a
concurrent Senate-House resolution to ​establish a Senate-House legislative Commission to Study
Pipeline Construction and Operations and to recommend improvements for the safe transport of
oil, natural gas and other hazardous liquids through pipelines-- ​from the Table and put it in
position for a final vote by the full Senate at any time.
Senate Resolution 373 was ​reported out of Committee in June​ to the full Senate.
Senate Bill 1199​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery)-- providing for a landowners’ bill of rights in
cases of eminent domain, including by private entities like pipeline companies (​sponsor
summary​)-- was also ​reported out of Committee in June​ and has sat on the Senate Calendar since
then.
Legislation sponsored by Sen. Dinniman-- ​Senate Bill 930​ (Dinniman-D- Chester)
setting notification requirements related to pipeline emergencies (​sponsor summary​) and ​Senate
Bill 931​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requiring the installation of automatic or remote controlled
safety values in natural gas pipelines in densely populated areas was reported out of committee
in November of last year and has remained on the Senate Calendar without action since then.
Sen. Dinniman has followed up on his concerns about the safety and construction
practices of the Mariner East 2 Pipeline by ​filing a petition with the Public Utility Commission​ in
April that led to the shutdown of construction on that pipeline in Chester County.
Part of the PUC shutdown order remains in effect. The Commission is scheduled to meet
on October 4 and may take additional action on this issue.
StateImpact PA reported Monday​ the Mariner East 2 Pipeline faces a number of
regulatory hurdles with the PUC and DEP before it can complete construction and begin
operation.
Senate/House Hearings
In March, the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy and Consumer Affairs and
Professional Licensure ​Committees held a joint hearing on pipeline safety issues​ that pointed to

34
the need to hold pipeline companies more accountable for impacts and better communication.
In July, the House Republican ​Policy Committee held a hearing on pipeline siting​ and
safety issues for pipelines like the Mariner East 2 Pipeline in Chester and Delaware counties.
Pipeline Task Force
In February 2016, the ​Pipeline Task Force presented a series of 184​ suggestions to Gov.
Wolf to help Pennsylvania achieve responsible development of natural gas pipeline infrastructure
in the state. Among the recommendations were--
-- Plan, site and route pipelines to avoid/reduce environmental and community impacts
-- Amplify and engage in meaningful public participation
-- Establish early coordination with local landowners and lessors
-- Educate landowners on pipeline development issues
-- Develop long-term operations and maintenance plans to ensure pipeline safety and integrity
-- Train emergency responders
-- Enhance emergency response training for responder agencies
-- Employ construction methods that reduce environmental impact
-- Minimize impacts of stream crossings
-- Ensure adequate agency staffing for reviewing pipeline infrastructure projects
Click Here​ for a copy of the report.
NewsClips:
Crable: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Gets Green Light To Operate Starting Saturday
Cusick: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Goes Into Full Operation This Weekend
Hurdle: Numerous Unresolved PUC, DEP Regulatory Issues Delay Opening Of Mariner East 2
Pipeline
Phillips: Mariner East 2 Pipeline: What Are Natural Gas Liquids And What Happens If they
Leak?
Trump Administration Tackles Pipeline Cybersecurity
Trump Nominates Coal, Nuclear Bailout Support To FERC
Trump Nominates DOE’s McNamee To FERC
Zinke Talks Natural Gas Exports, Pipeline Constraints In PA Visit
Williams Pipeline CEO Compliments PA’s Regulatory Climate
Related Stories:
PUC Continues On-Site Mutual Aid To Massachusetts In Aftermath Of Natural Gas Line
Explosion
FERC Approves Operation Of Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Staring Oct. 6
[Posted: Oct. 2, 2018]

Bipartisan Bill To Authorize Community Solar Energy Projects Introduced In The House

35
Rep. ​James Santora​ (R-Delaware) Wednesday introduced bipartisan legislation-- ​House Bill
2681​-- to authorized community solar electric generating systems.
Rep. Santora, along with Representatives ​Aaron Kaufer​ (R-Luzerne), ​Donna Bullock
(D-Philadelphia) and ​Peter Schweyer​ (D-Lehigh) originally circulated the co-sponsor memo on
this bill. The memo said in part--
“Community solar allows neighbors, businesses, farms, and other community members to
directly participate in and receive the benefits from a solar project connected to their local
electric distribution company’s grid.
“Participants can subscribe to a portion of an offsite solar project and receive credit on
their electricity bill for the power produced, just as if the panels were on their roof.
“This program extends to all Pennsylvania residents and businesses the ability to acquire
solar energy from a specific community solar project. It also gives citizens and businesses the
choice to participate – there is no mandate for participation or request for state funding.
“Under current law, individuals who are renters, have a shaded roof, live in an apartment
building, or lack roof access, are unable to directly participate in Pennsylvania’s growing solar
economy.
“This bill simply removes an existing policy barrier and by doing so will allow
individuals to participate in a community solar project if they choose. It’s a simple fix that opens
a new market sector in the energy industry, allowing for continued innovation.
“Community solar offers many benefits for both participants and the Commonwealth,
including--
-- Economic development through private investment and creation of local jobs through the
entire solar supply chain including installers, contractors, investors and site preparation.
-- Saving consumers and businesses money on their electricity bills, and benefiting all ratepayers
by supplying extra energy to the grid during peak demand on hot days when prices are highest.
-- Using private capital to connect community solar projects to the grid and upgrading the
electricity network for the benefit of all consumers
-- Creating a pathway for low and moderate income residents to enjoy the benefits of solar
because these projects do not require a large upfront investment.
-- Increasing the amount of clean, pollution-free energy coming onto the grid.
-- Promoting good land use decisions since solar projects no longer need to be on the property of

36
the subscriber. These projects can be located almost anywhere—rooftops, parking lots,
brownfields, reclaimed mining lands—and where these projects make the most sense. For
example, farmers could more aggressively benefit from the cost savings and extra income stream
of solar without having to take farmland out of production. Some ground mounted solar arrays
are now being developed as preserves for native plants and pollinators.
-- Community solar projects can be developed by private owners, municipalities and institutions,
stimulating the development of true community partnerships.
The memo concluded by saying, “The four of us have different backgrounds and
perspectives, but are united in the view that it is time for Pennsylvania join this growing and
innovative new market.”
(​Photos:​ Representatives J​ ames Santora​ (R-Delaware), ​Aaron Kaufer​ (R-Luzerne), ​Donna
Bullock​ (D-Philadelphia) and ​Peter Schweyer​ (D-Lehigh).)
Resource Link:
Vote Solar - Pennsylvania
NewsClips:
Western PA Solar Tour Oct. 6 Features Stops In Washington County
C-PACE Alliance Tapped To Help Design C-PACE Program For Local Governments In PA
PJM Renewables Future Includes Significant Chunk Of Corporate Procurement
Related Story:
PennLive.com Op-Ed: Community Solar Is Long Overdue In PA, Lawmakers In Harrisburg Can
Fix That
[Posted: Oct. 5, 2018]

House Environment Committee Set To Meet Oct. 9 On Natural Gas Royalty Bill

The ​House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ is scheduled to hold a meeting
October 9 to consider ​Senate Bill 138​ (Yaw-R-Lycoming) providing oil and gas royalty interest
landowners access to records of drilling companies to verify proper payment of royalties
(​sponsor summary​).
A companion bill also passed by the Senate on this issue-- ​Senate Bill 139
(Yaw-R-Lycoming)-- is not on the agenda, along it is in the Committee.
The General Assembly has been wrestling with the issues surrounding Act 60 of 1979
which set a guaranteed minimum royalty of not less than 12.5 percent for royalty interest
landowners and whether post-production costs should be deducted from that amount.
A ​2010 PA Supreme Court ruling​ resulted in a decision allowing oil and gas producers to
deduct the cost of moving gas from wellhead to the marketplace.
As a result, shale gas drilling companies have been deducting post-production costs and
paying landowners less than the 12.5 percent they believe they were guaranteed. Companies also
have provisions in their oil and gas leases with landowners allowing them to deduct
post-production costs.
Rep. Garth Everett (R-Lycoming) has been introducing legislation since the 2013-14
legislative session to guarantee landowners the full 12.5 percent royalty without deducting
post-production costs.
His most recent bill-- ​House Bill 557​ (Everett-R-Lycoming)-- is also in the House
Environmental Committee.

37
Rep. Everett and other House members from shale gas areas have trying to attach
language from their bill to any other potential vehicle that comes along.
A lengthy debate on legislation-- House Bill 1401 (DiGirolamo-R-Bucks) to impose a
severance tax on natural gas production last December saw several attempts to ​amend the bill
with minimum royalty payment language​.
In May, ​Gov. Wolf came out in favor of bipartisan bills​-- ​Senate Bill 1000​ and ​House
Bill 2253​-- imposing a severance tax that includes minimum royalty payment language. House
Bill 2253 is also in the House Environmental Committee.
In February 2017, Rep. John Maher (R-Allegheny) Majority Chair of the House
Environmental Committee was ​quoted in a StateImpact PA article​ as saying, “I think Senator
Yaw’s ideas are good. But my concern last session was if those bills went into law, there can be
tendency around the legislature to say, ‘Oh we’ve already addressed that issue.’ His ideas are
good, but they’re not enough.”
The shale gas industry has been vigorously lobbying against Rep. Everett’s legislation.
There have also been a series of lawsuits filed by landowners with royalty interests
against natural gas companies.
One of the largest-- against Chesapeake Energy-- was ​settled by a large group of
Pennsylvania landowners in August​. Last January another ​group of landowners reached a
settlement with Chesapeake Energy​ in federal court.
The ​Attorney General also filed a lawsuit​ against Chesapeake Energy over royalty
payments in 2015 and has not yet been resolved.
The Independent Fiscal Office reported in March of this year Pennsylvania landowners
received over $5.325 billion in natural gas royalties​ from 2012 to 2016.
The Committee meeting will be held in Room B-31 Main Capitol and will be called Off
the Floor, which means there is no specific meeting time and can be held whenever the House
takes a break from its session. ​House meetings are typically webcast through the ​House
Republican Caucus​ website.
Rep. John Maher (R-Allegheny) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1522 or sending email to:
jmaher@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Mike Carroll serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by
calling 717-787-3589 or sending email to: ​mcarroll@pahouse.net​.
NewsClip:
Cusick: House Panel To Take Up Gas Royalty Bill, But Not The One Advocates Hoped For
[Posted: Oct. 1, 2018]

News From Around The State

Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland
County As Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program

On October 4, ​GIANT Food Stores​ and ​Keep


Pennsylvania Beautiful​ held a volunteer tree
planting event at ​Kings Gap Environmental Center
in Cumberland County as part of GIANT's
program to help customers reduce their carbon
38
footprint.
“We are thrilled to expand our relationship with Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful as part of
our ​Reduced Emissions Program​,” said Manuel Haro, GIANT/MARTIN’S vice president,
strategy. “This is a great opportunity for both GIANT/MARTIN’S and Keep Pennsylvania
Beautiful to go the extra mile and make a difference, together, right here in the communities we
work and live in across the Commonwealth.”
Announced in April of this year, for every qualifying gallon of fuel purchased at
GIANT/MARTIN’S 99 fuel stations, ​GreenPrint​ will invest in carbon projects across the globe,
like creating local greenscapes or tree plantings.
These efforts will offset up to 30 percent of the customer’s tailpipe carbon emissions.
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful has more than 25 years of experience in organizing
volunteer-driven illegal dump cleanup and beautification events.
Expanding upon the contributions from Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful’s active network of
local affiliates, the organization will enlist GIANT employee volunteers in conjunction with the
Reduced Emissions Program community outreach team.
GIANT already provides many hours of employee-contributed community improvement
projects and this new program will continue to advance its efforts to be a better community and a
better place to work.
“We are excited to build on our existing relationship with GIANT through the Reduced
Emissions Program,” explains Shannon Reiter, president of Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful.
“GIANT is a sponsor of the Great American Cleanup of PA and for the last two years has
provided recycled content benches to schools participating in our Litter Free School Zone
program. We look forward to supporting GIANT employees wanting to engage directly in their
communities through this new effort.”
GIANT is committed to being a responsible retailer through a variety of other green
efforts.
Last month, GIANT announced its Cleona, Lancaster County store located at 481 West
Penn Avenue, as the first in the chain to reach zero waste. A recognized definition by the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency, zero waste means 90 percent or more of a store’s total waste
is being diverted from a landfill or incineration.
Last year, the company saved more than 930,000 trees by recycling cardboard at all
stores and distribution centers.
Since 2011, GIANT and its parent company have successfully removed more than one
billion plastic bags from the waste stream through more efficient bagging, increased usage of
reusable tote bags by customers, and turning plastic bags into 1,500 donated park benches
through its Bags to Benches program.
Currently, 77 percent of all waste generated by its stores is diverted through recycling
and composting.
The volunteer tree planting on October 4 will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at
Kings Gap Environmental Center​, 500 Kings Gap Road, Carlisle, 17015.
For more information, visit Giant’s ​Reduced Emission Program​ and ​Care For The
Environment​ webpages.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on

39
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
NewsClips:
ER Nurses Seeking More Health Issues Linked To Climate Change
Changing Weather Will Influence Erie-Area Bird Migration
Op-Ed: The Economic And Environmental Benefits Of A Carbon Swap For PA Families
Op-Ed: EPA’s Affordable Clean Energy Rules Is Neither ​-- PUC Commissioner Andrew Place
Editorial: More Trees In Philadelphia Can Help With Climate Change
Trump’s NHTSA Sees 7-Degree Rise In Global Temps In 82 Years
DOE Moves To Slash Cost Of Carbon Capture For Coal-Fired Power Plants
Trump Administration Preparing To Weaken Mercury Rule
EPA Rewrites Mercury Rules Using New Cost-Benefit Approach To Curtail Future Regs
Related Story:
PA's Weis Markets Receives Platinum EPA Greenchill Certification For Reducing Refrigerant
Emissions
Related Stories This Week:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
[Posted: Oct. 1, 2018]

Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania

Keep America Beautiful​ and Anheuser-Busch Wednesday announced the award of 10 grants
totaling $95,000 as part of its Watershed Grants Program. The grants were awarded to--
-- ​Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful​: Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful, a state affiliate of Keep America
Beautiful, will create mini-grants to be used for watershed projects throughout the state of
Pennsylvania.
-- ​Keep Philadelphia Beautiful​: Keep Philadelphia Beautiful (KPB), the Philadelphia Water
Department, and social enterprise United by Blue will partner with the ​Heinz Wildlife Refuge​ in

40
Southwest Philadelphia to conduct KPB’s second annual river cleanup at that site.
Grant funds support volunteer initiatives ranging from river cleanups to invasive species
removal to riparian restoration planting to river bank stabilization and stream buffers, all
designed to improve the health and vitality of local watersheds.
The projects will engage volunteers from Keep America Beautiful community-based
affiliates and partnering organizations working with the input and participation from local
Anheuser-Busch wholesalers.
“We are proud of our longstanding partnership with Keep America Beautiful and our
collective goal to drive meaningful change for our environment,” said Adam Warrington, vice
president, corporate social responsibility at Anheuser-Busch. “Our company wants a world that
is cleaner and more sustainable for future generations, and we believe in doing our part to
promote water conservation and improved energy efficiency across every aspect of our business.
We look forward to our continued partnership with Keep America Beautiful to fulfill our shared
objective of a better world.”
“Keep America Beautiful is thrilled with our partnership with Anheuser-Busch on this
grant program because clean, beautiful watersheds directly connect with a community’s
long-term environmental stewardship efforts,” said Helen Lowman, president and CEO, Keep
America Beautiful.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
Related Stories:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

41
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In
MS4 Stormwater Pollution Reduction

On October 16 from Noon to 1:00 p.m., Penn State Extension will


host a webinar on the ​Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In
MS4 Stormwater Pollution Reduction​.
Andy Yencha, Extension Educator, explains the purpose of municipal
separate storm sewer systems, the requirements DEP places on some
communities when it comes to their stormwater management
activities, the benefits of separating municipal sanitary and storm
sewer systems to protect surface and groundwater quality, and the
large role Community Forest Managers play in educating, forming
policy and taking on-site actions for improving stormwater
management.
Professional continuing education credits are available.
Click Here​ to register or for more information. Questions should be directed to Scott
Sjolander at 814-350-7749 or send email to: ​sas305@psu.edu​.
(​Photo:​ ​Role Of Trees In Stormwater Management.​ )
Related Stories:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18

The ​York County Master Watershed Stewards​ will


host a ​Rain Barrel Workshop​ on October 18 at the
Penn State Extension Office, 112 Pleasant Acres
Road in York from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.
The workshop fee includes a plastic 65 gallon

42
drum, all the necessary parts, and assistance to build your rain barrel! All tools are provided.
Please bring appropriate transportation to take your barrel home.
Click Here​ to register for the workshop and for more information.
There are Penn State Extension ​Master Watershed Stewards Programs​ in Allegheny,
Berks, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery,
Northampton, Wyoming and York Counties.
Interested in becoming a Master Watershed Steward in your area? Visit Penn State
Extension’s ​Master Watershed Steward Program​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Erin
Frederick at 610-391-9840 or send email to: ​elf145@psu.edu​.
Related Stories:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
[Posted: Oct. 2, 2018]

Pike Conservation District Supports Student Rusty Crayfish Sampling Project

A ​Pike County Conservation District​ $500


Environmental Education Grant recently
supported an invasive species sampling project
conducted by students in the ​Wallenpaupack High
School Environmental Club​.
The grant helped to purchase project equipment.
Under the guidance of Wallenpaupack Biology
teacher Linda Lohner and Ecologist Richard
Evans of the National Park Service, the students
searched for rusty crayfish on the Pennsylvania
side of the ​Delaware Water Gap National
Recreation Area​.
The large, aggressive species of freshwater

43
crayfish had been found on the New Jersey side in 2015.
The rusty crayfish is native to the Ohio River Basin, but was introduced to new areas by
fishermen using them as bait. As its range rapidly expands in North America, the rusty crayfish
is displacing native species, such as our common brook crayfish and spiny cheeked crayfish.
During their summer break, the Wallenpaupack students sampled 26 sites and logged 580
hours on their project. Of 620 crayfish captured, none were identified as rusty crayfish.
“Engaging in a real research project – working with scientists and collecting real data – is
a great experience for students,” says Lohner. “You can’t learn what field work is like in a
classroom or from a book.”
The Wallenpaupack students presented project highlights to members of the PCCD Board
of Directors on September 17.
Ecologist Evans shared the students’ data with scientists at the Fish & Boat Commission,
the ​Academy of Natural Sciences at Drexel University​, and ​Delaware Riverkeeper​.
“We are so proud of these young researchers,” said PCCD Executive Director Michele
Long. “They gained valuable experience and skills, and contributed to data that can help to stop
the rusty crayfish from further impacting our native species and local waters.”
Visit the Education tab at PikeConservation.org for more information about the District’s
Environmental Education Grant or call 570-226-8220.
(​Photo:​ Wallenpaupack Area High School students Max Olsson, Jillian Tait, Paulina Schmidt,
Marlee Olsson, Robbie Opalecky, Charles Olsson, and Ann Olsson prepare to survey crayfish in
Raymondskill Creek.)
NewsClips:
Beveridge: Floating Student Science Lab Docks In Monongahela
Buffalo Creek Watershed Assn. Holds Oct. 11 Meet Reptiles, Amphibians In Washington
County
EPCAMR Grant Will Help Wilkes-Barre Area Students Grow
STEAM Education Program Expanding In Scranton Schools
Agreement Between Easton, Da Vinci Science City Expected Next Month
With Opening Of The Discovery Center, Public Can Explore Hidden Reservoir In East
Fairmount Park
Related Stories:
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
DEP Blog: Intern Brittany Sprout Pursues New Dream Inspired By Working For DEP
[Posted: Oct. 1, 2018]

DEP Blog: Intern Brittany Sprout Pursues New Dream Inspired By Working For DEP

By: Megan Lehman, ​DEP Northcentral Regional Office

As college students settle back into their ivy-covered


campuses across Pennsylvania for the fall semester, former
DEP intern Brittany Sprout has begun pursuit of a new
dream inspired by her transformative experience working for
the agency.

44
As a rising senior biology major at Lock Haven University, Sprout had no aquatic
coursework or prior related experience when she began her summer internship in DEP’s
Northcentral Regional Office in Williamsport in May 2017.
But once she began processing and subsampling ​macroinvertebrate samples​ in the NCRO
lab, Sprout developed an interest, enthusiasm, and skill set that led her to enroll in graduate
school with plans to pursue a career in aquatic biology.
“I found a true passion for identifying aquatic insects, which is a surprise I wasn’t
expecting,” said Sprout. “I also realized exactly why these insects are so important.”
During her paid DEP internship, Sprout participated in a wide range of hands-on tasks in
the field and in the lab, including stream and lake surveys, habitat assessments, electrofishing
surveys, processing fish tissue samples, taxonomically identifying macroinvertebrate samples,
and calculating biological metrics and Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) scores—all essential steps
in the highly technical process required for DEP to perform its duties to assess and protect the
region’s waterways.
Her work was supervised by two aquatic biologists in NCRO’s Clean Water Program:
Dave Rebuck and Steve Means.
Sprout remembers the exact day she caught the macroinvertebrate bug.
“I was out in Penns Creek for my first bug collection in the field with Dave Rebuck,” she
said. “I remember collecting them in my net, and I couldn’t wait to get back to the lab to
subsample them and pick them out. I was actually excited to stare at bugs for hours! In the lab, I
lost track of time and didn’t want to leave at the end of the day until I knew what those bugs
were.”
Sprout became a voracious learner, rapidly achieving proficiency in the processing and
taxonomic identification of aquatic macroinvertebrate samples. She developed a skill level that
Rebuck says is “rarely achieved” by student interns.
She used a stereomicroscope to take high-quality digital photos and assembled them into
a library of reference images for use by the NCRO staff.
By the end of the summer, Sprout helped the staff to process the entire inventory of
macroinvertebrate samples in NCRO’s laboratory.
“The progress she made from the start to the end of her internship and the help she
provided us was truly remarkable,” said Rebuck. “Brittany’s experience is an excellent example
of how much our DEP internship program can benefit both the interns and the department, when
students take full advantage of real-world learning opportunities and DEP staff provide the
appropriate teaching, training, guidance, and support.”
“I gained an incredible amount of knowledge and experience,” said Sprout. “Before I
came to DEP, I had no knowledge of aquatic insects or how to sample them. I didn’t know how
to collect macroinvertebrate samples or even identify them with their common names or order.
Now, I can sit down with 200 random bugs and tell you their genus within a few hours.”
After completing her summer internship, Sprout returned to work for additional time
during the following winter break, when she helped train new interns to continue her work.
“Most impressive were the leadership skills Brittany demonstrated while teaching and
training new student interns working in the Clean Water Program,” said Rebuck. “Brittany made
our jobs easier with all the support she provided to improve the efficiency and productivity of
our work efforts, which allowed us to accomplish program objectives and goals.”
Her life-changing DEP internship experience led Sprout to work as the lead

45
macroinvertebrate taxonomist on a joint research project between Lock Haven University and the
Fish and Boat Commission during her final undergraduate semester in Spring 2018.
Recently, Sprout took the biggest step toward her new dream of becoming an aquatic
biologist by beginning study at the University of Denver in a Master of Science program in
Ecology and Evolution.
Her graduate research will focus on collecting aquatic insects throughout the Rocky
Mountains to study the impacts of high altitude environments on benthic macroinvertebrates.
“My experiences at DEP are definitely the reason I have made it this far,” said Sprout.
“Aside from the skills and practical experience I gained during my internship, I also gained
professionalism. I also realized what I did and didn’t like about the job I was doing and will
remember that for the future when I begin my career after school.”
Beyond her exemplary service to DEP, Brittany Sprout will also be remembered for a
lasting personal gesture: Painting a canvas portrait of a mayfly for the NCRO lab.
Visit the DEP website to learn more about the ​DEP Internship Program​ and find out how
talented students can apply​.
For more information on environmental programs in Pennsylvania, visit ​DEP’s website​,
Click Here​ to sign up for DEP’s monthly newsletter, sign up for ​DEP Connects​ events, sign up
for ​DEP’s eNotice​, visit ​DEP’s Blog​, ​Like DEP on Facebook​, ​Follow DEP on Twitter​ and visit
DEP’s YouTube Channel​.
NewsClips:
Beveridge: Floating Student Science Lab Docks In Monongahela
Buffalo Creek Watershed Assn. Holds Oct. 11 Meet Reptiles, Amphibians In Washington
County
EPCAMR Grant Will Help Wilkes-Barre Area Students Grow
STEAM Education Program Expanding In Scranton Schools
Agreement Between Easton, Da Vinci Science City Expected Next Month
With Opening Of The Discovery Center, Public Can Explore Hidden Reservoir In East
Fairmount Park
Related Stories:
Boy Scout Takes On 4 Conservation Projects To Qualify For Prestigious William T. Hornaday
Silver Award - Project #1: Saving Cranberry Glade Lake
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Pike Conservation District Supports Student Rusty Crayfish Sampling Project
[Posted: Oct. 3, 2018]

Videos Of Presentations From 2018 Schuylkill River Watershed Congress Now Available

The ​Delaware RiverKeeper​ Thursday announced the


videos of presentations and panel discussions​ from
the 2018 Schuylkill River Watershed Congress are
now available. They include--
-- ​Assessing, Addressing Forest Loss Across The
Delaware River Watershed
-- ​Pipeline Legal Primer

46
-- ​Pipeline Lessons
-- ​Updates, Improvements To Online Model My Watershed​ - Stroud Water Research Center
-- ​EnviroDIY Sensor Stations For Monitoring, Education In Delaware River Basin
-- ​Ecology, Management Of Cyanotoxin Producing Blue Green Algaein In The Schuylkill
-- ​Anti-Degradation: Protecting Our Cleanest Streams In PA
-- ​Update On The Spotted Lanternfly In PA
-- ​What You Need To Know About GIS​ - Shippensburg University
-- ​Connecting People To The Delaware Through Snorkeling
Click Here​ to view the entire video playlist.
Call For Presenters
The organizing committee of the ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River
has ​issued a call for presentation proposals​.​ The deadline for submissions is October 31.
NewsClips:
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct. 5 RiverWatch Video Report
Editorial: Power Vested In DRBC To Protect Watershed From Fracking
[Posted: Oct. 5, 2018]

PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College

The ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​ and


Penn State University will host the 2018 ​Northeast
Cover Crops Council Conference​ on November
15-16 at the Ramada Hotel and Conference Center
in State College.
The benefits of cover crops are wide
ranging—from decreased soil erosion and tighter
nutrient cycling that can reduce the amount (and
cost) of fertilizer, to increased soil organic matter
and crop resilience during seasons with challenging
weather conditions.
Farmers, students, researchers, extension
educators, government and industry representatives, and others will gather to talk and learn about
all things cover crop-related.
Sessions will focus on soil health, no-till cover crop practices, pest management, over
crop mixtures, harvesting cover crops for forage, and more.
To register and for more information, visit the ​Northeast Cover Crops Council
Conference​ event webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other educational opportunities, visit
the ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​ website.
NewsClips:
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
Lower Macungie Buys 190 Acres Of Farmland For Preservation
Upper Macungie Agrees To See Farmland Rights To 25 Acres To County
PA Supreme Court Declines To Step Into Smelly Dispute Over Pig Farm

47
Crable: Are Meat Goats Antidote For Struggling Lancaster County Dairy Farmers?
Gardening Is Contagious: Philly Neighbors Bring Beauty, Bounty To Their Alley
In Hatfield, Suburban Neighbors In Dispute Over Backyard Beekeeping
Hatfield Delays Decision On Backyard Bees
Allegheny Front: Dozens Of Programs At Risk If Federal Farm Bill Expires
Related Stories:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
How You Can Help In Your Area
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Oct. 2, 2018]

PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct.
13 In Jefferson County

The ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​ will


host two Alternative Land Access - Taking Over An
Established Farm Business Workshops in October--
-- October 11:​ At the ​Black Urban Gardeners &
Farmers of Pittsburgh Co-Op​ 7019 Monticello Street
in Pittsburgh from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Are you actively searching for land? Do you
currently own or lease land? Are you thinking about
transitioning your land to new owners?
PASA invites you to join them and the
National Young Farmers Coalition​ for a listening session to discuss the farmland access and

48
tenure challenges that you’ve endured in western Pennsylvania.
Whether you’re a beginning or experienced farmer, your voice is critical to informing our
state and federal legislators about what farmers need to succeed.
Through this farmer-to-farmer conversation, we’ll work together to identify common
challenges around land access for farmers in Western Pennsylvania and build a land access
policy platform to advocate for changes in the state.
This listening session is free and includes dinner. ​Click Here​ to register and for all the
details.
-- October 13:​ "Transition Truths” At the ​Quiet Creek Herb Farm​, 93 Quiet Creek Lane in
Brookville from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.
You found your dream farm, and everything is already set up! The current owners are
looking to retire, and they want YOU to take over the operation. Sounds too good to be true,
right?
Believe it or not, there are many established farms out there without successors lined up,
and one of them might be the perfect fit for you. But before you go jumping into an established
business, you need to know the realities of what it means to run a business that has already been
in operation for years, even decades.
Claire and Rusty Orner of Quiet Creek Herb Farm, which is itself in the early stages of
transitioning to new owners, will share the daily realities of running an established and respected
farm business, and explain what an incoming steward can expect when taking over such an
operation.
This workshop is also free. ​Click Here​ to register and for all the details.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other educational opportunities, visit
the ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​ website.
NewsClips:
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
Lower Macungie Buys 190 Acres Of Farmland For Preservation
Upper Macungie Agrees To See Farmland Rights To 25 Acres To County
PA Supreme Court Declines To Step Into Smelly Dispute Over Pig Farm
Crable: Are Meat Goats Antidote For Struggling Lancaster County Dairy Farmers?
Gardening Is Contagious: Philly Neighbors Bring Beauty, Bounty To Their Alley
In Hatfield, Suburban Neighbors In Dispute Over Backyard Beekeeping
Hatfield Delays Decision On Backyard Bees
Allegheny Front: Dozens Of Programs At Risk If Federal Farm Bill Expires
Related Stories:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4

49
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop biomass
Nitrogen Content
How You Can Help In Your Area
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Oct. 3, 2018]

First Penn State Water Insights Seminar Oct. 9: Using Sensors To Map Cover Crop
Biomass Nitrogen Content

The first Penn State ​Water Insights Seminar​ of the series will be
held on October 9 on the topic of using sensors to map cover crop
biomass nitrogen content, soil texture and soil organic matter.
The presenter will be ​Charlie White​, Assistant Professor and
Extension Specialist on Soil Fertility and Nutrient Management.
White has been an extension associate, research associate, and is
now an assistant professor at Penn State working on a variety of soil
fertility and nutrient management topics in agronomic crops.
His previous work has focused on nitrogen management with cover
crops, soil health, and soil testing methods. He holds a Master’s
Degree in Soil Science from the University of Maryland and a PhD in Soil Science from Penn
State.
The Seminar will be held in Room 312 of the Agriculture and Bio Engineering Building
on University Park Campus starting at Noon. There is also an option to ​join the Seminar via
Zoom​.
Water Insights Seminars are a weekly interdisciplinary series presenting talks on water
science, water management, and water policy and is intended to engage the University and
broader community in collaborative learning and discussion about critical water challenges from
local to global scales.
They are presented by Penn State’s ​Environment and Natural Resources Institute​.
All Seminars are recorded and posted on the ​Water Insights Seminar​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
Lower Macungie Buys 190 Acres Of Farmland For Preservation
Upper Macungie Agrees To See Farmland Rights To 25 Acres To County
PA Supreme Court Declines To Step Into Smelly Dispute Over Pig Farm

50
Crable: Are Meat Goats Antidote For Struggling Lancaster County Dairy Farmers?
Gardening Is Contagious: Philly Neighbors Bring Beauty, Bounty To Their Alley
In Hatfield, Suburban Neighbors In Dispute Over Backyard Beekeeping
Hatfield Delays Decision On Backyard Bees
Allegheny Front: Dozens Of Programs At Risk If Federal Farm Bill Expires
Related Stories:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
DEP Secretary Visits 2 Wyoming County Farms To Highlight Conservation Practices Reducing
Pollution To The Susquehanna River
CBF-PA: Water Quality, Soil Health, Sales On The Menu At Field Day On Misty Mountain
Farm, Lycoming County
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
Penn State Extension: Oct. 16 Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play In MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction
Giant Food Stores, Keep PA Beautiful To Held Tree Planting Event In Cumberland County As
Part Of Carbon Emissions Reduction Program
Keep America Beautiful, Anheuser-Busch Award 2 Watershed Grants In Pennsylvania
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
PASA: Northeast Cover Crop Council Annual Conference Nov. 15-16 In State College
PASA: Taking Over An Established Farm Business Workshops Oct. 11 In Pittsburgh, Oct. 13 In
Jefferson County
How You Can Help In Your Area
Want To Find A Watershed Group Near You? Try The PA Land Trust Assn. Watershed
Association Finder
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

National ARRI Mined Land Reforestation Conference Featured Visits To PA Restoration


Sites

The ​Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative


2018 Mined Land Reforestation Conference​ took place
August 8-9 at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.
Shaun Busler, of ​Stream Restoration
Incorporated​, and an ​Slippery Rock Watershed
Coalition​ participant, enjoyed attending the conference
and learning more about the latest news and ideas
regarding restoring forests on coal mined lands.
This year’s theme was ‘Developing
Partnerships for Mine Land Reforestation.’
Eric Cavazza, Director of the DEP Bureau of
Abandoned Mine Reclamation, provided the keynote address. The Conference featured excellent

51
presentations, interesting posters, and an awards luncheon on August 8th, with site visits to
mined lands at various stages of reforestation on August 9th.
Tour sites included Amerikohl Barrett #2, an active mining operation whose innovative
reclamation practices include end-dumped piles on flat and traditional grading on slopes, with an
Indiana bat and Allegheny Woodrat protection and enhancement plan.
Another field trip stop was the Coaldale AML site, owned by Carmen III, Inc. and the
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Dean Baker led a tour of Coaldale, which
has two priority 2 sites and dangerous highwalls totaling 7,000 linear feet.
The ​Moshannon State Forest​ Legacy Site, another tour stop, is undergoing reforestation
to reduce forest fragmentation, diversify age class, and improve wildlife habitat.
This forest, a prime elk and deer browsing area, lies within the transition zone between
the northern hardwood and Allegheny hardwood forests to the north and mixed oaks and
oak-hickory forests to the south.
The Force Legacy Site, owned by the ​Western Pennsylvania Conservancy​, is undergoing
reforestation to decrease forest fragmentation, restore forest habitat for wildlife, and to improve
water quality. The site has 1,281 chestnut trees.
The ​American Chestnut Foundation-PA​ and the ​Appalachian Regional Reforestation
Initiative​ have partnered to include American chestnuts and TACF’s potentially blight resistant
chestnuts on reclaimed mines.
Beginning in 2008, ARRI and TACF initiated a program named “Operation Springboard”
to use reclaimed surface mines as a springboard for chestnut dispersal into surrounding forests
throughout American chestnut’s native range, based on the assumption that chestnuts could be
successfully established on reclaimed areas.
The chestnuts on many of these plantings showed phenomenal growth and survival.
Encouraged by these successful plantings, ARRI and TACF are continuing to plant pure
American chestnuts on mined lands to help preserve American chestnuts’ genetics and to test the
suitability of different mined sites for chestnut restoration in anticipation of widespread release
of TACF’s blight resistant chestnuts.
NewsClips:
Ligonier Coal Company Honored For Mine Reclamation
Wilkes-Barre School District Looking To Build School On Old Mine Site
EPCAMR Grant Will Help Wilkes-Barre Area Students Grow
Related Stories:
Trout Unlimited Applies For Good Samaritan Status For Mine Water Treatment Project In
Clearfield County
October Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition

(Reprinted from the ​October edition of the Catalyst​ newsletter from the S​ lippery Rock Watershed
Coalition​ in Butler County. C
​ lick Here​ to sign up for your own copy.)
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Trout Unlimited Applies For Good Samaritan Status For Mine Water Treatment Project
In Clearfield County

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the October 6 PA Bulletin

52
Trout Unlimited has requested ​Good Samaritan Program​ status for a passive abandoned mine
drainage treatment project in Knox Township, Clearfield County.​ (​PA Bulletin page 6457​)
Treatment system construction is being carried out in conjunction with a DEP Bureau of
Abandoned Mine Reclamation project to remove coal refuse material from 9 acres, incorporate
alkaline material and otherwise reclaim 27 total acres.
From 1999 to November 2016, DEP has ​76 mine reclamation and acid mine drainage
Good Samaritan projects in the program and only recently began accepting proposals to plug
abandoned or orphaned oil and gas wells.
For more information on Environmental Good Samaritan Act protection for reclaiming
abandoned mine lands or treating discharges, visit DEP’s ​Environmental Good Samaritan
Program​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Ligonier Coal Company Honored For Mine Reclamation
Wilkes-Barre School District Looking To Build School On Old Mine Site
EPCAMR Grant Will Help Wilkes-Barre Area Students Grow
Related Stories:
DEP’s Good Samaritan Program Encourages Proposals To Plug Abandoned Oil & Gas Wells,
Treat Mine Drainage
National ARRI Mined Land Reforestation Conference Featured Visits To PA Restoration Sites
October Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition
[Posted: Oct. 5, 2018]

October Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition

The ​October edition of the Catalyst​ newsletter


is now available from the ​Slippery Rock
Watershed Coalition​ in Butler County
featuring articles on--
-- ​National ARRI Mined Land Restoration
Conference Featured Visits To PA
Restoration Sites
-- ​Another Fun-Filled Celebrate The Bloom!
At Jennings Environmental Ed Center​ ​(photo -
Clean Creek Pottery​)
-- ​The KIDS Catalyst: Autumn Leaves Are
Falling!
-- ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own copy.
The Catalyst newsletter is distributed to over 1,200 individuals in over a dozen countries
including: Brazil, Peru, South Korea, Mexico, England, Wales, Venezuela, South Africa, New
Zealand, Australia and Germany.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Slippery
Rock Watershed Coalition​ website. Also visit ​Clean Creek Pottery​ to help mine reclamation
efforts.
NewsClips:
Ligonier Coal Company Honored For Mine Reclamation

53
Wilkes-Barre School District Looking To Build School On Old Mine Site
EPCAMR Grant Will Help Wilkes-Barre Area Students Grow
Related Stories:
National ARRI Mined Land Reforestation Conference Featured Visits To PA Restoration Sites
Trout Unlimited Applies For Good Samaritan Status For Mine Water Treatment Project In
Clearfield County
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

DEP Announces Revised General Permit Available On Oil & Gas Development Erosion &
Sedimentation Control

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice​ in the October 6 PA Bulletin a


final, updated general permit covering Oil and Gas Development Erosion and Sedimentation
Control (ESCGP-3) is now available for use.
The Department will continue to accept applications for ESCGP-2 until October 15,
2018. Due to the expiration of ESCGP-2, the Department must act on all Notices of Intent (NOI)
submitted for coverage under ESCGP-2 by December 29, 2018.
Additionally, any project that was authorized for coverage under ESCGP-2 prior to this
date will have coverage administratively extended under the terms and conditions of ESCGP-2
for the remainder of the time period of the original coverage.
When warranted due to project characteristics, including Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission-regulated pipelines, the Department will publish notice of receipt of NOI for
coverage in the Pennsylvania Bulletin and provide a public comment period.
The Department will publish notice of every approval of coverage under the ESCGP-3 in
the Pennsylvania Bulletin.
Click Here​ for a copy of ESCGP-3 and related documents (when posted). Questions
should be directed to Joseph Kelly, Chief, Division of Well Development and Surface Activities,
by sending email to: ​josephkel@pa.gov​ or call 717-772-2199.
[Posted: Oct. 5, 2018]

Professional Recyclers Of PA Offering Recycling Professional Certification Courses

The ​Professional Recyclers of PA​ will be


offering ​Recycling Professional
Certification Courses​ in October. The
courses will include--
-- October 17-18: Bellefonte, Centre
County
-- ​Recycling 110: Recycling & the Law
-- ​Recycling 115: Recycling Economics
-- ​Recycling 150: Recycling Public Policy
-- October 22: Enola, Cumberland County
-- ​Recycling 540 - Grant Writing & Administration
Click Here​ to register or for more information. Questions should be directed to Jason
Tobias by calling 717-441-6049 or send email to: ​jason@proprecycles.org​.

54
To learn more about professional development courses, visit PROP’s ​Certification
Classes​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Professional
Recyclers of PA​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from PROP. ​Click Here​ to
become a member.
NewsClip:
Lackawanna County Hosting Tire Recycling Events Oct. 6, 13
Related Stories:
Op-Ed: Is It Time To Recycle Recycling?
PA Township News: The Recycling Crash, Foreign Markets Take A Toll On Local Recycling
Programs
[Posted: Oct. 5, 2018]

DEP: Brownfields Program Resulted In Over 6,000 Site Cleanups, 98,000 Jobs Since 1995

With the history of a highly successful


statewide ​brownfields program​, Department
of Environmental Protection Secretary
Patrick McDonnell Tuesday encouraged
attendees at the ​2018 Pennsylvania
Brownfields Conference​ to continue to
work with state government to look for
innovative ways to remediate industrial
land.
Pennsylvania is the first state in the country
to adopt uniform cleanup standards and has
the first voluntary cleanup program.
“Brownfield projects are a great example of government that works, and governments
working together,” said McDonnell. “We continue to develop, partner and foster collaborative
relationships with our stakeholders, both public and private. These partnerships have been an
asset in DEP’s efforts to keep stakeholders and regulators informed of policy implementation in
relation to the Land Recycling Program.”
McDonnell also told the gathering at Sands Casino Resort in Bethlehem that since the
program began in 1995, more than 6,000 cleanup projects have been completed and almost 1,500
more are in progress at brownfield sites.
The Pennsylvania Brownfields Conference is a yearly event hosted by the DEP and the
Western Pennsylvania Engineering Society. This year’s theme focused on: “Creating
Community Assets: Working with What You Have.”
Secretary McDonnell also touted the impact on communities where brownfield sites have
been remediated. To date, more than 98,000 jobs have been maintained or created, nearly $750
million in grants and loans have been provided by various state agencies, including DEP, and
more than 1,000 sites have received some type of financial assistance.
“By cleaning up brownfield sites, we not only provide for better human health, but also
promote the city’s cultural diversity and meet the needs of individual neighborhoods,” said
McDonnell. “These projects transform communities with benefits of providing jobs, healthcare,

55
housing opportunities, sustainability, energy conservation and so much more. Creating
sustainable communities as part of brownfield redevelopment is also good for the environment.”
The conference venue itself is a strong example of brownfields revitalization. In 2007,
Sands Casino Resort purchased the 126-acre former Bethlehem Steel plant, remediated the site
through the PA Brownfields Program and then opened the casino in 2009.
It is considered the largest brownfields site in the United States having been remediated
of contaminants left behind by the steel industry.
For more information on brownfields cleanup and redevelopment, visit DEP’s ​Land
Recycling Program​ webpage. ​Click Here​ for the latest issue and to subscribe to DEP’s
Brownfields Newsletter.
NewsClips:
Hazelwood Green Site May Try Spec Building
Tech Firm To Take Space In Hazelwood Green Brownfield Redevelopment
Redevelopment Of Hazelwood Green Mill Site Moves Forward
Green Space To Buffer Brownfield Development In Jeannette, Hearing Wednesday
Editorial: Brownfields Boost? Hopefully History Will Repeat In Williamsport
Related Story:
RFQ Issuesd For First Phase Development At Hazelwood Green Brownfield Development
Project In Pittsburgh
[Posted: Oct. 2, 2018]

RFQ Issued For First Phase Development At Hazelwood Green Brownfield Development
Project In Pittsburgh

Almono LLC has issued a ​Request for


Qualifications (RFQ)​ for the first phase of
development at ​Hazelwood Green​ brownfield
redevelopment project in Pittsburgh. Proposals
are due November 19.
The RFQ, seeks highly qualified
developers for approximately 27 acres of
developable area within the site’s Mill District.
The entire Mill District has a median target of 2.8
million square feet of mixed-use development
that includes 1,050 dwelling units.
With 178 acres of prime riverfront property, the Hazelwood Green (HG) site is
envisioned to become a world-class model for sustainable development, continuing Pittsburgh’s
history of reclamation and reinvention as a post-industrial city.
Situated in close proximity to medical and research facilities, and renowned universities,
including Carnegie Mellon University and the City of Pittsburgh HG’s prime riverfront location
presents a wealth of natural resources, beauty, and linkages to the surrounding Greater
Hazelwood neighborhood and the city’s extensive trail system.
Momentum and interest in the site are building rapidly due its strategic location and the
prestige of the site’s first anchor tenants.
The Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing Institute (ARM) and Carnegie Mellon

56
University’s Manufacturing Futures Initiative (MFI) are in the midst of construction to locate
within the historic steel mill shell of the RIDC-owned Mill 19 building, located in the site’s Mill
District, with a completion date anticipated in 2019.
Formerly the site of LTV Steel and the Jones & Laughlin Steel Co., the Hazelwood
Green development site is unique in that its ownership, Almono LP, is a partnership of three
Pittsburgh-based foundations – Richard King Mellon Foundation, Heinz Endowments, and the
Benedum Foundation.
These foundations joined forces in 2002 to purchase and land bank Pittsburgh’s last
remaining tract of significant riverfront property until the time was right to fully leverage this
well-situated asset to achieve greater regional benefit.
The recent approval of the new ​Preliminary Land Development Plan​ (PLDP) marks a
final turning point in the site’s readiness for vertical development.
The PLDP provides detail on the vision, intent, and technical guidelines for the build out
of Hazelwood Green, which will accommodate a mix of offices, research and development, light
manufacturing, housing, retail, and public green space.
The targeted total density for the site is 8 million square feet of mixed-use development
that would be built over a projected 20 years and require a robust multi-modal transportation
system to realize full development potential.
“Hazelwood Green is well positioned to become a world-class model for sustainable
development that transforms markets, regenerates the land and revitalizes the surrounding
neighborhoods.” says Hazelwood Green Project Director Rebecca Flora, and RFQ manager. “We
are seeking qualified developers that share our vision to join with us in advancing this
transformational project.”
Site tours, additional key dates and more information is available at the ​Request for
Qualifications (RFQ)​ webpage. All RFQ inquiries should be sent to:
RFQ@hazelwoodgreen.com​.
For more information on site redevelopment, visit the ​Hazelwood Green​ website.
NewsClips:
Hazelwood Green Site May Try Spec Building
Tech Firm To Take Space In Hazelwood Green Brownfield Redevelopment
Redevelopment Of Hazelwood Green Mill Site Moves Forward
Green Space To Buffer Brownfield Development In Jeannette, Hearing Wednesday
Editorial: Brownfields Boost? Hopefully History Will Repeat In Williamsport
Related Story:
DEP: Brownfields Program Resulted In Over 6,000 Site Cleanups, 98,000 Jobs Since 1995
[Posted: Oct. 1, 2018]

PennEnvironment Helps Citizens Take Charge Of Energy Use On National Energy


Efficiency Day

The ​PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center​ is


releasing a new guide​ to help Pennsylvanians
conserve energy and reduce wasted energy in their
homes and businesses.
Published on ​National Energy Efficiency Day

57
(October 5), with colder autumn and winter months looming, the energy-saving measures
proposed by the PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center’s ​It’s Time to Take Charge: A
Citizen’s Guide to Saving Energy​ can help tackle our energy waste problem in Pennsylvania and
nationwide.
“The ways we communicate, shop, work, and live have all changed dramatically in the
last decade. But we still produce and consume energy the same ways we did almost a hundred
years ago, putting our most basic needs at risk-- our health, the environment, and even the
climate, ” said David Masur, Executive Director at the PennEnvironment Research & Policy
Center. “We must start conserving energy, right now. Using this guide, Pennsylvanians can take
concrete steps on Energy Efficiency Day to adopt energy-saving measures and tap into new
technologies and appliances that increase home energy efficiency.”
Experts estimate that the United States can reduce its overall energy consumption by 40
to 60 percent by mid-century simply by using better technologies and eliminating waste across
our economy.
Much of the energy waste is due to inadequate insulation, inefficient heating and 1
cooling systems, and out-of-date appliances and technologies.
But our individual, everyday actions -- forgetting to shut off the lights, overheating our
water heaters, machine-washing half-full loads of clothing -- also add up.
“This energy efficiency guide is packed with practical tips and easy steps that
homeowners and renters can take to save money and save on usage. At CCI, we conduct in-home
energy audits and assessments and teach people about energy efficiency every day, and we loved
this tool!” said Jeaneen A. Zappa, the Executive Director at ​Get Energy Smarter.
“We can have better health and a more sustainable environment, while also paying less
on our utility bills,” continued Masur. “Efficiency improvements pay for themselves. This guide
is designed to help families cut through the clutter of information and pick the improvements that
will help them minimize energy waste.”
“Energy efficiency has already delivered significant benefits to Pennsylvania’s residents
and businesses,” said Matt Elliott, Executive Director of the ​Keystone Energy Efficiency
Alliance​ (KEEA) - a trade association representing 50 PA-based energy efficiency companies.
“Reducing energy consumption saves money while helping to grow the economy. In 2018, more
than 65,000 Pennsylvanians worked in energy efficiency-related jobs. While we are off to a good
start, we’ve merely scratched the surface of our full energy-saving and job-creation potential.”
“Americans across the country are shifting to cleaner, less risky energy sources such as
solar and wind, but regardless of where our energy comes from, wastefulness is unacceptable,”
concluded Masur, “Creating a clean, healthy future for our kids and grandkids will require not
just replacing fossil fuels with renewable sources, but also maximizing how much energy we get
from those renewable sources.”
Click Here​ for a copy of the Guide.
NewsClips:
Carbondale To Replace 900+ Street Lights With Energy Efficient LEDs
C-PACE Alliance Tapped To Help Design C-PACE Program For Local Governments In PA
[Posted: Oct. 5, 2018]

PUC Continues On-Site Mutual Aid To Massachusetts In Aftermath Of Natural Gas Line
Explosion

58
The ​Public Utility Commission​ Thursday announced personnel from its Gas Safety Division are
being deployed to Massachusetts to provide ongoing assistance in the aftermath of the September
13 natural gas line explosions in the state’s Merrimack Valley.
As part of a multi-state Mutual Aid Agreement, Pennsylvania’s Emergency Management
Agency recently notified the PUC of a second request submitted by the Massachusetts
Emergency Management Agency for additional natural gas engineering inspectors who are
certified through the Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration.
During the third week of September, the PUC sent two engineers to assist Massachusetts
response teams regarding service shut-offs and incident investigation.
“In the aftermath of this tragedy, the experience and expertise of our Gas Safety
personnel can be of tremendous value in helping with the ongoing investigation and recovery
from a devastating series of gas line explosions,” said PUC Chairman Gladys M. Brown. “While
our engineers are providing assistance, they also are gaining valuable insight into mass outage
management, operator qualification of workers from other states, and investigation information
associated with this outage that, in turn, we can share with Pennsylvania’s natural gas public
utilities.”
The PUC routinely reinforces best practices in gas safety to Pennsylvania’s natural gas
distribution companies, including: reviewing and analyzing procedures before working on
low/high pressure tie-ins and main abandonments; reviewing all maps and plans thoroughly prior
to all pressure-changing operations; ensuring that qualified technicians are present whenever
work is performed at or near regulator stations; verifying and excavating the exact location of all
underground sensing lines; identifying the type and adequacy of overpressure protection devices;
identifying emergency actions that will be required to be performed if necessary; and ensuring
that employee and contractor operator qualifications are current and cover the qualified tasks to
be performed.
If Pennsylvania experiences any type of emergency, the PUC can recall the engineers
immediately.
New York, New Hampshire and Michigan are among other states either providing or
considering sending engineers to assist with incident investigation and restoration of gas service
to affected customers, which requires replacement of about 48 miles of gas pipeline.
On the afternoon of September 13, overpressured gas mains owned by Columbia Gas
caused multiple explosions and fires in dozens of homes in the towns of Lawrence, Andover and
North Andover.
One person was killed, 30,000 residents were forced to evacuate their homes, and gas and
electricity service for thousands of customers was disrupted.
PUC Still Investigating Sept. 10 PA Explosion
Staff from the Public Utility Commission are still investigation the ​explosion of a 24-inch
natural gas pipeline in Beaver County​ on September 10.
NewsClips:
UGI Faces $2M Penalty For 2017 House Explosion In Lancaster County
PUC Seeks $2.1 Million Fine In Fatal 2017 UGI Gas Explosion In Lancaster
UGI Facing $2 Million Fine For Fatal Gas Blast In Lancaster County
Editorial: PUC Deserves Credit For Action Against Vortex Power Distributors
Murphy: Nuclear Safety Advocates Call Attention To Waste Nuclear Plants Leave Behind

59
PSEG Affirms It Will Shut Down Nuclear Plants In NJ Unless It Gets Subsidy
Op-Ed: The Economic And Environmental Benefits Of A Carbon Swap For PA Families
Nazareth Plans On Making Utility Companies Pay For Half Of Road Repairs
PJM Renewables Future Includes Significant Chunk Of Corporate Procurement
PJM: FirstEnergy Can Shut 4 Gigawatts Of Fossil Plants Without Harming Reliability
PJM Recasts Capacity Repricing In Market Reform Filing At FERC
Ahead Of FERC Storage Order Deadline, New Rules Begin To Take Shape At PJM
Op-Ed: When PJM’s Capacity Market Stops Working For Consumers Is It Time To Leave?
DOE Moves To Slash Cost Of Carbon Capture For Coal-Fired Power Plants
Op-Ed: EPA’s Affordable Clean Energy Rules Is Neither ​-- PUC Commissioner Andrew Place
Op-Ed: The Inevitable Policy Response Theory On Climate Change​ - Christina Simone,
Kleinman Center For Energy Policy
Trump Nominates Coal, Nuclear Bailout Support To FERC
Trump Nominates DOE’s McNamee To FERC
Related Stories:
FERC Approves Operation Of Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Staring Oct. 6
Senators To Introduce Bipartisan Pipeline Siting Bill, 4 Other Pipeline-Related Bills Now On
Senate Calendar
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

FERC Approves Operation Of Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Staring Oct. 6

Williams Pipeline Company​ Thursday reported the


Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has
approved the Company’s request to place its ​Atlantic
Sunrise Pipeline​ into full service. The Company plans
to place the project into full service on October 6,
2018.
Backed by long-term shipper commitments, the
project increases the design capacity of the Transco
pipeline, the largest-volume natural gas pipeline
system in the United States, by 1.7 billion cubic feet
per day (approximately 12 percent) to 15.8 billion
cubic feet per day.
In the process, the project further strengthens and extends the bidirectional flow of the
Transco system, directly connecting Marcellus gas supplies with markets as far south as
Alabama.
“This project makes the largest-volume pipeline system in the country even larger,
further executing on our strategy to connect premier natural gas supply areas with the best
markets in the country,” said Alan Armstrong, Williams president and chief executive officer.
“The project is significant for Pennsylvania and natural gas-consuming markets all along the
East Coast, alleviating infrastructure bottlenecks and providing millions of consumers direct
access to one of the most abundant, cost-effective natural gas supply sources in the country.”
Williams Chief Operating Officer Micheal Dunn added, “I’m proud of our project team
for their focus and carefully executing this complex project in a safe and environmentally

60
responsible manner. Their efforts have truly distinguished this project, positively collaborating
with regulators, key stakeholders and communities to overcome challenges and install this
critical infrastructure thoughtfully without experiencing any significant injuries or environmental
issues. Even in the final months of construction, as some segments of the project area sustained
more than 20 inches of rainfall, our teams acted quickly to restore the right-of-way and ensure
environmental compliance requirements were met.”
For more information, visit Williams’ ​Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline​ website.
NewsClips:
Crable: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Gets Green Light To Operate Starting Saturday
Cusick: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Goes Into Full Operation This Weekend
Hurdle: Numerous Unresolved PUC, DEP Regulatory Issues Delay Opening Of Mariner East 2
Pipeline
Phillips: Mariner East 2 Pipeline: What Are Natural Gas Liquids And What Happens If they
Leak?
Trump Administration Tackles Pipeline Cybersecurity
Trump Nominates Coal, Nuclear Bailout Support To FERC
Trump Nominates DOE’s McNamee To FERC
Zinke Talks Natural Gas Exports, Pipeline Constraints In PA Visit
Williams Pipeline CEO Compliments PA’s Regulatory Climate
Related Stories:
Senators To Introduce Bipartisan Pipeline Siting Bill, 4 Other Pipeline-Related Bills Now On
Senate Calendar
PUC Continues On-Site Mutual Aid To Massachusetts In Aftermath Of Natural Gas Line
Explosion
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

CEOs For Sustainability Speaker Series: Oct. 24 Partnering With Suppliers For A
Competitive Edge Workshop In Pittsburgh

CEOs for Sustainability​, a program of ​Sustainable Pittsburgh​,


will host a ​Partnering With Suppliers For A Competitive Edge
Speaker Series event on October 24 at the Energy Innovation
Center, 1435 Bedford Avenue in Pittsburgh from 7:30 to 9:30
a.m.
Are you responsible for purchasing or working with
suppliers at your business? Involved in strategy, business
development, marketing, or operations?
Come learn how leaders are reducing costs and risk,
achieving sustainability goals, and creating value throughout the
supply chain — from sourcing to logistics.
More companies recognize that good business depends on
successful supplier relationships. After all, the supply chain
accounts for 50–70 percent of total expenses and greenhouse gas
emissions at most manufacturing companies.
The benefits of a sustainable supply chain can be significant: greater efficiencies, a boost

61
to brand value, increased risk management, a better product, even new sources of revenue.
Yet, in a recent global survey, only 52 percent of companies had adopted any sustainable
sourcing practices.
Join CEOs for Sustainability as leaders from local and global businesses describe the
benefits and how to get started.
The keynote speaker will be Kathy Limper, Global Sourcing Manager, Regional
Sustainability Lead NAFTA for ​Covestro​.
The speakers on the panel for this event include--
-- David Landis, ​Vice President, ​EPIC Metals Corporation
-- Ciannie Rodriguez,​ Manager, ​IKEA Pittsburgh
-- Raymond Yeager​, President and CEO, ​DMI Companies
Click Here​ to register or for more information.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Sustainable
Pittsburgh​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates. ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow
them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the ​Pittsburgh Green
Story​ website.
(​Photo:​ Kathy Limper, Covestro.)
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation

Department of Conservation and Natural


Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn
Thursday announced grant investments
totaling more than $600,000 for two projects
that link natural resources to community
revitalization and improve well-being for
residents.
“Local parks, trails, and natural areas
improve the everyday lives of people of all
places, ages, and backgrounds, while serving
as a primary venue for outdoor recreation for
Pennsylvanians,” DCNR Secretary Cindy
Adams Dunn said at an event today at the Greene County Courthouse. “We are happy to assist
Greene County by investing in the Greene River Trail and the plans for Wisecarver, which
expand recreation opportunities for citizens and are an important part of the county’s quality of
life and revitalization efforts.”
The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is providing $403,000 for more
than two miles of the ​Greene River Trail​ in Rice’s Landing Borough and Cumberland Township,
and $200,000 for walkways, bridges and trails at the Wisecarver Recreation Area in
Waynesburg.
The existing Greene River Trail is 5.1 miles long, beginning in Millsboro at the ​Greene
Cove Yacht Club​ trailhead through Rice’s Landing and ending just north of the Village of
Crucible.

62
The grant will fund the southern extension for 2.2 miles to Jacobs Ferry Road. The goal is
to get the Greene River Trail connected to the village of Nemacolin, and then on to Point Marion
to connect to the ​Sheepskin Trail​ and beyond.
Wisecarver Recreation Area is a 360-acre site that includes an 18.5-acre reservoir. New
trails at the park will benefit not only the public, but will be a great asset to Waynesburg
University and area high school cross country teams. Matching funds for the grant will be
provided by the county.
Through its grant program, DCNR has provided financial and technical assistance
support for local park and recreation improvement projects in all 67 of Pennsylvania’s counties.
DCNR Grants
To learn more about other available grant opportunities to support trail and recreation
projects, attend one of the upcoming workshops on DCNR’s Community Conservation Grant
Program. ​Click Here​ for more.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(​Photo: ​Greene River Trail​.)
Related Story:
PA Recreation & Park Society, DCNR To Hold Community Conservation Grant Workshops In
Oct., Nov.
Related Stories This Week:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County

63
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn Thursday
visited Brentwood, Allegheny County, to announce the Wolf Administration’s investment in a
newly refreshed community swimming pool.
“Local parks are cherished public spaces and provide experiences that strengthen our
sense of community,” Dunn said. “We are happy to assist the borough by investing in its
community pool, which is an important part of the community’s revitalization efforts.”
DCNR is providing a grant of $697,600 dollars for the pool rehabilitation project. It will
include reconstruction of the pool with zero-depth entry, water features, and new fencing.
Partners on the pool project include Brentwood Borough and Allegheny County.
The investment is supported by the ​federal Land and Water Conservation Fund​. A key
purpose of the LWCF Act is to help preserve, develop, and assure universal access to outdoor
recreation facilities, and to provide recreation and strengthen the health of U.S. citizens in close
to home venues.
In a ​letter to Congress, Gov. Wolf urged support​ for permanent reauthorization of the
Land and Water Conservation Fund, which expired at the end of September. The Governor noted
that LWCF grants have improved thousands of communities throughout the commonwealth and
have helped fund significant improvements in our award-winning state parks.
Since 1965, the Commonwealth has awarded more than $164 million in LWCF grants to
Pennsylvania communities for more than 1,600 projects. All projects funded through LWCF are
permanently protected for the benefit of the public.
Through its grant program, DCNR has provided financial and technical assistance
support for local park and recreation improvement projects in all 67 of Pennsylvania’s counties.
DCNR Grants
To learn more about other available grant opportunities to support trail and recreation
projects, attend one of the upcoming workshops on DCNR’s Community Conservation Grant
Program. ​Click Here​ for more.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(​Photo: ​Greene River Trail​.)
Related Story:
PA Recreation & Park Society, DCNR To Hold Community Conservation Grant Workshops In
Oct., Nov.
Related Stories This Week:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7

64
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects

Gov. Tom Wolf Tuesday announced ​42 highway, bridge, transit, ports and waterways, and bike
and pedestrian projects​ will be in line for $49 million in funding through the Multimodal
Transportation Fund.
The list includes 5 recreation-related projects--
-- Allegheny County, City of McKeesport:​ $2,951,500 for improvements to the existing Steel
Valley Trail through the RIDC Park along the Monongahela River, linking the river to the
McKeesport Multimedia Center, and improvements to the City’s municipal parking garage that
offers trail parking.
-- Chester County, West Pikeland Township:​ $1,169,000 to replace an existing one-lane
bridge over Pickering Creek with a two-lane bridge, raise the Horseshoe Trail roadway, and
widen the waterway opening to prevent frequent flooding that is occurring now.
-- Lehigh County, Lower Macungie Township​: $152,053 for improvements that will provide
safe multimodal access to commercial and recreational facilities on Hamilton Boulevard from
neighborhoods to the south, including installation of 500 feet of sidewalk; textured crosswalks
and ramps at Krocks Road, Krocks Court, and Hamilton Boulevard; and a 90-foot sidewalk
between Wawa and the turnpike overpass.
-- Lycoming County, River Valley Transit​: $1,193,306 for the realignment of Franklin Street;
reconstruction of Basin Street; addition of bike lanes, transit stops, ADA ramps, sidewalks,
lighting, and storm water management.
-- Monroe County, Tobyhanna Township:​ $1,650,000 to widen Long Pond Road (SR 0940),
realign the I-380 southbound exit ramp, and add sidewalks, decorative street lighting, and a
multi-use trail along SR 0940.
For more information, visit PennDOT’s ​Multimodal Transportation​ webpage.
Other Grants
To learn more about other available grant opportunities to support trail and recreation
projects, attend one of the upcoming workshops on DCNR’s Community Conservation Grant
Program. ​Click Here​ for more.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
Related Story:

65
PA Recreation & Park Society, DCNR To Hold Community Conservation Grant Workshops In
Oct., Nov.
Related Stories This Week:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 2, 2018]

DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7

The leaves are beginning to change color.


There’s a cool, crispness in the air. Fall is here!
And it’s the perfect time to get outdoors and
enjoy Pennsylvania’s wondrous natural places.
One of the most fun and educational outdoor
activities to enjoy in Pennsylvania is organized
walking or hiking.
Why not participate on a day when hundreds of
others are doing the same across the state? And
for good reason -- to celebrate and learn more
about our forests during ​Walk in Penn’s Woods on Sunday, October 7​.
Purpose Of Walk In Penn's Woods
Walk in Penn’s Woods was created to educate Pennsylvanians about the value of forests
by physically and mentally engaging them at a forested tract.
The founders of Walk in Penn’s Woods -- the ​Center for Private Forests at Penn State
University​ and other partners, including DCNR -- intended the event to not just be a hike, but
more importantly, a platform upon which forest experts could communicate with citizens about
their forested setting, its value, and conservation.
Every walk has been designed to immerse citizens in the forest, while providing for the

66
availability of forest experts to answer questions and explain aspects of the forest and its
management.
DCNR’s Bureau of Forestry is proud to help plan, lead, and coordinate the 2018 Walk in
Penn’s Woods event. This year’s walks will involve dozens of DCNR professionals who will
serve as walk guides and interpreters, as well.
Last year’s inaugural event tallied more than 1,000 participants and was a resounding
success.
Currently, the ​Walk in Penn’s Woods​ website has nearly 70 walks scheduled in 48
counties across the Commonwealth. Walks will occur on state and national forest lands, state
parks, state game lands, and municipal and privately-owned woodlots.
Outdoor Learning
Some walks are geared simply toward sightseeing, whereas others take routes prepared to
rotate from one “forest station” to another. Forest topics mentioned in walk descriptions are
almost too numerous to list -- there are literally hikes for all types of forest enthusiasts.
The ​Walk in Penn’s Woods​ website lists walks by county and provides a brief
explanation of venue, time, and theme/topics. This year’s walk topics include (but are not limited
to):
-- Tree and plant identification
-- Forestry practices with demonstration areas
-- Historical emphasis
-- Scenic appreciation
-- Birds/other fauna viewing
-- Wildlife plantings/plots
-- Water and geologic resources
-- Ecology and succession
-- Forest stewardship
Most walks are designed so that people of all fitness levels can enjoy them! They are not
grueling, long hikes on extreme terrain. These hikes are also family and pet-friendly, typically.
However, some hike descriptions caution that pets are not allowed, while others are described as
not appropriate for wheelchairs or strollers/small children. Please wear appropriate attire and
footwear.
Walk descriptions also let you know if pre-registration is required.
Walk Events Spotlight
Here are some examples of walks that will be led by DCNR staff--
-- ​Jacobsburg Environmental Education Center​: Enjoy a walk with Lauren Forster,
Environmental Education Specialist Supervisor for Jacobsburg Environmental Education Center,
and Richard Deppen, Assistant Forest Manager for William Penn Forest District, who are
hosting the walk at the center.
They will take you on a cultural, historical, and forest ecology tour. The walk will be
approximately two miles long and take two hours. The walk is from 9:00 - 11:00 a.m., and the
address is Jacobsburg Environmental Education Center, 400 Belfast Road, Nazareth,
Northampton County.
-- ​Bald Eagle State Forest​: Bald Eagle State Forest provides a unique learning experience to
thousands of students, woodland owners, and other visitors about the importance of proper forest
management.

67
Please join Service Forester Gerald Hoy as he will teach tree and invasive plant
identification, wildlife habitat strategies, hemlock management, timber harvesting practices, and
more.
The walk is from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m., and begins at Stony Run Road, Millmont, Union
County.
-- ​Michaux State Forest:​ Enjoy a 2.5-mile hike on the Beaver Trail in Michaux State Forest,
featuring the scenic Long Pine Run Reservoir. The walk is guided by DCNR Bureau of Forestry
Environmental Education Specialist Ryan Reed.
The walk is from 10:00 - Noon. You can park along Birch Run Road at the Beaver Trail
trailhead.
-- ​Rothrock State Forest​: Enjoy educational stations set up along a popular walking trail at the
Musser Gap entry area to the Rothrock State Forest in Centre County. There will be a greeter at
the trailhead parking lot with a handout directing participants to the approximately 15 stations on
the trail ahead.
This two-mile walk (one way) will be self-guided between the stations with at least one
“station leader” at each stop. Learn from and ask questions of Rothrock State Forest District
Forester Mark Potter.
The walk is from 1:00 – 4:00 p.m., meeting at the Musser Gap Trail Parking Area.
Learn More About Penn's Woods
Find all of the walks​ and plan your trip!
As you get ready to take a walk, remember fall foliage is in its beginning stages, so it’s
the perfect opportunity to get out and start leaf peeping!
Check out DCNR’s ​2018 Fall Foliage Reports​, which are updated each week through the
fall season, and learn about ​some of the factors that cause leaf color change​ and impact the fall
foliage season in Pennsylvania.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
Related Stories:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At

68
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition

(Reprinted from the ​Oct. 3 Resource newsletter​ from DCNR. ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own
copy.)
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests

The ​PA Parks and Forests Foundation​ Monday


announced the release of “​Pennsylvania Parks and
Forests - 125 Years of Preservation and
Investment​” online story map in celebration of the
125th anniversary of state parks and forests in the
Commonwealth.
The story map outlines the development of
Pennsylvania’s public land system.
Working with the ​Center for Land Use and
Sustainability​ at Shippensburg University​, through a grant from the ​William Penn Foundation​,
the PA Parks and Forests Foundation and the ​PA Conservation Heritage Project​ created the story
map to highlight the history of Pennsylvania’s state parks and forests in celebration of their
quasquicentennial.
The story map brings the history to everyone, in an easy to understand format.
“Digital mapping technology has gotten to the point where we can create beautiful,
interactive maps that tell meaningful stories, said Dr. Claire Jantz, Director of the Center for
Land Use and Sustainability. “We are proud to have been a part of telling this story, and we hope
this story map will inspire people to enjoy and value these resources.”
“We are excited to share this new addition to the many resources available through the
Conservation Heritage Project website,” said Marci Mowery, President of the PA Parks and
Forests Foundation. “Pennsylvania has a rich conservation legacy. The Conservation Heritage
Project seeks to make this history available to citizens of all ages through story maps, stories,
documentaries and a multitude of resources.”
Click Here​ to visit the story map.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Parks &
Forests Foundation​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Foundation,
Like them on Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to become a member of the
Foundation.
Related Stories:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects

69
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 1, 2018]

Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR

The ​October 3 issue of the Resource​ newsletter is now


available from the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources features stories on--
-- DCNR Blog: Learn And Explore With A Walk In Penn’s
Woods
-- Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall
DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
-- ​PRPS, DCNR To Hold Community Conservation Grant
Workshops In Oct., Nov.
-- ​$100,000 In Grants To Support Local TreeVitalize Tree
Plantings, Stream Buffers
-- ​Additional State Forest Roads Opening For Hunting Seasons, Other Outdoor Activities
-- ​Pennsylvania Offers Fall Foliage Reports For Residents, Travelers
-- ​Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Rachel Reyna, DCNR’s Rural & Community Forest Section
-- ​Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of State Parks, Forests
-- ​New State Park Lake Depth Maps Available
--​ ​DCNR Blog: My Path To Fighting Wildlands Fires: A DCNR Firefighter's Journey
-- ​DCNR Blog: National Observance Salutes Those Who Hunt & Fish​ ​(photo)
-- ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own copy
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, Visit the ​Good Natured​ DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click
Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Schneck: Beautiful PA: Farmlands Offer Early Color Ahead Of Fall Foliage
Schneck: Fall Foliage Season In PA: Wait For It
Official: Warm, Wet Temps Dim Fall Glow
Fall Colors Expected To Be Later, Duller Than Usual

70
Seven Super Autumn Hikes In Eastern PA
Slow Start To Fall Foliage In Erie, Crawford Counties
Sunday Walks Will Explore Penn’s Woods
Koval: Hike In The Thomas Darling Nature Preserve Near Wilkes-Barre
Erie County Master Gardeners Grow Pumpkin Walk
Philadelphia Is About To Get More Bike Friendly
What Does It Take To Build A Bike Lane In Philadelphia
PA Fall Road Trip: 10 Scenic Towns You Should Visit This Season
11 Breathtaking Overlooks You Can Drive To In PA For Fall Foliage
Frye: Homemade Fire Starters Can Really Help Get That Campfire Going
Final Phase Of Wilkes-Barre Levee Trail Repairs Start Wednesday
Oil Region Alliance Acquires Standard Oil Mansion In Titusville
Oct. 5 Take Five Friday Without Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Missing Young Man’s Body Found In Linn Run State Park
Congress Debates Fix After Land & Water Conservation Fund Lapses
Letter: Protect The Federal Land And Water Conservation Fund
Editorial: Revive, Fully Fund Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship


Workshops Oct. 25, 26 In Chester County

The ​Brandywine Conservancy​ has partnered with the ​PA


Equine Counci​l, along with ​Natural Lands​ and ​Willistown
Conservation Trust​, to offer two ​Trail Stewardship

71
Workshops​ in Chester County during October.
The one-day workshops will provide an opportunity for the community to learn about
sustainable trail layout, construction, maintenance, tool selection and use.
Presented by Gwen and Bud Wills from the PA Equine Council, the workshop is geared
primarily towards equestrian trail users, however, many of the concepts taught are also
applicable for other trail enthusiasts, including hikers, bikers and cross-country skiers.
The workshop will begin with a presentation in the morning, followed by a hands-on
session in the afternoon where participants can implement and practice what they learned.
Interested participants can choose from two workshop locations:
-- October 25:​ Private property at 6 Castlebar Lane, Malvern. 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Check-in
begins at 8 a.m.; and
-- October 26​: Natural Lands’ ChesLen Preserve, 1199 Cannery Road, Coatesville. 8:30
a.m.–4:30 p.m. Check-in begins at 8 a.m.
Tickets are $15 per person; advance registration is required. Coffee, donuts, snacks and a
light lunch will be provided. ​Tickets can be purchased online​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Brandywine
Conservancy​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Conservancy (middle
of the webpage.) Visit the ​Conservancy’s Blog​, ​Like the Conservancy​ on Facebook and ​Follow
them on Instagram​.
Related Stories:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 1, 2018]

Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut


Mountain, Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event

The ​Brodhead Watershed Association​ will host 2


hikes in October, one part of the ​Get Outdoors

72
Poconos​ series and the second a ​Water Wiser Kids​ event.
October 21 - Chestnut Mountain
At 1,900 feet above sea level, ​Chestnut Mountain​ is one of Monroe County’s jewels of
conserved land, open to the public. It is part of the miles-long Pocono escarpment in northeastern
Pennsylvania-- that massive procession of folded rock bluffs that marches across the county.
Starting in the West End, near Hypsy Gap, familiar landmarks punctuate the
escarpment’s rocky heights-- Camelback, Pocono Manor, the Knob in Mount Pocono, Cresco
Heights. Then Chestnut Mountain, Spruce Mountain, Mount Wismer, and Skytop’s West
Mountain.
The preserve’s large parking area off Route 191 is a relic of the days when the previous
landowner heavily timbered the mountain. Formerly the loggers’ staging area, it is open to the
sun, and so has been overrun with opportunistic non-natives such as stilt grass, barberry and
multiflora rose.
Just ahead, the blue-blazed trail leads into the woods. Moving downhill, the trail dries
out, and, like trails throughout the Poconos, becomes rocky.
Hikers will move through tall, old stands of native rhododendrons, past the bear-clawed
beech tree and through the woods of beech, maple, ash and many kinds of oak. Deep among the
trees, enormous glacier-dropped boulders look like a mammoth sculpture garden.
Join hike leader Patti O’Keefe for this moderate-to-messy nature hike of about 2 miles
out and back. Sturdy boots and walking stick strongly recommended.
The free hike will start at 10:00 a.m. and participants are asked to meet off Route 191 in
Barrett Township. Directions will be made available when you register by calling 570-839-1120
or 570-629-2727 or sending email to: ​info@brodheadwatershed.org​.
October 27- Stars At Skywood
Dark, starry skies have filled people with awe forever. Many of humankind’s greatest
scientific achievements come from studying how the stars and planets move across the sky.
From the earliest times, people learned to use the stars to tell time of year, keep track of
the seasons, and understand the direction they are traveling on land and sea – north, south, east,
west.
On October 27, at ​Skywood Park in Paradise Township​, come hear great stories, myths,
and legends inspired by the night sky. Even the characters from Harry Potter can be found
among the stars!
Darryl and Jackie Speicher, renowned local naturalists, will lead the evening of
entertaining tales about the night sky.
Gazing upward, you’ll start to become familiar with some of the most common
constellations and star clusters. With these bright lights guiding the way, begin to orient yourself
in the galaxy.
The celestial roadmap leads the way. Darryl and Jackie will retell some of the Greek
mythology and American Indian folklore to bring the stars to life.
They will also introduce you to the “navigator stars” that help you find your way through
the galaxy, and look for shooting stars, planets, satellites, and other cosmic activity to catch
children’s imagination.
Bring a blanket and binoculars (we will have some to share). Come lay out under the
stars at Skywood Park and contemplate our place in the universe!
Dress in layers to be outside, and bring a blanket and flashlight. Suitable for

73
elementary-age children, teens, and adults.
This event is part of the ​Water Wiser Kids Series​ sponsored by Brodhead Watershed
Association, funded by a Dr. Claus Jordan Endowment Grant from Lehigh Valley Health
Network Pocono Foundation.
The free hike will be held from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. Directions will be made available when
you register by calling 570-839-1120 or sending email to: ​info@brodheadwatershed.org​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Brodhead Watershed Association​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the
Association. ​Click Here​ to become a member.
Related Stories:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk At
Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Scartelli Olszewski To Be Title Sponsor Of 5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Walk
At Lacawac Sanctuary Oct. 14 In Wayne County

Scranton and Wilkes-Barre personal injury law firm


Scartelli Olszewski, P.C​. will be a title race sponsor for
Lacawac Sanctuary’s​ ​5th Annual Lake to Lake 8K Trail
Run and Family/Dog Woods Walk​ to be held on October 14
at the Sanctuary in Wayne County.
The race course will lead participants over the trails of
Lacawac Sanctuary in Lake Ariel offering views of 400
acres of rich biodiversity and natural resources.
Attorney Peter Paul Olszewski, Jr., a shareholder and
managing partner with Scartelli Olszewski and the Chair of
the Board of Trustees of Lacawac Sanctuary, noted that
“protecting the environment is important to Northeastern

74
Pennsylvania. We are happy to support such a worthy cause in order to help preserve and
educate the public about one of the region’s natural landmarks.”
“The Lake to Lake event is a great way to get out and enjoy the beauty of Lacawac and
nature while supporting the work that takes place at Lacawac’s field research station and
environmental education facility,” said Craig Lukatch, President of Lacawac Sanctuary.
Race registration is $30 for the 8K and $20 for the woods dog walk.
Cash awards will be given in the Trail Run for Overall male and female, plus top three
finishers in age groups. The race results will be overseen by The Scranton Running Company
using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chip timing.
Click Here​ to register or for more information. For more information about sponsorships
and athlete and participant packets or to volunteer, contact Lacawac at 570-689-9494 or send
email to: ​craig.lukatch@lacawac.org​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Lacawac Sanctuary​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates (right panel). ​Follow on
Twitter​. ​Like on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
(​Photo:​ Melissa A. Scartelli, Esq, Scartelli Olszewski President and Founder with Sophia; and
Peter Paul Olszewski, Jr., shareholder and managing partner with Scartelli Olszewski with
Miranda.)
Related Stories:
Ohiopyle State Park Visitor Center First Stop On Fall DCNR Energy Efficiency Tour
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Multimodal Projects Funded Included 5 Trail, Bike, Recreation-Related Projects
DCNR, PA Urban & Community Forestry Council Announces $100,000 In Grants To Support
Local TreeVitalize Tree Plantings, Stream Buffers
DCNR Announces $600,000 Investments In Greene County Trails, Recreation
DCNR Announces $697,600 Grant For Community Pool In Brentwood, Allegheny County
Clinton County Event Recognizes 25 Years Of Keystone Fund Support For Local Projects
DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn's Woods Oct. 7
Brandywine Conservancy, PA Equine Council, Partners Offer Trail Stewardship Workshops Oct.
25, 26 In Chester County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Hosts 2 Hikes In Monroe County On Oct. 21 Chestnut Mountain,
Oct. 27 Stars At Skywood, A Water Wiser Kids Event
Online Story Map Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Pennsylvania's State Parks, Forests
Oct. 3 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Week 2 - Fall Foliage Report: Warmer Temps Slowed Foliage Transition
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service

The ​Manada Conservancy​ in Dauphin County


is now offering a ​Gardening for Nature
Landscape Design Service​ to help property
owners choose the right native plants to not

75
only enjoy through the seasons, but to support wildlife and pollinators.
The Conservancy's experienced native plant consultant-- Laurie Crawford-- will schedule
a site visit, discuss your goals, and prepare a landscape design tailored to your property.
Service details can be found in the Conservancy's ​Gardening for Nature brochure​.
For more information, visit the Manada Conservancy's ​Gardening For Nature​ webpage,
send email to: ​GardeningForNature@manada.org​ or call their office at 717-566-4122.
Visit the ​Manada Conservancy​ website to learn more about their programs, initiatives and
upcoming events. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Conservancy (mid-page).
Click Here​ to support their work.
Native Plant Resources
There are lots of resources available to help property owners landscape with native
plants, including--
-- ​DCNR Landscaping With Native Plants
-- Game Commission: ​Common Beneficial Plants Found In Wildlife Habitat
-- U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: ​Native Plants For Wildlife Habitat And Conservation
Landscaping
-- ​Chesapeake Bay Sustainable Landscape Professional Directory
-- ​Gardening For Butterflies: Penn State Extension
-- ​Planting For Pollinators: Penn State Extension
-- ​Center For Pollinator Research, Penn State
-- ​Pennsylvania Pollinator Protection Plan ​- ​Learn Why Pollinators Are At Risk In PA
-- ​Ernst Seeds - Pollinator Habitat Restoration
You can also check with land trusts, watershed groups or other groups near you to see
how they can help.
Related Story:
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species Ecologically Castrating The Landscape, But
There Is A Solution
Dept. Of Agriculture Issues General Quarantine Order To Address Rabies In Domestic Animals,
217 Cases In Animals This Year
Attention Drivers! Be Alert For Deer This Fall, Crashes And Fatalities Rose In PA
[Posted: Oct. 3, 2018]

Attention Drivers! Be Alert For Deer This Fall, Crashes And Fatalities Rose In PA

Insurance Commissioner Jessica Altman and Acting State


Police Commissioner Lt. Colonel Robert Evanchick
Thursday reminded drivers this is the time of year drivers
are most likely to be involved in a deer-related crash,
noting total crashes, as well as those involving injuries
and those resulting in fatalities, rose in 2017.
Figures compiled by State Farm Insurance show
Pennsylvania drivers had a 1-in-63 chance of a
deer-related crash from July 1, 2017 through June 30,
2018, the same as the prior 12 months, and the
third-highest rate in the country.

76
However, while State Farm reports the chance of hitting a deer dropped slightly for the
nation last year, the number of crashes rose in Pennsylvania.
PennDOT reports the number of deer-related crashes rose from 5,468 in 2016 to 5,674 in
2017. Also, the number of fatalities rose from 13 to 17, and the number of injuries was up
slightly, from 1,267 to 1,275.
Fatal deer-related crashes occurred in 14 of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties last year. These
include Berks (1 fatality), Blair (2), Bradford (2), Bucks (1), Carbon (1), Chester (1), Clearfield
(1), Erie (1), Fulton (1), Philadelphia (1), Pike (1), Somerset (1), Westmoreland (2), and York
(1).
“Fall is breeding season for deer, and they may be less aware of their surroundings,”
Altman advised. “Deer also often travel in groups, so if you see one deer, there are often more
nearby.”
November is the month when drivers are most likely to have a deer-related crash,
according to insurance industry information. October and December are the second and third
most likely months for these crashes.
Dawn and dusk are the peak times for deer activity, according to the Pennsylvania Game
Commission. When daylight saving time ends November 4, more drivers will be traveling to and
from work and school at these times of day.
Tips for motorists from the Game Commission--
-- ​Don’t count on deer whistles​ or deer fences to deter deer from crossing roads in front of you.
Stay alert.
-- ​Watch for the reflection of deer eyes ​and for deer silhouettes on the shoulder of the road. If
anything looks slightly suspicious, slow down.
-- ​Slow down in areas known to have a large deer population​; where deer-crossing signs are
posted; places where deer commonly cross roads; areas where roads divide agricultural fields
from woods; and whenever in forested areas between dusk and dawn.
-- ​Deer do unpredictable things. ​Sometimes they stop in the middle of the road when crossing.
Sometimes they cross and quickly re-cross back from where they came. Sometimes they move
toward an approaching vehicle. Assume nothing. Slow down; blow your horn to urge the deer to
leave the road. Stop if the deer stays on the road; don’t try to go around it.
“Deer-related crashes and other collisions can cause serious injury and thousands of
dollars in property damage,” said Lt. Colonel Evanchick. “Drivers should slow down, buckle up,
and never drive distracted to keep themselves and their passengers safe.”
In Pennsylvania, two types of crashes must be reported to the police: crashes that result in
one or more vehicles being damaged to the point that they cannot be driven from the scene and
collisions that result in injury or death.
Minor crashes or fender benders that do not result in injury may be reported to the police,
but it is not legally required.
Drivers involved in all collisions are required to exchange license and insurance
information with involved parties and render aid when necessary. ​Click Here​ for information on
what to do if you are involved in a vehicle crash.
“Under Pennsylvania law, a crash involving a deer, other animal, or fowl is considered a
not-at-fault accident, and insurers cannot add a surcharge to your premium for a deer-related
crash,” Altman said, adding this exclusion does not apply if your car does not come in contact
with the deer. “In addition, vehicle damage in these circumstances is handled under a driver’s

77
comprehensive coverage.”
State Farm reports the average cost of a deer-related crash jumped 3.9 percent last year,
rising from $4,179 to $4,341.
To report a dead deer for removal from state-maintained roads, motorists can call the
state Department of Transportation at 1-800-FIX-ROAD.
Related Story:
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species Ecologically Castrating The Landscape, But
There Is A Solution
Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service
Dept. Of Agriculture Issues General Quarantine Order To Address Rabies In Domestic Animals,
217 Cases In Animals This Year
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

PA Outdoor Writers Association Names Paula Piatt Executive Director

The ​PA Outdoor Writers Association’s​ Board of Directors Monday


announced the appointment of Paula Piatt as the organization’s new
executive director.
Piatt succeeds Dennis Scharadin, who retired from the
position on Aug. 31 after five years of leadership.
“We are thrilled to have Paula and the experience she brings
to the organization thanks to her long and distinguished career as an
outdoor communicator,” said Brad Isles, POWA president. “On
behalf of the board, we wish Dennis nothing but the best as he
transitions into retirement. We appreciate the countless hours and
knowledge he provided POWA during his tenure.”
An avid outdoorswoman, Paula currently serves as an
associate editor for Outdoor News Publications, where she also
regularly contributes as a feature writer.
She first joined POWA in the mid-1980s before relocating to the Adirondacks of New
York. Now, back home in Pennsylvania, she has been a member since 2010 and most recently
served on the Board of Directors.
"I'm excited to continue the good work of POWA in this new role. Now, more than ever,
the work of outdoor communications is vital to not only preserving our outdoor heritage, but
growing it for the future. I'm looking forward to helping both our individual and supporting
members do their best work," said Piatt.
During May’s POWA spring conference in Franklin she won an Excellence in Craft
Award in the Best Magazine or Regional Newspaper Feature category for “On duty,” which was
published in the September/October 2017 Just Labs magazine.
“Paula is more than a talented writer and editor. Her work with and knowledge of other
member-led organizations, particularly those in based the outdoors and conservation, will be a
great benefit to us as we look for new avenues of growth,” Isles said. “The future of POWA is
bright.”
Paula graduated from Lock Haven University with a degree in Journalism/Media Studies
and has worked in various media for the past 35 years.

78
She serves as a member of Gov. Tom Wolf's Advisory Council for Hunting, Fishing and
Conversation and holds memberships in the New York State Outdoor Writers Association; the
National Wild Turkey Federation; Backcountry Hunters and Anglers; and the Sayre Sportsmen's
Club, where she serves on the Board of Directors as secretary and delegate to the Pennsylvania
Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs.
Paula and her husband, Steve, who is also a POWA member, live in Sayre, Pa., with their
two Labrador retrievers. They co-hosted the POWA Spring Conference in Sayre in 2016.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PA Outdoor
Writers Association​ website.
Related Stories:
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species Ecologically Castrating The Landscape, But
There Is A Solution
Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service
Dept. Of Agriculture Issues General Quarantine Order To Address Rabies In Domestic Animals,
217 Cases In Animals This Year
Attention Drivers! Be Alert For Deer This Fall, Crashes And Fatalities Rose In PA
[Posted: Oct. 1, 2018]

Help Wanted: CBF-PA Student Leadership Field Education Program Educators

The ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA​ is seeking


qualified candidates to fill 2 Program Educator
positions for the ​PA Student Leadership Field
Education Program​.
This is a new education program, based in
Harrisburg, and will require extensive travel in the
Southcentral counties of Pennsylvania. This is a
full time 3-year term position.
Click Here​ for all the details.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues
in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up
for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
[Posted: Oct. 3, 2018]

Help Wanted: Delaware County Planning Department Open Space & Trail Manager

The ​Delaware County Planning Department​ is seeking qualified candidates for an ​Open Space
and Trail Manager​ position. ​Click Here​ for all the details.
[Posted: Oct. 4, 2018]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.
79
The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​, ​Twitter Feed​ and ​add ​PaEnviroDigest Google+​ to your Circle.

AccuWeather’s Winter Forecast: When Will Cold Weather Dig In its Heels?
Air
Grant From VW Settlement Helps Fund Greener School Buses In Lancaster County
Air Pollution Reaches Unhealthy Levels In Pittsburgh
Unhealthy Air Tuesday Was In Beaver County Not Pittsburgh
Researchers Offer All-School Asthma Screening To Help Kids Stay Healthy In Clairton
Op-Ed: EPA’s Affordable Clean Energy Rules Is Neither ​-- PUC Commissioner Andrew Place
Trump Administration Preparing To Weaken Mercury Rule
EPA Rewrites Mercury Rules Using New Cost-Benefit Approach To Curtail Future Regs
Alternative Fuels
PA State Parks To Host Electric Car Charging Stations
Erie’s Presque Isle To Get Electric Car Charging Station
Grant From VW Settlement Helps Fund Greener School Buses In Lancaster County
Harrisburg Biofuels Firm Exec Pleads Guilty In $4.1M Federal Tax Fraud
Awards & Recognition
Ligonier Coal Company Honored For Mine Reclamation
Beautification
Controversial Billboard Near Ben Franklin Bridge Debated In Philadelphia
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
PA Urges Lancaster Business Operating In NY To Get Training On Spotted Lanternflies
Budget
Scranton Still Evaluating Stormwater Management Plan Fee
September State Revenues 6.4 Percent Over Estimates, Up $209.8 Million For Fiscal Year
Allegheny Front: Dozens Of Programs At Risk If Federal Farm Bill Expires
Congress Debates Fix After Land & Water Conservation Fund Lapses
Letter: Protect The Federal Land And Water Conservation Fund
Editorial: Revive, Fully Fund Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund
Editorial: Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund Deserves To Remain
Chesapeake Bay
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
DEP Tours Wyoming County Farms
Scranton Still Evaluating Stormwater Management Plan Fee
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Climate
ER Nurses Seeking More Health Issues Linked To Climate Change
Changing Weather Will Influence Erie-Area Bird Migration

80
Op-Ed: The Economic And Environmental Benefits Of A Carbon Swap For PA Families
Op-Ed: EPA’s Affordable Clean Energy Rules Is Neither ​-- PUC Commissioner Andrew Place
Editorial: More Trees In Philadelphia Can Help With Climate Change
Trump’s NHTSA Sees 7-Degree Rise In Global Temps In 82 Years
DOE Moves To Slash Cost Of Carbon Capture For Coal-Fired Power Plants
Trump Administration Preparing To Weaken Mercury Rule
EPA Rewrites Mercury Rules Using New Cost-Benefit Approach To Curtail Future Regs
Coal Mining
CONSOL Energy, Komatsu Mining To Receive 2018 NIOSH Mine Safety Award
PJM: FirstEnergy Can Shut 4 Gigawatts Of Fossil Plants Without Harming Reliability
Op-Ed: EPA’s Affordable Clean Energy Rules Is Neither ​-- PUC Commissioner Andrew Place
Trump Administration Preparing To Weaken Mercury Rule
EPA Rewrites Mercury Rules Using New Cost-Benefit Approach To Curtail Future Regs
DOE Moves To Slash Cost Of Carbon Capture For Coal-Fired Power Plants
Trump Nominates Coal, Nuclear Bailout Support To FERC
Trump Nominates DOE’s McNamee To FERC
Compliance Action
UGI Faces $2M Penalty For 2017 House Explosion In Lancaster County
PUC Seeks $2.1 Million Fine In Fatal 2017 UGI Gas Explosion In Lancaster
UGI Facing $2 Million Fine For Fatal Gas Blast In Lancaster County
Harrisburg Biofuels Firm Exec Pleads Guilty In $4.1M Federal Tax Fraud
Deep Mine Safety
CONSOL Energy, Komatsu Mining To Receive 2018 NIOSH Mine Safety Award
Delaware River
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct. 5 RiverWatch Video Report
Editorial: Power Vested In DRBC To Protect Watershed From Fracking
Drinking Water
Lehigh County Demands Paint Industry Help With Lead Abatement
State Doesn’t Pay Local Lead Poisoning Home Inspectors, Medicaid Insurers Now Paid
Carr: Monroeville Authority Switching To Chlorine To Disinfect Drinking Water
Maykuth: Aqua America Now Surpasses Million-Customer Mark With Illinois Acquisition
Federal Court Opens Door To More Suits Over PFAS Contaminations In Bucks, Montgomery
Economic Development
Study: Economic Benefits Of Great Lakes Restoration Benefit Erie
Op-Ed: Natural Gas Driving Force Behind PA Manufacturing Growth
Education
Beveridge: Floating Student Science Lab Docks In Monongahela
Buffalo Creek Watershed Assn. Holds Oct. 11 Meet Reptiles, Amphibians In Washington
County
EPCAMR Grant Will Help Wilkes-Barre Area Students Grow
STEAM Education Program Expanding In Scranton Schools
Agreement Between Easton, Da Vinci Science City Expected Next Month
With Opening Of The Discovery Center, Public Can Explore Hidden Reservoir In East
Fairmount Park
Emergency Response

81
Blair Group Reboots Hazmat Emergency Planning
Energy
Murphy: Nuclear Safety Advocates Call Attention To Waste Nuclear Plants Leave Behind
PSEG Affirms It Will Shut Down Nuclear Plants In NJ Unless It Gets Subsidy
Op-Ed: The Economic And Environmental Benefits Of A Carbon Swap For PA Families
Editorial: PUC Deserves Credit For Action Against Vortex Power Distributors
Nazareth Plans On Making Utility Companies Pay For Half Of Road Repairs
PJM Renewables Future Includes Significant Chunk Of Corporate Procurement
PJM: FirstEnergy Can Shut 4 Gigawatts Of Fossil Plants Without Harming Reliability
PJM Recasts Capacity Repricing In Market Reform Filing At FERC
Ahead Of FERC Storage Order Deadline, New Rules Begin To Take Shape At PJM
Op-Ed: When PJM’s Capacity Market Stops Working For Consumers Is It Time To Leave?
DOE Moves To Slash Cost Of Carbon Capture For Coal-Fired Power Plants
Op-Ed: EPA’s Affordable Clean Energy Rules Is Neither ​-- PUC Commissioner Andrew Place
Op-Ed: The Inevitable Policy Response Theory On Climate Change​ - Christina Simone,
Kleinman Center For Energy Policy
Trump Nominates Coal, Nuclear Bailout Support To FERC
Trump Nominates DOE’s McNamee To FERC
Energy Conservation
Carbondale To Replace 900+ Street Lights With Energy Efficient LEDs
C-PACE Alliance Tapped To Help Design C-PACE Program For Local Governments In PA
Farming
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
Lower Macungie Buys 190 Acres Of Farmland For Preservation
Upper Macungie Agrees To See Farmland Rights To 25 Acres To County
PA Supreme Court Declines To Step Into Smelly Dispute Over Pig Farm
Crable: Are Meat Goats Antidote For Struggling Lancaster County Dairy Farmers?
Gardening Is Contagious: Philly Neighbors Bring Beauty, Bounty To Their Alley
In Hatfield, Suburban Neighbors In Dispute Over Backyard Beekeeping
Hatfield Delays Decision On Backyard Bees
Allegheny Front: Dozens Of Programs At Risk If Federal Farm Bill Expires
Federal Policy
Trump Touts Environmental Deregulation In Philadelphia
Flooding/Severe Weather
Flash Flooding Closes Roads In Allegheny County, Some Rescued In Pittsburgh
Flooding Closes Brentwood Schools Near Pittsburgh, Power Outage Delays Start At Shaler High
10 Tornadoes Confirmed Across PA During Tuesday Storms
Thanking First Responders For Help During Flooding In Schuylkill County
Work On Solomon Creek Flood Wall Project Begins In W-B
Prep Work For Solomon Creek Flood Wall Project To Begin Monday
24-day Gloom Streak Ends, September Joins Top 5 Rainiest In Philadelphia
EF-2 Tornado Tears Through Conneautville, Crawford County
Conneautville Elder-Care Community Hit By Tornado
Flooding - Hurricanes

82
PA Task Force 1 Members Return Home After Helping Hurricane-Devastated Carolinas
Despite Post-Hurricane Harvey Promise, Trump Has Not Replaced Flood Building Standards
Barranquitas, Puerto Rico Rebuilt After Maria But Not Ready For Another Storm
Forests
Schneck: Beautiful PA: Farmlands Offer Early Color Ahead Of Fall Foliage
Schneck: Fall Foliage Season In PA: Wait For It
Fall Colors Expected To Be Later, Duller Than Usual
Official: Warm, Wet Temps Dim Fall Glow
PA Fall Road Trip: 10 Scenic Towns You Should Visit This Season
11 Breathtaking Overlooks You Can Drive To In PA For Fall Foliage
PA Urges Lancaster Business Operating In NY To Get Training On Spotted Lanternflies
Editorial: More Trees In Philadelphia Can Help With Climate Change
Forests - Wildfires
Fire Ecologists Say More Fires Should Be Left To Burn, So Why Aren’t They?
Geologic Hazards
Landslide Closes Washington County Road In Same Area Previous Slides Damaged Homes
Green Infrastructure
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
DEP Tours Wyoming County Farms
Health
ER Nurses Seeking More Health Issues Linked To Climate Change
Lake Erie
Study: Economic Benefits Of Great Lakes Restoration Benefit Erie
Rep. Sonney Re-Elected To Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Legislative Caucus
Land Conservation
More Than 1,600 Acres Of Forest Protected In Perry County
Crable: Nearly 1,000 Wooded Acres Along Susquehanna River Will Be Preserved In Lancaster
Lower Macungie Buys 190 Acres Of Farmland For Preservation
Upper Macungie Agrees To See Farmland Rights To 25 Acres To County
Koval: Hike In The Thomas Darling Nature Preserve Near Wilkes-Barre
Barnes’ Dream: Lower Merion Garden Entrusted To St. Joe’s University
Congress Debates Fix After Land & Water Conservation Fund Lapses
Letter: Protect The Federal Land And Water Conservation Fund
Editorial: Revive, Fully Fund Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund
Editorial: Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund Deserves To Remain
Land Recycling
Hazelwood Green Site May Try Spec Building
Tech Firm To Take Space In Hazelwood Green Brownfield Redevelopment
Redevelopment Of Hazelwood Green Mill Site Moves Forward
Green Space To Buffer Brownfield Development In Jeannette, Hearing Wednesday
Editorial: Brownfields Boost? Hopefully History Will Repeat In Williamsport
Littering/Illegal Dumping
Lackawanna County Hosting Tire Recycling Events Oct. 6, 13
Clinton County CleanScapes To Host Forestland Beautification

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With No Cash For Trash, Philadelphia Mulls Partnerships With Private Groups
Kummer: Litter Detectives Stymied By Illegal Dumping On Philly’s River Banks
Op-Ed: Philly’s Litter Problem No Mystery. Why Won’t City Hall Step Up And Solve It?
Mine Reclamation
Ligonier Coal Company Honored For Mine Reclamation
Wilkes-Barre School District Looking To Build School On Old Mine Site
EPCAMR Grant Will Help Wilkes-Barre Area Students Grow
Ohio River
AP: Ohio River Agency Holds Off Vote On Dropping Pollution Rules
Editorial: ORSANCO Scheme To Deregulate Ohio River Cannot Be Justified
Oil & Gas
Editorial: Power Vested In DRBC To Protect Watershed From Fracking
Allegheny Front: Ohio Residents Fed Up With PA Fracking Wastewater
Hopey: Plum Residents Upset Over Proposed Drilling Waste Disposal Well In Their Town
Frazier: Proposed Drilling Waste Injection Well Gets A Hearing Near Pittsburgh
House Environment Committee Set To Meet Oct. 9 On Natural Gas Royalty Bill
Cusick: House Panel To Take Up Gas Royalty Bill, But Not The One Advocates Hoped For
5 New Gas Wells Coming To Upper Burrell Drilling Site
UGI Faces $2M Penalty For 2017 House Explosion In Lancaster County
PUC Seeks $2.1 Million Fine In Fatal 2017 UGI Gas Explosion In Lancaster
UGI Facing $2 Million Fine For Fatal Gas Blast In Lancaster County
Fire Erupts After Contractor Hits Natural Gas Line In Bethel Park
Worley & Obetz Bankruptcy Trustee Eyes Assets Of Obetz Family, Others
Op-Ed: Natural Gas Driving Force Behind PA Manufacturing Growth
U.S. Natural Gas Exports For 2018 More Than Double For 2017
Zinke Talks Natural Gas Exports, Pipeline Constraints In PA Visit
Pipelines
Crable: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Gets Green Light To Operate Starting Saturday
Cusick: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Goes Into Full Operation This Weekend
Hurdle: Numerous Unresolved PUC, DEP Regulatory Issues Delay Opening Of Mariner East 2
Pipeline
Phillips: Mariner East 2 Pipeline: What Are Natural Gas Liquids And What Happens If they
Leak?
Trump Administration Tackles Pipeline Cybersecurity
Trump Nominates Coal, Nuclear Bailout Support To FERC
Trump Nominates DOE’s McNamee To FERC
Zinke Talks Natural Gas Exports, Pipeline Constraints In PA Visit
Williams Pipeline CEO Compliments PA’s Regulatory Climate
Radiation Protection
Murphy: Nuclear Safety Advocates Call Attention To Waste Nuclear Plants Leave Behind
PSEG Affirms It Will Shut Down Nuclear Plants In NJ Unless It Gets Subsidy
Sisk: Russian Military Targeted PA Nuclear Power Company In Hacking Scheme
Westinghouse Among Targets Of Alleged Russian Cyber Spies
Russian Hackers Indicted For Targeting Nuclear Firm Westinghouse Electric
Trump Nominates Coal, Nuclear Bailout Support To FERC

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Trump Nominates DOE’s McNamee To FERC
Trump’s EPA Moving To Loosen Radiation Limits, Experts Say
Recreation
Schneck: Beautiful PA: Farmlands Offer Early Color Ahead Of Fall Foliage
Schneck: Fall Foliage Season In PA: Wait For It
Official: Warm, Wet Temps Dim Fall Glow
Fall Colors Expected To Be Later, Duller Than Usual
Seven Super Autumn Hikes In Eastern PA
Slow Start To Fall Foliage In Erie, Crawford Counties
Sunday Walks Will Explore Penn’s Woods
Koval: Hike In The Thomas Darling Nature Preserve Near Wilkes-Barre
Erie County Master Gardeners Grow Pumpkin Walk
Philadelphia Is About To Get More Bike Friendly
What Does It Take To Build A Bike Lane In Philadelphia
PA Fall Road Trip: 10 Scenic Towns You Should Visit This Season
11 Breathtaking Overlooks You Can Drive To In PA For Fall Foliage
Frye: Homemade Fire Starters Can Really Help Get That Campfire Going
Final Phase Of Wilkes-Barre Levee Trail Repairs Start Wednesday
Oil Region Alliance Acquires Standard Oil Mansion In Titusville
Oct. 5 Take Five Friday Without Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Missing Young Man’s Body Found In Linn Run State Park
Congress Debates Fix After Land & Water Conservation Fund Lapses
Letter: Protect The Federal Land And Water Conservation Fund
Editorial: Revive, Fully Fund Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund
Recycling/Waste
Lackawanna County Hosting Tire Recycling Events Oct. 6, 13
Renewable Energy
Western PA Solar Tour Oct. 6 Features Stops In Washington County
C-PACE Alliance Tapped To Help Design C-PACE Program For Local Governments In PA
PJM Renewables Future Includes Significant Chunk Of Corporate Procurement
Stormwater
Scranton Still Evaluating Stormwater Management Plan Fee
Wastewater Facilities
Monroeville Authority In Line For Nearly $395K In Grants For Sewer Lining Projects
Watershed Protection
Crable: Lancaster County Presents Bold New Plan To Reduce Water Pollution, Asks More Of
All Sectors
DEP Tours Wyoming County Farms
Scranton Still Evaluating Stormwater Management Plan Fee
Editorial: ORSANCO Scheme To Deregulate Ohio River Cannot Be Justified
AP: Ohio River Agency Holds Off Vote On Dropping Pollution Rules
Study: Economic Benefits Of Great Lakes Restoration Benefit Erie
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct. 5 RiverWatch Video Report
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal

85
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Wildlife
Officials Plan To Vaccinate Raccoons In Pittsburgh Neighborhoods
AP: 2 More Rabid Raccoons Found In Pittsburgh Area
Changing Weather Will Influence Erie-Area Bird Migration
Philadelphia’s Glass Skyline Is Killing Birds, New Fairmount Park Building Has A Solution
Fishing Line Around Blue Heron’s Leg Has McDade Park Staff, Guests Concerned
3 Bat Species Could Be Listed As Endangered
Crable: Jesse Rothacker Works To Improve The Reputation Of Reptiles
Schneck: What Do Rattlesnakes, Other Reptiles Do In The Fall?
Buffalo Creek Watershed Assn. Holds Oct. 11 Meet Reptiles, Amphibians In Washington
County
With Opening Of The Discovery Center, Public Can Explore Hidden Reservoir In East
Fairmount Park
West Nile/Zika Virus
Why It Could Be Worst-Ever Year For West Nile Virus In PA, What You Can Do

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

October 6--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Hard-To-Recycle Collection Event​. ​Settlers Cabin Park,
Robinson Township​, Allegheny County. 9:00 to 1:00.

October 6--​ ​Independence Conservancy Community Tire Collection​. Ambridge Borough


Building, 600 11th Street, Ambridge, Beaver County. 9:00 to Noon.

October 6--​ ​PA Forestry Association Annual Conference - Managing & Conserving
Pennsylvania’s Forested Waters​. Toftrees Resort, State College, Centre County.

October 6-- ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. ​Richland Community
Library, 111 East Main Street in Richland, Lebanon County. 10:00 to 11:00

October 7--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Backyard Composting Workshop​. Blueberry Hill Park,
Franklin Park, Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

October 7--​ ​NEW​. ​DCNR Blog: Learn & Explore With A Walk In Penn’s Woods​.

October 7-- ​Manada Conservancy​. ​A Walk In Penn’s Woods At DeHart Dam, Dauphin County​.
Participants will meet in the gravel parking lot at the DeHart Dam entrance, approximately 12
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miles northeast of Dauphin PA and accessed from Rt. 325 (Clarks Valley Road). Google Maps
will identify the parking location as "Dehart Dam, Halifax, PA." 1:00.

October 9--​ ​NEW​. ​House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ meets to consider
Senate Bill 138​ (Yaw-R-Lycoming) providing oil and gas royalty interest landowners access to
records of drilling companies to verify proper payment of royalties (​sponsor summary​). Room
B-31 Main Capitol. Off the Floor. ​House meetings are typically webcast through the ​House
Republican Caucus​ website.

October 9--​ ​DEP Webinar On Level 2 Charging Station Grant Program​. 10:30.

October 9--​ ​NEW​. ​Penn State Environment and Natural Resources Institute​. ​Water Insights
Seminar: Using Sensors to Map Cover Crop Biomass Nitrogen Content​. Room 312, Agriculture
and Bio Engineering Building, University Park Campus. Noon. There is also an option to​ ​join
the Seminar via Zoom​.

October 9-11-- ​PA Association of Conservation Districts​. ​Annual Watershed Specialists


Meeting​. State College.

October 10--​ ​NEW​. ​House Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee​ meets to
consider ​House Resolution 1112​ (Barrar-R-Delaware) calling on federal government to
recognize the importance of durable, flood-resilient infrastructure (​sponsor summary​). Room
G-50 Irvis Building. Off the Floor. ​House meetings are typically webcast through the H ​ ouse
Republican Caucus​ website.

October 10--​ ​DEP Technical Advisory Committee On Diesel Powered (Mining) Equipment​.
DEP New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Road, New Stanton. 10:00. DEP Contact: Peggy
Scheloski, 724-404-3143 or ​mscheloske@pa.gov​.

October 10- ​DEP Hearing (If Needed) On Georgia Pacific Plant RACT II Air Quality Plan in
Sergeant Township, McKean County​. DEP Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street,
Meadville. 9:00.

October 10--​ ​Western PA Conservancy​. ​Affordable Farmland Protection Strategies Workshop​.


Mattress Factory Museum​, 500 Sampsonia Way, Pittsburgh. 9:30 to 5:00

October 10-- ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. ​Park Street Complex,
648 West Park Street, Honesdale, Wayne County. 6:00 to 7:30

October 11--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Next
scheduled meeting is December 13. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to:
kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

October 11--​ ​DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board​ Regulation, Legislation and
Technical Committee conference call. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden 717-783-8846 or

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send email to: ​dsnowden@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

October 11--​ ​Stroud Water Research Center​. ​Premiere Of Lay Of The Land: Healthy Soils,
Healthy Waters Film​. ​Community Mennonite Church Of Lancaster, 328 West Orange Street,
Lancaster 6:00.

October 11--​ ​Pike County Conservation District Local Road Maintenance Workshop​. Dingman
Township Fire Hall, 680 Log Tavern Road, Milford. 9:00 to Noon.

October 11--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​. ​Taking Over An Established
Farm Business Workshop​. ​Black Urban Gardeners & Farmers of Pittsburgh Co-Op​, 7019
Monticello Street, Pittsburgh. 5:30 to 8:30.

October 12--​ ​Lebanon County Grazing Network Soil Pit/Soil Health Field Day​. ​Sandy Springs
Farm​, 130 Sinclair Road, Newmanstown. 9:30 - 2:30.

October 13--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. Ross Township Community
Center, Allegheny County. 12:30 to 2:00.

October 13--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Household Chemical Collection Event​. Bradys Run Park,
Beaver County. 9:00 to 1:00.

October 13--​ ​Tree Pittsburgh​. ​Free Tree Give Away In Allegheny County​. ​Pittsburgh Zoo
parking lot, 7370 Baker Street in Pittsburgh. 10:00 to 2:00. ​Click Here to register​.

October 13--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​. ​Transition Truths - Taking
Over an Established Farm Business Workshop​. ​Quiet Creek Herb Farm​, 93 Quiet Creek Lane,
Brookville, Jefferson County. 1:00 to 4:00.

October 14--​ ​NEW​. ​Lacawac Sanctuary​. ​Lake to Lake 8K Trail Run & Family/DOG Woods
Walk​. Lacawac Sanctuary, Wayne County.

October 15--​ Environmental Issues Forum by ​Joint House-Senate Legislative Air and Water
Pollution Control and Conservation Committee​ on biogas and bioenergy. Room 8E-A, East
Wing Capitol Building. Noon. ​Click Here​ for more.

October 15--​ ​NEW​. Performance-Based Budget Board meeting. Hearing Room 1, North Office
Building. 4:00.

October 16-- ​CANCELED.​ ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Next scheduled meeting is
November 13. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

October 16-- ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Keith Saladar, Executive Director, ​ksalador@pa.gov​ or call 717-787-8171.

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October 16-​- ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Laboratory Accreditation Advisory Committee​ meeting. The
next scheduled meeting is on December 5. DEP Contact: Aaren Alger, 717-346-8212 or send
email to: ​aaalger@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

October 16-- ​NEW​. ​Penn State Extension Webinar: Role Community Forest Managers Can Play
In MS4 Stormwater Pollution Reduction​. Noon to 1:00.

October 17-- ​NEW​. ​Senate State Government Committee​ holds a hearing on several resolutions
calling for the amending of the U.S. Constitution - ​Senate Resolution 133​ (Eichelberger-R-Blair)
to require a balanced budget and member term limits (​sponsor summary​), ​Senate Resolution 134
(Eichelberger-R-Blair) to add a Regulation Freedom amendment to require the adoption of a
regulation by Congress when one quarter of its members object to a regulation (​sponsor
summary​), ​Senate Resolution 254​ (Costa-D-Allegheny) Free and Fair Elections amendment
requiring campaign finance disclosure (​sponsor summary​). Hearing Room 1, North Office
Building. 9:00. ​Click Here​ to see if the hearing will be webcast.

October 17--​ ​DEP State Board For Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Edgar
Chescattle, ​echescattie@pa.gov​.

October 17--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Buchanan State Forest District​,
District Office, 25185 Great Cove Road, McConnellsburg, Fulton County. 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
Click Here​ for more.

October 17--​ ​NEW​. Dept. of Labor & Industry ​Uniform Construction Code Review and
Advisory Council​ meeting. L&I Building, Room E-100 First Floor, 651 Boas Street, Harrisburg.
10:00. L&I Contact: Cindy Holtry, 717-783-4560. ​(​formal notice)​

October 17--​ ​PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference In Mars, Butler County​.

October 17-21--​ ​Passive House Western PA​. ​North American Passive House Network 2018
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

October 17-18--​ ​NEW​. ​Professional Recyclers of PA Recycling Certification Courses​.


Bellefonte, Centre County.

October 18--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​ meeting


rescheduled to November 15. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic 717-783-9730 or send email to:
jmelnic@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

October 18-- ​DEP Small Water Systems Technical Assistance Center Board​ meeting. DEP
Southcentral Regional Office, Susquehanna Room, 909 Elmerton Avenue, Harrisburg. 9:00.
DEP Contact: Dawn Hissner 717-787-9633 or send email to ​dhissner@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

October 18--​ ​PA State Assn. Of Township Supervisors​.​ PA Stormwater Conference​ [Western].

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Butler County.

October 18-- ​NEW​. ​York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop​. ​Penn
State Extension Office, 112 Pleasant Acres Road, York. 6:30 to 8:00

October 18-- ​PA Resources Council​. ​Recycling Awareness Workshop​. Sewickley Public
Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:00 p.m.

October 18--​ ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission Small Water System Finances, Funding
Preparing For Emergencies, Regulatory Updates Workshop​. ​SRBC offices, 4423 North Front
Street, Harrisburg. 8:40 to 3:15.

October 20--​ ​Eastern PA Coalition For Abandoned Mine Reclamation​. ​Fall Cleanup In
Centralia, Columbia County​.

October 20-- ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. ​Lebanon Community
Library, 125 North 7th Street, Lebanon, Lebanon County. 10:00 to 11:00

October 21--​ ​NEW​. ​Brodhead Watershed Association​. ​Get Outdoors Poconos Chestnut
Mountain Hike​. Monroe County. 10:00.

October 22--​ ​NEW​. ​Professional Recyclers of PA Recycling Certification Courses​. Enola,


Cumberland County.

October 23-​- ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Next scheduled
meeting is December 4. DEP Contact: John Krueger, 717-783-9264, ​jkrueger@pa.gov​.

October 23--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Montgomery County
Fire Academy, 1175 Conshohocken Road, Conshohocken. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for more.

October 23-​- ​Penn State Extension Webinar On Addressing Orphan & Abandoned Wells From
DEP, Industry Perspectives​. 1:00.

October 24--​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 1:00. ​Click Here​ to register to join the meeting by webinar.
Participants also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 643 952 548.

October 24--​ ​DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee​ meeting. 12th Floor
Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Nancy Herb, 717-783-9269,
nherb@pa.gov​.

October 24--​ ​NEW.​ ​DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board​ Regulation, Legislation and
Technical Committee conference call. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden 717-783-8846 or
send email to: ​dsnowden@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

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October 24--​ ​CANCELED​. DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Clear Creek State
Forest District​. Scheduled for October 30.

October 24--​ ​Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Drexel University Hosts Voting For The
Environment Program​. ​Academy, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia. 6:30 to 8:00.

October 24--​ ​NEW​. ​CEOs for Sustainability​. ​Sustainability Speaker Series: Partnering With
Suppliers For A Competitive Edge Workshop​. Pittsburgh. 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.

October 24-25--​ ​Penn State Extension: Biochar & Torrefied Biomass Short Course​. ​Penn State
University Agricultural Engineering Building, Shortlidge Road, University Park.

October 25--​ ​DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: ​Daniel Snowden 717-783-8846 or send email to:
dsnowden@pa.gov​.

October 25-​- ​DEP Webinar On Electric and Hydrogen Fuel Cell Charging Projects Grant
Program​. 10:30.

October 25--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Luzerne County
Community College, Educational Conference Center (Building #10), 1333 South Prospect Street,
Nanticoke. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for more.

October 25--​ ​NEW​. ​Brandywine Conservancy​, ​PA Equine Council​. ​Trail Stewardship
Workshop​. ​Private property at 6 Castlebar Lane, Malvern. Chester County. 8:30 - 4:30.

October 26--​ ​NEW​. ​Brandywine Conservancy​, ​PA Equine Council​. ​Trail Stewardship
Workshop​. ​Natural Lands’ ChesLen Preserve, 1199 Cannery Road, Coatesville, Chester
County.. 8:30–4:30.

October 27-- ​PA Resources Council​, ​PA American Water​. ​Drug Take-Back Event - 3 Locations
in Allegheny County​. 10:00 to 2:00--
-- Green Tree Borough Building, 10 W. Manila Ave.
-- Medical Rescue Team South, 315 Cypress Way, Mt. Lebanon
-- The Mall At Robinson (parking lot near Dick’s Sporting Goods), 100 Robinson Centre Dr.

October 27--​ ​NEW​. ​Brodhead Watershed Association​. ​Water Wiser Kids: Stars At Skywood
Park Hike​. Monroe County. 7:30 to 9:00.

October 30--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Clear Creek State Forest District​.
District Office, 158 South Second Ave., Clarion, Clarion County. 6:30 to 8:00. ​Click Here​ for
more.

October 30--​ ​PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference In King of Prussia​.

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October 30-31--​ ​Northeast Recycling Council Fall Conference​. Sheraton Hartford South Hotel,
Rocky Hill, Connecticut.

October 31--​ ​DEP State Board for Certification of Sewage Enforcement Officers​ meeting.
Conference Room 11B, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Kristen Szwajkowski,
717-772-2186, ​kszwajkows@pa.gov​.

November 1--​ ​U.S. Green Building Council Central PA Chapter Forever Green Awards
Ceremony.​ Civic Club of Harrisburg.

November 1--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Giant Food Store
Community Room, 3301 Trindle Road, Camp Hill, Cumberland County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click
Here​ for more.

November 1--​ ​Pike County Conservation District Celebrates Natural Resources Annual Dinner.
The Waterfront Room at​ ​Silver Birches Resort​, Lake Wallenpaupack. 6:00 to 8:00.

November 1-2--​ ​PA Water And Wastewater Technology Summit​. ​Penn Stater Conference
Center Hotel, State College.

November 3--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. ​Construction Junction​,


Point Breeze, Allegheny County. 11:00 to 12:30.

November 3--​ ​Tree Pittsburgh​. ​Free Tree Give Away In Allegheny County​. ​North Park Ice
Rink​, 1200 Pearce Mill Road, Wexford. 10:00 to 2:00.​ ​Click Here to register​.

November 5--​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ Act 101 Workgroup meets. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713 or send email to:
lahenry@pa.gov​.
-- Finalizing recommendations on Act 101

November 5--​ ​Penn State Extension Protect Your Springs, Wells, Septic Systems & Cisterns
Workshops (2)​. ​Terre Hill Community Center​, 131 West Main Street, Terre Hill, Lancaster
County . 2:00 to 4:00 and 6:00 to 8:00

November 6--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. North Park Rose Barn,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

November 7--​ ​DEP Aggregate Advisory Board​ meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden 717-783-8846 or send email to:
dsnowden@pa.gov​.

November 7--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​.

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November 7-- ​DEP Hearing (If Needed) on RACT II Air Quality Plan for a Tennessee Gas
Pipeline Compressor Station In Howe Township, Forest County​. ​DEP Northwest Regional
Office, 230 Chestnut Street in Meadville, Crawford County. 9:00

November 7--​ D​EP Meeting/Hearing On Proposed NPDES Stormwater Permit For A Biosolids
(sewage sludge) processing facility In Pen Argyle, Northampton County​. ​Wind Gap Middle
School, 1620 Teels Road, Pen Argyle. 6:00 to 9:30.

November 7--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Unitarian


Universalist Fellowship of Centre County, 780 Waupelani Drive Ext., State College, Centre
County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 8--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Rothrock State Forest District​,
Shaver’s Creek CFD Community Building, 8707 Firemans Park Ln, Petersburg, Huntingdon
County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 8--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Weiser State Forest District​,
District Office, 16 Weiser Lane, Aristes, Columbia County. 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here​ for
more.

November 13-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

November 13-- ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Keith Saladar, Executive Director, ​ksalador@pa.gov​ or call 717-787-8171.
[​Note: ​The last meeting of 2018]

November 13--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Pinchot State Forest District​.
District Office, 1841 Abington Road, North Abington Township, Lackawanna County. 6:00 to
8:00. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 13--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Trinity Point
Church of God, 180 W. Trinity Drive, Clarion, Clarion County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for
more.

November 14--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting.


Rescheduled to November 29. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.

November 14--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. South Park Buffalo Inn,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

November 14--​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Collier township
Community Center, 5 Lobaugh Street, Oakdale, Allegheny County . 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here
for more.

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November 15-- ​ ​DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson. 9:00. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic 717-783-9730 or send email to: ​jmelnic@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

November 15-16--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​, Penn State. ​Northeast
Cover Crops Council Conference​. ​Ramada Hotel and Conference Center, State College.

November 16--​ ​PA State Assn. Of township Supervisors​.​ PA Stormwater Conference​ [Eastern].
Montgomery County.

November 20--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Trails Workshop - Building Strong Community
Connections​. ​Shippensburg University​, Cumberland County. 8:30 to 5:00.

November 29--​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.

November 29--​ ​NEW​. ​Stroud Water Research Center Water’s Edge Gala - Freshwater
Excellence Award Celebration​. ​Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library​, Winterthur,
Delaware.

November 29-- ​Academy Of Natural Sciences of Drexel University​. ​Delaware Watershed


Research Conference​. Academy Offices in Philadelphia.

December 4-​- ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: John Krueger, 717-783-9264, ​jkrueger@pa.gov​.

December 4--​ ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Ebensburg Office, 286 Industrial
Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143,
mscheloske@pa.gov​.

December 5-- ​DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. ​DEP Contact: Kris Shiffer 717-772-5809 or send email to: ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

December 5-​- ​NEW​. ​DEP Laboratory Accreditation Advisory Committee​ meeting. DEP
Laboratory Building, 2575 Interstate Dr. Harrisburg. 9:00. DEP Contact: Aaren Alger,
717-346-8212 or send email to: ​aaalger@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice)​

December 6--​ ​DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Michael Maddigan, 717-772-3609, ​mmaddigan@pa.gov​.

December 6--​ ​10,000 Friends Of Pennsylvania Commonwealth Awards Dinner​. ​ArtsQuest​,


Bethlehem.

December 12--​ ​DEP State Board for Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators

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meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Edgar
Chescattie, 717-772-2814, ​eshescattie@pa.gov​.

December 12--​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ & Recycling Fund Advisory Committee
meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713,
lahenry@pa.gov​.

December 13--​ ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to:
kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)
-- Draft regulations setting methane emission limits for oil and gas operations

December 17--​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 1:00. ​Click Here​ to register to join the meeting by webinar.
Participants also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 644 895 237.

December 18-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

January 27-30--​ ​Partnership For The Delaware Estuary​. ​2019 Delaware Estuary Science &
Environmental Summit​. Cape May, NJ.

March 9--​ ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River​. Montgomery County
Community College​ ​campus in Pottstown​.

April 29 to May 2--​ ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National Watershed and Stormwater
Conference​. South Carolina.

May 8-10--​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.

Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.

Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel

DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events

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Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule

You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

October 15-- ​DEP Coastal Zone Grants


October 15-- ​NRCS-PA Emergency Watershed Protection Assistance Grants
October 19--​ ​NRCS-PA Farm, Forest Conservation Assistance (EQIP, AMA)
October 31--​ ​PA Resources Council Gene Capaldi Lens On Litter Photo Contest
October 31--​ ​Axalta, Philadelphia Eagles All-Pro Teachers Program
October 31--​ ​Dept. of Agriculture Spotted Lanternfly Student Calendar Contest
November 9-- ​Chesapeake Bay Land And Water Initiative Grants
November 15--​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission Fall Photo Contest
November 16-- ​PA Housing Finance Agency RFP For Housing Proposals
November 20--​ ​PA Visitors Bureau Scenic Beauty Photo Contest In 5 Counties
December 1-- ​USDA Rural Community Water Infrastructure Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
December 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
December 14--​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
December 14--​ ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
December 15--​ ​Coldwater Heritage Partnership Grants
December 21--​ ​ORSANCO Ohio River Sweep Student Poster Contest
December 31--​ ​DEP County Act 101 Waste Planning, HHW, Education Grants
January 25--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 31--​ ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
July 15--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
December 16--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
June 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
December 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.

-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.
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Regulations -----------------------

The Public Utility Commission ​published notice​ in the October 6 PA Bulletin of its Tentative
Supplemental Implementation Order for Section 1329 of the Public Utility Code relating to water
and wastewater assets valuation.

Pennsylvania Bulletin - October 6, 2018

Technical Guidance -------------------

The Governor’s Office ​formally published notice​ of Executive Order 2018-8 related to the PFAS
Action Team in the October 6 PA Bulletin.

Permits ------------

Note:​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 63 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the October 6 PA Bulletin -
pages 6394 to 6457​.

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice​ in the October 6 PA Bulletin of an


updated, final General Permit (ESCGP-3) covering Oil and Gas Development.

Related Tools ----------------------

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

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DEP Technical Guidance In Process
Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

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Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or
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