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ABSTRACT

“Dominus Lux Mea – The Lord


is my Light”
As educators, it is our mission
to develop learning capabilities
of all students. This evaluation
of the stage 4 Science unit
“Body Bits” was composed
through the lens of
Contemporary Teacher
Leadership models, targeting
the improvement of
capabilities of both students
EVALUATION & and educators. The unit was
reconstructed with a greater
focus upon Inquiry-Based
RECONSTRUCTION pedagogies, harnessing key
principles of the
OF STAGE 4 Understanding by Design
framework. Key alterations
have been featured to meet
SCIENCE “BODY supportive academic
literature.
BITS” UNIT James Wilson - 17727701
Analysis, Proposal & Further
Recommendations of Unit Improvement

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Table of Contents

Section I: Introductory Information & Report


Schooling Context 3
Goals & Objectives 3
Recommendations 3
Background Information 4
Recommendations Report 5
References 10
Section II: Reconstruction & Alterations
Reconstructed Scope and Sequence 15
Construted Concept Map 17
Reconstructed Assessment Task & Marking Criteria 18
Reconstructed Unit Program 24
Section III: Appendices of Documentation
Appendix A: Comparative Table of Strengths, 46
Concerns & Recommended Changes
Appendix B: Original Scope and Sequence 49
Appendix C: Original Assessment Task & Marking 50
Criteria
Appendix D: Original Unit Program 58

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SECTION I: EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY,
BACKGROUND
INFORMATION, &
RECOMMENDATIONS
REPORT

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Executive Summary

Schooling Context
St Dominic’s College (SDC) is located at Kingswood in Western Sydney, NSW. This boy’s
College for years 7-12 is a part of the Catholic Education System, formed under the
Edumund Rice Traditions of learning. Although located in a low-SES area of Western Sydney,
SDC stands above the average Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA)
with 76% of the 1003 students within the upper-middle or top quarters of distribution
(ACARA, 2017). NAPLAN results of SDC highlight that the College is significantly below the
average across Australian schools in regards to literacy and numeracy ability (ACARA, 2017).
Staff at SDC have noted for students to be particularly disengaged in topics of science,
mathematics, history and for Stage 4 students in particular, language. Many students elect
to discontinue these subjects in their Stage 6 learnings of the HSC. Modification of stage-
appropriate tasks to further develop numerical application abilities of students.

Goals & Objectives of This Reconstructed Unit


This unit has been reconstructed with five key goals in mind, being;
 Greater focus upon literacy capabilities through examination of differences in
understanding and sharing of varied viewpoints within scientific concepts in varied
text-types.
 Improvement of student numeracy development through creation of additional
numeracy-focused tasks.
 Heightened incorporation of critical thinking and creative reasoning of abstract
concepts.
 Enhancement of student social capability through increased frequency of
collaborative tasks.
 Enhanced demonstration of student assessment throughout the duration of the unit.

Recommendations
Recommendations examined within this report include;
 Enhancement of student literacy and numeracy capabilities through restructured
task design.
 Enhancement of primary and secondary investigations and discussions within
classroom activities to promote critical thinking.
 Focus upon collaborative learning tasks to ensure sustained student engagement
and motivation to succeed.
 Alteration of pre-existing summative assessment and pre-assessment tasks to
provide greater alignment to outcomes and greater inclusion of measurement of
assessment.

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Background Context: “Body Bits”
This unit, titled “Body Bits”, is taught at St Dominic’s College in Kingswood, NSW. This unit is
structured for Year 8 students who have previously aligned understanding of both
Knowledge & Understanding (K&A) and Working Scientifically (WS) outcomes from Living
World 1 & Living World 2 from the NESA Science Syllabus. “Body Bits” is structured in a
manner that allows opportunity for collaborative work through instances of research tasks
and practical investigations.

Content examined in “Body Bits” relates particularly to specified functions of multicellular


organisms and organs crucial to their survival, as well as changes in scientific knowledge
with development of evidence and scientific discoveries. Students examine such body
systems as the circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, endocrine system,
and the musculoskeletal system, with opportunities for dissection practicals as well as other
collaborative practical investigations. Students then examine the role of scientific
understanding in the development of biotechnologies. Students further demonstrate
application of knowledge through interpretations of ethics within biotechnology
development.

Student assessment of learning is measured via a take-home research task & follow-up
written exam. Students are provided opportunity to bring hand-written notes into this exam
to demonstrate application of study and understanding.

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Recommendations Report

Introductory Statement
Alterations made upon the “Body Bits” unit provide opportunity to experiment in
new approaches to the science classroom. If these approaches prove successful, they may
be applied to further units of work. This unit of work was created initially in 2015 and had
not since seen alterations made to promote student leaning at a greater level. Major
concerns noted during revision of the initial unit relate to poor development of student
general capabilities, critical thought processes and social engagement (See Appendix A).
Further, the initial unit failed to demonstrate successful assessment in student learning
success through a poorly structured assessment, non-sequenced flow of content and
minimal notations of assessment throughout the unit (See Appendix A). This revised unit has
been altered using principles of the Understanding by Design (UbD) teaching framework in
order to provide an inquiry-based approach to learning (Blessinger & Carfora, 2014; Hodson,
2016; Wiggins & McTighe, 2005). In achieving these focus points, this unit will identify
desired results, demonstrate evidence as, for, and of learning, and provide positive learning
experiences for both our teachers and students (Carroll & Beman, 2015; Wiggins & McTighe,
2005).
At a core focus, the initial unit program provides minimal indication of development
of student general capabilities (See Appendix A). Students appear to simply discuss notes
provided by the teacher at infrequent periods before completing a small investigation and
undertaking no analysis of findings. Our recommendations of this report will focus upon
Literacy, Numeracy, Critical Thinking, and Personal & Social Capabilities. Such general
capabilities provides students with authentic, enriching learning experiences, allowing for
greater cognitive development (Ashman & Conway, 2017; Glatthorn, Boschee, Whitehead &
Boschee, 2018).

Concern Focus: Development of General Capabilities - Literacy


The initial unit focused upon a ‘stand-and-deliver’ approach wherein students simply
recited facts and shared minimal personal insights into concepts (See Appendix A). As
student literacy levels are noticeably lower than average at SDC, it is crucial that we focus
upon development of literacy skills (ACARA, 2017). Fazelian, Ebrahim & Soraghi (2010) posit
that enhancing student literacy experiences promotes greater retention and engagement
across all diverse learning groups. It is crucial for our teaching staff to uphold high
expectations of all students regarding application of literacy capabilities in order to maintain
student success (Day, Gu & Sammons, 2016). Our reconstructed program harnesses student
literacy development through enhancement of diverse language choices targeting
interaction between peers, including paired discussion and debating tasks (Osborne, 2014).
In such instances as these debates, students challenge the basis of understandings with
exhibitions of diverse language frameworks rarely noted in a science context (Osborne,

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2014). Furthermore, students utilise appropriate metalanguage to discuss and pose varied
viewpoints upon ethical or moral issues. Allowing greater focus upon specific text types and
conveyance of opinions engages students to actively harness persuasive language and
application of contextualised metalanguage within science (Osborne, 2014; Zepke & Leach,
2010).
Appropriate implementation of visual-based literacy strategies act to directly
enhance students’ abilities to process and organise data (Moore-Russo & Shanhan, 2014).
Flexible scaffolding incorporated into this revised unit program by our staff will heighten
student literacy development via such instances as additional visual media, videos,
simulations, and virtual tours of body systems noted throughout the program (Crider, 2015;
Moore-Russo & Shanhan, 2014). Students are further capable of gathering, processing and
expressing viewpoints in a coherent manner across these additional text types (Ervine,
2016; Roswell, McLean & Hamilton, 2014). Research has emphasised that incorporation of
visual-based approaches directly increases engagement of a wider range of diverse students
in the classroom (Meo, 2008).

Concern Focus: Development of General Capabilities –


Numeracy
Analysis of the initial unit highlights a significate disadvantage placed upon students
regarding numeracy capabilities (See Appendix A). Students demonstrate minimal
application of numerical concepts including graphing of data, table construction and analysis
of results during practical investigations (Appendix A). Further, the Working Scientifically
(WS) strands of this unit suggest a significantly greater level of these applications than
evident within the unit plan (Appendix A). As such, our revised unit has been restructured
with focus upon incorporation of the Stage 4 Mathematics Syllabus that places additional
development upon numerical capabilities (NESA, 2017). In accordance with supportive
literature, students are provided multiple instances of opportunity during investigations to
apply their theoretical findings into visual and numerical data, including appropriate usage
of line graphs, column graphs, table construction and calculation of relative health factors
such as heart rate and lung capacity (Goos, Geiger & Dole, 2014; Noyes, Wake & Drake,
2013). Given the significantly-below-average NAPLAN data of SDC students across both
years 7 and 9, we must focus upon implementing strategies to enhance basic numeracy
capabilities, whilst also extending to further application, seen within the inclusion of scaling
tasks and presentation of numerical data (Thomson, De Bortoli & Buckley, 2013). From this,
we can greater assess content provided, whilst also allowing for greater opportunity of
revision in content, two key factors in effective teaching strategies (Noyes, Wake & Drake,
2013).

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Concern Focus: Development of General Capabilities – Creative
& Critical Thinking
Explicit requirements of critical and creative thinking articulated within the
Australian Curriculum demonstrates that it is imperative to ensure competencies and
predispositions are developed in a systematic structure (Leonie, 2013). Revision of the initial
unit showed a distinct lack in opportunities for our students to demonstrate true application
of creative and critical thinking (See Appendix A). Students are provided minimal
opportunity to predict outcomes, nor pose investigative questions of complex issues
(Appendix A). Such values are crucial in promotion student retention to learning, allowing
for a broader interest and attention to abstract concepts (Mcilvenny, 2013). To enhance
these values, our reconstructed unit provides enhanced focus upon wider applications of
research, as well as discussions of content prior to investigations wherein students predict
outcomes based upon foundational knowledge. This was constructed in a manner reflective
upon Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) principles. It is essential that we consider IBL approaches
in unit construction in order to enhance student motivation of concepts at a deeper level of
analysis (Pedaste et al., 2015). Students are to demonstrate critical thought processes
through the manner in which they break apart abstract concepts into manageable
components and apply concise thought structures to relate content (Kadir & Akshir, 2016).
The inclusion of pre-assessment tasks throughout this revised unit such as the ‘body-maps’
creation acts to explore individual capabilities and the expression of critical thoughts,
relating foundational background knowledge of crucial scientific concepts in a creative,
engaging manner (Caroline, 2015).

Concern Focus: Development of General Capabilities –


Personal & Social Capability
Expression of personal and social capability within the initial unit plan was minimal
on most occasions (See Appendix A). Students demonstrated poor regulation of self-
discipline and motivation of learning goals during both theoretical and practical tasks
(Appendix A). Further, students demonstrated little-to-none expressions of diverse
perspectives in society, with no valuing of opinions differing their own (Appendix A).
Reconstructions to this unit were thus devised based upon higher frequency in expressions
of collaborative engagement tasks to present a more inquiry-based approach to learning
(ACARA, 2018; Gillies & Baffour, 2017). The inclusion of a ‘student roles’ system within
science acts to directly enrich student sense of regulation and self-discipline in task
structures (Hmelo-Silver, Duncan & Chinn, 2013. In this unit, eight varied roles are to be
shared amongst four students in each group during practical tasks and investigations. Whilst
these roles will alternate frequently between students, it is noted by supportive academic
research to provide a greater sense of purpose in task completion (Hmelo-Silver, Duncan &
Chinn, 2013). Lloyd, Lewthwaite, Osborne & Boon (2015) posit that students demonstrate
greater responsibility and accountability of actions throughout learning, which is a key
standpoint of inquiry-based task design. Construction of group-driven goals is highlighted

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within research to harness student motivation to achieve through a positive growth mindset
(Tomlinson, 2015; Mutch, 2003). This will allow our students to cultivate a stronger sense of
pride and ownership in their participation and content creations (Mutch, 2003).
Across several sectors of our reconstructed unit, students are provided opportunity
to express understanding through shared or varied opinions and attitudes, seen within
practical tasks and open discussion of ethical and moral applications of biotechnologies.
Specifically, students examine differing opinions related to treatment of cancer, sharing
viewpoints on the matter regarding ethical boundaries. To embrace such diversity in opinion
within our classrooms acts to directly promote well-being and emotional success, two
driving factors in enhancement of student learning (Harackiewicz, Smith & Priniski, 2016).
Additional practical investigations acts to promote enhanced social interaction with peers
whilst upholding the values of inquiry-based learning, being promotion of abstract thought
processes from analysis of practical and secondary data (Osborne, 2017).

Concern Focus: Assessment As/For/Of Student Learning


Prior to our unit reconstruction, there was no assessment structure provided
regarding details of formal assessment, nor instances of student assessment of/as/for
learning (See Appendix A). Student depth of understanding was not attained via pre-
assessments at any stage of the unit. Our modifications have allowed for promotion of NESA
guidelines of Stage 4 learning (NESA, 2018). We must focus upon these guidelines to
enhance success in collaborative activities, peer-assessment, self-assessment and formative
feedback (NESA, 2018). We have thus reconstructed this unit in a manner that details the
formal assessment task allocated during the unit within the unit description. Students
completing this task are provided greater opportunity to demonstrate active research and
persuasive text formats in their responses (Tyler, 2013). In achieving this, our staff will have
a stronger focus upon alignment of teaching strategies to meet outcomes required for
assessing student learning (Marshall, 2013). Alterations to the existing assessment will allow
for accuracy in assessment of learning wherein our students apply knowledge of abstract
concepts via appropriate interrelationships between body systems and biotechnologies (See
Reconstructed Assessment Task). This task aligns succinctly to the Living World outcomes
that drives “Body Bits”, seeking to integrate knowledge and application of student learning
(Rosenberg & Koehler, 2015).
Reconstruction of our unit means that we will succinctly define various assessments
of student learning throughout the duration of the unit with greater accountability in
collection of evidence of learning (Goff, Potter, Piere, Carey & Gullage, 2015). The inclusion
of pre-assessment tasks acts to eliminate redundancy in content delivery where lesser
required by our staff (Clary et al., 2018). Inclusion of detail in assessment of/as/for learning
within our reconstructed unit means that we can modify our content that may lack certain
requirements to develop student metacognitive and socio-emotional learning skills
(Molenaar, Sleegers & Boxtel, 2014). These alterations have been made in accordance to
key principles of the UbD framework to convey effective strategies in assessing student
learning, opposed to knowledge (Clary et al., 2018; Goff, Potter, Piere, Carey & Gullage,
2015). Performance task assessments have been utilised within our report to measure
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student ability to apply foundational knowledge into theoretical applications. Throughout
these formal and informal assessments, we must focus upon providing timely feedback to
maintain student engagement in challenging work (Hattie & Timperley, 2007).

Concluding Statement
The crucial goal of all staff here at St Dominic’s should be provision of positive,
lasting impacts upon student success. It is evident from initial review of “Body Bits” that
prior levels of engagement, focus upon general capabilities and delivery of appropriate
assessment is below standards. If these outcomes are to be improved, significant instances
of change are to be made. The proposed modifications and additions to “Body Bits” have
been implemented to create a learning environment focusing upon engagement,
responsibility, and positive success in learning.

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Carroll, J., & Beman, V. (2015). Boys, Inquiry Learning and the power of choice in a Middle School
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Clary, R.M., Elder, A., Dunne, J., Saebo, S., Beard, D., Wax, C., & Tucker, D.L. (2018). Beyond the
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Crider, A. (2015). Teaching visual literacy in the Science classroom. New Direction for Teaching and
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Ervine, M.D. (2016). Visual literacy in instructional design programs. Journal of Visual Literacy, 35(2),
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Gillies, R.M., & Baffour, B. (2017). The effects of teacher-introduced multimodal representations
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Glatthorn, A.A., Boschee, F., Whitehead, B.M., & Boschee, B.F. (2018). Curriculum Leadership:
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Goff, L., Potter, M.K., Pierre, E., Carey, T., & Gullage, A. (2015). Learning outcomes assessment: A
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SECTION II: RECONSTRUCTED &
ADDITIONALLY CREATED
PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION
Foreword:
These documents have been reconstructed and created in accordance with key Understanding by Design principles outlined by Wiggins &
McTighe (2005).
The scope and sequence initially provided was excessive in size, and lacked clarity in assessment weightings. Individual textbook chapters were
included within the scope and sequence, which proves unnecessary in such early stages of planning. The formal date atop the initial Scope and
Sequence is listed for 2016, suggesting that alterations may not have been made to the program within 2018 to better suit student learning.
The concept map created for this redesigned unit stems into two key categories; Body systems, and technological developments. From here,
evident links between concepts are identified and organised, including links between the circulatory system and the respiratory system, as well
as links between the musculoskeletal system and biotechnologies.
The assessment provided in this restructured unit has modified from the initial assessment. The questions posed upon students have varied to
meet greater standards of the Bloom’s Taxonomy Action Verbs. The initial task description provided has been altered to provide a more
interesting process for students. Finally, this revised assessment has removed the internal exam component of the task, in order to provide a
more distinct assessment of student learning.
The reconstructed unit has been designed with a strong focus upon alterations of activities to better meet the above recommendations.
Significant changes were created in the teaching strategies thus much of the tasks are highlighted in red.

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Reconstructed Scope and Sequence – Stage 4, Year 8 (St Dominic’s College) 2018.
Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10

Term 1 Unit 1: “Let’s Get Physical”


Outcomes:
SC4-1VA, SC4-2VA, SC4-3VA, SC4-4WS, SC4-5WS, SC4-6WS, SC4-7WS, SC4-8WS, SC4-9WS, SC4-3PW, SC4-4PW
Content: Key Concepts:
PW3 – a, b, c, d, e  Kinetic & Potential Energy  Transformations of Energy  Electricity & Circuits
PW4 – a, c, b  Energy Conversions  Efficiency of Energy  Implications to Society
Assessment & Weighting:
STEM Task (30%)

Outcomes Met:
SC4-4WS, SC4-5WS and SC4-7WS to SC4-9WS, SC4-4PW
Term 2 Unit 2: “Body Bits”
Outcomes:
SC4-1VA, SC4-2VA, SC4-3VA, SC4-4WS, SC4-5WS, SC4-6WS, SC4-7WS, SC4-8WS, SC4-9WS, SC4-14LW, SC4-15LW
Content: Key Concepts:
LW3 – a, b, c, d, e, f  Respiration & Photosynthesis  Cellular Requirements  Vital Body Systems
LW4 – a, b, c, d  Contributions to Health  Evidence from Discovery  Developments of Technology
Assessment & Weighting:
Individual Research Task & In-Class Examination (25%)

Outcomes Met:
SC4-7WS, SC4 -8WS, SC4- 9WS, SC4- 14LW , SC4 – 15LW

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Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10

Term 3 Unit 3: “Everything Matters”


Outcomes:
SC4-1VA, SC4-2VA, SC4-3VA, SC4-4WS, SC4-5WS, SC4-6WS, SC4-7WS, SC4-8WS, SC4-9WS, SC4-16CW, SC4-17CW
Content: Key Concepts:
CW1 – a, b, c, d, e, f  Behaviour of Matter  Heat & Particle Movement  Modelling Density in Matter
CW2 – a, b, c, d, e, f  Properties of Elements  Common Compounds  Arrangement of Particles
CW4 – a, b, c, d, e, f  Identifying Chemical Change  Formation of Substances  Reversibility of Processes
Assessment & Weighting:
In-Class Examination (20%)

Outcomes Met:
SC4-7WS to SC4-9WS, SC4-16CW, SC4-17CW
Term 4 Unit 4: “Sustaining Earth”
Outcomes:
SC4-1VA, SC4-2VA, SC4-3VA, SC4-4WS, SC4-5WS, SC4-6WS, SC4-7WS, SC4-8WS, SC4-9WS, SC4-12ES, SC4-13ES,
SC4-15LW
Content: Key Concepts:
ES3 – a, b, c, d, e, f  Earth & it’s Resources  The Four Spheres  Renewable & Non-Renewable
ES4 – a, b, c, d  The Water Cycle  Water Management Practice  Resource Management
LW5 – d, e, f  Interactions in Ecosystems  Technological Developments  Practices in Agriculture
Assessment & Weighting:
Data Analysis – Research Task (25%)

Outcomes Met:
SC4-7WS to SC4-9WS, SC4-12 ES, SC4 – 13ES

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Concept Map – “Body Bits”

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Reconstructed Assessment Task and
Marking Rubric

St Science Faculty
Dominic’s Year 8 “Body Bits”
Assessment Task
College
Teacher Name:
Student Name:
Class:
Title of Assessment: Biotechnologies: Shaping our
Understanding of Technological
Advancements
Content to be Assessed: Living World 3: Interrelationship of
Human Body Systems
Living World 4: Shaping our
Understanding of the World
Type of Assessment: Individual – Take Home Research Task
Weighting: 25%
Date of Issue: Term 2, Week 3
Date of Draft Due: Term 2, Week 8
Date Assessment Task is Due: Term 2, Week 9
Outcomes Assessed:
SC4-14LW Relates the structure and function of
living things to their classification,
survival and reproduction
SC4-15LW Explains how new biological evidence
changes people’s understanding of the
world
Task Rationale:
With a rise in scientific understanding of the human body and technological
advancements surrounding it, we have seen a rise in biotechnologies designed
to improve quality of life. It is crucial to understand the importance and
rationale behind biotechnologies to make an informed decision regarding the
practice of artificial body systems.

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Task Description:
You are the leading professor at ‘Biotechnologies R Us Inc.’. The NSW
Government Department of Health & Wellbeing has assigned you the role of
presenting information regarding biotechnologies you develop at the Federal
Health Conference later this year. In order to prepare yourself, the Department
has provided you with a set of questions you must address regarding a
biotechnology of your choice. This task requires you to demonstrate critical
research regarding biotechnologies, their ethics, and how our understandings
have changed alongside developments in scientific procedures. In each
response, you are expected to utilise at least 5 references.
Task Outline:
The Department of Health & Wellbeing have provided you with three key
focus-questions. Using these questions as a guide, you are to demonstrate your
understanding of key components learned throughout this unit of work
through detailed responses. These responses should be roughly 2-3 paragraphs
per response. These responses are as follows;

I. Identify and elaborate upon how your chosen biotechnology works,


including information on the key features of its design and function.
II. Distinguish key reasons why your chosen biotechnology has been
researched and developed. Elaborate upon how this biotechnology
relates to a given body system and its benefits.
III. From your research and considerations of body systems and ethics,
justify why money should continue to be given towards research of your
biotechnology in the future.

Your biotechnology can be chosen from the list below, or alternatively you may
choose another relative biotechnology if you wish. *NOTE* Your own chosen
biotechnology MUST be approved by your teacher before commencing
research.

Biotechnologies:
Pacemakers Artificial Blood Vessels Artificial Heart Valves
Organ Harvesting Artificial Hearts Prosthetic Limbs
Antibiotic-Resistant Genetic Tissue Harvesting of Venoms
Bacteria Engineering
Where to Start:
You will be allocated two lessons of in-class time to discuss any issues
regarding your assessment with your teacher. Upon receiving this assessment
you will also be provided with a scaffold breaking down essential components
required for each question. You will also receive helpful guides for preparing
your response based upon the Bloom’s Taxonomy Action Verbs.

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Marking Criteria: Response I (20 marks)
Outcome: Non-Attempt: 0 Developing: 1-3 Elementary: 4-6 Sound: 7-9 Thorough: 10-12 Outstanding: 13-
Marks Marks Marks Marks Marks 15 Marks
SC4-15LW Does not meet the Demonstrates Provides a basic Denotes a sound Demonstrates Provides an
Explains how minimum required minimal understanding of incorporation of thorough outstanding
new biological standard of effort understanding of structure and understanding of understanding of incorporation of
evidence for this task. structure and function of chosen biological evidence links in links in
changes function of biotechnologies through developments of development of
people’s biotechnology with with few errors description of technologies technologies with
understanding no relation to throughout. structure and through detailed no errors present.
of the world human function. identification of Accurately
understanding. structure and describes structure
function. and function.
Outcome: Non-Attempt: 0 Developing: 1 Elementary: 2 Sound: 3 Marks Thorough: 4 Outstanding: 5
Marks Mark Marks Marks Marks
SC4-7WS Does not meet the Provides minimal Provides basic Provides sound Provides detailed Provides
Processes and minimum required analysis of analysis of analysis of analysis of outstanding
analyses data standard of effort secondary data in secondary data in secondary data in secondary data in analysis of
from a first- for this task. response using 1 response using 2 response using 3 response using 4 secondary data in
hand accurate resource. accurate resources. accurate resources. accurate resources. response using 3
investigation OR OR OR OR accurate resources.
and secondary Provides analysis Provides analysis Provides analysis Provides analysis OR
sources to of secondary data of secondary data of secondary data of secondary data Provides analysis
identify trends, in response using 2 in response using 3 in response using 4 in response using 5 of secondary data
patterns and resources with resources with resources with resources with in response using 6
relationships, errors in errors in errors in errors in or more resources
and draw referencing. referencing. referencing. referencing. with errors in
conclusions referencing.

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Marking Criteria: Response II (20 marks)
Outcome: Non-Attempt: 0 Developing: 1-2 Elementary: 3-4 Sound: 5-6 Thorough: 7-8 Outstanding: 9-
Marks Marks Marks Marks Marks 10 Marks
SC4-15LW Does not meet the Demonstrates Provides basic Shows a sound Demonstrates a Demonstrates
Explains how minimum required minimal links to understanding of strong outstanding links
new biological standard of effort incorporation of understanding of how biotechnology interpretation of between body
evidence for this task. links between biological evidence relates to body links between body systems and
changes biological evidence and the systems and systems and understanding of
people’s and development development of reasons for their reasons for biological evidence
understanding of chosen chosen development. development of regarding chosen
of the world biotechnology biotechnology. chosen biotechnology.
biotechnology.
Outcome: Non-Attempt: 0 Developing: 1 Elementary: 2 Sound: 3 Marks Thorough: 4 Outstanding: 5
Marks Mark Marks Marks Marks
SC4-14LW Does not meet the Provides minimal Demonstrates poor Provides a sound Provides a strong Demonstrates
Relates the minimum required inclusion of application of inclusion of links application outstanding links
structure and standard of effort relationships relationships between body between between reasons
function of for this task. between body between body systems and biotechnology for development of
living things to systems and needs systems and needs subsequent chosen and chosen
their for biotechnology. for biotechnology. biotechnology subsequent body biotechnology and
classification, available. systems influenced. relation to body
survival and systems.
reproduction

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James Wilson 17727701
Outcome: Non-Attempt: 0 Developing: 1 Elementary: 2 Sound: 3 Marks Thorough: 4 Outstanding: 5
Marks Mark Marks Marks Marks
SC4-9WS Does not meet the Demonstrates Provides basic Utilises a sound Demonstrates Harnesses
Presents minimum required minimal inclusion of understanding of thorough inclusion outstanding
science ideas, standard of effort incorporation of appropriate scientific ideas and of appropriate inclusion of
findings and for this task. scientific ideas and scientific language findings to provide scientific language appropriate
information to a information in text types within detail in response. text types with few scientific language
given audience response with response. Includes minimal errors. Accurately text types with no
using minimal inclusion Incorporates brief instances of presents science errors present.
appropriate of appropriate mentions of scientific language ideas and findings Accurately
scientific scientific language scientific reasoning text types with no relative to presents ideas and
language text text types. in response with errors. biotechnology findings relative to
types and multiple errors. chosen. chosen
representations biotechnology.

Marking Criteria: Response III (20 marks)


Outcome: Non-Attempt: 0 Developing: 1-2 Elementary: 3-4 Sound: 5-6 Thorough: 7-8 Outstanding: 9-
Marks Marks Marks Marks Marks 10 Marks
SC4-15LW Does not meet the Provides minimal Shows basic links Harnesses a sound Harnesses a Provides an
Explains how minimum required justification of of benefits of justification of thorough outstanding
new biological standard of effort benefits from chosen funding for understanding of justification of
evidence for this task. chosen biotechnology to research of chosen ethics and benefits ethical practises
changes biotechnology with considerations of biotechnology. relating to chosen and funding of
people’s no clear further funding. Relates briefly to biotechnology in biotechnology with
understanding consideration of Includes brief but consideration of justification for reference to
of the world ethical concerns. poor consideration ethical concerns. future funding. specific benefits of
of ethical concerns. biotechnology.

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Outcome: Non-Attempt: 0 Developing: 1 Elementary: 2 Sound: 3 Marks Thorough: 4 Outstanding: 5
Marks Mark Marks Marks Marks
Relates the Does not meet the Demonstrates a Shows basic links Uses sound links Enhances a Provides an
structure and minimum required poor link between between body between ethical thorough link outstanding
function of standard of effort body systems and systems and ethical concerns of chosen between justification of
living things to for this task. requirements for concerns of biotechnology and justification of funding of chosen
their chosen biotechnology benefits of research funding for chosen biotechnology with
classification, biotechnology. chosen. and funding for biotechnology with strong connective
survival and Does not consider future awareness of body links to body
reproduction ethics of body relationships with systems. systems.
systems. body systems.
Outcome: Non-Attempt: 0 Developing: 1 Elementary: 2 Sound: 3 Marks Thorough: 4 Outstanding: 5
Marks Mark Marks Marks Marks
SC4-8WS Does not meet the Incorporates poor Harnesses basic Demonstrates Harnesses a Provides an
Selects and uses minimum required resource usage to inclusion of at least sound inclusion of thorough outstanding usage
appropriate standard of effort produce an two justified creative solutions incorporation of of appropriate
strategies, for this task. attempted solution arguments relative to identified issue plausible and strategies and
understanding to identified issues to biotechnology of biotechnology. creative solutions plausible solutions
and skills to of ethical concerns. solutions with Demonstrates at regarding ethics of regarding ethics of
produce multiple errors least three justified chosen chosen
creative and present. arguments relative biotechnology with biotechnology with
plausible to solutions with few errors present no errors present
solutions to some errors in justification. in justification.
identified present.
problems.

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Reconstructed Unit Program

*Please Note: All Changes Made have been written in red font or highlighted where necessary*

Stage 4 Science – Year 8

Unit 2: Body Bits

Unit Length: Unit Description


12 Weeks Humans have always been fascinated by the insides of their bodies and how they work and
the context of this unit has been selected to motivate learning. In this unit the students will
build on their knowledge of cells and learn about the specialised tissues and body systems
that are found in the both the human body and plants. They will specifically learn about the
Core Unit Focus: digestive, respiratory, circulatory, excretory, reproductive systems in humans as well as how
cells maintain plants as working organisms. Students will increase their scientific literacy as
Development of student they become familiar with many specialised terms. As part of the unit they learn about the
learning capabilities importance of healthy eating and exercise. This also increases their personal awareness of
their bodies and allows them to more fully understand themselves and make informed
decisions in the future.

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Values and Attitudes Assessment as Learning
SC4-1VA appreciates the importance of science in their lives and the role of scientific inquiry in increasing Student assessment as learning is
understanding of the world around them measured through completion of
practical tasks including
SC4-2VA shows a willingness to engage in finding solutions to science-related personal, social and global issues,
investigations, discussions, informal
including shaping sustainable futures
debates, and formal or informal
SC4-3VA demonstrates confidence in making reasoned, evidence based decisions about the current and future questioning of students.
use and influence of science and technology, including ethical considerations

Skills Assessment for learning


SC4-1WS identifies questions and problems that can be tested or researched and makes predictions based on
Student assessment for learning is
scientific knowledge SC4-4WS
noted through instances of pre-
SC4-2WS collaboratively and individually produces a plan to investigate questions and problems SC4-5WS assessment activities including a
‘design your own body bits’ task prior
SC4-3WS follows a sequence of instructions to safely undertake a range of investigation types, collaboratively to body systems commencement.
and individually SC4-6WS Assessment for learning also
SC4-4WS identifies questions and problems that can be tested or researched and makes predictions based on demonstrated through discussions
scientific knowledge prior to beginnings of new sub-topics
wherein students share prior
SC4-5WS collaboratively and individually produces a plan to investigate questions and problems understanding.
SC4-6WS follows a sequence of instructions to safely undertake a range of investigation types, collaboratively
and individually
Assessment of learning
SC4-7WS processes and analyses data from a first-hand investigation and secondary sources to identify trends,
patterns and relationships, and draw conclusions Student assessment of learning is
demonstrated through participation
SC4-8WS selects and uses appropriate strategies, understanding and skills to produce creative and plausible
of activities relating to, and
solutions to identified problems
completion of, the required formal

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James Wilson 17727701
SC4-9WS presents science ideas, findings and information to a given audience using appropriate scientific assessment task. Students are
language, text types and representations required to research and present
understanding of the
Knowledge and Understanding interrelationships between body
SC4-14LW relates the structure and function of living things to their classification, survival and reproduction systems and our understanding of
technological advancements
SC4-15LW explains how new biological evidence changes people’s understanding of the world concerning biotechnologies.

Key Terms

Haemoglobin Red blood cells White blood cells Platelets Heart

Arteries Veins Capillaries Plasma Nephrons

Respiratory Alveoli Photosynthesis Respiration Root

Chlorophyll
Stem Flower Uterus hygiene

Organ transplant testicles Sperm Ovaries Penis

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Thinking Skills Co-operative Learning Graphic Organisers

 Higher Order Thinking Skills  Think-pair-share  Mind Maps or Concept Maps


 Visual Representations  Jigsaw  Venn Diagrams

 Think all possibilities (TAP)  Brainstorming  Five Ws

 Predict, Explain, Observe  Numbered heads  PMI charts

 Y Chart or W Chart  Discussion  T charts

 Constructing Experiments  Expert Groups  Flow Charts


 Other:  Other:  Other:

Week 1
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW2 Cells are the basic WS6 Students conduct investigations by: “Snakes & Ladders” Interactive Activity Student Assessment for
units of living things and Students participate in interactive ‘Snakes & Ladders’ Learning examined through
have specialised f. performing specific roles safely and game on smartboard, advancing in the game when participation in activities and
structures and functions responsibly when working collaboratively to correctly answering questions relating to unicellular and accuracy of knowledge in
Students complete a task within the timeline multicellular organisms, growth and repair and, cell pre-assessment tasks.
WS7.1 Students process data and information differentiation and specialisation of the tissues, organs
a. identify that living
by: and organ systems of multicellular organisms.
things are made of cells
c identify that new cells a. summarising data from students' own
are produced by cell investigations and secondary sources

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division b. using a range of representations to organise Cell Size Revision Task Assessment as learning
data, including graphs, keys, models, Students complete a scaffolded table comparing differing demonstrated through
f identify that different diagrams, tables and spreadsheets sizes of cells using research where required. Students use appropriate usage of
cells make up the these findings to create a column graph comparing numerical applications in
c. extracting information from diagrams,
tissues, organs and differing cells in the body in sizes. determining cell sizes and
flowcharts, tables, databases, other texts,
organ systems of scales.
multimedia resources and graphs including
multicellular organisms
histograms and column, sector and line
Introductory Group Research Activity Student knowledge is
graphs
LW3 Multicellular Teacher introduces the role of cell division in growth and assessed through
organisms contain d. accessing information from a range of repair and what happens when cell division goes wrong appropriate implementation
systems of organs that sources, including using digital technologies resulting in cancer. Class discussion on factors that can of ideas and findings from
carry out specialised increase the risk of getting cancer. Students in pairs secondary sources to
functions that enable research statistical data regarding smoking and lung provide valid data in a range
them to survive and WS9 Students communicate by: cancer, including age brackets and rates of survival, of text types such as graphs
reproduce recording data and re-drawing necessary tables or graphs or tables.
a. presenting ideas, findings and solutions to in their books.
c. Outline the role of problems using scientific language and
cell division in growth, representations using digital technologies as Group Presentation Design Student knowledge is
repair and reproduction appropriate Students research in groups of 4 to create a 10 slide assessed through accuracy
in multicellular b. using appropriate text types in presentations, PowerPoint on cancer and scientific discoveries. and quality of presentation
organisms including a discussion, explanation, Presentation must include; data.
exposition, procedure and recount  Description of types of cancer.
LW4 Scientific  Causational factors of cancer.
d. constructing and using a range of
knowledge has changes  Traditional treatments of cancer and issues
representations to honestly, clearly and/or
as new evidence associated with use
succinctly present data and information
becomes available. And
including diagrams, keys, models, tables,  Selection of a new area of research including;
some scientific o vitamin C and tumor cells that carry a
drawings, images, flowcharts, spreadsheets
discoveries have common cancer-causing mutations
and databases
significantly changed o a gel, made from a common weed called
people’s understanding Euphorbia peplus,
of the world o the venom of the deathstalker scorpion
o Packaging chemotherapy drugs with
nanoparticles

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a research an example Class Presentation Activity Assessment of personal and
of how changes in Students present findings of their research in a 2-minute social capabilities assessed
scientific knowledge mini-presentation to the class. through participation and
have contributed to fluency in delivery of
finding a solution to a presentation findings to the
human health issue class.
Extension: Students design a ‘family portrait’ of varied cells, using understanding of scaling and cell sizes to create a mathematically feasible interpretation of cell sizes.
Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..4 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 1. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




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James Wilson 17727701
Week 2
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW3 Multicellular WS6 Students conduct investigations by: “All Body Systems Go” Pre-Assessment Assessment for learning is
organisms contain systems Students work in groups of 4 to create an A3 diagram of determined through
of organs that carry out a. collaboratively and individually conducting a the human body and its body systems. Using prior accuracy of body-maps
specialised functions that range of investigation types, including knowledge students are to draw the major body systems design with inclusion of
enable them to survive fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety and their locations, reminded by teacher they will revisit relevant systems.
and reproduce and ethical guidelines are followed these systems to examine how their knowledge has
b. assembling and using appropriate developed over time.
e. Describe the role of the equipment and resources to perform the
digestive, circulatory, investigation, including safety equipment Student “Investigative Roles” Planning Activity Assessment as learning is
excretory Students provided with a ‘Practical Roles’ information demonstrated through
skeletal/muscular and d. following the planned procedure, including sheet. Students are instructed to form groups of 4 students student active participation
respiratory systems in in fair tests, measuring and controlling to complete practical tasks with, before assigning each- in creation and sharing of
maintaining a human as a variables other the following roles; student ‘roles’.
functioning multicellular e. recording observations and measurements  Planner
organism accurately, using appropriate units for  Task Officiator
physical quantities  Scribe
LW4 Scientific f. performing specific roles safely and  Investigator
knowledge changes as new responsibly when working collaboratively to  Safety Officiator
evidence becomes complete a task within the timeline  Data Analysis Expert
available, and some  Results analyst
scientific discoveries have  Equipment specialist
WS7.1 Students process data and information
significantly changed Students are advised to work with these groups for each
by:
people's understanding of designed practical activity whilst alternating roles.
the world. a. summarising data from students' own
investigations and secondary sources Digestive System Inquiry Focus Question
a. research an example of Student critical thinking
Students are posed the question “What makes a ‘healthy
how changes in scientific processes are demonstrated
diet’ healthy?” Students discuss background understanding
knowledge have through responses.
of dietary requirements as a class.
contributed to finding a

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James Wilson 17727701
solution to a human health b. using a range of representations to organise Digestive System Introductory Discussion
issue data, including graphs, keys, models, Teacher guided interactive presentation to the digestive
diagrams, tables and spreadsheets system. With visual assistance including videos and
LW4 Scientific imagery, students identify the key parts and functions of
c. extracting information from diagrams,
knowledge changes as new the digestive system including mechanical and chemical
flowcharts, tables, databases, other texts,
evidence becomes breakdown of food. Students take notes and draw
multimedia resources and graphs including
available, and some diagrams where necessary on the structure and function of
histograms and column, sector and line
scientific discoveries have the digestive system.
graphs
significantly changed
people's understanding of Collaborative Experimental Investigations Student literacy and
WS7.2 Students analyse data and information Students are posed the following questions; numeracy skills are
the world.
by: “How does stomach acid digest food?” informally assessed in
a. research an example of “How does the small intestine work? How do we fit it analysis of results and
b. constructing and using a range of
how changes in scientific within our body?” findings. Personal and social
representations, including graphs, keys
knowledge have Students will design a safe investigation to visually capabilities are assessed
and models to represent and analyse
contributed to finding a demonstrate the stomach using acids to ‘digest’ various through performance of
patterns or relationships, including using
solution to a human health food sources. Students to record findings of time taken to group in completing assigned
digital technologies as appropriate
issue digest and compare data in a column graph. Students tasks and consideration of
c. identifying data which supports or discounts proceed to investigate function of the small intestine safe practises.
b. recount how evidence
a question being investigated or a proposed through investigation using Iodine & Glucose solution.
from a scientific discovery
solution to a problem
has changed
understanding and d. using scientific understanding to identify Fake Vomit – Teacher brings in a beaker of vomit obtained Student critical thinking skills
contributed to solving a relationships and draw conclusions based on from the autopsy of a murder victim which students must are assessed through
real world problem, eg students' data or secondary sources analyse to discover where the person ate their last meal. application of background
animal or plant disease, Introduce the 6 D method of solving a problem: knowledge within a relative
hygiene, food  Define context. Students transfer
WS9 Students communicate by:
preservation, sewage  Discover this knowledge into further
treatment or a. presenting ideas, findings and solutions to  Dream application of designing an
biotechnology problems using scientific language and  Design investigation.
representations using digital technologies as  Deliver
c. describe, using appropriate  Debrief
examples, how
b. using appropriate text types in Students will research food tests and design and complete
developments in
presentations, including a discussion, a first hand investigation involving chemical tests for

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James Wilson 17727701
technology have explanation, exposition, procedure and specific food groups. They then carry out a vomit analysis
contributed to finding recount identifying the potential presence of glucose, proteins,
solutions to a lipids and starch.
d. constructing and using a range of
contemporary issue, eg
representations to honestly, clearly and/or
organ transplantation, “From Food to Flush” Pairs or Small Group Activity – Student personal and social
succinctly present data and information
artificial joints/limbs, Making a Board Game capabilities are
including diagrams, keys, models, tables,
treatment for diabetes, Students develop a board game about the digestive demonstrated through
drawings, images, flowcharts, spreadsheets
asthma, kidney or heart system. The game must be able to be played by 4 people construction and
and databases
disease and include all organs and trivia cards. presentation of game.
Students might like to include digestive disorders in their
game.
Extension Task: Students investigate effects of damaged or altered digestive organs upon bodily function. Students may choose from the following or alternatively choose
their own research focus;
 Influence of pancreatic function if damaged by cancer.
 Influence of gastro bypass surgery upon stomach function
 Influence upon liver function in bile production if damaged by alcohol or drug misuse.
Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..4 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 2. Describe their success and potential modifications to make
to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 2 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




32
James Wilson 17727701
Week 3

Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW2 Cells are the basic WS4 Students question and predict by:
Assessment Task Notification Provision
units of living things and b. making predictions based on scientific
have specialised knowledge and their own observations Teacher provides explicit outline of assessment task
structures and functions. WS5.1 Students identify data to be collected in an requirements regarding content and due date.
c. outline the role of investigation by:
Learning About Science – Energy From Food Student assessment as
respiration in providing b. proposing the type of information and data learning measured through
energy for the activities that needs to be collected in a range of Class discussion on the requirements of a cell to obtain application of prior
of cells investigation types, including first-hand and nutrients and oxygen for respiration. Discussion on food knowledge of digestive
LW3 Multicellular secondary sources to provide these nutrients to cells. system.
organisms contain
systems of organs that WS6 Students conduct investigations by: Collaborative Practical Investigation
carry out specialised
a. collaboratively and individually conducting Students work in pre-prepared groups to complete a Student personal and social
functions that enable
a range of investigation types, including capabilities assessed through
them to survive and practical investigation measuring energy burned from
active involvement and safe
reproduce fieldwork and experiments, ensuring different foods in kJ/g. Students complete risk
practise considerations in
safety and ethical guidelines are followed assessment prior to task and discuss their thoughts on
a. identify the practical investigation.
which food will provide greatest energy. Students are to Student numeracy
materials required by b. assembling and using appropriate combine results into a multi-column graph demonstrating
multicellular organisms capabilities assessed through
equipment and resources to perform the differences before discussion of findings and reasons for construction of accurate
for the processes of
investigation, including safety equipment differing data. graph data.
respiration and
d. following the planned procedure,
photosynthesis Collaborative Group Debate Task
including in fair tests, measuring and
controlling variables Students are sorted into six teams of 4 students. 3 of Student social capabilities
e. recording observations and these teams are to be ‘affirmative’ teams, and 3 are to be and application of critical
measurements accurately, using thinking is assessed through
‘negative’ teams. Students are posed the following
involvement and quality of

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James Wilson 17727701
appropriate units for physical quantities context statement for which they will debate; thought processes in debate
“Fatty foods don’t make you fat” discussions. Students
assessed upon their ability to
f. performing specific roles safely and Students are to share thoughts and plan as teams before provide their personal
responsibly when working collaboratively to providing a whole-class debate sharing thoughts and viewpoint regarding the
complete a task within the timeline understandings. topic debated.
g. assessing the method used and identifying
improvements to the method
Individual Application Task Student assessment as
Knowledge about diseases and the digestive system has learning demonstrated
WS7.1 Students process data and information by: contributed to finding solutions to some diseases. through application of
b. using a range of representations to organise Students are to select o disease from a list that can be knowledge gained into
data, including graphs, keys, models, controlled by specific dietary guidelines. Students are to succinct findings through
diagrams, tables and spreadsheets use the 6 D (Define, Discover, Dream, Design, Deliver, and construction of a meal plan.
Debrief) method of solving a problem to develop a 2 –
e. applying simple numerical procedures, eg day meal plan for a teenage boy with a given digestive
calculating means when processing data and condition.
information, as appropriate

WS7.2 Students analyse data and information by:


a. checking the reliability of gathered data and
information by comparing with observations
or information from other sources

d. using scientific understanding to identify


relationships and draw conclusions based
on students’ data or secondary sources

WS9 Students communicate by:


d. constructing and using a range of
representations to honestly, clearly and/or

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James Wilson 17727701
succinctly present data and information
including diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts, spreadsheets
and databases
Extension: Students create a multi-panel comic strip demonstrating the breakdown of a particular nutrient including carbohydrates, proteins or fats within the digestive
tract, and its provision of energy to the body.

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..4 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 3. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 3 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




35
James Wilson 17727701
Week 4
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW3 Multicellular WS5.1 Students identify data to be collected in Respiratory System Pre-Assessment Task: Assessment for learning is
organisms contain systems an investigation by: Students complete a Quizlet containing questions measured through student success
of organs that carry out relevant to the respiratory system. Teacher is to in understanding of content in pre-
specialised functions that c. locating possible sources of data and record final data to determine areas of additional assessment Quizlet.
enable them to survive and information, including secondary sources, focus in future content.
reproduce relevant to the investigation
Teacher-Guided Multimodal presentation
WS6 Students conduct investigations by: Teacher guided introduction to the respiratory
b. explain that the systems
system in which students utilise videos and imagery
in multicellular organisms a. collaboratively and individually conducting a
to identify the key parts and functions of the
work together to provide range of investigation types, including
respiratory system, explain gas exchange in the
cell requirements, fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety
alveoli and explain how we breath with specific
including gases, nutrients and ethical guidelines are followed
reference to the diaphragm. Students return to their
and water, and to remove
e. recording observations and measurements group body-maps and discuss the accuracy in their
cell wastes
accurately, using appropriate units for initial drawings opposed to their new knowledge
physical quantities basis.
e. Describe the role of the
digestive, circulatory, Individual Student Investigation
WS7.1 Students process data and information
excretory Measuring your vital capacity - Students use a balloon
by:
skeletal/muscular and and ruler to measure the vital capacity of their lungs.
respiratory systems in b. using a range of representations to organise
maintaining a human as a data, including graphs, keys, models, Student Collaborative Investigation Student critical thinking is assessed
functioning multicellular diagrams, tables and spreadsheets Students are posed the following questions; through application of prior
organism “What will happen if we cannot expel CO2 from the foundations to discuss analysis
WS7.2 Students analyse data and information by: body?” questions provided. Student
“Why will the density of a liquid change during assessment as learning
b. constructing and using a range of breathing?” demonstrated through accuracy in
representations, including graphs, keys Students use Limewater and CO2 to demonstrate the data and procedure. Student
and models to represent and analyse impact upon retaining CO2 in the body, using a pH literacy and numeracy capabilities

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James Wilson 17727701
patterns or relationships, including using chart to map changes. Students to record their data demonstrated through
digital technologies as appropriate in a table and map using a line graph. construction of graphs and analysis
of data in a range of text types.
WS9 Students communicate by:
b. using appropriate text types in Student Open-Ended Discussion Application of student critical
presentations, including a discussion, Students are posed the following questions to discuss thinking processes assessed
explanation, exposition, procedure and as a class; through detailed understandings of
recount “How does the rate of respiration differ between a fit the respiratory system and
d. constructing and using a range of or unfit individual?” digestive system and their
representations to honestly, clearly and/or “What influence may a healthy diet have upon interrelationships.
succinctly present data and information respiration success?”
including diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts, spreadsheets
and databases

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..4 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 4. Describe their success and potential modifications to make
to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 4 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




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James Wilson 17727701
Week 5
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW3 Multicellular WS5.1 Students identify data to be collected in Teacher-Guided Pre-Assessment Task Assessment for learning measured
organisms contain an investigation by: Students are posed the following questions, through understanding demonstrated
systems of organs that advised that they will return to these questions at in open pre-assessment discussions.
carry out specialised c. locating possible sources of data and the end of the system studies to compare Students demonstrate critical thinking
functions that enable information, including secondary sources, understanding; through application of prior
them to survive and relevant to the investigation “What drives our blood?” foundations to relate body systems
reproduce “How does blood return from our feet when we and their interrelationships.
WS6 Students conduct investigations by: are standing?”
“What influence does a balanced diet and exercise
b. explain that the a. collaboratively and individually conducting a
play upon heart function?”
systems in multicellular range of investigation types, including
“What differences in circulation may be found
organisms work fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety
between a healthy vs unhealthy individual?”
together to provide cell and ethical guidelines are followed
Students discuss questions as a class.
requirements, including
b. assembling and using appropriate equipment
gases, nutrients and
and resources to perform the investigation, Virtual Interactive Tour
water, and to remove
including safety equipment Teacher utilizes an interactive tour of the
cell wastes
circulatory system, modelling the core structures
d. following the planned procedure, including in
of the system. Students identify blood and its
fair tests, measuring and controlling variables
e. Describe the role of fractions and functions, blood vessels: veins,
the digestive, arteries and capillaries and the structure and
circulatory, excretory e. recording observations and measurements function of the heart. Students return to their
skeletal/muscular and accurately, using appropriate units for physical initial body-maps to compare prior understanding
respiratory systems in quantities with new knowledge gained.
maintaining a human as
f. performing specific roles safely and responsibly
a functioning
when working collaboratively to complete a
multicellular organism Student-Focused Dissection Investigation Assessment as learning demonstrated
task within the timeline
Students provided in groups a pig heart. Students through application of safe practises
use foundation knowledge to identify key in practical task. Student knowledge is
WS7.1 Students process data and information by: components of the heart present in humans before demonstrated through relating

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a. summarising data from students' own completing a dissection of the heart. Students structural features of dissected heart
investigations and secondary sources draw essential components noted and discuss to human hearts before applying
provided questions after completion. critical thinking processes in
b. using a range of representations to organise
discussion questions.
data, including graphs, keys, models, diagrams,
tables and spreadsheets
c. extracting information from diagrams, Student-Driven Debate
flowcharts, tables, databases, other texts, Students form groups of teams as prior discussed Student social capabilities and
multimedia resources and graphs including (Week 3) to debate the following question; application of critical thinking is
histograms and column, sector and line graphs “Healthy diet is more important than physical assessed through involvement and
exercise in maintaining ideal heart function” quality of thought processes in debate
Students share foundation knowledge of the discussions. Students assessed upon
WS9 Students communicate by: digestive system combined with knowledge of the their ability to provide their personal
circulatory system to discuss varied viewpoints viewpoint regarding the topic
b. using appropriate text types in presentations, with specific examples required. debated.
including a discussion, explanation, exposition,
procedure and recount
d. constructing and using a range of
representations to honestly, clearly and/or
succinctly present data and information
including diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts, spreadsheets
and databases
Individual Model Creation
Students create a model of the heart using materials of their own choice to illustrate blood blow. Students copy and label these diagrams in their books and compare with
scientific diagrams to be provided prior.
Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..4 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 5. Describe their success and potential modifications to make
to further this success.


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James Wilson 17727701

Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 5 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




Week 6
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW4 Scientific WS4 Students question and predict by: Teacher-Guided Visual Presentation Students demonstrate critical thinking
knowledge changes as Teacher utilizes videos and other imagery to and application of foundational ethical
a. identifying questions and problems that can be highlight the development of varied knowledge in discussion of
new evidence becomes
investigated scientifically biotechnologies. Students discuss development of biotechnologies. Student personal
available, and some
scientific discoveries biotechnologies as a class, concerning ethics in capabilities demonstrated through
have significantly WS7.1 Students process data and information by: production and usage. Such examples include; shared insights into personal opinions
changed people's  Snake & spider venom for treatment of regarding ethical issues.
a. summarising data from students' own
understanding of the illness
investigations and secondary sources
world.  Biological warfare & weapons
d. accessing information from a range of sources,  Hybridization of genetically modified
a. research an example including using digital technologies animals for varied purposes
of how changes in Students discuss potential advantages and
scientific knowledge disadvantages of each biotechnology, identifying
WS7.2 Students analyse data and information by:
have contributed to difficulties of developing the biotechnology.
finding a solution to a Students further discuss potential solutions to
identified issues with given biotechnologies.

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James Wilson 17727701
human health issue a. checking the reliability of gathered data and
information by comparing with observations or
information from other sources
b .recount how
Individual Research Allocation Student personal capability measured
evidence from a
WS8 Students solve problems by: Students provided two periods of class time to through application of research
scientific discovery has
research biotechnological foundations for their allocation and expression of capability
changed understanding a. using identified strategies to suggest possible assessment task. in research.
and contributed to solutions to a familiar problem
solving a real world
b. describing different strategies that could be Small Group Activity Student critical thinking capabilities
problem, eg animal or
employed to solve an identified problem with a Ethical, social and moral issues are addressed in assessed through application of
plant disease, hygiene,
scientific component the worksheet Affairs of the Heart” where the ethical practises and critical thought
food preservation,
group discusses which person should receive a processes throughout activity.
sewage treatment or c. using scientific knowledge and findings from heart transplant.
biotechnology investigations to evaluate claims
c. describe, using d. using cause and effect relationships to explain Student Ethics Application Task Student personal and social
examples, how ideas and findings Students are posed scenarios, including the capabilities assessed through
developments in following; acknowledgement of values, opinions
technology have e. evaluating the appropriateness of different
“Steve Jobs was a man who chose to refuse and attitudes of diverse groups within
contributed to finding strategies for solving an identified problem
biotechnological cancer treatments, opting instead a societal context. Students
solutions to a for natural remedies. He passed away unable to rid demonstrate critical thinking in
contemporary issue, eg his body of the cancer using his chosen remedies” application of contemporary ethical
organ transplantation, WS9 Students communicate by: From these scenarios, students consider and and moral issues with shared personal
artificial joints/limbs, discuss the ethical implications, as well as personal insights in the matter.
a. presenting ideas, findings and solutions to
treatment for diabetes, standpoint of choice. Students share their opinions
problems using scientific language and
asthma, kidney or heart on what they would do if they were the
representations using digital technologies as
disease individual(s) in the scenarios.
appropriate
d. give examples to
d. constructing and using a range of
show that groups of
representations to honestly, clearly and/or
people in society may
succinctly present data and information
use or weight criteria
including diagrams, keys, models, tables,
differently in making
drawings, images, flowcharts, spreadsheets
decisions about the
and databases
application of a solution

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James Wilson 17727701
to a contemporary
issue, eg organ
transplantation, control
and prevention of
diseases and dietary
deficiencies

Extension: Students research and create a small poster presentation depicting ethical and/or moral issues associated with Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic
Repeats (CRISPR). Students encouraged to present their findings from a personal standpoint regarding the benefits and limitations of CRISPR.

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..4 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 6. Describe their success and potential modifications to make
to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 6 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




42
James Wilson 17727701
Week 7
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW3 Multicellular WS6 Students conduct investigations by: Scaled Model Introductory Activity Assessment for learning measured
organisms contain Teacher presents a scale model of an adult through student background
systems of organs that a. collaboratively and individually conducting a skeleton, asking students to estimate the total understanding of musculoskeletal
carry out specialised range of investigation types, including number of bones present. Students are challenged system.
functions that enable fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety to list as many names of bones as they can in their
them to survive and and ethical guidelines are followed books.
reproduce b. assembling and using appropriate equipment
and resources to perform the investigation, Teacher-Driven Visual Presentation
including safety equipment Teacher utilizes visual imagery and simulations to
b. explain that the
highlight key structures of the musculoskeletal
systems in multicellular d. following the planned procedure, including in system. Students draw and label locations of key
organisms work fair tests, measuring and controlling variables muscles, tendons, ligaments and joints. Students
together to provide cell
further identify key types of joints and their
requirements, including
e. recording observations and measurements locations.
gases, nutrients and
water, and to remove accurately, using appropriate units for physical
quantities Student-Driven Dissection Activity
cell wastes
Students complete a dissection of a chicken wing. Assessment as learning
f. performing specific roles safely and responsibly
Prior to dissection, students examine external demonstrated through application of
e. Describe the role of when working collaboratively to complete a
structure of chicken wing and compare it to human safe practises in practical task.
the digestive, task within the timeline
anatomy. Students are posed questions such as Student knowledge is demonstrated
circulatory, excretory ‘What happens if the tendons in the ‘wing’ are through relating structural features
skeletal/muscular and WS7.1 Students process data and information by: removed?’ of dissected wing to human anatomy
respiratory systems in Students draw and label their diagrams after before applying critical thinking
a. summarising data from students' own
maintaining a human as dissection task with associated discussion processes in discussion questions.
investigations and secondary sources
a functioning questions as a class. Critical thinking capabilities assessed
multicellular organism through application of questions.

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James Wilson 17727701
b. using a range of representations to organise Virtual Hip Replacement Task Student personal and social
data, including graphs, keys, models, diagrams, Students complete a virtual tour of a hip capabilities assessed through
tables and spreadsheets replacement, answering assigned questions acknowledgement of values,
throughout task. opinions and attitudes of diverse
WS9 Students communicate by: Upon completion students discuss ethical practices groups within a societal context.
behind such surgeries, as well as financial stability Students demonstrate critical
d. constructing and using a range of in providing these surgeries. thinking in application of
representations to honestly, clearly and/or contemporary ethical and moral
succinctly present data and information issues with shared personal insights
including diagrams, keys, models, tables, in the matter.
drawings, images, flowcharts, spreadsheets
and databases
Extension: Students to create a diary entry under the identify of an individual who has lost a limb in a car accident. This individual has just completed surgery to provide an
artificial limb of their own choosing. Students are to complete this entry through describing the motion success and setbacks of this artificial limb.
Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..4 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 7. Describe their success and potential modifications to make
to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 7 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




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SECTION III: APPENDICES OF
INITIAL DOCUMENTATION
Foreword:
The appendices provided in section III are initial documents provided by St Dominic’s College. No concept map was provided and thus this
section will contain only a scope and sequence, assessment & marking rubric, and unit outline.
The scope and sequence included in this section was provided as a screenshot of the initial document and thus may appear blurry if zoomed in
on a document.

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Appendix A: Comparative Table of Strengths, Concerns & Suggested
Alterations
Area of Strengths of the Concerns of the area of Suggested Changes to Research support for the changes
consideration area of consideration counteract concerns suggested.
consideration

Initial program displays Initial unit poses lack of Reconstructed unit will focus upon Incorporation of debating allows students to exhibit
consistent opportunity inclusion of diverse language inclusion of group-based informal diverse language frameworks often under-utilised in
Literacy for interpretation of data choices designed for interaction debates and exhibitions of science (Osborne, 2014). Collaborative discussions
and evaluation of between students such as collaborative discussions of enhance diverse language choices used to discuss
reliability of information paired discussion. Unit relies content regarding abstract abstract content (Day, Gu & Sammns, 2016; Osborne,
from research of key upon metalanguage attained concepts. Visual-Based literacy 2014).
texts. Students evaluate from research and basic inclusions to be emphasised within Visual-Based Literacy directly enhances students’
language from secondary classroom discussion. unit reconstruction. abilities to process and organise data (Moore-Russo &
resources. Shanhan, 2014). Incorporation of visual media and
virtual tours can express content in coherent manners
more relatable for students (Ervine, 2016).
Initial unit harnesses Initial unit allows for minimal Reconstructed unit will exhibit Appropriate application of scientific metalanguage
brief foundations of expression and application of opportunities for students to apply across a range of abstract concepts will enhance
varied literacy structures metalanguage. Students are scientific metalanguage to relate student success in harnessing persuasive language and
and creative adaptations required to cite facts from abstract concepts. Such contextualised language usage within science (Zepke &
including presentations research however rarely extend opportunity will be enhanced Leach, 2010).
and model design to their understanding through a through debating tasks, as well as
demonstrate wide range of specialist open discussions of content
understanding. vocabulary to contribute to wherein students relate diverse
abstract text composition. scientific concepts.

Students are provided a Initial unit demonstrates poor Reconstructed unit will harness Enhancing a sense of relatability in content through
sense of relevancy as extended incorporation of greater instances of numerical numerical applications provides stronger engagement
individuals through numerical applications where applications provided during as well as deeper understanding from students (Goos,

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James Wilson 17727701
Numeracy calculations of specific opportunities are available practical tasks and research tasks Geiger & Dole, 2014). Diverse applications of numerical
numerical data including including practical including graphing, creation of data including graphing and analysis of calculations
scaling, heart rate investigations. Students tables and analysis of calculations. allows for critical thinking of abstract findings attained
measurement and complete task and discuss during investigations (Thomson, De Bortoli & Buckley,
calculation of vital lung findings with minimal 2013).
capacity. incorporation of numeracy.
Brief inclusions of Unit displays excessive usage of Reconstructed unit will be focused Enhancement in understanding of content provided, as
numeracy capabilities numerical-based Working upon inclusion of additional well as content greater required for revision is crucial
within initial unit allows Scientifically (WS) content numeracy-driven tasks to align with in maintaining effective teaching strategies (Noyes,
students to recognise descriptors with minimal outcomes and content strands, Wake & Drake, 2013).
and describe specific mention of how these with removal of WS content
relationships in data. descriptors are applied within descriptors where strategies do not
teaching strategies. align to learning outcomes.

Initial unit allows for Initial unit lacks opportunity for Reconstructed unit will provide Greater focus upon ranges of information investigated
Critical and organisation and students to pose investigative multiple opportunities for students is crucial in promoting retention to student learning,
Creative Thinking processing of information questions and address complex to research a broader range of with a broader range of interest and focus upon
through research and issues, focusing instead upon a information of their own choice abstract concepts (Mcilvenny, 2013).
presentation creation as set-question approach to relative to concepts within content. Engagement is further enhanced with opportunity to
well as usage of the 6D research and investigation. Students provided chance to consider methodological and safety components of
method. design and organise practical practical investigations (Kadir & Akshir, 2016).
investigations.
Initial unit allows for There is minimal opportunity Reconstructed unit allows for Focus upon introductory discussions directly enhances
Appropriate transferral for students to predict inclusion of prior discussion of critical thought processes, where students relate
of knowledge from possibilities of results of concepts before commencing background foundations to new scientific concepts in a
theory to practise practical investigations and practical wherein students predict manner that addresses application of critical and
through creation of show critical thought processes. outcomes based upon prior creative thought processes (Caroline, 2015; Kadir &
models. Rather, students are simply knowledge. Additional inclusion of Akshir, 2016).
provided a method outline to pre-assessment tasks shows critical
follow for each investigation. application of prior foundations.
Initial unit provides Initial unit provides minimal Reconstructed unit enhances Students provided opportunity to express diverse
Personal and opportunity for incorporations of diverse greater acknowledgement of viewpoints are significantly more engaged to content,
Social collaborative teamwork perspectives in society. values, opinions and attitudes of with a greater sense of relatability in content
Capabilities through practical Students complete practical different groups within societal (Harackiewicz, Smith & Priniski, 2016). Students share
investigations. Students tasks with no further contexts. This is to be achieved abstract thoughts and opinions relative to diverse

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James Wilson 17727701
demonstrate applications towards the wider through application of ethical and moral issues addressed within science,
responsibility in learning community, nor investigation of contemporary ethical and moral providing opportunity for expression of personal values
through these tasks. differing opinions and attitudes issues, such as biotechnologies and (Osborne, 2017).
to compare with their own. their relationships with body
systems.
Initial unit allows for Initial unit harnesses poor Reconstructed unit will provide Students harnessing a ‘roles’ system demonstrate
effective communication regulation of self-discipline and introduction of a ‘roles’ system greater regulation of learning, as well as significantly
through frequent small personal learning goals within practical and collaborative stronger ownership over learning (Gillies & Baffour,
group activities and throughout practical tasks to provide greater enhance 2017). Students take greater pride in work ethic and
discussions. components of the unit. responsibility of learning to also demonstrate pro-social behaviours in assisting
Students simply form groups students. Student roles are to be peers with a positive mindframe (Hmelo-Silver, Duncan
and complete a task with alternated regularly to ensure & Chinn, 2013).
minimal regulation of task engagement in varied aspects of
design. content at all times.
Initial unit contained Within the initial unit there is The reconstructed unit will focus Enhanced focus upon assessment provides greater
summative assessment minimal-to-no clear evidence of upon inclusion of student accountability in evidence of learning (Goff, Piere,
Understanding by structured for student learning via the assessment as/of/for learning in Carey & Gullage, 2015).
Design completion after provided assessment column of the assessment column. Inclusion of pre-assessment tasks directly enhances
students examine the unit. Further, there is no Modifications to the unit allow for student success through elimination of redundancy in
relative content to allow mention of pre-assessment at inclusion of a pre-assessment task information already attained prior (Clary et al., 2018).
greater representation of the beginning or throughout the prior to unit commencement as Educators can use these findings to integrate
outcomes. unit. Finally, there is no well as throughout the unit. Finally, knowledge and applications of student understanding
inclusion of details of the reconstructed unit will feature in learning (Rosenberg & Koehler, 2015).
summative assessment within inclusion of an assessment
the unit program. overview in the unit.
Initial unit featured The initial assessment task does The reconstructed unit will feature Alterations to formal assessment task allow for a
inclusion of on-going not align succinctly with an assessment with modified significantly stronger expression of understanding of
reflection and evaluation outcomes. This assessment choice of questions to align greater content, with less invasive stress of the initially
of teaching success features an examination with with outcomes. Formal assessment required written exam (Marshall, 2013). This
within the unit, hand-written notes permitted task is to be structured as a assessment task allows for stronger assessment of
suggesting focus upon which creates unnecessary research task where formal learning outcomes and accuracy in assessment of
select UbD principles. stress upon student assessment examination is removed. knowledge (Marshall, 2013; Rosenberg & Koehler,
of learning, removing potential 2015).
for application of knowledge.

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Appendix B: Original Scope and Sequence

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Appendix C: Original Assessment & Marking
Rubric
Canvas Course: Science

Task Title: Biotechnology

Due Date: 26th June 2018 - Period 3 Warner Hall

Task Type: Student Research and Exam

Outcomes being assessed:

A Student:

Working Scientifically:

SC4-7WS processes and analyses data from a first-hand investigation and secondary sources to identify trends,
patterns and relationships, and draw conclusions

SC4-8WS selects and uses appropriate strategies, understanding and skills to produce creative and plausible
solutions to identified problems

SC4-9WS presents science ideas, findings and information to a given audience using appropriate scientific language,
text types and representations

Knowledge and Understanding:

SC4-14LW relates the structure and function of living things to their classification, survival and reproduction

SC4-15LW explains how new biological evidence changes people’s understanding of the world

Exam Instructions
 Reading time - 5 minutes Working time – 45 minutes
 Use your research summaries to assist you.
 Answer all three (3) questions in the spaces provided.
 Your answer should be at least 6 lines and be well structured in a style similar to the TEEEC format.
 A TEEEC scaffold is given overleaf for reference.
 The marking criteria is given on the question paper.
 At the end of the exam hand in your summary notes and exam paper

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TEEEC Scaffold

Topic Sentence Introduces topic of the paragraph.

Use key words from the question to form


topic sentence.

Expand Expand on topic sentence and give more


detail.

Define any key terms.

Example Evidence to support your idea/concept


with quotes, evidence and example(s).

Evaluate/Effect Explain or evaluate the example(s) used in


the previous sentence.

What is the outcome/consequence of this


example?

Conclusion Connect back to the question by using key


words from the question

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Name_________________________________ Teacher:
___________________________________

Question One

Clarify why the biotechnology you researched is being developed.


Clarify -Make clear or plain

The biotechnology ………………………………………………………………………….

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Description Marks
The response contains a clearly stated scientific explanation about the major concept
that relates to several pieces of information and clearly reflect the verb in the question.
9 - 10
Contains well structured paragraphs and relevant sentences. Spelling and punctuation
is sophisticated.
The response contains two or more pieces of scientific information relevant to the
major concepts that clearly reflect the verb in the question.
7-8
Contains well structured paragraphs and relevant sentences. Spelling and punctuation
is substantial.
The response contains a single piece of scientific information relevant to the major
concept that reflects the verb in the question. 5-6
Contains some well-structured sentences. Spelling and punctuation is sound.
The response contains a common-sense explanation about the major concept that
relates to two or more pieces of common-sense information.
3-4
Contains well-structured paragraphs and relevant sentences. Spelling and punctuation
is substantial.
The response contains two or more common-sense information relevant to the major
concept. 2
Contains some well-structured sentences. Spelling and punctuation is sound.
The response contains a single piece of common-sense information relevant to the
major concept. 1
Spelling and punctuation is limited.
A response was made but it does not meet any of the marking criteria
OR 0
Non- attempt. The space for the response is left blank

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Name: _________________________________ Teacher:
___________________________________

Question Two

Explain how the biotechnology works. Include information on the key features of its design
Explain - Relate cause and effect; make the relationships between things evident; provide
why and/or how

The biotechnology ………………………………………………………………………….

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Description Marks
The response contains a clearly stated scientific explanation about the major concept
that relates to several pieces of information and clearly reflect the verb in the question.
9 - 10
Contains well structured paragraphs and relevant sentences. Spelling and punctuation
is sophisticated.
The response contains two or more pieces of scientific information relevant to the
major concepts that clearly reflect the verb in the question.
7-8
Contains well structured paragraphs and relevant sentences. Spelling and punctuation
is substantial.
The response contains a single piece of scientific information relevant to the major
concept that reflects the verb in the question. 5-6
Contains some well-structured sentences. Spelling and punctuation is sound.
The response contains a common-sense explanation about the major concept that
relates to two or more pieces of common-sense information.
3-4
Contains well-structured paragraphs and relevant sentences. Spelling and punctuation
is substantial.
The response contains two or more common-sense information relevant to the major
concept. 2
Contains some well-structured sentences. Spelling and punctuation is sound.
The response contains a single piece of common-sense information relevant to the
major concept. 1
Spelling and punctuation is limited.
A response was made but it does not meet any of the marking criteria
OR 0
Non- attempt. The space for the response is left blank

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Name: _________________________________ Teacher:
___________________________________

Question Three

Recommend why money should be given for research in your chosen biotechnology
should continue in the future.
Recommend - Provide (at least 3) detailed reasons in favour;

The biotechnology ………………………………………………………………………….

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Description Marks
The response contains a clearly stated scientific explanation about the major concept
that relates to several pieces of information and clearly reflect the verb in the question.
9 - 10
Contains well structured paragraphs and relevant sentences. Spelling and punctuation
is sophisticated.
The response contains two or more pieces of scientific information relevant to the
major concepts that clearly reflect the verb in the question.
7-8
Contains well structured paragraphs and relevant sentences. Spelling and punctuation
is substantial.
The response contains a single piece of scientific information relevant to the major
concept that reflects the verb in the question. 5-6
Contains some well-structured sentences. Spelling and punctuation is sound.
The response contains a common-sense explanation about the major concept that
relates to two or more pieces of common-sense information.
3-4
Contains well-structured paragraphs and relevant sentences. Spelling and punctuation
is substantial.
The response contains two or more common-sense information relevant to the major
concept. 2
Contains some well-structured sentences. Spelling and punctuation is sound.
The response contains a single piece of common-sense information relevant to the
major concept. 1
Spelling and punctuation is limited.
A response was made but it does not meet any of the marking criteria
OR 0
Non- attempt. The space for the response is left blank

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Appendix D: Original Unit Program
Stage 4 Science – Year 8

Unit 2: Body Bits

Unit Length: Unit Description

Humans have always been fascinated by the insides of their bodies and how they work and the context of this unit has been selected to motivate
learning. In this unit the students will build on their knowledge of cells and learn about the specialised tissues and body systems that are found
12 Weeks
in the both the human body and plants. They will specifically learn about the digestive, respiratory, circulatory, excretory, reproductive systems
in humans as well as how cells maintain plants as working organisms. Students will increase their scientific literacy as they become familiar with
many specialised terms. As part of the unit they learn about the importance of healthy eating and exercise. This also increases their personal
awareness of their bodies and allows them to more fully understand themselves and make informed decisions in the future.

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Assessment
Outcomes
Assessment as learning
Values and Attitudes

SC4-1VA appreciates the importance of science in their lives and the role of scientific inquiry in increasing understanding of the
world around them

SC4-2VA shows a willingness to engage in finding solutions to science-related personal, social and global issues, including shaping Assessment for learning
sustainable futures

SC4-3VA demonstrates confidence in making reasoned, evidence based decisions about the current and future use and influence of
science and technology, including ethical considerations

Skills Assessment of learning

SC4-1WS identifies questions and problems that can be tested or researched and makes predictions based on scientific knowledge
SC4-4WS

SC4-2WS collaboratively and individually produces a plan to investigate questions and problems SC4-5WS

SC4-3WS follows a sequence of instructions to safely undertake a range of investigation types, collaboratively and individually
SC4-6WS

SC4-4WS identifies questions and problems that can be tested or researched and makes predictions based on scientific knowledge

SC4-5WS collaboratively and individually produces a plan to investigate questions and problems

SC4-6WS follows a sequence of instructions to safely undertake a range of investigation types, collaboratively and individually

SC4-7WS processes and analyses data from a first-hand investigation and secondary sources to identify trends, patterns and
relationships, and draw conclusions

SC4-8WS selects and uses appropriate strategies, understanding and skills to produce creative and plausible solutions to identified
problems

SC4-9WS presents science ideas, findings and information to a given audience using appropriate scientific language, text types and
representations

Knowledge and Understanding

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SC4-14LW relates the structure and function of living things to their classification, survival and reproduction

SC4-15LW explains how new biological evidence changes people’s understanding of the world

Key Terms

Haemoglobin Red blood cells White blood cells Platelets Heart

Arteries Veins Capillaries Plasma Nephrons

Respiratory Alveoli Photosynthesis Respiration Root

Chlorophyll hygiene
Stem Flower Leaf

Organ transplant testicles Sperm Ovaries Penis

Thinking Skills Co-operative Learning Graphic Organisers

 Higher Order Thinking Skills  Think-pair-share  Mind Maps or Concept Maps


 Visual Representations  Jigsaw  Venn Diagrams

 Think all possibilities (TAP)  Brainstorming  Five Ws

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 Predict, Explain, Observe  Numbered heads  PMI charts

 Y Chart or W Chart  Discussion  T charts

 Constructing Experiments  Expert Groups  Flow Charts


 Other:  Other:  Other:

Week 1
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW2 Cells are the basic units Learning About Cells


f living things and have To assist students in building on their understanding of cells.
WS7.1 Students process data and
specialised structures and information by:
functions Individually Activity
Students b. using a range of Individually work on a mind map for cells to review year 7 work. Share with
representations to organise partner and improve the mind map.
a. identify that living things data, including graphs, keys,
are made of cells models, diagrams, tables and Class Activity
c identify that new cells are spreadsheets Discussion on unicellular and multicellular organisms, growth and repair and,
produced by cell division cell differentiation and specialisation of the tissues, organs and organ systems
WS9 Students communicate by: of multicellular organisms
e distinguish between
d. constructing and using a range
unicellular and multicellular Students add this information to their mind maps.
of representations to honestly,
animals
clearly and/or succinctly
present data and information Resources
f identify that different cells including diagrams, keys, Jacaranda – Chapter 2 – Cells – The Building Blocks of Life
make up the tissues, organs models, tables, drawings,
and organ systems of images, flowcharts,
multicellular organisms spreadsheets and databases

LW3 Multicellular organisms


contain systems of organs
that carry out specialised
functions that enable them
to survive and reproduce
(ACSSU150)

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James Wilson 17727701
c. Outline the role of cell
division in growth, repair and
reproduction in multicellular
organisms

Week 1
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

Learning About Science – Scientific Research


To assist students in building on their understanding of the importance of
LW2 Cells are the basic
units of living things and scientific research and discoveries. Teacher introduces the role of cell division
WS6 Students conduct
have specialised structures investigations by: in growth and repair and what happens when cell division goes wrong resulting
and functions. (ACSSU149) in cancer. Class discussion on factors that can increase the risk of getting
f. performing specific roles safely cancer.
d. identify that new cells are and responsibly when working
produced by cell division collaboratively to complete a Individual Activity
task within the timeline Analysing data on smoking and lung cancer
LW3 Multicellular
organisms contain systems of WS7.1 Students process data and Resources
organs that carry out information by: Jacaranda 6.1 Looking for Patterns to address Health Issues
specialised functions that Section on smoking and cancer and the following ‘Skill Builder”
enable them to survive and a. summarising data from
reproduce. (ACSSU150) students' own investigations
and secondary sources Small group activity *
c. outline the role of cell (ACSIS130, ACSIS145) Students undertake research and present a 10 slide powerpoint on cancer and NOTE*
division in growth, repair and a new scientific discovery There are a number of
b. using a range of
reproduction in multicellular Title slide students who have family
representations to organise
organisms Slides 1 & 2 what is cancer? Different types of caner members who are currently
data, including graphs, keys,
models, diagrams, tables and Slides 3 & 4 what are some causes of cancer or factors that increase the undergoing treatment for
spreadsheets chances of developing cancer? cancer. Please consult with the
LW4Scientific knowledge has
Slides 5 - 7 What are the three traditional treatments for cancer and what are year coordinator and support
changes as new evidence c. extracting information from the issues associated with their use? Surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy staff before doing this activity.
becomes available. And some diagrams, flowcharts, tables, Slides 8 – 10 Selection of one of the following new areas of research:
scientific discoveries have databases, other texts,
 The model drug Glivec, also known as STI571.
significantly changed multimedia resources and
people’s understanding of  the new drug developed by biochemist Philip Hogg
graphs including histograms
the world and column, sector and line  vitamin C and tumor cells that carry a common cancer-causing
graphs mutations
 a gel, made from a common weed called Euphorbia peplus,

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James Wilson 17727701
a research an example of d. accessing information from a  the venom of the deathstalker scorpion
how changes in scientific range of sources, including  Packaging chemotherapy drugs with nanoparticles
knowledge have contributed using digital technologies  Using substances extracted from mistletoe
to finding a solution to a  Genetics and cancer
human health issue  Other approved by teacher

WS9 Students communicate by: Class Activity


Students present their findings on their newly developing treatment and or
knowledge to the class
a. presenting ideas, findings and
solutions to problems using
scientific language and
representations using digital
technologies as appropriate
(ACSIS133, ACSIS148)

b. using appropriate text types in


presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount

d. constructing and using a range of


representations to honestly,
clearly and/or succinctly present
data and information including
diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts,
spreadsheets and databases

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 1. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




63
James Wilson 17727701
Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




Week 2
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes
WS4 Students question and predict by: Learning About Science – Energy From Food Assessment of Learning
b making predictions based on scientific Class discussion on the cellular process of respiration to supply energy
LW2 Cells are the basic
units of living things and knowledge and their own observations for growth, development and reproduction; and the requirements of a
have specialised structures (ACSIS124, ACSIS139) cell to obtain nutrients and oxygen for respiration. Discussion on food
and functions. (ACSSU149) to provide these nutrients to cells.
WS5.1 Students identify data to be collected in
c. outline the role of Small Group Activity
an investigation by:
respiration in providing Investigation 8.3 Measuring Energy in Food
energy for the activities of b. proposing the type of information and
cells data that needs to be collected in a
Individual Activity
range of investigation types, including
LW3 Multicellular organisms Skill Builder – Energy in Food
first-hand and secondary sources
contain systems of organs
that carry out specialised Resources
functions that enable them WS5.2 Students plan first-hand Jacaranda 8.2 Taking in Nutrients
to survive and reproduce investigations by:
(ACSSU150) c. identifying in fair tests, variables to be
a.identify the materials controlled (held constant), measured
required by multicellular and changed
organisms for the processes
of respiration and
WS6 Students conduct investigations by:
photosynthesis
c. collaboratively and individually
conducting a range of investigation
types, including fieldwork and
experiments, ensuring safety and ethical
guidelines are followed (ACSIS125,
ACSIS140)

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b. assembling and using appropriate
equipment and resources to perform the
investigation, including safety
equipment

f. following the planned procedure,


including in fair tests, measuring and
controlling variables (ACSIS126,
ACSIS141)
g. recording observations and
measurements accurately, using
appropriate units for physical quantities

f. performing specific roles safely and


responsibly when working
collaboratively to complete a task within
the timeline
g. assessing the method used and
identifying improvements to the method
(ACSIS131, ACSIS146)

WS7.1 Students process data and


information by:
a. summarising data from students' own
investigations and secondary sources
(ACSIS130, ACSIS145)

b. using a range of representations to


organise data, including graphs, keys,
models, diagrams, tables and
spreadsheets
e. applying simple numerical procedures,
eg calculating means when processing
data and information, as appropriate

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WS7.2 Students analyse data and information
by:
a. checking the reliability of gathered data
and information by comparing with
observations or information from other
sources

e. using scientific understanding to


identify relationships and draw
conclusions based on students’ data or
secondary sources
(ACSIS130, ACSIS145)
f. reflecting on the method used to
investigate a question or solve a
problem, including evaluating the quality
of the data collected (ACSIS131, ACSIS146)

WS9 Students communicate by:


b. using appropriate text types in
presentations, including a discussion,
explanation, exposition, procedure and
recount
d. constructing and using a range of
representations to honestly, clearly
and/or succinctly present data and
information including diagrams, keys,
models, tables, drawings, images,
flowcharts, spreadsheets and databases

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Week 2
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes
LW3 Multicellular organisms WS4 Students question and predict by: Learning About Science – Food Testing
contain systems of organs a. identifying questions and problems that can To learn about food groups and foot testing. Apart from providing energy
that carry out specialised be investigated scientifically (ACSIS124, food also provides various chemicals for cellular processes in the form of
functions that enable them to ACSIS139) glucose, protein, lipids, starch and vitamins and minerals.
survive and reproduce b. making predictions based on scientific
(ACSSU150) knowledge and their own observations Small Group Activity
(ACSIS124, ACSIS139) This activity should be carried out to introduce students to the 6D method
of solving a problem. This will aid students in completing their assessment
e. Describe the role of the WS5.1 Students identify data to be collected in task which should be handed out at this time.
digestive, circulatory, an investigation by:
excretory skeletal/muscular a. identifying the purpose of an Fake Vomit – Teacher brings in a beaker of vomit obtained from the
and respiratory systems in investigation autopsy of a murder victim which students must analyse to discover where
maintaining a human as a the person ate their last meal.
functioning multicellular b. proposing the type of information and
Introduce the 6 D method of solving a problem:
data that needs to be collected in a
organism Define
range of investigation types, including
first-hand and secondary sources Discover
Dream
Design
WS5.2 Students plan first-hand Deliver
investigations by: Debrief
a. collaboratively and individually planning
a range of investigation types, including Students will research food tests and design and complete a first hand
fieldwork, experiments, surveys and investigation involving chemical tests for specific food groups. They then
research (ACSIS125, ACSIS140) carry out a vomit analysis identifying the potential presence of glucose,
proteins, lipids and starch.
b. outlining a logical procedure for
undertaking a range of investigations to
collect valid first-hand data, including Ressources
fair tests Jacaranda – 8.2 - Taking in Nutrients
Jacaranda - 8.5 – Science as a Human Endeavour – Dietary Deficiencies –
one problem, many opinions

WS5.3 Students choose equipment or resources


for an investigation by:
a. identifying suitable equipment or
resources to perform the task, including
safety equipment and digital
technologies

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b. selecting equipment to collect data
with accuracy appropriate to the task
(ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

WS6 Students conduct investigations by:


a. collaboratively and individually conducting
a range of investigation types, including
fieldwork and experiments, ensuring safety
and ethical guidelines are followed
(ACSIS125, ACSIS140)
b. assembling and using appropriate
equipment and resources to perform the
investigation, including safety
equipment

d. following the planned procedure, including in


fair tests, measuring and controlling
variables (ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

h. recording observations and


measurements accurately, using
appropriate units for physical quantities

WS7.1 Students process data and


information by:
a. summarising data from students' own
investigations and secondary sources
(ACSIS130, ACSIS145)

b. using a range of representations to


organise data, including graphs, keys,
models, diagrams, tables and
spreadsheets

WS7.2 Students analyse data and information


by:

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c. identifying data which supports or
discounts a question being investigated
or a proposed solution to a problem

f. using scientific understanding to


identify relationships and draw
conclusions based on students’ data or
secondary sources
(ACSIS130, ACSIS145)
g. proposing inferences based on
presented information and
observations
WS8 Students solve problems by
d. using cause and effect relationships to
explain ideas and findings

WS9 Students communicate by:


a. presenting ideas, findings and solutions
to problems using scientific language
and representations using digital
technologies as appropriate (ACSIS133,
ACSIS148)

b. using appropriate text types in


presentations, including a discussion,
explanation, exposition, procedure and
recount

Extensions & Adjustments


 Alternatively to ‘from food to flush’ - Students construct a flow chart of the path travelled through the digestive system or write a story following a piece of food as
it passes through the system.
 Video B27
Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 2. Describe their success and potential modifications to make
to further this success.


69
James Wilson 17727701


Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




Week 3
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes
LW3 Multicellular organisms Learning About Science - The Digestive System and Digestion Assessment of Learning –
contain systems of organs Task 1 designing a 2 day
WS5.1 Students identify data to be
that carry out specialised collected in an investigation by: Class Discussion meal plan for a person
functions that enable them to Teacher guided introduction to the digestive system with a specified disease.
survive and reproduce c. locating possible sources of data and Students identify the key parts and functions of the digestive system
(ACSSU150) information, including secondary including mechanical and chemical breakdown of food Assessment as learning
sources, relevant to the investigation Labelled diagram of the
e. Describe the role of the Individual Activity parts and functions of the
digestive, circulatory, Note taking and drawing diagrams on the structure and function of the digestive system
excretory skeletal/muscular WS6 Students conduct investigations by: digestive system.
and respiratory systems in a. collaboratively and individually Assessment for learning
maintaining a human as a conducting a range of investigation Pairs or Small Group Activity – Making a Board Game Completed board game or
functioning multicellular types, including fieldwork and From Food to Flush alternative writing task
organism experiments, ensuring safety and ethical Students develop a board game about the digestive system. The game must
guidelines are followed (ACSIS125, be able to be played by 4 people and include all organs and trivia cards.
LW4 Scientific knowledge
ACSIS140) Students might like to include digestive disorders in their game. Assessment for learning
changes as new evidence b. assembling and using appropriate
becomes available, and some equipment and resources to perform the Pairs or Small Groups Activity – Making a model digestive system
scientific discoveries have investigation, including safety Students use a variety of objects to make their own model of the digestive
significantly changed people's equipment system
understanding of the world.
d. following the planned procedure,
(ACSHE119, ACSHE134) Small Groups - Experiments
including in fair tests, measuring and
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James Wilson 17727701
a. research an example of controlling variables (ACSIS126, ACSIS141) Making a model stomach using acid to study the digestion of various food
how changes in scientific samples.
knowledge have contributed e. recording observations and
to finding a solution to a measurements accurately, using A Model Intestine - To investigate how the small intestine works by
human health issue appropriate units for physical quantities studying dialysis using iodine, glucose solution.
b. recount how evidence from
a scientific discovery has f. performing specific roles safely and Investigation 8.4 – Observing Villi
changed understanding and responsibly when working
contributed to solving a real collaboratively to complete a task within Investigation 8.5 – Does Temperature Affect Enzymes
world problem, eg animal or the timeline
plant disease, hygiene, food
preservation, sewage
treatment or biotechnology WS7.1 Students process data and
Resources
information by:
Jacaranda- 8.3- The Digestive System
c. describe, using examples, a. summarising data from students' own Jacaranda – 8.4 – Physical or Chemical Digestion
how developments in investigations and secondary sources Jacaranda - 8.5 – Science as a Human Endeavour – Dietary Deficiencies –
technology have contributed (ACSIS130, ACSIS145)
one problem, many opinions
to finding solutions to a b. using a range of representations to
contemporary issue, eg organ organise data, including graphs, keys,
transplantation, artificial models, diagrams, tables and
joints/limbs, treatment for spreadsheets
diabetes, asthma, kidney or
heart disease c. extracting information from diagrams,
flowcharts, tables, databases, other
texts, multimedia resources and graphs
including histograms and column, sector
and line graphs

WS7.2 Students analyse data and


information by:
b. constructing and using a range of
representations, including graphs, keys
and models to represent and analyse
patterns or relationships, including using
digital technologies as appropriate
(ACSIS129, ACSIS144)

c. identifying data which supports or


discounts a question being investigated
or a proposed solution to a problem

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James Wilson 17727701
d. using scientific understanding to identify
relationships and draw conclusions
based on students' data or secondary
sources (ACSIS130, ACSIS145)

WS9 Students communicate by:


a. presenting ideas, findings and solutions
to problems using scientific language
and representations using digital
technologies as appropriate (ACSIS133,
ACSIS148)

b. using appropriate text types in


presentations, including a discussion,
explanation, exposition, procedure and
recount
d. constructing and using a range of
representations to honestly, clearly
and/or succinctly present data and
information including diagrams, keys,
models, tables, drawings, images,
flowcharts, spreadsheets and databases

Week 3

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James Wilson 17727701
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes
LW3 Multicellular organisms Learning About Science - The Digestive System and Digestion Assessment of Learning –
contain systems of organs Task 1 designing a 2 day
WS4 Students question and predict
that carry out specialised by: Class Discussion meal plan for a person
functions that enable them to Teacher guided introduction to the digestive system and diseases with a specified disease.
survive and reproduce a. identifying questions and
(ACSSU150) problems that can be investigated Individual Research Assessment as learning
scientifically (ACSIS124, ACSIS139) Peptic Ulcer Disease - It was once commonly thought that stress, smoking and diet Labelled diagram of the
e. Describe the role of the were the principal causes of stomach ulcers. However, research of two parts and functions of the
digestive, circulatory, WS5.1 Students identify data to be Australians, Barry J Marshall and J Robin Warrethat found that the Helicobacter digestive system
excretory skeletal/muscular collected in an investigation by: pylori (H. pylori) bacterium responsible for most duodenal ulcers and 60 per cent
and respiratory systems in of stomach ulcers thus altering our treatment. Assessment for learning
a. identifying the purpose of an
maintaining a human as a Completed board game or
investigation
functioning multicellular Individual Assessment Task alternative writing task
organism b. proposing the type of information Knowledge about diseases and the digestive system has contributed to finding
and data that needs to be solutions to some diseases. Students are to select o disease from a list that can be
collected in a range of controlled by specific dietary guidelines. Students are to use the 6 D (Define, Assessment for learning
LW4 Scientific knowledge investigation types, including first-
changes as new evidence Discover, Dream, Design, Deliver, Debrief) method of solving a problem to develop
hand and secondary sources a 2 – day meal plan for a teenage boy with that condition. Details are in the 2016
becomes available, and some
scientific discoveries have Assessment folder.
significantly changed people's c. locating possible sources of data
understanding of the world. and information, including
(ACSHE119, ACSHE134) secondary sources, relevant to Resources
the investigation Jacaranda- 8.3- The Digestive System
a. research an example of
Jacaranda – 8.4 – Physical or Chemical Digestion
how changes in scientific
knowledge have contributed WS5.3 Students choose equipment Jacaranda - 8.5 – Science as a Human Endeavour – Dietary Deficiencies – one
to finding a solution to a or resources for an problem, many opinions
human health issue investigation by:

b. recount how evidence from a. identifying suitable equipment or


a scientific discovery has resources to perform the task,
changed understanding and including safety equipment and
contributed to solving a real digital technologies
world problem, eg animal or b. selecting equipment to collect
plant disease, hygiene, food data with accuracy appropriate to
preservation, sewage the task (ACSIS126, ACSIS141)
treatment or biotechnology

WS7.1 Students process data and


c. describe, using examples,
information by:
how developments in
73
James Wilson 17727701
technology have contributed a. summarising data from students'
to finding solutions to a own investigations and secondary
contemporary issue, eg organ sources (ACSIS130, ACSIS145)
transplantation, artificial
b. using a range of representations
joints/limbs, treatment for
to organise data, including
diabetes, asthma, kidney or
graphs, keys, models, diagrams,
heart disease
tables and spreadsheets
c. extracting information from
diagrams, flowcharts, tables,
databases, other texts,
multimedia resources and graphs
including histograms and column,
sector and line graphs
d. accessing information from a
range of sources, including using
digital technologies

Students solve problems by:


a. using identified strategies to
suggest possible solutions to a
familiar problem
b. describing different strategies that
could be employed to solve an
identified problem with a scientific
component

WS9 Students communicate by:


a. presenting ideas, findings and
solutions to problems using
scientific language and
representations using digital
technologies as appropriate
(ACSIS133, ACSIS148)

b. using appropriate text types in


presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount
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James Wilson 17727701
c. using a recognised method to
acknowledge sources of data and
information
d. constructing and using a range of
representations to honestly,
clearly and/or succinctly present
data and information including
diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts,
spreadsheets and databases

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 3. Describe their success and potential modifications to make
to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




75
James Wilson 17727701
Week 4
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes
LW3 Multicellular organisms Learning About Science - The Respiratory System Assessment as learning
contain systems of organs Class Discussion Labelled parts and functions
WS5.1 Students identify data to be collected
that carry out specialised in an investigation by: Teacher guided introduction to the respiratory system in which of the respiratory system
functions that enable them to students identify the key parts and functions of the respiratory
survive and reproduce c. locating possible sources of data and system, explain gas exchange in the alveoli and explain how we
(ACSSU150) information, including secondary sources, breath with specific reference to the diaphragm
relevant to the investigation

b. explain that the systems in Note the use of terminology and differentiate breathing, respiration
multicellular organisms work WS6 Students conduct investigations by: and the respiratory tract from cellular respiration
together to provide cell a. collaboratively and individually conducting
requirements, including Individual Activity
a range of investigation types, including
gases, nutrients and water, Note taking and drawing diagrams on the structure and function of
fieldwork and experiments, ensuring
and to remove cell wastes safety and ethical guidelines are followed the respiratory system.
(ACSIS125, ACSIS140)

e. Describe the role of the d. following the planned procedure, Class Activity - Demonstration
digestive, circulatory, including in fair tests, measuring and
Changing air –To compare inhaled and exhaled air - Students set up
excretory skeletal/muscular controlling variables (ACSIS126, ACSIS141)
a basic lung apparatus (be careful to ensure that only one tube in
and respiratory systems in
each flask extends below limewater level)
maintaining a human as a e. recording observations and
functioning multicellular measurements accurately, using Individual Activity
organism appropriate units for physical quantities
Investigation 8.6 Measuring your vital capacity - Students use a
balloon and ruler to measure the vital capacity of their lungs.

WS7.1 Students process data and


information by:
Resources
b. using a range of representations to Jacaranda – 8.6 – Breathe in. breathe out
organise data, including graphs, keys,
models, diagrams, tables and
spreadsheets
c. extracting information from diagrams,
flowcharts, tables, databases, other texts,
multimedia resources and graphs
including histograms and column, sector
and line graphs

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James Wilson 17727701
WS7.2 Students analyse data and
information by:
b. constructing and using a range of
representations, including graphs, keys
and models to represent and analyse
patterns or relationships, including using
digital technologies as appropriate
(ACSIS129, ACSIS144)

WS9 Students communicate by:


b. using appropriate text types in
presentations, including a discussion,
explanation, exposition, procedure and
recount
d. constructing and using a range of
representations to honestly, clearly and/or
succinctly present data and information
including diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts,
spreadsheets and databases

Extensions & Adjustments


 Online research – research asthma rather than different respiratory systems

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 4. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.


Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.



77
James Wilson 17727701
Week 5
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes
LW3 Multicellular organisms Learning About Science - Circulatory System
contain systems of organs
WS5.1 Students identify data to be
that carry out specialised collected in an investigation Class Discussion
functions that enable them by: Teacher guided introduction to circulatory system Assessment as learning
to survive and reproduce Students identify blood and its fractions and functions, blood vessels: Labelled diagram of the heart
(ACSSU150) c. locating possible sources of veins, arteries and capillaries and the structure and function of the
data and information, including heart. Assessment for learning
secondary sources, relevant to Completed research Questions
b. explain that the systems in the investigation
multicellular organisms work Individual Activity
together to provide cell Note taking and drawing diagrams on the structure and function of the Assessment for learning
requirements, including WS6 Students conduct circulatory system. Completed practical report and
gases, nutrients and water, investigations by: graph
and to remove cell wastes a. collaboratively and individually Individual Activity
conducting a range of Students create a model of the heart and label the parts and illustrate
investigation types, including blood flow
e. Describe the role of the
digestive, circulatory, fieldwork and experiments,
ensuring safety and ethical Experiments
excretory skeletal/muscular
guidelines are followed Jacaranda Investigation 8.1 Pluck Dissection - Demonstration
and respiratory systems in (ACSIS125, ACSIS140) Investigation 8.7 – Viewing Blood cells
maintaining a human as a
b. assembling and using Investigation 8.8 – Heart Dissection
functioning multicellular
organism appropriate equipment and
resources to perform the Resources
investigation, including safety Jacaranda – 8.7 – Blood Highways
equipment Jacaranda – 8.8 – Have a Heart
d. following the planned procedure,
including in fair tests, measuring
and controlling variables
(ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

e. recording observations and


measurements accurately, using
appropriate units for physical
quantities
f. performing specific roles safely
and responsibly when working
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James Wilson 17727701
collaboratively to complete a
task within the timeline

WS7.1 Students process data and


information by:
a. summarising data from students'
own investigations and
secondary sources (ACSIS130,
ACSIS145)

b. using a range of representations


to organise data, including
graphs, keys, models, diagrams,
tables and spreadsheets
c. extracting information from
diagrams, flowcharts, tables,
databases, other texts,
multimedia resources and
graphs including histograms and
column, sector and line graphs

WS9 Students communicate by:


b. using appropriate text types in
presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount
d. constructing and using a range
of representations to honestly,
clearly and/or succinctly present
data and information including
diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts,
spreadsheets and databases

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James Wilson 17727701
Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 5. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




Week 6
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

Learning About Science - Biotechnologies


Teacher plays a number of your tube clips to stimulate discussion of
LW4 Scientific knowledge WS4 Students question and
changes as new evidence predict by: biotechnology and artificial body parts.
becomes available, and some
a. identifying questions and Individual Activity
scientific discoveries have
problems that can be Students use the internet to identify as many artificial body parts as
significantly changed
investigated scientifically possible on an outline of the body.
people's understanding of the (ACSIS124, ACSIS139)
world. (ACSHE119,
ACSHE134) Pairs Activity
Internet research

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James Wilson 17727701
a. research an example of Heart Transplants – Artificial Hearts – Growing Replacement Hearts
how changes in scientific WS7.1 Students process data and - Define each
knowledge have contributed information by: - How effective are they?
to finding a solution to a
a. summarising data from - What are the advantages, disadvantages and identify the
human health issue difficulties associated with each
students' own investigations and
b .recount how evidence secondary sources (ACSIS130, - Who was Victor Chang and what contributions has he
from a scientific discovery ACSIS145) made to heart transplant in Australia and around the
has changed understanding world.
b. using a range of representations
and contributed to solving a to organise data, including
real world problem, eg graphs, keys, models, diagrams, Small Group Activity
animal or plant disease, tables and spreadsheets Ethical, social and moral issues are addressed in the worksheet Affairs
hygiene, food preservation, of the Heart” where the group discusses which person should receive a
sewage treatment or c. extracting information from heart transplant.
biotechnology diagrams, flowcharts, tables,
databases, other texts,
c. describe, using examples, Resources
multimedia resources and
how developments in Jacaranda – 16.7 Replacement Parts
graphs including histograms and
technology have contributed column, sector and line graphs
to finding solutions to a
contemporary issue, eg organ
transplantation, artificial d. accessing information from a
joints/limbs, treatment for range of sources, including
diabetes, asthma, kidney or using digital technologies
heart disease
d. give examples to show that WS7.2 Students analyse data and
groups of people in society information by:
may use or weight criteria a. checking the reliability of
differently in making gathered data and information
decisions about the by comparing with observations
application of a solution to a or information from other
contemporary issue, eg organ sources
transplantation, control and
prevention of diseases and b. constructing and using a range
dietary deficiencies of representations, including
graphs, keys and models to
represent and analyse patterns
or relationships, including using
digital technologies as
appropriate (ACSIS129, ACSIS144)

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WS8 Students solve problems by:
a. using identified strategies to
suggest possible solutions to a
familiar problem
b. describing different strategies
that could be employed to solve
an identified problem with a
scientific component
c. using scientific knowledge and
findings from investigations to
evaluate claims (ACSIS132,
ACSIS234)

d. using cause and effect


relationships to explain ideas
and findings
e. evaluating the appropriateness
of different strategies for solving
an identified problem

WS9 Students communicate by:


a. presenting ideas, findings and
solutions to problems using
scientific language and
representations using digital
technologies as appropriate
(ACSIS133, ACSIS148)

b. using appropriate text types in


presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount
c. using a recognised method to
acknowledge sources of data
and information
d. constructing and using a range
of representations to honestly,
clearly and/or succinctly present
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data and information including
diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts,
spreadsheets and databases

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 6. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




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Week 7
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW3 Multicellular organisms


contain systems of organs Learning About Science – The Muscular/Skeletal System
WS5.1 Students identify data to be
that carry out specialised collected in an investigation Class discussion
functions that enable them to by: Teacher guided introduction to the skeletal system, joints, ligaments and Assessment as learning
survive and reproduce tendons and muscles Label the main bones of the
(ACSSU150) c. locating possible sources of human skeleton
data and information, including Individual Activity
secondary sources, relevant to Note taking and drawing diagrams on the structure and function of the
b. explain that the systems in the investigation
multicellular organisms work skeletal and muscular system.
together to provide cell
requirements, including WS6 Students conduct Virtual knee or hip replacement surgery
gases, nutrients and water, investigations by: Online activity students google search the keyword EdHeads. Assessment as learning
and to remove cell wastes a. collaboratively and individually Students complete the activity individually. It is recommended that they Creation of a skeletal model
conducting a range of have their own earphones to complete the activity.
e. Describe the role of the investigation types, including
fieldwork and experiments, Group Activity
digestive, circulatory,
ensuring safety and ethical Jacaranda 8.11 - chicken wing dissection
excretory skeletal/muscular
guidelines are followed
and respiratory systems in (ACSIS125, ACSIS140) Investigation 8.10 – Rubbery Bones
maintaining a human as a
functioning multicellular b. assembling and using
appropriate equipment and Resources Assessment as learning
organism
resources to perform the Jacaranda – 8.10 – Bodies on the Move Identify the joins and functions
investigation, including safety Clips of x-rays showing the movement of joint of joints within the human
equipment http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/amazing-x-ray-gifs-show- skeleton
joints-motion
d. following the planned
procedure, including in fair tests,
measuring and controlling
variables (ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

e. recording observations and


measurements accurately, using
appropriate units for physical
quantities
f. performing specific roles safely
and responsibly when working
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collaboratively to complete a
task within the timeline
Assessment as learning
WS7.1 Students process data and Label the main muscles of the
information by: human skeleton

a. summarising data from students'


own investigations and
secondary sources (ACSIS130,
ACSIS145)

b. using a range of representations


to organise data, including Assessment for learning
graphs, keys, models, diagrams, Completed practical report
tables and spreadsheets including graph.
c. extracting information from
diagrams, flowcharts, tables,
databases, other texts,
multimedia resources and
graphs including histograms and
column, sector and line graphs

WS9 Students communicate by:


b. using appropriate text types in
presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount
d. constructing and using a range
of representations to honestly,
clearly and/or succinctly present
data and information including
diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts,
spreadsheets and databases

Extensions & Adjustments


 From the butcher obtain a long bone that has been cut longitudinally to observe the composition

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 x-rays for the class to observe

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 7. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




Week 8
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW3 Multicellular organisms Learning About Science - Excretory system


contain systems of organs Class Discussion
WS5.1 Students identify data to be
that carry out specialised collected in an investigation Brainstorm ‘ How does the body remove wastes’
functions that enable them to by: - Refer to the following
survive and reproduce Defecation
(ACSSU150) c. locating possible sources of Lungs (Carbon Dioxide)
data and information, including Liver (urea)
e. Describe the role of the secondary sources, relevant to Skin (heat)
digestive, circulatory, the investigation Kidneys (urine)
excretory skeletal/muscular
and respiratory systems in WS6 Students conduct Individual Activity
maintaining a human as a investigations by: Note taking and drawing diagrams on the structure and function of the
excretory system.
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functioning multicellular a. collaboratively and individually
organism conducting a range of Small Group Activity
investigation types, including Kidney Dissection
fieldwork and experiments,
b. explain that the systems in ensuring safety and ethical
multicellular organisms work guidelines are followed
together to provide cell (ACSIS125, ACSIS140)
requirements, including Resources
gases, nutrients and water, b. assembling and using Jacaranda – 8.9 Getting Rid of Waste
and to remove cell wastes appropriate equipment and
resources to perform the
investigation, including safety
equipment
d. following the planned
procedure, including in fair tests,
measuring and controlling
variables (ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

e. recording observations and


measurements accurately, using
appropriate units for physical
quantities
f. performing specific roles safely
and responsibly when working
collaboratively to complete a
task within the timeline

WS7.1 Students process data and


information by:
a. summarising data from
students' own investigations and
secondary sources (ACSIS130,
ACSIS145)

b. using a range of representations


to organise data, including
graphs, keys, models, diagrams,
tables and spreadsheets
c. extracting information from
diagrams, flowcharts, tables,
databases, other texts,
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multimedia resources and
graphs including histograms and
column, sector and line graphs

WS9 Students communicate by:


b. using appropriate text types in
presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount
d. constructing and using a range
of representations to honestly,
clearly and/or succinctly present
data and information including
diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts,
spreadsheets and databases

Extensions & Adjustments

 Video B26
 Tinkle Testing
– Students are given a variety of ‘urine’ samples. Students need to identify what is contained within the urine to solve a crime. See resources 2015 – year 8 Folder . Suggested
foods are beetroot and asparagus.

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 8. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.

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Week 9
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

Learning About Science - Putting it all together


Students use the following terms to create a visual summary of the
LW3 Multicellular WS4 Students question and
organisms contain systems of predict by: information presented in this unit to show how the various systems
organs that carry out are linked.
b. making predictions based on
specialised functions that
scientific knowledge and their Group Activity
enable them to survive and
own observations (ACSIS124, Investigation 8.9 – Check your Heart - Heart rate and exercise – To
reproduce. (ACSSU150) ACSIS139)
investigate the effect of exercise on heart rate.
b. explain that the systems in
multicellular organisms work WS5.1 Students identify data to be Resources
together to provide cell collected in an investigation
requirements, including Jacaranda Investigation 8.9
by:
gases, nutrients and water,
and to remove cell wastes a. identifying the purpose of an
investigation

b. proposing the type of


information and data that
needs to be collected in a
range of investigation types,
including first-hand and
secondary sources WS6
Students conduct
investigations by:
a. collaboratively and individually
conducting a range of
investigation types, including
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fieldwork and experiments,
ensuring safety and ethical
guidelines are followed
(ACSIS125, ACSIS140)

d. following the planned


procedure, including in fair tests,
measuring and controlling
variables (ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

e. recording observations and


measurements accurately, using
appropriate units for physical
quantities
f. performing specific roles safely
and responsibly when working
collaboratively to complete a
task within the timeline

WS7.1 Students process data and


information by:
a. summarising data from
students' own investigations and
secondary sources (ACSIS130,
ACSIS145)

b. using a range of representations


to organise data, including
graphs, keys, models, diagrams,
tables and spreadsheets
e. applying simple numerical
procedures, eg calculating
means when processing data
and information, as appropriate

WS7.2 Students analyse data and


information by:
b. constructing and using a range
of representations, including
graphs, keys and models to
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represent and analyse patterns
or relationships, including using
digital technologies as
appropriate (ACSIS129, ACSIS144)

d. using scientific understanding to


identify relationships and draw
conclusions based on students'
data or secondary sources
(ACSIS130, ACSIS145)

e. proposing inferences based on


presented information and
observations

WS8 Students solve problems by:


d. using cause and effect
relationships to explain ideas
and findings

WS9 Students communicate by:


a. presenting ideas, findings and
solutions to problems using
scientific language and
representations using digital
technologies as appropriate
(ACSIS133, ACSIS148)

b. using appropriate text types in


presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount
d. constructing and using a range
of representations to honestly,
clearly and/or succinctly present
data and information including
diagrams, keys, models, tables,
drawings, images, flowcharts,
spreadsheets and databases

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e. constructing and using the
appropriate type of graph
(histogram, column, sector or
line graph) to express
relationships clearly and
succinctly, employing digital
technologies as appropriate

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 9. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




Week 10
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes

LW3 Multicellular organisms Learning About Science - Reproduction


contain systems of organs Teacher defines sexual reproduction
WS5.1 Students identify data to
that carry out specialised be collected in Discuss advantages and disadvantages of sexual reproduction
functions that enable them to an investigation by: Assessment as learning
survive and reproduce Individual Activity Advantages and disadvantages of
(ACSSU150) c. locating possible sources of sexual reproduction
data and information,
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f. Outline the role of the including secondary sources, Note taking and drawing diagrams on the structure and function of the
reproductive system in relevant to the investigation reproductive system. Students label the reproductive organs of both the Assessment as learning
humans male and female reproductive systems and explain their function. Labelled diagram of the male and
female reproductive organs
WS7.1 Students process data
and information by: Assessment of learning
Completion of Student research
a. summarising data from
project
students' own investigations
and secondary sources
(ACSIS130, ACSIS145)

b. using a range of
representations to organise
data, including graphs, keys,
models, diagrams, tables
and spreadsheets
c. extracting information from
diagrams, flowcharts, tables,
databases, other texts,
multimedia resources and
graphs including histograms
and column, sector and line
graphs

WS9 Students communicate by:


b. using appropriate text types
in presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount
d. constructing and using a
range of representations to
honestly, clearly and/or
succinctly present data and
information including
diagrams, keys, models,
tables, drawings, images,
flowcharts, spreadsheets and
databases

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Extensions & Adjustments
DVD Watch the birth of a child

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 10. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




Week 11
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes
LW3 Multicellular organisms Learning About Science – Plant Structure and Function
contain systems of organs Class Discussion
WS5.1 Students identify data to
that carry out specialised be collected in Teacher guided introduction to the parts of a plant
functions that enable them an investigation by: Students are to know the following parts and functions
to survive and reproduce Roots
(ACSSU150) c. locating possible sources of Xylem
data and information, Phloem
a. Identify the materials including secondary sources, Leaf
required by multicellular relevant to the investigation Stomata
organisms for the processes Chlorophyll
of respiration and flower
photosynthesis WS6 Students conduct
investigations by: Individual Activity Assessment as learning

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a. collaboratively and Note taking and drawing diagrams on the structure and function of plants Labelled parts and basic functions
b. explain that the systems in
individually conducting a and plant transport systems including the leaf.. of a plant
multicellular organisms work
range of investigation types,
together to provide cell
including fieldwork and Individual Activity
requirements, including
experiments, ensuring safety Growing bean seeds - Students use old empty CD cases to grow a bean
gases, nutrients and water,
and ethical guidelines are seed. The nature of the case allows for easy observation of the parts of the
and to remove cell wastes
followed (ACSIS125, ACSIS140) plant, while also allowing for easy storage (CD rack)
d. describe the role of the b. assembling and using Viewing Specialised Cells – use of microviewers to view xylem, phloem
flower, root, stem and leaf in appropriate equipment and chloroplasts and stomata and guard cells.
maintaining flowering plants resources to perform the
as functioning organisms investigation, including Water transport in celery – Students observe the movement of water in the
safety equipment
xylem of the celery. Teacher can extend this practical by allowing students
d. following the planned to create their own slides from celery sample or use prepared slides to
procedure, including in fair observe the xylem
tests, measuring and
controlling variables Transpiration – coating leaves with Vaseline to determine which side of the
(ACSIS126, ACSIS141)
leaf has the most stomata
e. recording observations and
measurements accurately, Resources
using appropriate units for Video – leaf structure, stomata and carbon dioxide
physical quantities http://www.saps.org.uk/secondary/teaching-resources/799-video-
f. performing specific roles clip-leaf-structure
safely and responsibly when
working collaboratively to
complete a task within the
timeline

WS7.1 Students process data


and information by:
a. summarising data from
students' own investigations
and secondary sources
(ACSIS130, ACSIS145)

b. using a range of
representations to organise
data, including graphs, keys,
models, diagrams, tables
and spreadsheets

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c. extracting information from
diagrams, flowcharts, tables,
databases, other texts,
multimedia resources and
graphs including histograms
and column, sector and line
graphs

WS9 Students communicate by:


b. using appropriate text types
in presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount
d. constructing and using a
range of representations to
honestly, clearly and/or
succinctly present data and
information including
diagrams, keys, models,
tables, drawings, images,
flowcharts, spreadsheets
and databases

Extensions & Adjustments


Teacher guided introduction to the reproductive organ of a plant
Students should be able to identify the flower as the reproductive organ of a plant and specifically identify the individual parts and functions. Students label a cross section of a flower.
This may be completed in conjunction with a flower dissection if seasonal conditions are appropriate.

Week 11
Content & Values and Working Scientifically Teaching, Learning & Resources Assessment
Attitudes
LW3 Multicellular organisms Learning About Science – Photosynthesis and Respiration
contain systems of organs Class Discussion
WS4 Students question and
that carry out specialised predict by: Teacher guided discussion on photosynthesis and respiration
functions that enable them
Individual Activity

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to survive and reproduce a. identifying questions and Note taking on photosynthesis and respiration including the equations of
(ACSSU150) problems that can be each process
investigated scientifically
a. Identify the materials (ACSIS124, ACSIS139)
Small Group Activity
required by multicellular b. making predictions based on Photosynthesis – testing leaves for starch
organisms for the processes scientific knowledge and
of respiration and their own observations Individual Activities
photosynthesis (ACSIS124, ACSIS139) Analysis of Data – completion of various worksheets on experiments Assessment as learning
concerning plants and the processes of respiration and photosynthesis. Labelled parts and basic functions
d. describe the role of the WS5.1 Students identify data to of a plant
flower, root, stem and leaf in be collected in Resources
maintaining flowering plants an investigation by: Video - Oxygen from pond weed practical
as functioning organisms http://www.saps.org.uk/secondary/teaching-resources/190-using-
a. identifying the purpose of an
investigation cabomba-to-demonstrate-oxygen-evolution-in-the-process-of-
photosynthesis-
b. proposing the type of
information and data that
needs to be collected in a
range of investigation types, Note that details and experiments on photosynthesis and
including first-hand and
respiration are also covered in unit 2
secondary sources
WS5.2 Students plan first-hand
investigations by:
b. outlining a logical procedure
for undertaking a range
of investigations to
collect valid first-hand data,
including fair tests
c. identifying in fair
tests, variables to be
controlled (held constant),
measured and changed

WS5.3 Students choose


equipment or resources
for an investigation by:
a. identifying suitable
equipment or resources to
perform the task, including

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safety equipment and digital
technologies
b. selecting equipment to
collect data with accuracy
appropriate to the task
(ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

WS6 Students conduct


investigations by:
a. collaboratively and
individually conducting a
range of investigation types,
including fieldwork and
experiments, ensuring safety
and ethical guidelines are
followed (ACSIS125, ACSIS140)

b. assembling and using


appropriate equipment and
resources to perform the
investigation, including
safety equipment
c. selecting equipment to
collect data with accuracy
appropriate to the task
(ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

d. following the planned


procedure, including in fair
tests, measuring and
controlling variables
(ACSIS126, ACSIS141)

e. recording observations and


measurements accurately,
using appropriate units for
physical quantities
f. performing specific roles
safely and responsibly when
working collaboratively to

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complete a task within the
timeline
g. assessing the method used
and identifying
improvements to the method
(ACSIS131, ACSIS146)

WS7.1 Students process data


and information by:
a. summarising data from
students' own investigations
and secondary sources
(ACSIS130, ACSIS145)

b. using a range of
representations to organise
data, including graphs, keys,
models, diagrams, tables
and spreadsheets
c. extracting information from
diagrams, flowcharts, tables,
databases, other texts,
multimedia resources and
graphs including histograms
and column, sector and line
graphs
d. accessing information from a
range of sources, including
using digital technologies

e. applying simple numerical


procedures, eg calculating
means when processing
data and information, as
appropriate

WS7.2 Students analyse data


and information by:

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a. checking the reliability of
gathered data and
information by comparing
with observations or
information from other
sources
b. constructing and using a
range of representations,
including graphs, keys
and models to represent and
analyse patterns or
relationships, including using
digital technologies as
appropriate (ACSIS129,
ACSIS144)

c. identifying data which


supports or discounts a
question being investigated
or a proposed solution to a
problem
d. using scientific
understanding to identify
relationships and draw
conclusions based on
students' data or secondary
sources (ACSIS130, ACSIS145)
e. proposing inferences based
on presented information
and observations
f. reflecting on the method
used to investigate a
question or solve a problem,
including evaluating the
quality of the data collected
(ACSIS131, ACSIS146)

WS8 Students solve problems


by:

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a. using identified strategies to
suggest possible solutions to
a familiar problem
b. describing different
strategies that could be
employed to solve an
identified problem with a
scientific component
c. using scientific knowledge
and findings from
investigations to evaluate
claims (ACSIS132, ACSIS234)
d. using cause and effect
relationships to explain ideas
and findings
e. evaluating the
appropriateness of different
strategies for solving an
identified problem

WS9 Students communicate by:


a. presenting ideas, findings
and solutions to problems
using scientific language and
representations using digital
technologies as appropriate
(ACSIS133, ACSIS148)

b. using appropriate text types


in presentations, including a
discussion, explanation,
exposition, procedure and
recount
c. using a recognised method
to acknowledge sources of
data and information
d. constructing and using a
range of representations to
honestly, clearly and/or
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succinctly present data and
information including
diagrams, keys, models,
tables, drawings, images,
flowcharts, spreadsheets
and databases
e. constructing and using the
appropriate type of graph
(histogram, column, sector or
line graph) to express
relationships clearly and
succinctly, employing digital
technologies as appropriate

Extensions & Adjustments


First hand investigation to examine the factors that can influence photosynthesis – light v dark or different coloured lights

Reflection:
From the teaching and learning strategies listed on Pg..2 reflect upon your inclusion of strategies within Week 11. Describe their success and potential modifications to
make to further this success.




Reflect upon how you have addressed general capabilities within your week 1 activities. Provide any suggestions for further improvement required.




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St Dominic’s College Teacher Evaluation of Unit
Teacher Name: Class:

Describe five key strategies you found the most successful within your classes from Week 1-11. Why was this successful?

Describe your classroom lesson that created that greatest engagement. Why was this lesson so engaging for students?

Describe your classroom lesson that you feel had the LEAST success. Why do you feel this was unsuccessful?

Describe possible alterations you would create to this unit plan to reflect upon student engagement and success.

Nine random words to make 23000 word count cheers!

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