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Persuasion via Rhetoric Quiz II

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Persuasion via Rh no Persuasion throu 4 1371003 1

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1
CORREC Which of the following descriptions best captures the difference between a
T euphemism and a dysphemism?
A dysphemism is employed to create a negative effect on a reader's attitude
and a euphemism is employed to create a positive effect on a reader's
A) attitude.

A dysphemism is a form of rhetoric but a euphemism is not.


B)
A euphemism is employed to create a negative effect on a reader's attitude
and a dysphemism is employed to create a positive effect on a reader's
C) attitude.

A euphemism is a form of rhetoric but a dysphemism is not.


D)
Feedback: Most of the things we say convey a positive or negative spin
because we generally attach positive or negative values to the issues we talk
about. Rarely there are the 'Mr. Spock types' who pride themselves on
riding their language of emotive value. So, euphemisms and dysphemisms
abound.
Choose the type of rhetorical device below that best fits the following description.
2 10 3 10 4 10

5 10 6 10 7 10

8 10 9 5 10 5

11 5 12 5 13 5

14 5 15 5 16 5

17 5 18 5 19 5

20 5 21 5 22 5

23 5

2
CORREC This rhetorical device is a thought or image about a group of people based upon
T little or no evidence.

Loaded question
A)

Downplayer
B)

Hyperbole
C)

Horse laugh
D)

Proof Surrogate
E)

Euphemism
F)
Weaseler
G)

Stereotype
H)

Innuendo
I)

Dysphemism
J)

Feedback: Whether it is being used in a compliment or an insult, stereotypes


are not accurate representations of reality.
3
CORREC This rhetorical device allows someone to insinuate something deprecatory about
T someone or something without actually saying it.

Loaded question
A)

Downplayer
B)

Hyperbole
C)

Horse laugh
D)

Proof Surrogate
E)

Euphemism
F)

Weaseler
G)

Stereotype
H)

Innuendo
I)

Dysphemism
J)

Feedback: A person who does not make an insulting claim directly is not
innocent if he asserts it through innuendo.
4
CORREC This rhetorical device is phrased as a question that rests upon one or more
T unwarranted or unjustified assumptions.

Loaded question
A)

Downplayer
B)

Hyperbole
C)

Horse laugh
D)

Proof Surrogate
E)

Euphemism
F)

Weaseler
G)

Stereotype
H)

Innuendo
I)

Dysphemism
J)

Feedback: The age-old loaded question, "When did you stop beating your
wife?" rests on the assumption that the questioned has beaten his wife in the
past. Notice that if this is not true, then neither a "yes" nor a "no" response
will nullify the accusation. It's a trap.
5
CORREC This rhetorical device works by protecting a claim from criticism by watering it
T down so to give the speaker a way out in the case that the claim is challenged.

Loaded question
A)

Downplayer
B)

Hyperbole
C)

Horse laugh
D)

Proof Surrogate
E)

Euphemism
F)

Weaseler
G)

Stereotype
H)

Innuendo
I)

Dysphemism
J)

Feedback: It is not always the case that only 'weasels' use watered down
expressions such as 'it is not always the case that...', 'sometimes', 'it seems to
me', etc. These expressions are necessary tools of humble and conscientious
people. However, when the aim is to protect one's self from being challenged,
rather than having the courage of his/her convictions, than the watered
down expressions, used for this purpose, are 'weaselers'.
6
CORREC This rhetorical device works by attempting to make someone or something less
T
significant or important.

Loaded question
A)

Downplayer
B)

Hyperbole
C)

Horse laugh
D)

Proof Surrogate
E)

Euphemism
F)

Weaseler
G)

Stereotype
H)

Innuendo
I)

Dysphemism
J)

Feedback: While it might be just as true to say that "Jane passed the
entrance exam." as to say "Jane achieved the highest score ever recorded on
the entrance exam to the academy!", the first merely states the fact and the
second gives details of the significance of that fact. In some situations, say,
informing Jane's parents, to use the first sentence would be to downplay the
event. In leaving out the details that are relevant to parents, it could also be
considered deceptive (since the downplayed version carries the implication
that Jane didn't do much better than the minimum required).
7
CORREC This rhetorical device is best described as an extravagant overstatement.
T
Loaded question
A)

Downplayer
B)

Hyperbole
C)

Horse laugh
D)

Proof Surrogate
E)

Euphemism
F)

Weaseler
G)

Stereotype
H)

Innuendo
I)

Dysphemism
J)

Feedback: It's when the colorfulness of language becomes excessive that a


claim turns into hyperbole.
8
CORREC This rhetorical device works by suggesting that there is evidence or authority
T for a claim without actually citing this evidence.

Loaded question
A)

Downplayer
B)
Hyperbole
C)

Horse laugh
D)

Proof Surrogate
E)

Euphemism
F)

Weaseler
G)

Stereotype
H)

Innuendo
I)

Dysphemism
J)

Feedback: As a 'surrogate' the expression stands in the place of actual proof.


It leads the listener to expect an upcoming proof, or wonder if s/he missed
something, or be hood-winked into thinking an adequate proof was being
given.
9
CORREC Your teacher might have called this paper on capitalism "independent thinking".
T

Euphemism
A)

Innuendo
B)

Rhetorical explanation
C)

Proof surrogate
D)
Rhetorical definition
E)

Feedback: Your teacher was probably stretching to say something nice


about a poorly researched and off-the-topic piece of work.
10
CORREC I don't know what my opponents will base their speeches on; I'm basing mine
T on love for my country.

Euphemism
A)

Innuendo
B)

Weaseler
C)

Downplayer
D)

Stereotype
E)

Feedback: The speak insinuates that his/her opponent's speeches won't be


based on anything as patriotic as the speaker's and will therefore be of
inferior quality.
11
CORREC Economists say this layoff is Cleveland's final readjustment to a service
T economy.

Innuendo
A)

Euphemism
B)

Downplayer
C)

Stereotype
D)

Rhetorical definition
E)
Feedback: Cleveland's economy is in trouble.
12
CORREC At the end of the day, the reasons for our view tend to preponderate over the
T reasons for the contrary view.

Euphemism
A)

Innuendo
B)

Rhetorical explanation
C)

Weaseler
D)

Rhetorical definition
E)

Feedback: They "tend to" isn't as firm as "they do", which affords some
slack to the claim just in case the speaker wants to revise what was said to
fall into line with later developments.
13
CORREC Of course she told you it'll run smoothly. Car salespeople will tell you whatever
T they think you want to hear.

Rhetorical explanation
A)

Weaseler
B)

Loaded question
C)

Downplayer
D)

Proof surrogate
E)

Feedback: The information covered is slanted toward the speaker's point of


view, which is quite negative.
14
CORREC For all practical purposes, there has basically been only one worthwhile idea in
T the history of philosophy.

Innuendo
A)

Loaded question
B)

Weaseler
C)

Stereotype
D)

Rhetorical definition
E)

Feedback: Saying that there has been only one worthwhile idea in the
history of philosophy is a very controversial thing to say. Adding "for all
practical purposes" might give the speaker space to retract the intensity of
that claim (but not much).
15
CORREC Are you here to beg for another favor?
T

Euphemism
A)

Loaded question
B)

Rhetorical explanation
C)

Weaseler
D)

Rhetorical definition
E)

Feedback:
Another favor implies there have others in the past. 'Beg' is used to blatantly
show the speaker's attitude toward the listener (or perhaps, to those on the
periphery overhearing the interchange).
16
CORREC Open this envelope and you'll get a check for three million dollars, if your name
T appears on our list of winners.

Rhetorical definition
A)

Innuendo
B)

Downplayer
C)

Weaseler
D)

Stereotype
E)

Feedback:
"If your name appears..." has a bit of weaseler thrown in. It's what is
referred to as 'the catch' (as in: "What's the catch?").

17
CORREC Letter to the editor: "We can thank ivory tower professors like Mr. Fosl for all
T the head-in-the-clouds ideas our society has to contend with."

Stereotype
A)

Weaseler
B)

Rhetorical explanation
C)

Loaded question
D)

Rhetorical definition
E)

Feedback:
This is a stereotypical stereotype (Notice I equivocated on the word
'stereotype'. In my first usage, it meant 'typical', and in the second usage it
meant 'generalizing without justification'). Since Mr. Fosl is like this, all
professors are like this. And since we 'all know how professors are' and Mr.
Fosl is a professor, we can therefore throw some blame his way.

18
CORREC Is this going to be another bright suggestion like your proposal that we take
T scuba lessons?

Stereotype
A)

Loaded question
B)

Proof surrogate
C)

Rhetorical definition
D)

Innuendo
E)

Feedback: Since the listener cannot answer the question without convicting
him/herself because the question is loaded, the speaker gets to voice a
rhetorical comparison too. Since the idea of scuba lessons was not well-
received, the speaker wants to transfer the negative feeling of that idea to the
new idea.
19
CORREC Who was that young woman with the Senator last night: his niece?
T

Stereotype
A)

Euphemism
B)

Rhetorical definition
C)

Rhetorical explanation
D)
Innuendo
E)

Feedback:
Offering the answer "his niece" might suffice as an explanation, but it is
rhetorically negative because of the innuendo that the Senator could be
having an affair--maybe the young woman wasn't his niece. But notice,
nobody said that explicitly.

20
CORREC You can't sleep with the covers over your head. All the medical journals will
T tell you that's harmful.

Stereotype
A)

Euphemism
B)

Weaseler
C)

Proof surrogate
D)

Downplayer
E)

Feedback:
Well, what do the medical journals say? Where are the references? Merely
claiming that medical journals support your point is worthless as a proof,
but that's the spot where a proof would fit, if there was one.

21
CORREC Taxation is the oppressive practice of taking other people's hard-earned money.
T

Loaded question
A)

Euphemism
B)

Rhetorical explanation
C)
Innuendo
D)

Weaseler
E)

Feedback: The listener is supposed to compare taxation with other


"oppressive practices" and arrive at the same negative assessment.
22
CORREC We will fund this new program through revenue enhancements from the sale of
T beer and cigarettes.

Downplayer
A)

Euphemism
B)

Proof surrogate
C)

Weaseler
D)

Innuendo
E)

Feedback:
The word "enhancement" is a Slanter that makes the whole idea of taxing
these items more palatable to those who buy them.

23
CORREC Overheard: "You know why the subway is so dirty, don't you? They're getting
T people on welfare to clean the cars."

Rhetorical explanation
A)

Loaded question
B)

Downplayer
C)
Stereotype
D)

Rhetorical definition
E)

Feedback: The hidden assumption is that people on welfare don't have a


good work ethic.
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