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Mahamrityunjaya Mantra – Door

into Eternal Life


Swami Vibhooti Saraswati
The healing power of the Mahamrityunjaya mantra was invoked in
Ganga Darshan, Munger, by Swami Satyananda in 1986, and in
Rikhia in 2000. It is currently being chanted in the Satyananda
ashrams and yoga centres throughout India and the world at the
same time every week. People who are facing illness, obstacles,
tragedy or crisis in their lives, and who cannot be physically present
during the chanting, can give their names for inclusion in the
chanting by phone or letter. Many people have been helped through
difficult times in this way, even though they are not physically
present, the power of the Mahamrityunjaya mantra is so great.
The chanting takes place on Saturday evenings, around six o’clock
(with a slight time change according to the time of year). It can also
be chanted by the family and friends at home, or in any other place
where you wish to create a positive, protective and high energy.
This mantra is also chanted during auspicious occasions such as
initiation ceremonies and havans. You are welcome to join us
wherever you may be in the world. If you chant at the same time as
the mantra is being chanted in the ashrams and centres, you can
‘tune in’ with us and become part of the collective force created.

The meaning of the Mahamrityunjaya mantra


The Sanskrit word maha means ‘great’, mrityu means ‘death’ and
jaya means ‘victory’. Mantra is a word of great power that can give
protection against negative forces and, according to Swami
Satyananda, can even change one’s destiny. The Mahamrityunjaya
mantra consists of 34 akshara (literally ‘imperishable’) or eternal
sounds, and is as follows:
Om tryambakam yajaamahe
sugandhim pushthivardhanam;
Urvaarukamiva bandhanaan
Mrityormuksheeya maamritaat.
The literal meaning of the mantra is as follows: “We worship the
three-eyed one (Lord Shiva) who is fragrant (in a state of supreme
bliss), and who sustains all living beings. May he liberate us from
(the eternal cycle of birth and) death. May he lead us to immortality,
just as the cucumber is released from its bondage (the vine to which
it is attached).”

Benefits of chanting the Mahamrityunjaya mantra


The Mahamrityunjaya mantra is a potent combination of sounds
that, if repeated with faith, dedication and perseverance over a
period of time, leads, not only to victory over the fear of death, but
eventually to victory over death itself or moksha (liberation). It is
therefore known as a ‘moksha mantra’. It is stimulating and heating
(unlike the Gayatri mantra, which is soothing and cooling). It
bestows longevity, and is designed to cure illness. It wards off evil
or negative forces by creating a protective psychic shield around the
practitioner. It is said to destroy sorrow and poverty, and to fulfil all
of one’s desires. Anyone who wishes to remove obstacles in life and
overcome difficult situations or illness should repeat this mantra
regularly. If chanted a minimum of eleven times, last thing at night,
it will ensure a better sleep and more positive dreams.

Background to Mahamrityunjaya mantra


The Mahamrityunjaya mantra is from the Krishna Yajur Veda.
Mrityunjaya is another name for Lord Shiva, the great yogi who is
actually said to have existed and to have conquered death. Shiva is
also the prateek or symbol of consciousness, and has three aspects:
shanta roopa or ‘peaceful form’, Raudra roopa or ‘fierce form’, and
dhyaanastha roopa or ‘form engrossed in meditation’. The devata of
the Mahamrityunjaya mantra is Rudra or Raudra, who represents
Lord Shiva in his fierce and destructive aspect.
This mantra was revealed to the great Rishi Vashishtha (who is said
to have been born from a pitcher) while he was in a state of deep
meditation. It is to be found in Shree Rudra Prashnaha (Rudra’s
Question), from the fifth chapter of the Taittiriya Upanishad, which
belongs to the Yajur Veda. It is mentioned in many places in the
Rig, Yajur and Sama Vedas. The mantra itself is actually comprised
from mantras which are found in the three Vedas: The Rig Veda
(7th mandal, 59th chapter, 12th mantra), the Yajur Veda (3rd
chapter, 60th mantra), and the Atharva Veda (14th mandal, 1st
chapter, 17th mantra).
The Mahamrityunjaya mantra is also to be found in the ayurvedic
scriptures. In the Prakriti Khanda of the Brahma Vaivarta Purana, it
has been said that Lord Shri Krishna gave the knowledge of
Mrityunjaya to the wife of Sage Angira. In the Sati Khand of the
Shiva Purana, Shukracharya (guru of the demons) himself has called
it Mrita Sanjeevani Vidya (the knowledge which leads to eternal
life). Shukracharya expounded it to Sage Dadhichi.
How to chant the Mahamrityunjaya mantra
The mantra can be chanted alone, individually. It can also be
chanted in small groups sitting in a circle. However, it is most
powerful when chanted in large groups sitting in even, orderly rows.
It is most beneficial when performed on an empty, or at least half-
empty stomach. A mala (rosary) of 108 beads can be held in the
right hand, just level with the heart, in the centre of the chest (the
kshetram or trigger point for anahata chakra, the heart centre). It is
best to use your japa mala, but any other mala of your choice can
also be used. The mantra is chanted 108 times in a constant fixed
rhythm.
One person should lead the chanting by repeating the mantra once
(or even twice to set the speed and swara), then the others may join
in for the remaining 107 (or six) japas. In this way the group will be
able to chant together in chorus as one voice, and the effect and
build-up of energy will thus be greater. The person guiding the
chanting should make sure the speed is kept constant.
Pronunciation: The pronunciation should be correct for the mantra
to be really effective. Many people chant ‘bandhanaat’ instead of
‘bandhanaan’. This is not incorrect, but ‘bandhanaan’ is the more
perfect pronunciation.
Breath: The Mahamrityunjaya mantra is usually chanted in two
parts, with a breath in between for ease of chanting and beauty of
flow. This breath is taken at the end of the first line, after
‘pushthivardhanam’. Of course, there is nothing to prevent the
practitioner chanting it in one breath if he so wishes, but this will
not be possible for everyone. The mantra can also be divided into
four and used during the practice of simple nadi shodhana
pranayama (psychic network purification). The process is as
follows. Breathing in through the left nostril, repeat mentally, “Om
tryambakam yajaamahe”; breathing out through the left nostril
repeat mentally, “sugandhim pushthivardhanam”; breathing in
through the right nostril repeat mentally, “urvaarukamiva
bandhanaan”; breathing out through the left nostril repeat mentally
“mrityormuksheeya maamritaat”.
Speed and sound: When chanted dynamically, at a fast speed, the
Mahamrityunjaya mantra generates a very powerful energy, and is
at its most effective potency. One remains alert, stimulated and
energized. It can also be chanted slowly in a relaxed way, but the
energy tends to drop and drag if it is done too slowly. Also, people
tend to become too introverted and even sleep or lose interest. The
body also begins to complain because it has to sit for too long. A
medium speed is most comfortable for the majority of people, and
provides a nice balance (the middle path being the yogic way).
However, whichever speed you decide to adopt, remember that it
should be constant from beginning to end, creating a synchronized
and melodious sound, to uplift the mind and spirit.
All those taking part in the chanting should blend their voices
together, so the overall effect is like the gentle and soothing hum of
bees. No voice should predominate, except of course the voice of
the person who is guiding the chanting. Everyone should try to
remain aware throughout the chanting of the speed and the swara
(notes), and harmonize their chanting with the voices of those
around them. There is a tendency, as the chanting progresses, for
people to become introverted (or tired) and for the chanting to slow
down. Just one person in a large group, who has a loud or discordant
voice, can bring down the energy level of the whole group and
disturb the harmony. The leader is there to see that this does not
happen. So, a very important element in the chanting is awareness!
The secret is that one should be neither too introverted nor too
extroverted but poised somewhere in between on the threshold that
divides the two states.
Tune: The most common and simple way of chanting the
Mahamrityunjaya mantra is with just three notes. In Rikhia four
notes are used to add to the beauty of the sound. However, there are
many styles and beautiful ways of chanting, from classical vedic
chanting to the modern classical singer, Pandit Jasraj and others who
have set the mantra to ragas. Many tapes are readily available. You
can choose the one which suits you best, or even create your own!

Preparing to chant
Imagine that you are in the Himalayas, sitting alone beside the
crystal clear, dark blue Manasarovar lake. Before you, in the
distance, is the snow-capped peak of Mount Kailash, the presence of
which is overpowering. (Pause) Surrender to it and feel that you are
in the home of the gods, the abode of Lord Shiva. (Pause) There is
no sound, no vibration. All around you is the open blue sky, the vast
space of pure consciousness. You have nothing to do there but sit
down quiet and still, like one of the gods, peaceful within and
without, and close your eyes. (Pause) Become aware of the presence
of Lord Shiva (supreme consciousness) all around you and
penetrating you, as you sit in your chosen asana, ready to chant the
Mahamrityunjaya mantra. (Pause)
Your head and spine are upright and straight and your hands are
resting on the knees in chin or jnana mudra. You are watching the
breath coming and going in the nostrils as the mind becomes more
and more calm and steady and relaxed. (Pause) In your right hand
you are holding a mala with which to count the 108 Shiva mantras,
and your awareness is fixed at bhrumadhya (the eyebrow centre)
where it will remain throughout the chanting. (Pause) Before
commencing, you will chant the mantra Om, long and deeply, three
times. Then you will start chanting the Mahamrityunjaya mantra,
visualizing Lord Shiva (or your ishta devata/symbol) throughout, at
the eyebrow centre.

Ending the chanting


When you have finished chanting, sit for a few minutes in the
profound stillness and silence of the Himalayas, which lies within
your own self. (Pause) Now become aware of the protective psychic
energy field which you have created around yourself with the
chanting of the Mahamrityunjaya mantra. (Pause) Know that you
will carry that protection with you wherever you go until you chant
again next week. Think of anyone whom you would like to include
within this field, someone sick or in need of help. Project the energy
out to them. (Pause) Feel that Lord Shiva or the power of pure
consciousness is sitting in your heart, radiating his blessings and
energy out to you, and to them also. (Pause) Mentally, bow to him
and feel the power of his mantra pervading your entire being.
(Pause) May the Mahamrityunjaya mantra uplift your life and help
you (and others) overcome all the difficulties that may lay before
you.

Mahamrityunjaya Mantra
Mahamrityunjaya Mantra (maha-mrityun-jaya) is one of
the more potent of the ancient Sanskrit mantras. Maha
mrityunjaya is a call for enlightenment and is a practice of
purifying the karmas of the soul at a deep level. It is also
said to be quite beneficial for mental, emotional, and physical
health.

Om Tryambakam Yajamahe
Sugandhim Pushtivardhanam
Urvarukamiva Bandhanan
Mrityor Mukshiya Maamritat
We Meditate on the Three-eyed reality
Which permeates and nourishes all like a fragrance.
May we be liberated from death for the sake of immortality,
Even as the cucumber is severed from bondage to the
creeper.

AUM/OM: Absolute reality. That which encompasses the


three states of waking, dreaming, deep sleep, represented by
AUM, the three levels of gross, subtle, causal, the three
levels of conscious, unconscious, subconscious, and the three
universal processes of coming, being, and going. Absolute
silence beyond the three levels is the silence after AUM.
Tryambakam: Trya means three. Ambakam means eyes. It
means the three eyes of the Absolute, which are the
processes of creation, existence, and dissolution, as well as
the other triads, which are part of AUM. The three "eyes"
means experiencing these three stages and triads at one
time, from the higher, all pervasive vantage point of the
Absolute.

Yajamahe: We rejoice in meditation on all of this.


Sugandhim: Means fragrance. Like a spreading fragrance,
all of this permeates the whole of existence, while at the
same time being that existence
Pushtivardhanam: Means that which sustains and
nourishes all. Thus, the fragrance that permeates all is the
sustainer of all beings, while also the essence of all beings.

Urvarukamiva: Urva means big and powerful. Arukam


means disease, like the spiritual diseases of ignorance and
untruth, which are like the death of Wisdom or Truth.
Bandhanan: Means bound down, as in bound down to the
ignorance and untruth.

Mrityor: Means ignorance and untruth.


Mukshiya: Means liberation from the cycles of physical,
mental, and spiritual death.
Maamritat: Means please give me rejuvenating nectar, so
as to have this liberation, like the process of severing the
cucumber from the creeping vine.

------------------------------
40 day practice
The period of 40 days has been widely recognized as an
auspicious period both in the East and the West since ancient
times. A traditional way to do an extended mantra practice is
to choose a number of repetitions per day, and to do that for
40 days. The mind likes to have a beginning and end to a
practice, a sense of completion, such as comes with a 40 day
(or longer) practice.
1. Fixed time per practice session: Mind finds comfort
in knowing that it will do the practice of one round of
108 repetitions (or some other number of rounds), and
that each round will take a predictable amount of time
(18 minutes per round of 108 repetitions).

2. Same number of rounds: Mind also likes the


predictability of doing a certain number of rounds done
per day. Mind may resist at times, but once it gets
started in the practice, mind likes the habit.

3. Specific number of days: Mind also likes the plan of


knowing how many days or months a practice will take
to complete. This can be very beneficial in stabilizing a
noisy mind, which is a common complaint.

Listening to this online Mahamrityunjaya mantra recording of


108 repetitions (18 minutes) is equivalent to one round of a
mala. A mala is a set of counting beads with 108 beads. Only
100 are counted, with the other 8 considered an offering to
the divine, however you personally hold that. You might
choose to do 1, 2, 3, or 4 rounds of 108 mantras per day,
counting with a set of mala beads.

Or, you can use the Mahamrityunjaya Mantra CD instead of


the mala beads, as the CD has 4 tracks of 108 repetitions
each. You might choose to do 1, 2, 3, or 4 tracks of 108
mantras per day. You might also want to alternate between
doing some with the recording and some without, counting
instead with a set of mala beads.
It has been said that there is freedom in discipline; choosing
to do a regular practice frees the mind from wondering what
practice will be done that day. It is also important not to do
the mantra practice with rote repetition, but rather, with
feeling and awareness.

By running your own experiment for 40 days, you can decide


for yourself whether or not the practice is beneficial.
Extended practice
A noticeable level of mantra siddhi (power of the mantra) is
said to come with 125,000 repetitions of a mantra (Such an
extended practice is called a purascharna). This is equivalent
to 1250 rounds of a mala.

Listening to this online Mahamrityunjaya mantra recording of


108 repetitions (18 minutes) is equivalent to one round of a
mala (Or, you can also use the Mahamrityunjaya Mantra CD).
To complete the equivalent of 1250 rounds of a mala, or a
total of 125,000 repetitions of Mahamrityunjaya mantra, will
take this amount of time:

Rounds Time Total Appx.


per day per day days months
1 18 min 1250 42
2 36 min 625 21
3 54 min 417 14
Rounds Time Total Appx.
per day per day days months
1 18 min 1250 42
2 36 min 625 21
3 54 min 417 14
4 1 hr, 12 min 313 10 1/2
5 1 hr, 30 min 250 8 1/2
6 1 hr, 48 min 209 7
7 2 hr, 6 min 179 6
Such an extended practice with Maha Mrityunjaya mantra
can have a tremendous effect in stabilizing the mind in
preparation for advancing in meditation. Such a practice
simply must be done personally to understand the benefits.
It does take quite a commitment to do this practice every
day for such a long period, but it is well worth the effort.
In choosing the level of practice per day, it is important to
have stability from one day to the next, and to not skip any
days. It is best to choose the level that works for you
consistently, rather than changing the number from day to
day. For example, if two rounds per day is a good number
(34 minutes), then it's better to stay with that amount each
and every day, not to do none on one day, but four on the
next day.
Mrityunjaya Mantra- Victory
over Death
(also called- Mahamoksha Mantra, Great
Enlightenment)
Article contributed by Pandit Sanjay Rath
http://srath.com

OM TRYAMBAKAM
YAJAMAHE
SUGANDHIM
PUSHTHI
VARDHANAM
URVARUKAMIVA
BANDHANAT
MRYTYOR
MUKSHEEYA
MAMRITAT ||
 
Mrityunjaya (Bija) mantra
The Bija mantra is given by Kahola Rishi; The mantra is in
Gayatri channdah; The mantra devata (deity) is Sri
Mrityunjaya (form of Shiva). This mantra is to be used for
meditation and at all times for protection from all evils.

Introduction
There are many mantra for warding off evils like death and
other suffering given in the sacred literature of the Hindu's.
These mantra are of various types but the Mrityunjaya
meditation and at all times for protection from all evils.

Introduction
There are many mantra for warding off evils like death and
other suffering given in the sacred literature of the Hindu's.
These mantra are of various types but the Mrityunjaya
mantra has been extolled in sacred literature as being the
best. This mantra is addressed to Lord Shiva and is taught in
the Rig Veda (7 mandala 59 Chapter) as well as the Yajur
Veda (3-60) showing that it is a Sruti having been received
by Maharishi Vasistha, the Kula Guru of Bhagavan Sri
Ramachandra.
This Maha-mrityunjaya mantra is from the Rig-Veda (7th
Book or Mandala, 59 Chapter) and needs initiation for
attaining siddhi. Anybody can recite this mantra and attain
good health, release from bondage and other problems. This
is the greatest panacea for all evils and can be recited at any
time like any other Maha-mantra. 

Rishi-adi Nyasa
The preparatory rites should be learnt from any book on
Karma-kanda (pooja method). However we give the
simplest method of reciting this mantra to overcome the
greatest of evils. Nyasa is the method of protecting the self
by placing the parts of the mantra on five body parts. These
body parts are the crucial centers for the spiritual energy. 
• Rishi (Guru/teacher of the mantra) - siras (head). In
this case the Rishi is Maharishi Vasistha.

• Channdah (meter, which is technically very specific


for each mantra) - mukha (mouth). This vedic mantra
is in Anusthub channdah. This is a meter having four
pada (feet) of 8 phonemes each making the entire
Anusthub metre as composed of 32 (8 x 4 = 32)
syllables. It maybe noted that any change in the metre
shall cause a distortion in the channdah and the mantra
vibration shall be ruined.
• Channdah (meter, which is technically very specific
for each mantra) - mukha (mouth). This vedic mantra
is in Anusthub channdah. This is a meter having four
pada (feet) of 8 phonemes each making the entire
Anusthub metre as composed of 32 (8 x 4 = 32)
syllables. It maybe noted that any change in the metre
shall cause a distortion in the channdah and the mantra
vibration shall be ruined.

• Devata (the deity of the mantra) - hridaya (heart). In


this case the devata is Lord Shiva addressed as "Sri
Mrityunjaya Tryambakeswara devata", the
Jyotirlinga.

• Bija (the seed syllable that created the mantra and


contains the mantra within itself, like the seed that
creates the tree) - Liinga (sexual organ). There are
some opinion on this, but the most appropriate one is
given by Kahola Rishi as "haum".

• Shakti (the physical power of the mantra like the


mother) - pada (feet). It is the giver of gati or
direction. In this case the shakti is Devi Amriteswari,
addressed as 'hriim'.

Sukracharya's Penance & teaching


Jyotish teaching

The Mahamrityunjaya mantra was taught by Lord Shiva to


Sukracharya the preceptor of the demons after he succeeded
in the impossible test of hanging upside down from a tree
for twenty years (Vimsottari dasa period) with smoke
blowing into him from a fire lit beneath. Even Brihaspati
was shocked at the prospect of such a terrible penance and
calmly settled to observe Sukracharya accept the challenge
of Indra and succeed. 
Tapaswi Yoga definition: Since Sukracharya (Venus in
in the impossible test of hanging upside down from a tree
for twenty years (Vimsottari dasa period) with smoke
blowing into him from a fire lit beneath. Even Brihaspati
was shocked at the prospect of such a terrible penance and
calmly settled to observe Sukracharya accept the challenge
of Indra and succeed. 
Tapaswi Yoga definition: Since Sukracharya (Venus in
astrology)  passed the penance he was glorified as the
Tapaswi Raja (the king of the spiritual discipline and
penance). The definition of Tapaswi Yoga comes from this
penance as Saturn (punishment, hard toil), Ketu (smoke
blown into the nose and other forms of self inflicted torture)
and Venus (desire and its renunciation) must come together
to define the personal ability of the Tapaswi.
After the penance Lord Shiva taught the Mahamrityunjaya
mantra to Sukracharya, who under very compelling
circumstances had to teach this to the son of Brihaspati and
that is how the devas also got the mantra. This mantra was
given (sruti) to Vasistha Maharishi for the welfare of this
world. The mantra and explanation given by Sukracharya to
Rishi Dadhicha when the latter's body was cut and thrown
by Raja Kshuva is recorded in the Shiva Purana.
Sukracharya said "O! Dadhicha, I pray to Lord Shiva and
give you the upadesa (advise/wisdom/teaching) of the
highest Maha Mrityunjaya mantra." The mantra is in
Anusthub Channdah and accordingly, is divided into four
padas composed of eight syllables each. 
Sukracharya said "The first pada is and means - we
worship or sing the praise of Lord Trayambaka. Tryambaka
is the name of Lord Shiva as the father of the three worlds -
bhu, bhuva and svarga lokas. He is the father and lord of the
three mandala's - Surya, Soma and Agni mandala. He is
Maheswara, the lord of the three Guna's - Satva, Rajas and
Tamas. He is the Sadashiva, the teacher of the three tatvas -
Atma tatva, Vidya tatva and Shiva tatva. He is the father
(cause and source) of the three energies (agni) -
Aavahaniya, Garhapatya and Dakshinagni. He is the father
of all physical creation through the three murti bhuta -
Prithvi (solid), Jala (liquid) and Tejas or agni (energy). He
three mandala's - Surya, Soma and Agni mandala. He is
Maheswara, the lord of the three Guna's - Satva, Rajas and
Tamas. He is the Sadashiva, the teacher of the three tatvas -
Atma tatva, Vidya tatva and Shiva tatva. He is the father
(cause and source) of the three energies (agni) -
Aavahaniya, Garhapatya and Dakshinagni. He is the father
of all physical creation through the three murti bhuta -
Prithvi (solid), Jala (liquid) and Tejas or agni (energy). He
is the lord of the three heavens created by the dominance of
the three Gunas - Rajas (Brahma), Satva (Vishnu) and
Tamas (Shiva). Know Him to be the nirakara (formless)
Sadashiva as He is above this physical mode and is their
Maheswara. This is the first foot of the mantra (composed
of eight syllables)."
"The second pada of the mantra," continued Sukracharya,
"is . Sugandhim refers to the fragrance of the flower that
spreads in all directions, and in a similar way Shiva is
present in the entire creation, both animate and inanimate.
In all the bhutas (modes of existence), in the three Gunas
(nature of creation as being Satva, Rajas or Tamas), in the
ten indriyas (five gyana-indriyas or senses and five karma-
indriyas or organs of action), in all the devas (33 devas are
the source of all illumination and enlightenment) and the
ganas (hosts of demi-gods),  Shiva exists and pervades as
the illumine atma (soul) and is their essence.
Pustivardhanam is now being explained. That inward
dwelling spirit (atman), the Purusha Shiva is the real
sustainer of Prakriti (and not vice-versa as all people
perceive). Starting with the mahatatva (primordial state of
matter/energy) to the individual parts of creation, the entire
sustenance of the physically created beings (both animate
and inanimate) is done by the imperishable Purusha. You, I,
Brahma, Vishnu, the Munis and even Indra & devas are
maintained/sustained (by the atma and that is Him). Since
the Purusha (atma - Shiva) is the granter of sustenance to
prakriti (body/nature), he is 'Pusti-vardhana'."
Having explained the first two pada of the mantra,
Sukracharya continued to explain the remaining two pada.
He said " the next two pada (consisting of sixteen syllables)
maintained/sustained (by the atma and that is Him). Since
the Purusha (atma - Shiva) is the granter of sustenance to
prakriti (body/nature), he is 'Pusti-vardhana'."
Having explained the first two pada of the mantra,
Sukracharya continued to explain the remaining two pada.
He said " the next two pada (consisting of sixteen syllables)
is meaning - Prabhu! just as the ripe cucumber is severed
from the bondage of the creeper, in the same manner may
we be delivered from death for the sake of immortality
(moksha). Rudra deva is like amrita (nectar of immortality).
Those who worship Him with good karma, penance and
repentance, meditation, contemplation, prayer or praise, will
surely renewed life and vigor. The strength of truth force (in
this mantra) is such that Lord Shiva shall definitely free the
worshipper from the bondage of death because Shiva alone
is the giver of bondage and moksha. 
This is the Mritasanjivani mantra and has the power to give
back life and rescue from death and great evils. You should
adore Lord Shiva and recite this mantra. Water sanctified
with this mantra should be drunk all the time. [Authors
note: It is well known that the rudraksha bead is placed in a
glass of water after being held in the palm during the
recitation of the mantra. this water is drunk during the day.]
Oblations in the sacrificial fire with this mantra is very
purifying. Now I shall teach the dhyana for the mantra."
Saying so, Sukracharya started reciting the shlokas for
meditating on Lord Shiva.
 
 
 
 
Understanding the Maha Mrityunjaya Mantra
• It is important to understand the meaning of the words
as this makes the repetition meaningful and brings
forth the results.

• OM is not spelt out in the Rig-Veda, but has to be


 
Understanding the Maha Mrityunjaya Mantra
• It is important to understand the meaning of the words
as this makes the repetition meaningful and brings
forth the results.

• OM is not spelt out in the Rig-Veda, but has to be


added to the beginning of all Mantras as given in an
earlier Mantra of the Rig-Veda addressed to Ganapati.
This Mantra is given in the prayer page of my Book
"Maharishi Jaimini's Upadesa Sutra".
• TRYAMBAKKAM refers to the Three eyes of Lord
Shiva. 'Trya' means 'Three' and 'Ambakam' means
eyes. These three eyes or sources of enlightenment are
the Trimurti or three primary deities, namely Brahma,
Vishnu and Shiva and the three 'AMBA' (also meaning
Mother or Shakti' are Saraswati, Lakshmi and Gouri.
Thus in this word, we are referring to God as
Omniscient (Brahma), Omnipresent (Vishnu) and
Omnipotent (Shiva). This is the wisdom of Brihaspati
and is referred to as Sri Duttatreya having three heads
of Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva.

• YAJAMAHE means, "We sing Thy praise".

• SUGANDHIM refers to His fragrance (of knowledge,


presence and strength i.e. three aspects) as being the
best and always spreading around. Fragrance refers to
the joy that we get on knowing, seeing or feeling His
virtuous deeds.
• PUSTIVARDHANAM: Pooshan refers to Him as the
sustainer of this world and in this manner, He is the
Father (Pater) of all. Pooshan is also the inner impeller
of all knowledge and is thus Savitur or the Sun and
also symbolizes Brahma the Omniscient Creator. In
this manner He is also the Father (Genitor) of all.
• URVAAROKAMEVA: 'URVA' means "VISHAL" or
big and powerful or deadly. 'AAROOKAM' means
sustainer of this world and in this manner, He is the
Father (Pater) of all. Pooshan is also the inner impeller
of all knowledge and is thus Savitur or the Sun and
also symbolizes Brahma the Omniscient Creator. In
this manner He is also the Father (Genitor) of all.
• URVAAROKAMEVA: 'URVA' means "VISHAL" or
big and powerful or deadly. 'AAROOKAM' means
'Disease'. Thus URVAROOKA means deadly and
overpowering diseases. (The CUCUMBER
interpretation given in various places is also correct for
the word URVAROOKAM). The diseases are also of
three kinds caused by the influence (in the negative) of
the three Guna's and are ignorance (Avidya etc),
falsehood (Asat etc as even though Vishnu is
everywhere, we fail to perceive Him and are guided by
our sight and other senses) and weaknesses (Shadripu
etc. a constraint of this physical body and Shiva is all
powerful).
• BANDANAAN means bound down. Thus read with
URVAROOKAMEVA, it means 'I am bound down by
deadly and overpowering diseases'.
• MRITYORMOOKSHEYA means to deliver us from
death (both premature death in this Physical world and
from the neverending cycle of deaths due to re-birth)
for the sake of Mokshya (Nirvana or final
emancipation from re-birth).
• MAAMRITAAT means 'please give me some
Amritam (life rejuvinating nectar). Read with the
previous word, it means that we are praying for some
'Amrit' to get out of the death inflicting diseases as
well as the cycle of re-birth.