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Accedian Networks

4878 Levy street, suite 202


Saint-Laurent, QC, Canada, H4R 2P1
Tel: 514-331-6181
1-866-685-8181

Accedian Customer
Evaluation Guide
Revision 10 (2007/11/19)
Accedian Customer Evaluation Guide
Revision 10 (2007/11/12)

Table of contents

1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................... 1
2. ABOUT ACCEDIAN NETWORKS ......................................................................... 1
3. ACCEDIAN PRODUCTS ..................................................................................... 1
4. ETHERNID™ FEATURES .................................................................................... 2
4.1. MANAGEABILITY ............................................................................................. 3
4.2. MEDIA MANAGEMENT ....................................................................................... 3
4.3. VLAN SUPPORT ............................................................................................. 3
4.4. LOOPBACK CAPABILITIES USED TO TEST CARRIER CIRCUITS ........................................... 3
4.5. PERFORMANCE ASSURANCE AGENT™ AND ETHERNET SLA MONITORING ............................ 3
4.6. NON-INTRUSIVE MONITORING ............................................................................ 5
4.7. ADDED RELIABILITY TO ETHERNET ........................................................................ 5
4.8. OAM CAPABILITIES ......................................................................................... 5
4.9. SNMP ........................................................................................................ 6
4.10. BANDWIDTH POLICING ..................................................................................... 6
4.11. RFC-2544 .................................................................................................. 6
5. USE CASES ....................................................................................................... 7
5.1. MANAGEABILITY ............................................................................................. 7
5.1.1. Connecting to the Integrated Secure Web GUI User Interface ..................... 7
5.1.2. Connecting to the CLI using the Management Interface with SSH .............. 10
5.1.3. Connecting to the CLI using the serial port ............................................. 11
5.1.4. Navigating the CLI.............................................................................. 12
5.1.5. Add/Modify/Delete Users ..................................................................... 15
5.1.6. Accessing the Web GUI remotely .......................................................... 16
5.1.7. Setting up a Management VLAN ........................................................... 17
5.2. MEDIA MANAGEMENT ..................................................................................... 22
5.2.1. Port Configuration and Media selection on the EtherNID™ GE ................... 22
5.2.2. Connecting the Network and Client port, verifying auto-negotiation features
and advertised link information ......................................................................... 26
5.2.3. Connecting SFPs, verifying digital diagnostics features and LLR ................. 28
5.2.4. Enabling Fault Propagation .................................................................. 29
5.3. VLAN SUPPORT ........................................................................................... 31
5.3.1. Tagging Forwarded traffic, testing P-bits preservation feature (.1Q in .1Q) . 31
5.4. LOOPBACK CAPABILITIES USED TO TEST CARRIER CIRCUITS ......................................... 33
5.4.1. Adding an Interface IP address on the Client Port.................................... 33
5.4.2. Running a loopback test suite using the JDSU/Acterna™ FST-2802 TestPad’s
in-band commands .......................................................................................... 34
5.4.3. Configuring a Manual Loopback ............................................................ 39
5.5. PERFORMANCE ASSURANCE AGENT™ AND ETHERNET SLA MONITORING .......................... 42
5.5.1. Using the Performance Assurance Agent™ (PAA™) .................................. 42
5.5.2. Performance Assurance Agent™ (PAA™) using the Web GUI ..................... 50
5.6. NON-INTRUSIVE MONITORING .......................................................................... 54
5.6.1. Monitoring pass-through traffic using the monitor ports ........................... 54
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5.7. ADDED RELIABILITY TO ETHERNET ...................................................................... 56


5.7.1. Power Over Ethernet (PoE) and 5V DC................................................... 56
5.7.2. Twelve unit rack mount with 48V A and 48 V B ....................................... 57
5.7.3. Failover Bypass .................................................................................. 58
5.8. OAM CAPABILITIES ....................................................................................... 59
5.8.1. Configure OAM ................................................................................... 59
5.9. SNMP ...................................................................................................... 62
5.9.1. Enabling SNMP and Retrieving Data (Stats per Flow and PAA™ results) ...... 62
5.9.2. Integrating the EtherNID™ into SNMPc™ for monitoring........................... 63
5.10. BANDWIDTH POLICING ................................................................................... 69
5.10.1. Configuring Bandwidth Policing ......................................................... 69
5.11. RFC-2544 ................................................................................................ 75
5.11.1. RFC-2544 Testsuite ......................................................................... 75
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1. Introduction
This document is aimed at guiding the evaluator of the Accedian Ethernet Demarcation
Devices. We present a summary of all the features of the EtherNID™ followed by simple
scenarios that can be set up in a lab environment in order to test these features.

2. About Accedian Networks


Accedian Networks offers Carrier-Grade solutions for Ethernet Service Assurance and OAM
including Ethernet Demarcation Devices using a unique, innovative, yet standards-based
approach.

Accedian's Ethernet Service Assurance Platform (E-SAP) allows Ethernet Service Providers
to differentiate their offering, and to adapt Ethernet to their stringent operational
requirements, making it predictable, maintainable, and reliable.

3. Accedian Products
Accedian Networks is specialized in the manufacturing of Ethernet Demarcation Devices
(EDD), also called Network Interface Devices (NID). Accedian’s EtherNID™ EDDs are usually
installed at the Customer Premises to extend the management capabilities of the Carrier up
to the customer’s closet. The Carrier can then precisely monitor the Ethernet service
delivery (SLAs), test the circuits locally or on an end-to-end basis, and apply advanced
traffic filtering, looping and tapping functions.

The EtherNID™ can also be installed in a shelf for POP or co-location CO environments to
provide intermediate points of testing, monitoring and management for a series of Ethernet
services.

Accedian Networks innovates by minimizing delay and jitter. The architecture of the
EtherNID™ is based on a proprietary FastThru™ architecture that assures ultra-low latency
and jitter through the unit, which in turn assures ZERO packet loss in all conditions. This
unique approach is based on a hardware-based packet processing function instead of on a
network processor based “Store-and-Forward” type of processing.

This architecture provides flexibility to implement most of the features targeted by the
Ethernet OAM standards that were newly released or that are still in development. These
standards cover Link, Connectivity and Service level awareness and OAM.

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Available in several models, Accedian's EtherNID™ product line covers all of today's needs,
10/100 Mbps or GigE, copper or fiber:

Network-side Client-side
EtherNID™ EE 10/100BaseTX 10/100BaseTX
(Electrical to RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto
Electrical) MDIX) connector MDIX) connector
10/100BaseTX
EtherNID™ OE 100BaseFX/LX/SX/ZX/BX
RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto
(Optical to Electrical) SFP module connector
MDIX) connector
EtherNID™ GE
10/100/1000BaseTX/FX/LX/SX 10/100/1000BaseTX/FX/LX/SX
(Tri-rate ports with
SFP module or RJ-45 (Auto- SFP module or RJ-45 (Auto-
different possibilities
negotiation/Auto MDIX) negotiation/Auto MDIX)
of media
connector connector
combinations)
10/100BaseTX
100BaseFX/LX/SX/ZX/BX
EtherNID™ DE+ OE SFP module connector RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto
Dual NID OE MDIX) connector
(Dual Optical to 10/100BaseTX
Electrical) 100BaseFX/LX/SX/ZX/BX
RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto
SFP module connector
MDIX) connector
10/100BaseTX
EtherNID™ VEE RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto
10/100BaseTX MDIX) connector
VLAN Aggregator
RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto
(Electrical to 10/100BaseTX
MDIX) connector
Electrical) RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto
MDIX) connector
10/100BaseTX
RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto
EtherNID™ VOE MDIX) connector
100BaseFX/LX/SX/ZX/BX
VLAN Aggregator
SFP module connector 10/100BaseTX
(Optical to Electrical)
RJ-45 (Auto-negotiation/Auto
MDIX) connector

4. EtherNID™ Features
The EtherNID™ has many great features that enhance the existing network and that enable
End-to-End OAM. We will address each feature and explain how it applies in the network.

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4.1. Manageability
The EtherNID™ comes with an integrated Secure Web Driven user interface used for its
configuration. The Management port interface can be used for both the Web GUI and the
Command-Line Interface (CLI). It also has a serial port interface to be used exclusively
with the integrated CLI. Remote in-band management via the Web GUI, CLI and SNMP is
available through the Network or Client ports and can be optionally tunnelled through a
management VLAN. Configuration of the EtherNID™ can be manually entered or via CLI
scripts using batch mode configurations. Multiple user accounts can be created and
modified thus enabling user based sessions.

4.2. Media Management


Several types of EtherNID™ were developed in order to address different needs within the
network. In addition to all the other functionalities, the EtherNID™ can play the role of an
intelligent media converter. An overview of every EtherNID™ is done in section 3:
Accedian Products.

The ports are equipped with features such as auto MDIX (electrical only), Auto-Negotiation,
Manageable Link Speed Advertisement, and Fault Propagation. In addition, the optical ports
are equipped with features such as Link Loss Return (LLR), Versatile SFP modules, Dual
Fiber or Single-Bidi fiber, Diagnostics supporting light levels (SFF-8472).

4.3. VLAN Support


VLAN tagging/detagging can be used to isolate different subscribers. The Carrier has the
option to configure a table of VLANs to block or pass-through traffic and control the quantity
of VLANs that the end-customer can use. Another added benefit is the Stats per Flow,
making it possible to bill the customer on a per-VLAN basis.

The EtherNID™ supports .1Q in .1Q, which means that traffic, can be coming in tagged and
be re-tagged for further isolation if required. Additionally, oversized packets (Jumbo
Frames) of up to 10,240 bytes are supported.

4.4. Loopback Capabilities used to test Carrier Circuits


Loopbacks are used by Carriers to pre-test the network’s traffic flow. The EtherNID™
supports Loopbacks based on filters (VLAN, IP, MAC, etc.). It can be set in-band using
industry-popular Ethernet Test Sets or manually using the EtherNID™’s loopback
configuration web page or CLI remotely or locally. The loopback can be configured to
automatically timeout.

4.5. Performance Assurance Agent™ and Ethernet SLA


Monitoring
The in-service Performance Assurance Agent (PAA™) is an innovative technology that allows
constantly monitoring key performance health parameters (Latency, Jitter, One-Way Jitter,

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One Way Packet loss, End-to-end continuity) such as those defined in Service Level
Agreements (SLAs). High precision measurements (1 microsecond accuracy) are taken live
from the network, while the customer traffic is running seamlessly. In fact, measurements
can be taken per flow, per VLAN and per CoS (using p-bit) basis, thus assuring End-to-End
performance across Multi-Vendor/Multi-Carrier/Layer2/Layer3 networks.

Figure 1 : Point to Multi-Point Performance Monitoring

Up to 100 SLA-Meter™ flows can be achieved simultaneously, in a point-to-point, point-to-


multipoint or multipoint-to-multipoint fashion thus guaranteeing a great versatility in
supporting various network topologies and scenarios, from the private business line to a
hub-and-spoke topology or a mesh network.

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Figure 2 : Multi-SLA Metering

4.6. Non-Intrusive Monitoring


Dual Monitor ports are integrated into the EtherNID™ to be used for non-intrusive trouble-
shooting of the network. They provide individual access to eastbound and westbound
directions as well as combined access to both directions using Intelligent Port Mirroring. It
is possible to apply filters in order to selectively monitor parts of traffic (per VLAN, per MAC,
per IP) as well. BPDU (Spanning Tree) packets can be discarded using the EtherNID™’s
filtering functionalities.

4.7. Added Reliability to Ethernet


The EtherNID™ is powered in several redundant ways, making it versatile and reliable. It
can be powered over Ethernet (PoE) using any 802.3af-compliant power injector. The
EtherNID™ can also be powered with a 5V DC power adaptor, and by using standard 48V
A/B feeds.

The EtherNID™ is able to detect the power source thus allowing the NID to display which
source is actively being used. The EtherNID™ acts as a pass-through when there is a power
failure, the transparent Failover bypass function will take over and dying gasp messages will
be sent. Therefore, it will not add a single point of failure to the network. Alarms can be
configured with different priority levels. These alarms can be retrieved and displayed with
diagnostic LEDs, via SNMP and 802.3ah (OAM). A Remote Syslog is also available, making
it easy to keep track of the activities performed by the EtherNID™.

4.8. OAM Capabilities


The Ethernet OAM standard IEEE 802.3ah is supported. With the help of the EtherNID™, it
is possible to extend Management visibility for OAM all the way to the customer’s premises.

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4.9. SNMP
The EtherNID™ has built-in public and private MIBs. Simply enable the SNMP Agent for use
with popular Network Management Tools.

4.10. Bandwidth Policing


Bandwidth Policing aligned on MEF standards is also available on the EtherNID™.
Bandwidth Policing can be achieved on a per flow, per VLAN and per CoS (using p-bit) basis
and support color marking along the standard Committed Information Rate (CIR),
Committed Bust Size (CBS), Excess Information Rate (EIR) and Excess Burst Size (EBS)
parameters. Bandwidth granularity is highly precise with increments of 0,0625 Mbps up to
25 Mbps depending on the media speed and bandwidth rate.

4.11. RFC-2544
Accedian Networks allows Ethernet Service Providers to validate the maximum throughput
of a circuit while the end-user traffic remains completely unaffected with its Seamless
Throughput Measurement technology.

The standard RFC-2544 method is widely used as a turn-up solution in order to test a
circuit’s throughput prior to enabling customer traffic, but when customers report
bandwidth-related problems, or when new equipment is installed in the network, the circuit
must be brought down in order to run these tests.

As part of its End-to-end live Ethernet SLA verification, Accedian’s breakthrough technology
allows operators to remotely run In-Service RFC-2544 validation non-intrusively, while end-
user traffic continues flowing seamlessly.

Completely non-service affecting and based on the RFC-2544 standard, the EtherNID™
utilises the end-user traffic as part of the test pattern in order to exercise End-to-end
CIR/EIR/CBS/EBS parameters of an EVC while the end-user applications continue flowing
through in a seamless fashion. Accedian’s Ethernet Demarcation Devices will generate a
variable flow of test traffic in addition to the user traffic, in order to create a continuous
throughput of data at a given rate (for example, at CIR or at wirespeed).

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The new patent-pending technology allows carriers to ensure the end-user is getting the
bandwidth paid for without having to bring down the service, and thus generating
considerable savings in OPEX by avoiding the use of costly maintenance windows (nights
and weekends).

Accedian’s EtherNID™ also features a full suite of RFC-2544 Scripts and Testsuites, as
defined by the RFC-2544, which are intended to be used as out-of-service diagnostic tools:

• Throughput test: searches for the maximum rate for which there is no frame loss for
a variety of frame sizes;
• Delay test: measures the delay and jitter (delay variation) at a given rate and for a
given duration and variety of frame sizes;
• Frame loss test: verifies the highest rate for which there is not a single frame lost for
a duration of time;
• Back-to-back test: verifies the burst capability of a circuit while performing full
wirespeed rate tests for a duration of time.

5. Use Cases
5.1. Manageability

5.1.1. Connecting to the Integrated Secure Web GUI User Interface


This section describes how to connect an EtherNID™ onto the network and to use the Web
interface to manage it.

Procedure

1. Power on the EtherNID™ by introducing a power source (3 connectors: PoE, 5V/2A


DC, 48V DC A/B)

2. Modify the PC's (used to manage EtherNID™) network interface card’s TCP/IP
settings to a static IP within this range 192.168.1.x, 255.255.255.0 without a default
gateway)

3. Plug in an Ethernet cable from the PC to the labelled Management port on the
EtherNID™.

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4. Verify connectivity using a DOS command prompt to perform a ping to the factory
default IP address of the EtherNID 192.168.1.254. Should receive 3 to 4 successful
reply packets.

5. Open a Internet Explorer or Firefox browser window and type https://192.168.1.254/


and hit enter

6. Login to the WEB interface by entering Login admin and Password admin

7. Go to Session > Management, make note of the Session ID with the asterisk (*)
beside the Username. This will be needed to kill the older writelocked session after
the EtherNID™ IP address is modified to a unique IP address

8. Go to System > Interface, click on the Management Interface name. Change the IP
address to a unique address, then click modify

Note: This will avoid duplicate IP addresses with other existing factory default
EtherNID™ s in the same network. The EtherNID™ will not detect duplicate IP
addresses.

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Note: The web browser will continue to attempt to open the page
https://192.168.1.254/goform/sys_intf. Stop the browser from attempting to open the
page by clicking on the browser’s stop button.

9. Type in the new EtherNID™ IP address on the web browser (ie:


https://192.168.1.XXX) and log back in to the WEB interface

10. Go to Session > Management, click on the writelock button then check the
Terminate box corresponding to the session ID noted above. Click Terminate.

At this point, you are ready to connect the EtherNID™ onto the network.

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5.1.2. Connecting to the CLI using the Management Interface with


SSH

Procedure

1. Power on the EtherNID™ by introducing a power source (3 connectors: PoE, 5V/2A


DC, 48V DC A or B)

2. Connect an RJ-45 cable to the Management port of the EtherNID™.

3. Use an application that can use SSH (ex. PUTTY)

4. Simply type the default management interface IP address of the EtherNID™ on port
22 and connect.

5. When the prompt of the CLI is seen, type admin as user and admin as password.

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6. Type the <help> mark. All possible commands are displayed.

7. As an example, type <alarm> followed by the ‘tab’ button twice. All sub-commands
for the <alarm> are displayed. The ‘tab’ button can always be used to find out what
are the sub-commands.

8. Type <alarm show configuration> and press enter. All configured alarms are
displayed

5.1.3. Connecting to the CLI using the serial port

Procedure

1. Power on the EtherNID™ (with Factory Default Settings)

2. Connect a PC to the serial port on the back of the EtherNID™ using an RS-232 cable.

3. Open a Hyperterminal session with the following configuration:


Select the correct communication port (ex: COM1)
Bits per second: 115200
Data bits: 8
Parity: None

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Stop bits: 1
Flow Control: None
Connect. Press ‘enter’.

Login as – <admin> and Password – <admin>

5.1.4. Navigating the CLI

Procedure

1. Login to the CLI with <admin> and Password <admin>.

2. Type <help> followed by enter. The available help commands are all listed.

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3. Type <help interface>. All the sub-commands for the interface command are listed.

4. Type <help interface add> followed by enter. A more detailed explanation is given.

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5. In order to check the validity of a command or the obtain correct spelling, the ‘tab’
button can be used at all times. Type <media> followed by the ‘tab’ button. The
command will be auto-completed to <media-selection>. Press ‘tab’ a second time.
The available sub-commands are displayed.

6. Press enter after <media-selection>. Since the command <media-selection> is


incomplete, the CLI will list all the detailed sub-commands.

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Note: Incomplete commands are not valid in the CLI. The ‘tab’ button allows
easy completion of the commands.

7. Here is an example of a complete command. Type <port show configuration


Network>. The following is displayed.

5.1.5. Add/Modify/Delete Users

Procedure

1. Login to the EtherNID™

2. Go to System > Authentication.

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3. Click on <add>.

4. Type in the user information and click <modify>.

5. Go to Session > Logout. Click on <Logout>. You have now logged out of the
current session.

6. Login back onto the EtherNID™ using the newly created user account. Login should
be successful.

7. Go to Session > Logout once more to log out.

8. Login using admin/admin.

9. Go to System > Authentication. From the list of users, click on the newly created
user. Click on <delete>. User has now been deleted.

10. Logout once more. Attempt to login using the deleted user. Login should not be
successful and the following message is displayed:

5.1.6. Accessing the Web GUI remotely

Procedure

1. Go to System > Interface where the port interfaces are listed. New Interfaces can
be added here. Existing interfaces can be modified. By default, the Management
interface is listed with a static IP address of 192.168.1.254/255.255.255.0 assigned
to it. The second interface to be listed by default is the Network interface with no IP
address assigned to it (unless a DHCP server is active in which case an address is
automatically assigned).

2. Drill down by clicking on Network. You now have the option to change the interface
name, assign a different port to it and select the interface type (standard, VLAN or
Bridge). You can also choose to assign an Automatic IP (DHCP) or a Manual
Configuration with static IP address to the interface.

3. Select <Manual Configuration>. Assign a static IP address to the interface. Choose


an IP address range that is different from that of the Management interface. Click on
<modify> to save the settings.

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4. You can use this EtherNID™ interface as a default gateway by selecting the <Used as
default gateway> checkbox. We will not do so in this example.

5. Go back to System > Interface (you may do so by simply clicking on <Interface>


tab). The IP address for the Network interface is now seen on the main page.

Note: At this point, you can use the interfaces for several purposes. The Network port
could be used as a remote management interface. An OAM loopback could be created
on the Client interface. For an EtherNID™ GE, it is also possible to change the media of
the new interfaces without affecting the IP address modifications.

6. In order to access the EtherNID™ from anywhere in the network, the TCP/IP settings
of the PC used for management need to be modified. Simply, assign an IP address
that is within the same range of the configured Network port.

Configure TCP/IP Settings with alias


192.168.2.11/255.255.255.0

Remotely Manage

Configure Network Port Interface


192.168.2.22/255.255.255.0

Network Cloud

7. It is possible to set DHCP and the IP address would then be assigned automatically.

5.1.7. Setting up a Management VLAN

This section describes how to configure a management VLAN interface on the EtherNID™.
An example setup will also be described.

Procedure

1. Connect a PC to the EtherNID™ Management port.

2. Type the IP address of the EtherNID™ Management port interface in a Web browser
(Internet Explorer or Firefox). The default factory setting IP address is
192.168.1.254.

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3. Login using <admin> and Password <admin>

4. Go to System > Interface where the port interfaces are listed. New Interfaces can
be added here. Existing interfaces can be modified. By default, the Management
interface is listed with a static IP address of 192.168.1.254/255.255.255.0 assigned
to it. The second interface to be listed by default is the Network interface with no IP
address assigned to it.

5. Drill down by clicking on Network. You now have the option to change the interface
name, assign a different port to it and select the interface type (standard, VLAN or
Bridge). You can also choose to assign an Automatic IP (DHCP) or a Manual
Configuration with a static IP address to the interface.

6. Select ‘VLAN’ from the ‘Interface Type’ drop-down menu and type ‘101’ in the ‘VLAN
ID’ box.

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7. Select <Manual Configuration>. Assign a static IP address to the interface. Choose


an IP address range that is different from that of the Management interface. Click on
<modify> to save the settings.

8. You can use this EtherNID™ interface as a default gateway by selecting the <Used as
default gateway> checkbox. We will not do so in this example.

9. Go back to System > Interface (you may do so by simply clicking on the


<Interface> tab). The IP address for the Network interface is now seen on the
main page.

10. The Management VLAN 101 Interface has now been created. In order to access the
EtherNID™ securely via this newly created interface on the Network port, simply
connect any PC to an access port on a switch that will tag the traffic with the VLAN
ID 101. Thus allowing remote access via the Management VLAN.

11. It is important to block the customer traffic going into the Management VLAN. Filters
can be used to perform this task.

12. Go to Traffic > L2 Filters. Assuming that the customer VLAN is 201. Click on
<add>. Select the ‘VLAN 1 ID’ checkbox and type 201 in the box. Click on
<modify>. A filter for the customer VLAN has now been created.

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13. Go back to Traffic > L2 Filter. Click on the existing filter called ‘catch-all’. This
filter comes pre-configured with the EtherNID™. Make sure it is as depicted as in the
following screen-shots:

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14. Go to Traffic > Policies. Select the ‘catch-all’ entry from the list under ‘Traffic-A
access policies on port Client’. And drill-down on it.

15. Select the ‘Policy enable’ checkbox. Choose ‘L2 Filter’ from the drop-down menu
‘Filter type’. Choose ‘catch-all’ from the drop-down menu ‘L2 Filter’. Under ‘Actions’,
select ‘drop’. The Monitoring option can be enabled if required. As explained
earlier, all traffic will be dropped except the traffic on the customer VLAN after
configuration of the second filter.

16. Repeat this task for ‘Traffic-B access policies on port Network’, taking into account
both traffic directions.

Note: This will not prevent the Management VLAN traffic from communicating with the
EtherNID™.

17. Go back to Traffic > Policies. Select any entry and drill-down on it under ‘Traffic-
A access policies on port Client’. Select the ‘Policy enable’ checkbox. Choose ‘L2
filter’ from the ‘Filter Type’ drop-down menu. Choose the newly created customer
VLAN 201 traffic filter ‘customer_traffic’ from the ‘L2 filter’ drop-down menu. For
‘Actions’ choose ‘Permit traffic’. Click on ‘apply’.

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18. The setup is now complete. The following depicts an example scenario:

5.2. Media Management

5.2.1. Port Configuration and Media selection on the EtherNID™ GE


This section describes how to configure various interfaces on the EtherNID™ ports.

Procedure

1. Connect a PC to the EtherNID™ Management port.

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2. Type the IP address of the EtherNID™ Management port interface in a Web browser
(Internet Explorer or Firefox). The default factory setting IP address is
192.168.1.254.

3. Login using <admin> and Password <admin>

4. Go to Port > Configuration. Verify the current port assignments. For the
EtherNID™ GE, depending on the media selection the port assignments will change.
The three possible combinations are as follows:

-SFP-A (Client by default) with SFP-B (Network by Default)


-SFP-A (Client by default) with RJ45-B (Network by default)
-RJ45-A (Client by default) with RJ45-B (Network by default)

Using the drop down menu <Media-selection>, the port assignment can be changed.
When the change is made, the media is assigned a port name by default. If needed,
this port name assignment can be modified afterwards.

For this example, we will have the two copper ports as Client and Network (RJ45-A with
RJ45-B).

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5. Go to System > Interface where the port interfaces are listed. New Interfaces can
be added here. Existing interfaces can be modified. By default, the Management
interface is listed with a static IP address of 192.168.1.254/255.255.255.0 assigned
to it. The second interface to be listed by default is the Network interface with no IP
address assigned to it.

6. The following screen capture depicts an EtherNID™ that has been configured with
different IP addresses and displays the route information.

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7. Drill down by clicking on Network. You now have the option to change the interface
name, assign a different port to it and select the interface type (standard, VLAN or
Bridge). You can also choose to assign an Automatic IP (DHCP) or a Manual
Configuration with a static IP address to the interface.

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8. Select <Manual Configuration>. Assign a static IP address to the interface. Choose


an IP address range that is different from that of the Management interface. Click on
<modify> to save the settings.

9. You can use this EtherNID™ interface as a default gateway by selecting the <Used as
default gateway> checkbox. We will not do so in this example.

10. Go back to System > Interface (you may do so by simply clicking on <Interface>
tab). The IP address for the Network interface is now seen on the main page.

11. Click on <add>. The <new interface setting> page is seen. From the drop down
menu <On port>, select the Client port. Select <Manual Configuration> and add the
IP address 192.168.4.44 with a network mask of 255.255.255.0. Click on <Modify>.
This new interface on the Client port can be used as a remote management interface
or a loopback interface.

12. Go back to the System > Interface. You will see the newly created interface on
the Client port with the new IP address.

At this point, you can use the interfaces for several purposes. An OAM loopback could
be created on the Client interface. The Network port could be used as a management
interface. It can also be used for the PAA (Performance Assurance Agent™, see
Application Note AN104). For an EtherNID™ GE, it is also possible to change the media
of the new interfaces without affecting the IP address modifications.

5.2.2. Connecting the Network and Client port, verifying auto-


negotiation features and advertised link information

Procedure

1. Connect a PC to the EtherNID™ Management port and login to the Web GUI.

2. Connect an RJ-45 cable onto the Network port coming from a network device
(switch, router) or from a secondary EtherNID™.

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3. Go to Port > Configuration. Drill down on the Network port. Verify that the ‘Auto-
Negotiation enable’ checkbox is selected.

4. Go to Port > PHY. Drill down on the Network port. You will notice that under the
‘Link Partner Ability’ section, the information of the other device’s link speeds are
displayed.

5. Go back to Port > Configuration. Drill down on the Network port. Unselect the
‘Auto-Negotiation enable’ checkbox and select 100Mbps. Click on <modify>.

6. Login to the network device the EtherNID™‘s Network port is connected to. Verify
that the rate is limited to 10Mbps on that port.

Note: You might notice that if the device has auto-negotiation enabled, the port might
be set to half duplex as a default setting. This case is true for a Cisco switch for
example.

7. Go to Port > PHY. Drill down on the Network port. You will notice that there are no
checked values for the ‘Link partner ability’ since Auto-Negotiation was disabled.

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8. It is also possible to modify the values of the advertised link speed information. In
this case, during auto-negotiation, that speed will be taken.

5.2.3. Connecting SFPs, verifying digital diagnostics features and


LLR

Procedure

1. Connect a PC to the EtherNID™ Management port and login to the WEB GUI.

2. Connect SFP connectors into the slots for the optical links.

3. Connect a multimode cable onto the SFP.

4. Connect that multimode cable onto the SFP of the second EtherNID™.

5. Go to Port > Configuration of the first EtherNID™. Drill down on SFP-A (the one
with the multimode cable connected to it).

6. Select the ‘LLR enable’ checkbox. Click on <modify>.

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7. Pull the cable from the ‘SFP-A IN’ slot of the second EtherNID™. You will notice that
the optical links will go down for both EtherNID™s.

5.2.4. Enabling Fault Propagation

Procedure

1. Connect a PC to the EtherNID™ Management port and login to the WEB GUI.

2. Connect an RJ-45 cable onto the Client and Network ports.

3. Go to Port > Configuration. Scroll down and select the ‘Enable fault propagation’
checkbox on the Network port. Click on <modify>.

4. Remove the cable from the Client port.

5. Go to Port > Configuration. You will notice a yellow LED besides the Network port
indicating that the link is down and that the fault was propagated from the Client
port.

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6. Connect the cable back onto the Client port.

7. Click on Port > Configuration in order to refresh the page. The Client and Network
port LEDs are now GREEN indicating that the links are UP.

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5.3. VLAN Support

5.3.1. Tagging Forwarded traffic, testing P-bits preservation


feature (.1Q in .1Q)

Procedure

1. Power up two EtherNID™s and connect them as illustrated in the diagram below.

2. Connect the outgoing customer traffic to the Client port of the EtherNID™.

3. Connect the Carrier traffic to the Network port.

Note: This Carrier traffic could be going directly onto a network device or through a
secondary EtherNID™.

4. Connect the PC used for configuring the EtherNID™ to the Management port.

5. Login to the WEB GUI of the EtherNID™ with incoming customer traffic.

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Configure the Network port for


forwarding
Enable VLAN Encapsulation
OE
Client Port
Tagged Traffic
Network
Port
Management
Port
Network
Port

Management
OE Port

Management
Console

6. Go to Traffic > Forwarding. Select the ‘Enable VLAN Encapsulation’ checkbox.

7. Select Network from the drop-down menu as ‘Trunk port’.

8. Type a number under ‘VLAN ID’ and set a ‘VLAN Priority’ of 1 (in this test it is used
only for incoming untagged traffic). Click on ‘modify’.

Note: The tagging function will occur for outbound traffic.

Note: There are a few ways to test the tagging. The traffic can be sent using a test set.
Internet traffic could also be used or simply the existing LAN in the company. Tagged
traffic will be transmitted successfully throughout the network. Simply make sure that

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traffic coming in from the customer side is transmitted onto the other side at the end
point of the carrier network.

9. We will test the .1Q in .1Q with the P-Bits preservation feature. Go to Traffic >
Forwarding. This time enable VLAN encapsulation for the Client port.

10. Select the ‘Enable P-Bits preservation’ checkbox. In doing so, the incoming
customer traffic is forced to preserve the priority indicated by the forwarded traffic
on the Network port.

11. Start passing traffic in the network. You can verify the P-bits preservation by using a
tool such as Ethereal connected to one of the monitor ports.

5.4. Loopback Capabilities used to test Carrier Circuits

5.4.1. Adding an Interface IP address on the Client Port

Procedure

1. Go to System > Interface.

2. Click on <add>. The <new interface setting> page is seen. From the drop down
menu ‘On port’, select the Client port. Select <Manual Configuration> and add the
IP address 192.168.5.55 with a network mask of 255.255.255.0. Click on
<modify>.

3. Go back to the System > Interface. You will see the newly created interface on
the Client port with the new IP address.

Note: This newly created Client port interface can be used for a layer-3 loopback
configuration.

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5.4.2. Running a loopback test suite using the JDSU/Acterna™ FST-


2802 TestPad’s in-band commands
This section describes how to run a loopback test suite using a JDSU/ Acterna™ FST-2802
tester and an EtherNID™. The procedure for an EtherNID™ GE is described below but the
same procedure can be used for other EtherNID™ types.

The following diagram depicts the test set-up.

In this scenario, the network is layer-2 or layer-3. It can be as simple as a wire or as


complex as an MPLS network. The resulting performance measurement is dependant on the
performance of the whole network. In the case of a simple wire or a simple Ethernet switch,
the expected result is that the test should perform at wire speed with no packet loss and
extremely low latency and jitter. We will perform both layer-2 and layer-3 test suites.

EtherNID™ Setup

The EtherNID™ is capable of running an Ethernet loopback test on the Network or Client
port. In both cases, an OAM instance configuration must exist for the port running the test.
We will be using the Network port for this setup. You will need to enable the JDSU/
Acterna™ support on the corresponding loopback configuration page. The following steps
describe this.

1. Connect the JDSU/ Acterna™ FST-2802 tester to the network.

Note: There is a special set-up configuration required for the JDSU/ Acterna™ FST-2802.
This will be explained in detail at the end. The EtherNID™ setup needs to be completed
prior to this.

Note: You may not run a BERT payload when performing an in-band loopback test.

2. Connect the Network port of the EtherNID™ on the other end of the switched network.
Note: For the EtherNID™ GE port connector assignment; please verify the Port >
Configuration page of the Web application. For an EE or OE, you may skip this step.

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Diagram 1: Setup with one EtherNID™:

JDSU/ActernaTM
FST-2802
Loopback

EtherNIDTM
Layer 2 and Layer 3 Traffic

Note: For detailed initial setup of the EtherNID™, see Application Note AN100.

3. Go to System> Interface, click on Network. Select Manual Configuration. Set an IP


address 192.168.2.xxx with mask 255.255.255.0 (Do not use the same IP range as the
one for the Management port). This will be useful for a layer-3 test run with the JDSU/
Acterna™. Select ‘’Used as default gateway’’. Click on Modify.

Note: You may not be able to assign an IP address because of the restrictions on the
network being used. In this case you will only be running the test at layer-2. Leave it with
an address of 0.0.0.0 with a subnet mask 0.0.0.0.
Also, Depending on the media selection and port connector assignment, you may need to
add an interface related to the port used. For simplicity, we will use the Network port
(RJ45-B) to assign the OAM instance.

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4. Go to OAM > Configuration; click ADD. Type a name for the OAM Instance. Select
the Network Interface (for which an IP address was assigned) from the dropdown menu.
Click on Modify.

Note: Do not select the Enable OAM checkbox.

5. Go to OAM > Loopback, click on the newly created OAM instance. Select
JDSU/Acterna™ under ‘’Remote loopback enable’’. If a loopback timeout is required,
enter the timeout value in minutes and click apply. The top ‘’Loopback Enable’’ checkbox
is for a manual loopback and is not applicable for this test.

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The above set-up will arm the EtherNID™ to receive an in-band loop-up command from the
Acterna™ test set. Once it receives it, the EtherNID™ will set itself to loopback the test
traffic with the MAC addresses swapped. During the test, the traffic originating from the
other port, in this case the Network will be blocked. On reception of a loop-down command,
the EtherNID™ removes the loop-back and the traffic will normally flow through. During the
test, the embedded Web server and SNMP agent are still reachable. However, this extra
traffic will impact the test result.

JDSU/Acterna™ Setup

6. Power-on the JDSU/Acterna™ TestPAD. Make sure, the link is UP.

Layer-2

7. From the main page, Press “TERM”. Select “1G Ethernet”, then “Layer 2 Traffic”.

8. Press SETUP. Go to “TX Profile” page. Choose LP as the TX Profile. For FRAME, choose
DIX. VLAN TAG should be set to “Non-Tagged”. TX Payload should be “Acterna™”.

9. Select the TRAFFIC tab. Load Type should be set to CONST. Load Unit should be in
Mbps. The Const Load should be 100.00. Click OK.

10. Perform a quick throughput test. From the main menu, make sure ‘Transmit ON’ is in
yellow. Press on “Loop Up”. You will see a notice at the bottom indicating Port 1:
‘Remote Loop Up Success: *JDSU* in LLB’. This corresponds to the name assigned to
the OAM instance on the EtherNID™ (Acterna_OAM truncated). Press on “Start Traffic”.
After a few moments, press “Stop Traffic”. Received Frames should be equal to
Transmitted Frames. No packet loss observed.

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11. From the main menu page, press “Loop Down”.

12. Press “Start Traffic”. There should be no RX data once the traffic flow is restarted.

From the main page, Press RFC2544. A series of questions will be asked regarding
13. identification of the tester. Click OK for all.

14. Press RUN from the RFC 2544 Test Configuration page.

15. Verify the results of the test run.

16. You will be asked to save the test results. You may do so if required.

Layer-3

17. From the main page, Press on TERM. Select “1G Ethernet”, then “Layer 3 IP Traffic”.

18. Press SETUP. Go to “TX Profile” page. Choose LP as the TX profile. Assign the Dest IP
as the one for the interface of the OAM instance on the Network port of the EtherNID™
configured earlier. FRAME should be DIX. PACKET LENGTH can be any size. In this
example we will use 256 with a TTL of 64. VLAN TAG should be “Non-tagged”.

19. Click on the “IP Config” tab. Select a static IP address. Choose “Use IP below”. Assign
an IP address within the same range as that of the OAM interface (192.168.2.xxx) with
subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. Default gateway and Preferred/Alternate DNS server
can be set to 0.0.0.0. Click OK to save, and go back to the main menu.

20. Perform a quick throughput test. From the main menu, make sure ‘Transmit ON’ is in
yellow. Press on “Loop-Up”. You will see a notice at the bottom indicating Port 1:
‘Remote Loop Up Success: *JDSU* in LLB’. This corresponds to the name assigned to
the OAM instance on the EtherNID™ (Acterna_OAM truncated). Press on “Start Traffic”.
After a few moments, press “Stop Traffic”. Received Frames should be equal to
Transmitted Frames. No packet loss observed.

21. From the main page, Press RFC2544. A series of questions will be asked regarding
identification of the tester. Click OK for all.

22. Press RUN from the RFC 2544 Test Configuration page.

23. Verify the results of the test run.

24. You will be asked to save the test results. You may do so if required.

Note: Only one EtherNID™ on a given flat network should be enabled to respond to the
JDSU/Acterna™ loop-up and loop-down commands at a given time. The JDSU/ Acterna™
FST-2802 does not allow the user to directly select which remote device should perform the
loopback if more than one is discovered simultaneously. The only way to specify the device
that should respond is to manually configure the MAC address of the target EtherNID™ on
the JDSU/Acterna™ or to arm the OAM instance for JDSU/Acterna™‘s in-band commands on
only one EtherNID™ in the given flat network.

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5.4.3. Configuring a Manual Loopback


This section describes how to set up a layer-2 manual loopback based on VLANs that can be
used with any test set.

Procedure

Layer 2

1. Power on the Test set.

2. Construct a layer-2 packet. Make note of the Test set’s MAC source address.

3. Power on the EtherNID™ (with Factory Default Settings)

4. Connect to the Web GUI using Internet Explorer or Firefox web browser. Type the
following IP address: 192.168.1.254 and hit enter. *(For a detailed initial setup
procedure, see application note AN100).

5. Login with– <admin> and Password – <admin> to the Web GUI.

6. Go to Traffic > L2 Filters. Click on <add>.

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7. Type ‘Test_Loop_VLAN100’ in the ‘L2 Filter name’ box. Select the ‘MAC Source’
checkbox and type the noted MAC address of the Test set. Select the ‘VLAN 1 ID’
checkbox and type 100 in the box. Click on <Apply>.

8. Go to OAM > Configuration. Click on <add>.

9. Type ‘Manual_Loop’ under ‘OAM Instance name’. From the drop-down menu ‘Port
name’, select ‘Network’. From the drop-down menu ‘Encapsulation’, select ‘untagged’.
The ‘VLAN ID’ box remains ‘0’.

Note: The OAM instance could also be created on the Client port.

10. Uncheck the ‘Enable OAM’ checkbox. We will not use the OAM instance for the exchange
of OAM packets. Click on <modify>.

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11. Go back to OAM > Configuration. The newly created OAM instance is displayed.

12. Go to OAM > Loopback. Drill down on the newly created OAM Instance.

13. Select the ‘Enable Loopback’ checkbox. Type ‘30’ in the ‘Loopback timeout (in mins)’
box (if required).

14. From the drop-down menu ‘Filter type’, select ‘L2 Filter’.

15. From the drop-down menu ‘L2 Filter’, select the newly created filter
‘Test_Loop_VLAN100’. Under ‘Actions’ select the ‘Swap MAC addresses’ checkbox. Click
on <apply>.

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16. The EtherNID™ is now in ‘loopback’ mode on the Network port.

17. Connect the Test set to the EtherNID™‘s Client or Network port directly or via a network
(through a switch or router).

18. Start sending packets from the Test Set. Transmitted packets should equal Received
packets.

5.5. Performance Assurance Agent™ and Ethernet SLA


Monitoring

5.5.1. Using the Performance Assurance Agent™ (PAA™)


The Performance Assurance Agent™ is used to measure the jitter, latency and packet loss of
a given Network. Two EtherNID™s with matching settings will communicate with each
other to collect data.

The PAA™ can be configured in a point-to-point or point-to-multi-points fashion. Therefore,


either allowing a single PAA™ instance to exchange data with another PAA™ instance or
enabling it to communicate with several PAA™ instances simultaneously. Typically the
PAA™ instance would be configured between the Network port of the first EtherNID™ and
the Network port of the second EtherNID™ (point-to-point) in order to retrieve live latency,
jitter, packet loss measurements. It is also possible to select the Client ports of a given
EtherNID™ for PAA™ measurements when they are directly connected to each other or
through a network device in the same point-to-point fashion. This application note
describes how to use the EtherNID™ Performance Assurance Agent (PAA™). The various
CLI commands will be described.

Procedure

1. Power on the EtherNID™ (with Factory Default Settings)

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2. Login to the CLI with– <admin> and Password – <admin>

3. Type <paa> and press the ‘tab’ button twice. A list of self-descriptive options will be
displayed:
add
edit
show

Note: The ‘tab’ button can be used at all times to verify the validity of the command and
also the options related to the command.

4. The commands have been listed by category:


a. Alarm Trigger: An alarm will be triggered when this predetermined
threshold is reached and this threshold can be set for one-way or a round-
trip.
b. Reference Period: Indicates a particular reference period for the data to be
averaged (one-way or roundtrip). It also affects the minimum value, the
maximum value and the threshold crossing counts.

Note: All these values are in msec.

ow: one-way tw: two-way ref: reference pkt: packet max: maximum
dv: delay variation ad: average delay adv: average delay variation cc: continuity-check

One Way Roundtrip


Period Alarm Triggered

ow-dv-threshold tw-ad-threshold
ow-adv-threshold tw-adv-threshold
pkt-loss-threshold tw-delay-threshold
ow-max-dv tw-dv-threshold
cc-threshold tw-max-delay
tw-max-dv
Reference

ow -ref-period tw-ref-period

pkt-loss-ref-period

C) Commands for general settings of the parameters:

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Various Commands Functions


state disable or enable state of the PAA
sampling-period delay in between packets sent
First VLAN ID. When enabled, layer-
2 PAA packets are encapsulated
vlan1-id into the specified VLAN ID.
Second VLAN ID. When enabled,
layer-2 PAA packets are
encapsulated into a second VLAN.
Applies only when vlan1-id is
vlan2-id enabled.

First VLAN priority bits. Applies only


vlan1-priority when vlan1-id is enabled.

Second VLAN priority bits. Applies


vlan2-priority only when vlan2-id is enabled.
dscp diffserv Code-Point value
ToS IP Type of Service field
dest-ip destination IP address
dst-mac-addr destination MAC address

ecn Explicit Congestion Notification field

Note: The configuration of the PAA™ instance name and sampling period needs to
be identical on both EtherNID™s.

Layer 3

5. The PAA™ instances will be configured at layer-3. In order to configure the PAA™
instance at layer-3 the <udp> command is used. The detailed command is described
below.

6. Type <paa add udp paa2> and press ‘enter’ followed by <paa edit udp paa2 dest-ip [IP
address of the destination EtherNID™ interface]>. This task needs to be performed on
both EtherNID™s.

Note: We are assuming that the interface IP addresses used have already been
configured on both EtherNID™s. The configuration procedure for the interface IP
address is detailed in application note AN105. The address range cannot be in the same

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range as the Management port of the EtherNID™. An example, if the Management IP


range is 192.168.1.xxx:

EtherNID™-1>>192.168.2.44
EtherNID™-2>>192.168.2.55

7. Type <paa show configuration paa2> and press ‘enter’. The main PAA™ parameters are
listed as follows:
General
Continuity
-Packet Loss reference period
-Packet loss threshold
-Continuity check threshold
Delay and Delay Variation (also known as Latency and Jitter)
-One-way reference period
-Two-way reference period

The destination IP address can be seen. You have now configured the PAA™ to
communicate with the EtherNID™ on the other end of the network and vice versa. Thus
allowing the PAA™ instances to collect measurements throughout the network.

8. Type <paa edit udp paa2[space]> followed by ‘tab’. All the available commands are
listed for the modification of the PAA™ parameters.

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9. Type <paa edit udp paa2 state enable>. This will enable the PAA™ instance. Repeat
this task on the second EtherNID™.

10. Type <paa show status paa2>. The status of the PAA™ instance will be displayed. The
section ‘state’ shows whether a connection was established with the second EtherNID™.

11. By typing <paa edit udp paa2> followed by enter, some more details about the various
commands are displayed:

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The configuration of all these parameters can be done as is dictated by the customer’s
SLA. Numeric values can be set. For example if the average one-way delay variation
(jitter) threshold needed to be modified, the following command could be used:
<paa edit udp paa2 ow-dv-threshold 20>

Also, it is possible to indicate the value for the fields ToS/dscp/ecn used for the
exchange of data packets by the PAA™ instances.

Note: To calculate when an instantaneous alarm is triggered depending on the type of


measurement (3 types), the following equations can be used:

One-way delay variation:


ow-dv-threshold x sampling-period = Time when Alarm is Raised

Two-way delay variation:


tw-dv-threshold x sampling-period = Time when Alarm is Raised

Two-way delay:
tw-delay-threshold x sampling-period = Time when Alarm is Raised

12. Type <paa show result paa2> and press ‘enter’

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Layer 2

13. The following commands will describe the layer-2 configuration of the PAA™ instances
with a VLAN tag.

14. Type <paa add l2 paa1> followed by <paa edit l2 paa1 dst-mac-addr [MAC address of
the destination EtherNID™ interface]> . Using the Web GUI for example, this MAC
address is listed under Port > Configuration. In the CLI, type <port show
configuration Network> and hit enter. The MAC address of that port will be displayed.

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15. Repeat the previous task on the second EtherNID™. This time using the MAC address of
the port used on the first EtherNID™ as the destination MAC.

16. In order to enable the PAA™ instance, type <paa edit l2 paa1 state enable>.

17. Type <paa show configuration paa1>. The configuration details about the PAA™
instance will be displayed.

18. It is possible to set up a VLAN tag for the PAA™ instance. Type <paa edit l2 paa1 vlan1-
id 201>. This command will enable the use of a VLAN tag for the exchange of data
packets in between the PAA™ instances. In the case where there is VLAN stacking, it is
possible to assign the PAA™ instance to use the second VLAN. Also, it is possible to
assign a priority bit for either VLAN tags.

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19. Type <paa show result paa1>. The measurements will be displayed as follows.

5.5.2. Performance Assurance Agent™ (PAA™) using the Web GUI


This section illustrates the following scenario in regards to using PAA™ using the integrated
EtherNID™ Web GUI.

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Accedian Networks
EtherNID GE

PAA2
PAA1
Latency 2
Latency 1

VLAN 101
VLAN 102

Accedian Networks Accedian Networks


EtherNID GE EtherNID GE
Remote Site A
Remote Site B

Procedure

1. Login to the Web GUI of EtherNID™s 1, 2 and 3. Go to Port > Configuration. Make note
of the the MAC addresses of the Network ports of each device.

2. On EtherNID™ 1, create two PAA instances, one to retrieve data from remote Site A and
the other to retrieve data from remote Site B. Go to PAA > Configuration and click on
‘add’.

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3. Type a relevant name for the PAA instance for example paa_siteA.

4. Type should be set to ‘layer-2’. Select ‘Paa’ state checkbox. Type the MAC address of
the Network port on EtherNID™ 2. The port name should be ‘Network’. Select the
‘VLAN 1 Encapsulation’ checkbox and type 101. Leave all other parameters as is with
default settings. Click on ‘Apply’.

5. On EtherNID™ 1, create a second PAA instance to connect to Site B.

6. Go to PAA > Configuration and click on ‘add’.

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7. Type a relevant name for the PAA instance for example paa_siteB.

8. Type should be set to ‘layer-2’. Select ‘Paa’ state checkbox. Type the MAC address of
the Network port on EtherNID™ 3. The port name should be ‘Network’. Select the
‘VLAN 1 Encapsulation’ checkbox and type 102. Leave all other parameters as is with
default settings. Click on ‘Apply’.

Note: The same exact PAA instance parameters need to be configured on the remote peer
EtherNIDs except that the destination MAC address will now be that of EtherNID™ 1.

9. Connect to EtherNID™ 2 Web GUI.

10. Create the PAA instance that will connect to EtherNID™ 1.

11. Go to PAA > Configuration and click on ‘add’.

12. Type a relevant name for the PAA instance for example paa_siteA (should be the same
name as on EtherNID™ 1.

13. ‘Type’ should be set to ‘layer-2’. Select ‘Paa’ state checkbox. Type the MAC address of
the Network port on EtherNID™ 1. The port name should be ‘Network’. Select the
‘VLAN 1 Encapsulation’ checkbox and type 101. Leave all other parameters as is with
default settings. Click on ‘Apply’.

14. Connect to the EtherNID™ 3 Web GUI.

15. Create the PAA instance that will connect to EtherNID™ 1.

16. Go to PAA > Configuration and click on ‘add’.

17. Type a relevant name for the PAA instance for example paa_siteB (should be the same
as on EtherNID™ 1.

18. ‘Type’ should be set to ‘layer-2’. Select ‘Paa’ state checkbox. Type the MAC address of
the Network port on EtherNID™ 1. The port name should be ‘Network’. Select the
‘VLAN 1 Encapsulation’ checkbox and type 102. Leave all other parameters as is with
default settings. Click on ‘Apply’.

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19. Make sure that peer PAA instances are now in communication. Go to PAA > Status and
drill down on ‘paa_siteB’. It should be indicated that the instances are in ‘associated’
state.

20. Retrieve the PAA results. Go to PAA > Results and drill down on ‘paa_siteB’. The
results of the latency, jitter should be displayed.

21. Repeat the previous two steps for EtherNID™ 1.

5.6. Non-Intrusive Monitoring

5.6.1. Monitoring pass-through traffic using the monitor ports


This section describes how to monitor pass-through traffic. The EtherNID™ has a versatile
monitoring capability that can be tailored to the specific troubleshooting need by configuring
its traffic selection.

Two basic mode of monitoring exists:


• Separate monitor port for each traffic direction
• Combined traffic mode using a single monitor port

The former mode, separate monitor port, is used when exact relative timing monitoring is
required. Since the monitored traffic is not buffered, the arrival time, on the user traffic port
being monitor and the departure time on the monitor port is fix and very small (0.8 usec at
1000Mbps speed).

The later mode, where traffic from both directions is being monitored on the same monitor
port, is used when a “conversation” needs to be analysed. The monitor port must, in that
case, be the port labelled “Monitor-1”.

Monitored traffic is selected by using filter rules to select and direct traffic to the monitor
port. In many cases, the ability to select the traffic to monitor is essential when the packet
analyser is not able to sustain the complete traffic bandwidth present on the user
connection. This is even more important with 1000Mbps link. However, in situations where
the traffic is known not to exceed the capability of the packet analyser all the traffic can be
directed to a monitor port by using a “catch-all” filter rule.

Procedure

1. Connect a PC to the EtherNID™ Management port.

2. Login to the Web GUI (see appnote AN100 or Quick Start Guide on this).

3. Go to Traffic > L2 Filters. Click on <add> or click on a filter name, for example
<catch-all>.

4. Change (if desired) or type a name for the filter.

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5. Select the field to match and adjust accordingly. Do not select any field if using in a
“catch-all” application. Click on <modify>.

6. Go to Traffic > Policies. Select an entry in the list corresponding to the port from
which you want to monitor traffic (it is the ingress traffic from that port that will be
monitored). For example, select entry ‘1-1’.

7. Select the ‘Policy enable’ checkbox. Select ‘L2 filter” from the filter type drop down
menu. Select any desired filter name in the L2 filter drop down box (for example, select
the filter modified or created above. Select ‘Permit traffic’ from the radio button. Select
the ‘Enable monitoring’ checkbox. Choose the monitor port on which you would like to
see the monitored traffic.

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8. The above steps can be repeated to direct traffic from the opposite direction to “Monitor-
2”.

9. Alternatively to step 8, it is possible to direct the traffic from both directions to the same
output monitor port. To do so, simply repeat the above procedure by taking the opposite
direction ingress port and directing monitoring to “Monitor-1” again. Note that combining
both directions into one port can only be done with port “Monitor-1”.

10. Click on <apply>.

5.7. Added Reliability to Ethernet

5.7.1. Power Over Ethernet (PoE) and 5V DC


In order to add reliability to Ethernet, it is possible to have both the PoE and 5V DC power
source available simultaneously. When one power source fails the other will take over.

Procedure

1. Power up the EtherNID™ using the 5V DC connector at the back of the unit.

2. Connect the right most port to a PoE injector with an RJ-45 cable.

3. Connect to the Web GUI using the Management port.

4. Go to Alarm > Chassis. Verify that the two power supplies (5V DC and 48V A or B –
depending on the PoE injector) LEDs are green.

5. Unplug the 5V DC connector. Go to Alarm > Chassis. The LED for the 5V DC power
supply will be RED indicating that it is down. Plug the 5V power supply once more.

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6. Go to Alarm > Chassis. Verify that both power supplies are available.

7. Unplug the PoE injector. Go to Alarm > Chassis. The LED for the 48V B power supply
will be RED indicating that it is down.

5.7.2. Twelve unit rack mount with 48V A and 48 V B


In this scenario, a twelve-unit rack mount is used. Most often this is for office co-location.
Normally the rack would be in the IT closet where two 48V power supplies are available
around the clock. So if one should fail, the other would automatically take over. The
EtherNID™ comes with both 48V A and 48V B power connectors. In fact, you can decide to
use the 48V A or B connectors for a stand alone EtherNID™ as well (out of the rack mount).

Procedure

1. Power up the EtherNID™ using the 12-unit rack mount.

2. Make sure that both 48V A and 48V B power feeds are being supplied.

3. Connect to the Web GUI using the Management port.

4. Go to Alarm > Chassis. The LEDs will be GREEN for both the 48V A and 48V B power
supplies indicating that they are both available.

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5. Disconnect the 48V A power source. Go to Alarm > Chassis. The LED will be RED for
the 48V A power supply indicating that it is no longer available.

5.7.3. Failover Bypass

Procedure

1. Power up the EtherNID™ using the 5V DC connector at the back of the unit.

2. Connect the Network and Client ports onto the Network using RJ-45 cables.

Note: This test is for the EtherNID™ EE or GE configured with two copper ports as Client
and Network.

Network Port

Client Port

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3. Make sure that there is traffic flowing throughout the network. For example, try
accessing the Internet from the laptop connected to the Client port via the core switch.

4. Unplug the 5V DC power connection. The traffic should flow once more. The failover
bypass time on the EtherNID™ is instantaneous.

Note: The timing for traffic flow to resume will also depend on the switching or routing
device connected to it. For a cisco switch, the renegotiation time is typically 20 sec.

5.8. OAM Capabilities

5.8.1. Configure OAM


In order to set up OAM features on the EtherNID™, an interface needs to be configured on
the Network or Client port. Followed by the creation of an OAM instance.

Procedure

1. Connect to the Web GUI.

2. Go to System > Interfaces. Click on <add>.

3. Type a relevant name for the interface to be used for an OAM instance. Select the Client
port from the drop-down menu ‘On port’. Since the OAM test will be done for layer-2,
we will select ‘Manual Configuration’ for the IP address and leave the address at
0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0.

4. Go to OAM > Configuration. Click on <add>.

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5. From the drop-down list ‘Interface name’, select the newly created interface on the
client port. Select the ‘Enable OAM’ checkbox (it is selected by default). Choose ‘Active
Mode’. Click on ‘modify’. You have now activated the OAM instance on the Client
interface.

6. If you click on OAM > Configuration, you will see that the OAM instance is now active
and that the ‘Encapsulation’ is 802.3ah.

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7. Go to OAM > Statistics. Click on the OAM instance name to drill down. The following
information is seen:

8. Click on <refresh> in order to see the latest values.


Note: Other OAM features can also be verified, simply by clicking on OAM > Event and
OAM > Status.

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5.9. SNMP

5.9.1. Enabling SNMP and Retrieving Data (Stats per Flow and
PAA™ results)
This section describes how to enable the SNMP agent on the EtherNID™ in order to retrieve
the relevant data and information through a third party Network Management Software
application. Accedian Networks provide 10 private MIBs to be integrated onto an NMS in
order to retrieve its bandwidth policing data, statistics per flow, SFP digital diagnostics
information, alarms, full description of firmware version, port information and also the data
gathered by its Performance Assurance Agent™.

The statistics per flow are results gathered based on set filters (VLAN ID, Priority, DSCP,
MAC address, IP address, Ethertype, etc.). The PAA™ will provide the latency, jitter and
packet loss of the network. These precise measurements are gathered live from the
network without affecting the throughput.

ACCEDIAN-SMI
ACD-ALARM-MIB
ACD-DESC-MIB
ACD_FILTER-MIB
ACD-PAA-MIB
ACD-POLICY-MIB
ACD-PORT-MIB
ACD-REGULATOR
ACD-SFP-MIB
MAU-MIB

Procedure

1. Retrieve the Accedian private MIB files

2. Connect a PC to the EtherNID™ Management port and login to the Web GUI.

3. Go to System > SNMP. Select the ‘Enable Agent’ checkbox.

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4. Type public for the ‘Read-Only Community’. Click on <submit>.

5. Select ‘Enable primary SNMPv1 Traps host’ checkbox. Type the IP address of the host
for the MIB browser application (NMS).

6. Open the MIB browser application.

7. For the Traps section, you will notice an alarm Notification saying that there was a
‘coldStart’, which is normal.

8. Go to iso/org/dod/internet/private/enterprise/accedianMIB. Browse through.

9. Connect an RJ-45 cable onto the Network port of the EtherNID™. You will see an SNMP
Trap Notification saying ‘Generic: linkUp’ after the soaking time for an alarm is reached.

10. Unplug the cable. A ‘Generic: linkDown’ Notification is seen after the soaking time for
an alarm is reached.

5.9.2. Integrating the EtherNID™ into SNMPc™ for monitoring

This section describes how to integrate the EtherNID™ into SNMPc™ for monitoring via
SNMP. The integration is simple and straight forward. The first step consists of placing the
Accedian private MIB files into the appropriate folder. The second step consists of compiling
the MIB files through the SNMPc™ user interface. And finally the last step consists of
discovering EtherNID™ via SNMPc™ auto-discovery and polling.

Note: It is important to enable the SNMP agent on the EtherNID™ prior to the integration
with SNMPc™. Please see application note AN119 for instructions.

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Here are all the Accedian private MIB files to be integrated:

ACCEDIAN-SMI
ACD-ALARM-MIB
ACD-DESC-MIB
ACD_FILTER-MIB
ACD-PAA-MIB
ACD-POLICY-MIB
ACD-PORT-MIB
ACD-REGULATOR
ACD-SFP-MIB
MAU-MIB

Procedure

1. Install the SNMPc™ server. Follow the installation procedure for SNMPc™.

2. Place all the Accedian private MIB files (listed above) into the following folder
c:/Program Files/SNMPc Network Manager/mibfiles

Note: The location of this folder is dependent on the individual installation. In this case, it
was the <c> drive under <Program Files>

3. Open an SNMPc™ session. To do so simply go to the location where the program was
installed via the <start> menu. Go to SNMPc Network Manager. Click on <Startup
System>.

4. The login should be done automatically. If not, login as it is described by the SNMPc™
installation guide.

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5. Here is the view of the Console:

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6. Compile the Accedian private MIB files so that this information can be polled. To do so,
go to Config>Mib Database. You will notice that the list does not contain any of the
Accedian private MIB files, this is normal since they need to be compiled. Click on Add,
a list will be shown. Select ALL the Accedian private MIB files (including the MAU-MIB,
you may need to scroll down as they are listed in alphabetical order) using the
<control> key on the PC. Click on OK.

7. Click on Compile. It will prompt you with the message <Compile MIB>, simply agree to
it. Click on Done once the process is completed.

8. Now go to Config>Discovery/Polling…Select Enable Discovery. Go to the Seeds tab.


Type the IP addresses of the EtherNID™ to discover. Go back to the General tab and
click on Restart.

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9. The newly discovered network elements will be displayed.

10. The name of the EtherNID™ will actually be the its serial.

Note: It is highly recommended that the name used in SNMPc™ be the same name in the
EtherNID™. The EtherNID™ identifier can be modified in its Web GUI under Sytem>DNS.

11. In order to retrieve information via the private MIB files, for example the PAA™
information (two-way instantanteneous delay in this case, see AN104 for configuration
of the Performance Assurance Agent™ which measures the delay, delay variation,
packet loss, etc.), highlight the EtherNID™ in SNMPc™. Go to the MIB tab on the lower

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left hand side. Expand the <private> section, followed by the <accedianMIB>, then the
<acdMibs>, then <acdPaaResultTable>, then acdPaaResultEntry and finally,
<acdPaaResultTwoWayInstValue>.

12. Right-click once this OID has been selected. Click on <View Graph>. The live results of
the two-way instantaneous delay will be displayed graphically.

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5.10. Bandwidth Policing

5.10.1. Configuring Bandwidth Policing


This section describes how to configure the Traffic Regulator and the Policy Rule in the
Accedian EtherNID™ to allow the operator to limit the bandwidth being used by a given
customer or a service being delivered. The Accedian Bandwidth Policing feature is based on
the MEF standard requirements in terms of the values as well as the calculations.

Two types of rates can be calculated:


• Line Rate
• Data Rate

The Accedian Bandwidth Policing is based on a Two Rate Three Color algorithm that is MEF
compliant. The Accedian units use the Policies to determine the appropriate Traffic Regulator
and the frame initial colour (Green, Yellow or Red).

Each Traffic Regulator is configured with the following parameters:


• Committed Information Rate (CIR)
• Committed Bust Size (CBS)
• Excess Information Rate (EIR)
• Excess Burst Size (EBS)
• Color Mode
• Coupling Flag

The algorithm uses two token buckets and the above parameters to determine the frame’s
final colour when exiting the Traffic Regulator.
• Frames exiting the Traffic Regulator Red are dropped.
• Frames exiting the Traffic Regulator Yellow are forwarded and the EIR bucket is
updated.

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• Frames exiting the Traffic Regulator Green are forwarded and the CIR bucket is
updated.

The Color Mode parameter indicates if frame’s initial colour is Green or determined by the
policy. In colour-blind mode, all ingress frames are initially considered Green. In colour-
aware mode, the policy determines the frame’s initial colour.

The CBS and EBS parameters determine the maximum size of their respective token bucket.
Both parameters must be greater than or equal to the port MTU.

The Coupling Flag modifies the way tokens are added to the EIR token bucket.
• When the coupling flag is False, tokens are added to the bucket based on EIR only.
• When the coupling flag is True, tokens are added to the bucket based on EIR and
excess tokens unused by the CIR bucket.

The reason for differentiating all the traffic with colours is simply to have the flexibility to
control all different traffic flows going through a single port.

Below is a description of the calculations used according to the MEF standard (document
MEF 10.1). A list of commonly used MEF terms is available from the Metro Ethernet Forum.
The relevant terms with respect to bandwidth policing are highlighted in blue.

‘’The Bandwidth Profile algorithm is shown in Figure 3. For a sequence of Service Frames,
{t j , l j }, j ≥ 0, t j +1 ≥ t j , with arrival times at the reference point t j and lengths l j , the level of
compliance color assigned to each Service Frame MUST be defined according to the algorithm
in Figure 3. For this algorithm, Bc (t0 ) = CBS and Be (t0 ) = EBS . Bc (t ) and Be (t ) can be viewed
as the number of bytes in the Committed and Excess token buckets respectively at a given time t.

Service Frame of length l j arrives at time t j ( j ≥ 1)

Bc (t j ) = min ⎨CBS , Bc (t j −1 ) + × (t j − t j −1 )⎬
⎧ CIR ⎫
⎩ 8 ⎭
O (t j ) = max ⎨0, Bc (t j −1 ) + × (t j − t j −1 ) − CBS ⎬
⎧ CIR ⎫
⎩ 8 ⎭
Be (t j ) = min ⎨ EBS , Be (t j −1 ) + × (t j − t j −1 ) + CF × O(t j )⎬
⎧ EIR ⎫
⎩ 8 ⎭

[(CM == color - blind ) Yes


OR (Service Frame == Green )]
Declare Service Frame Green
Bc (t j ) = Bc (t j ) − l j
AND (l j ≤ Bc (t j ))
No

[(CM == color - blind ) Yes


OR (Service Frame ! = Red )]
Declare Service Frame Yellow
Be (t j ) = Be (t j ) − l j
AND (l j ≤ Be (t j ))
No

Declare Service Frame Red

Figure 3 – The Bandwidth Profile Algorithm


MEF10.1 Reproduced with permission of the Metro Ethernet Forum.

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Traffic Regulator Parameters and Definitions

A total of 15 Traffic regulators can be defined. Once defined, the Traffic regulators can be
applied to policies to regulate the flow of traffic.
To add a new regulator, click the Add button in the Traffic > Regulators tab.
To edit any existing regulator, click the regulator name in the list.

Note: Burst size must be greater than the port MTU to avoid packet loss.

Name
Used to assign a meaningful unique name to the regulator. For example use the name
‘Gold’ for premium traffic
CIR
Committed Information Rate in kbps. The maximum allowed rate being the port speed
CBS
Committed Burst Size in KBytes. Range is in between 2 and 62 KBytes.
EIR
Excess Information Rate in kbps. The maximum allowed rate being the port speed
EBS
Excess Burst Size in KBytes. Range is in between 2 and 62 KBytes.
Color mode
Color mode (color-blind / color-aware) defines whether the regulator should react to the
data color set previously by the policy rule
Coupling Flag
The coupling flag defines whether yellow data will use tokens from just the EIR (Flag =
False) or from the sum of CIR and EIR (Flag = True)

Supported bandwidth values

100Mbps product supported values:


0 to < 4 Mbps (step of 0,0625 Mbps)
4 to < 12 Mbps (step of 0,125 Mbps)
12 to 100 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps)

1Gbps product supported values:


0 to < 8 Mbps (step of 0,125 Mbps)
8 to 135 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps)
150 to 1 Gbps (step of 25 Mbps)

Procedure

11. Connect a PC to the EtherNID™ Management port.

12. Login to the Web GUI (see application note AN100 or Quick Start Guide on this).

13. Go to Traffic > Regulators. Click on <Add>.

14. Type Gold for the ‘Traffic regulator name:’.

15. Type 30 000 for the ‘Committed Information Rate (in kbps):’ which is going to set the
CIR to 30Mps.

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16. Type 8 for the ‘Committed Burst Size (in kBytes):’.

17. Type 3000 for the ‘Excess Information Rate (in kbps):’.

18. Type 8 for the ‘Excess Burst Size (in kBytes):’

19. Select color-blind for the ‘Color mode:’

20. Enter True for the ‘Coupling flag:’.

21. Simililarly create two other regulators, silver, platinum and bronze with different rates as
shown in the screen capture below.

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22. Go to Traffic > Policies. Drill down on any available policy under ‘Traffic-A : access
policies on port Client’.

23. In this section the Bronze rate will be applied to the traffic flows. Click on ‘Policy
enable’.

24. Select L2 filter from the ‘Filter type’ drop down menu and catch-all from the ‘L2 filter’
drop down menu.

25. Select ‘Enable bandwidth regulation’.

26. Select green from the ‘Pre-marking color’ drop down menu and Bronze from the
‘Bandwidth regulator’ menu.

27. Similarly configure the other regulators.

28. Start passing point-to-point traffic (Unicast) from the Network port to the Client port or
vice versa. Here are the values under the statistics per flow:

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29. Go to Traffic > Regulators. The following statistics are displayed:

It is also possible to configure Bandwidth Policing via the CLI. The main functions for the
bandwidth-regulator are add/edit/show. Below is an extraction of the help descriptions
from the CLI.

I001-0008: bandwidth-regulator add


bandwidth-regulator add - Add a bandwidth regulator configuration
Description:
With bandwidth-regulator add you can create a new bandwidth regulator
instance.
100Mbps product supported values:
- 0 to < 4 Mbps (step of 0,0625 Mbps).
- 4 to < 12 Mbps (step of 0,125 Mbps).
- 12 to 100 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps).
1Gbps product supported values:
- 0 to < 8 Mbps (step of 0,125 Mbps).
- 8 to 135 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps).
- 150 to 1 Gbps (step of 25 Mbps).
Syntax:
bandwidth-regulator add <regulator-name> {
{cir <0 to max-port-speed>} |
{cbs <2-62>} |
{eir <0 to max-port-speed>} |
{ebs <2-62>} |
{color-mode {aware | blind}} |

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{coupling-flag {true | false}} }+


Parameters:
<regulator-name> - <string>
cir - comitted information rate in kbps.
cbs - committed burst size in kBytes.
eir - excess information rate in kbps.
ebs - excess burst size in kBytes.
color-mode - determine if the regulator is color-aware or color-blind.
coupling-flag - indicate if the coupling flag of this regulator.

I001-0008: bandwidth-regulator
add delete edit show
I001-0008: bandwidth-regulator edit
bandwidth-regulator edit - Change a bandwidth regulator configuration
Description:
With bandwidth-regulator edit, you can change the parameters of an
existing bandwidth regulator instance.

100Mbps product supported values:


- 0 to < 4 Mbps (step of 0,0625 Mbps).
- 4 to < 12 Mbps (step of 0,125 Mbps).
- 12 to 100 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps).
1Gbps product supported values:
- 0 to < 8 Mbps (step of 0,125 Mbps).
- 8 to 135 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps).
- 150 to 1 Gbps (step of 25 Mbps).
Syntax:
bandwidth-regulator edit <regulator-name> {
{name <regulator-name>} |
{cir <0 to max-port-speed>} |
{cbs <2-62>} |
{eir <0 to max-port-speed>} |
{ebs <2-62>} }+

Parameters:
<regulator-name> - <string>
cir - comitted information rate in kbps.
cbs - committed burst size in kBytes.
eir - excess information rate in kbps.
ebs - excess burst size in kBytes

5.11. RFC-2544

5.11.1. RFC-2544 Testsuite


Accedian Networks’s RFC-2544 Testsuite is an advanced tool based on the RFC-2544
standard that can be used to measure and diagnose throughput, delay, jitter (delay
variation), frame loss, and back to back efficiency.

In order to access the Testsuite on an Accedian NID, the user should log-in a web based
session and select the RFC-2544 tab on the top menu, and choose the Testsuite option that
appears in the context menu.

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Testsuite Summary

The Testsuite configuration shows a variety of scenarios and configurations, which are
stored in the NID.

Figure 4: Testsuite Summary

This list of testsuites can be used to define a series of tests to run on a variety of circuits in
order to ensure DUT (Device Under Test) or NUT (Network Under Test).

To add a new testsuite, the user shall press the “Add” button below the list. To edit an
existing testsuite, the user will click the testsuite’s name. In both cases, the user will then
be shown the Testsuite Details (see next section).

Testsuite Details

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The Testsuite Details page lets the user define the contents and destination of the testsuite.
A Testsuite name and description are used to quickly and easily identify the testsuite for
future use. These two text fields appear in the Testsuite Summary described above.

Figure 5: Testsuite Details

The user shall then choose which specific tests should be run as part of the testsuite being
defined. Four distinct tests are defined by the RFC-2544 and available:
• Throughput test: searches for the maximum rate for which there is no frame loss for
a variety of frame sizes;
• Delay test: measures the delay and jitter (delay variation) at a given rate and for a
given duration and variety of frame sizes;
• Frame loss test: verifies the highest rate for which there is not a single frame lost for
a duration of time;
• Back-to-back test: verifies the burst capability of a circuit while performing full
wirespeed rate tests for a duration of time.

It is important to note that even though each test can be run independently, several tests
share the same parameters. For instance, the Delay test and Frame loss test all use
parameters from the Throughput settings in regards to rates being used.

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Peer Settings

The peer settings are used to identify the target NID and thus the DUT.

Figure 6: Peer settings

The MAC destination is the MAC address of the remote NID which will be used to close the
test circuit. Anything in between the current NID and the remote NID will be considered as
the DUT (Device Under Test). The user should also specify in which direction the test will be
run in the “Port name” parameter (Network or Client) as well as several RFC-2544 and
Y.1731 parameters, and optionally define VLAN 1 or VLAN 2 header settings.

Throughput Settings

These settings are used to define the Throughput test, which searches for the maximum
rate for which there is no frame loss.

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Figure 7: Throughput settings

The “Trial duration” parameter defines the length during which throughput will be analyzed
and during which no frame loss shall occur. The “Maximum rate” and “Minimum rate” define
the range of rates to search for while the “Step size” defines how the granularity of the
range. For example, if the user wishes to measure the quality of a wirespeed GigE circuit,
he would enter a range of 800 Mbps and 1000 Mbps with a step size of 10 Mbps. The NID
would then test at full GigE speed, 1000 Mbps and perform a dichotomist algorithm between
800 and 1000 (and a granularity of 10) to find the highest rate for which there is no frame
loss.

The frame loss setting defines the acceptable difference between measured frame loss. For
example, a setting of “1” would mean a 0.1% frame loss would be acceptable and
considered as “no frame loss” by the test. The default value is 0, which means absolutely
no frame loss is the target for defining full throughput.

The “Frame Size” parameters let the user choose which frame sizes are to be tested. By
default, the 10000 byte frame size (Jumbo frame) is unselected as it was not a frame size
defined by the RFC-2544 standard, but which Accedian supports nevertheless.

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An independent and complete Throughput test will be ran for each packet size selected.

Delay and Delay Variation Settings

Once a wirespeed rate with no frame loss has been defined by the throughput test, the
delay and delay variation test will measure the latency and jitter at that specific rate. If the
throughput test has not been ran prior to the delay test, the NID will perform a short
throughput test first (based on the throughput settings above).

Figure 8: Delay and delay variation settings

The “Trial duration” is the duration for which the test will be ran, while the “Frame loss”
parameter defines the same concept as seen in the Throughput settings.

Again, the test will be run for each one of the selected Frame sizes.

Frame Loss Settings

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The Frame loss test will verify that no frames are being lost for a duration of time, at two
consecutive rates.

Figure 9: Frame loss settings

The test will run for each Frame size selected, for a duration defined by “Trial duration”.
The “Step size” indicates the step between each rate being tested. The NID will start at the
“Maximum rate” defined in the throughput settings and step down by the value set in the
“Step size” parameter of the Frame loss settings. Two consecutive rates must be frame loss
less in order to successfully pass this test.

For example, if the DUT is able to perform full wirespeed at GigE, the test will run at 1000
Mbps and 980 Mbps (for a Step size of 20 Mbps). Both tests must yield no frame loss to be
successful, or a lower rate will then be tested (980 and 960 Mbps).

Back-to-Back Settings

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The Back-to-back test performs a burst for a duration of time.

Figure 10: Back-to-back settings

The NID will again perform a Back-to-back test for each one of the Frame sizes selected. To
be successful, the DUT must not create any frame loss for each burst. A burst will have a
duration specified by the “Total duration” parameter, and the NID will perform a number of
bursts as defined by the “Repeat” parameter. A pause of 2 seconds will be done after each
burst.

For example, the above test will indicate the NID to perform 50 bursts of 15 seconds, with a
pause of 2 seconds between each burst. This test will be repeated for all packet sizes
selected (64, 128, 256, 512, 1024, 1280 and 1518 bytes).

Report

The Report section, accessible from the “Report” item of the context menu on top, is used
start a new testsuite run or to view existing reports.

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Figure 11: Report summary

To run a new testsuite, based of one of the configured testsuite (see sections above), the
user shall press the “Start new testsuite” button.

To view an existing testsuite report, the user shall click the report’s filename hyperlink.

Start new testsuite

The new report page will request the user to enter some descriptive text, the name of the
report, as well as the testsuite to run.

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Figure 12: Report configuration

Once all the details have been set, the user presses the “Run” button to start running the
selected testsuite (“Testsuite configuration”). Once it is complete, the testsuite’s results will
be saved as a Report using the “File name” specified, and can thus be accessed later on.

View testsuite report

Once a testsuite has be ran, the test report will be available to the user. A previous report
can also be reviewed later on.

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Figure 13: Report contents

The report shows the configuration parameters of the testsuite, as well as the result for
each test (throughput test, delay test, frame loss test, back-to-back test) that was
performed, for every frame size selected.

The user can also download the test result to his computer by clicking the “Save as” button
on the Report contents.

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