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PSU

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE


TEMPLATE

Your First and Last Name:


Jessica Harrington

Date Submitted: 11/16/18

District where you completed


the TWS: Olathe School
District

Name of School Building


where you completed the
TWS: Clearwater Creek
Elementary

Content Area of your TWS:


Math

TWS Unit Topic:


Understanding Addition

Grade Level of the Classroom


/ Students in Which the TWS
Unit Was Completed: First
Grade
Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 1
I. Contextual Information and Learning Environment Factors

A. Narrative General Contextual Information for Community, District, and School (limited to 1 page)
In order to understand one’s students, it is important to know the community, district, and school in which the students belong. USD 233 is located

in Olathe, Kansas. Olathe, Kansas is a large, suburban community. Compared to other school districts, USD 233 is the second largest district in the

state of Kansas with more than 30,000 students (District Overview). The district is very large, but the class size average is about 20 students.

Within the district, there are 35 elementary schools, 10 middle schools, and 5 high schools. Even though there are many schools, the district feels

like a community. The various schools interact with each other to help create a community. For example, some of the high schools have clubs and

classes that allow high school students to visit an elementary school to observe and assist the teachers.

When reviewing the data, there is some diversity as well as poverty within the district. In USD 233, 28% of the students are economically

disadvantaged and about 11% of the students are ELL. For ethnicity, 68% of the students in the district are Caucasian, 7% are African American,

16% are Hispanic, and 9% are other ethnicities (KSDE, 2018). This data can be compared to Clearwater Creek Elementary. At Clearwater Creek

Elementary, about 12% of the students are economically disadvantaged and about 5% of the students are ELL. The ethnicity as Clearwater Creek

Elementary consists of 77% of students who are Caucasian, 4% African American, 10% Hispanic, and 9% of students who are other ethnicities

(KSDE, 2018). Even though there is poverty, the school district has a 98.4% attendance rate and a 91.2% graduation rate (District Overview).

Clearwater Creek Elementary is located in a neighborhood, so the community is very involved with the school. The community members care

about the school and want the students to succeed. The local businesses support the school and sponsor various school events. Along with business

sponsors, there are a lot of school volunteers. Parents as well as community members volunteer at the school regularly and assist the teachers with

many tasks. This information will help one understand the students within the community, school, and district.

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 2


B. Characteristics of Class (Use the following two tables to record information for the Whole Class)

Table 1.1 Class Contextual Information (limited to 1 page)


Grade level ___1___ Content area (e.g., mathematics) __Math_______ Topic (e.g., geometry)__Time______
Age range of students _____6-7________ Number of male students ____10_____
Total number of students ____21______ Number of female students ___11_____
Percentage of students receiving reduced lunch ____9%____ Percentage of students not receiving reduced lunch____91%_______
[if free/reduced lunch information not available for class, provide school percentages]
Area in which students live (check all that apply) Urban _____ Suburban __+___ Rural ______
Ethnicity of students (give numbers) ___2__ African American or Black __1___ Hispanic or Latino
___0__ Native American/Alaskan Native __17__White
___1__ Asian or Pacific Islander ___0__ Other (specify) __________
Language proficiency of students (give ___19_ Fluent English Proficient ___2__ English Language Learners
numbers)

Identified special needs categories ___0___ Specific Learning Disability ___3___ Speech/Language Impaired
represented (give numbers) ___0___ Hard of Hearing ___0__ Visually Impaired
___0___ Deaf ___0___ Orthopedically Impaired
___0___ Deaf-Blind ___1___ Emotionally Disturbed
___0___ Other Health Impaired ___0___ Autism
___0___ Multiple Disabilities ___0___ Mental Retardation
___0___ Brain Injury ___2___Gifted
___0___ Established Medical Disability (0-5 yrs) ___1___ Developmentally Delayed
___0___ At risk for developmental disabilities ___0___ Other (Specify)_______________

Provide appropriate charts/graphs to display demographic data for district, school, and classroom in Appendix A.

Table 1.2 Student Characteristics for Whole Class (limited to 1 page)


Student Characteristics Specific Descriptions
Intellectual Characteristics The first-grade class is very diverse in terms of intellectual characteristics. There are some students who are on-target
for first-grade, but there is a significant number of students who are below grade level. In terms of reading, the

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 3


- Including readiness, majority of the students are emergent readers. Many students are still learning their letter-sounds. There is one
cognitive abilities, learning student who is developmentally delayed, so the teacher is spending one-on-one time with the student to help them
needs, developmental levels, master the skills needed. There are two students who are gifted. In order to accommodate to these students, they are
etc. given extension activities to help them take their learning a step further. There are some students who are
experiencing learned helplessness. In order to overcome the learned helplessness, students are learning to work out
their own problems. As a class, the students are struggling with multi-step directions. In order to help students
overcome this struggle, the class is practicing how to follow a series of steps. In math, the students are able to
successfully distinguish shapes (solid figures vs. flat shapes) and are gaining an understanding of fractions. Overall,
each student is making improvements in their intellectual abilities (A. Atchity, personal communication, September
4, 2018).

Previously demonstrated N/A


academic performance/ Students are in First Grade and have no previous demonstration of this academic ability.
ability:
% Above standard _____
% Meets standard _____
% Below standard _____
Social Characteristics In terms of social characteristics, this class is very social and motivated by others. The class loves to talk, and they
- Including emotional, enjoy talking about themselves. They are easily motivated but they get frustrated very easily. There are some
attitudinal, motivational, etc. students who become stressed because they put a lot of pressure on themselves to do well. One student does not seem
to enjoy school, so we try to make the lesson engaging and interesting to the student. The students are learning how
to work together and there is some struggle with working with peers. To overcome this struggle, we are teaching the
students what is appropriate and polite behavior when working with peers. The majority of the students have a good
attitude about school and like learning (A. Atchity, personal communication, September 4, 2018).

Personal Characteristics This class is a young class, with the majority of students being 6 years old. Most of the students seem to be average
- Including physical, social, height and weight, but there are a few students who seem small for their age. Since they are 6 and 7-year-old
individual experiences, students, they are losing their baby teeth. They are all very social and love talking about themselves, their family, and
talents, language, culture, their experiences. The students are involved in the community because many of the students are in extracurricular
family and community activities. Some students are in Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, dance, musical lessons, and sports. They enjoy interacting
values, etc. with each other, but need to work on their sharing skills. In the class, there are 2 ELL students, but they understand
English fairly well. There is some diversity in terms of ethnicity. In the class, there are two students who are African
American, 1 student who is Hispanic, and 1 student who is Asian. The rest of the students are Caucasian. Since they
are in first grade, the students are beginning to express their individuality. Each student has their own likes and
dislikes as well as strengths and weaknesses.
Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 4
C. Narrative: Implications for Whole Class Instruction Based on Information from Table 1.2 (limited to 1 page)
I can use the information I have gathered about student characteristics and apply the information to whole class instruction. Since the class is very

diverse in terms of intellectual abilities, I will need to make sure each student is understanding the material. There will be students who understand

the material very quickly and there will be students who will struggle with the concept. In order to make sure all students are learning to the best of

their ability, I will have extension activities ready for those students who understand the concept quickly and I will have activities available for

those students who need reteaching of the unmastered skill.

To reach the needs of all students, I will have a mixture of small group, whole group, and independent work during my lessons. I can have students

work in pairs, which will help with their social skills and they can learn from each other. When working with the whole group, I can make sure that

every student is following along and learning. The independent work allows me to see who is struggling and who is mastering the skill.

Since some students are struggling with peer interaction, I will constantly observe the students during group work to make sure they are following

directions, helping each other, and are being friendly to their peers. Also, the students struggle with multi-step directions, so I will make sure each

student understands the directions. I will provide step-by-step instructions and I will observe the students to see if they are following along and are

on task. If I see that the students are off-task, I will redirect them to their learning.

There are two students who are ELL in my class, so I will have very clear directions and I will check in with them to see if they are understanding

the lesson. I will be careful of how I word the concepts, so the students who are ELL will not become confused with the vocabulary.

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 5


D. Sub- Groups/Students Information
Describe this Why was this
subgroup/student using subgroup/student What was learned about this subgroup/student?
information from Table 1.1 selected?
Student A is a Caucasian, I chose Student A Intellectual
male student who is gifted. because he is an Student A is very intelligent, but lacks motivation to learn. Sometimes, he
The student is very intelligent student, refuses to do an assignment and will become disengaged in his learning. He
intelligent, but lacks but often lacks loves to read and has great math skills.
motivation. This student is motivation and
also Emotionally Disturbed struggles with peer-
and often struggles interaction. I want to Social
controlling his anger. help him with his Student A struggles with his social skills. He can get frustrated with his peers
SUBGROUP social skills and get very quickly and might yell or become physical. When this happens, we talk
or him interested in his with Student A, but he refuses to acknowledge what the teacher is saying.
FOCUS learning. Student A does not work well with others. He does not have many friends, but
STUDENT he tries to play with his peers at recess. He has 1 good friend that he usually
plays with.
Personal
Student A has had a difficult school year so far. His father recently passed
away and his home life was not the best. His parents did argue frequently.
Currently, Student A is living at his grandparents and does not have a stable
home. The student does have interests and if you talk about Student A’s
interests with him, he will open up and start talking. He enjoys sports, Boy
Scouts, and video games.
Student B is an African I chose Student B Intellectual
American, female student because she is a very Student B is a very smart girl. She is a great reader and writer. However, she is
who is ELL. She loves to talk intelligent girl, but often caught copying her peers work, when she is fully capable of completing
SUBGROUP
and is intelligent, but she she needs to work on her own work.
or
does not follow directions her listening skills. I
FOCUS
and gets distracted easily. know that she is able Social
STUDENT
to do the work, so I Student B is very social and sweet. She has many friends and loves to talk to
want to help her her peers. Since she likes to talk, she can become easily distracted and misses
important directions and parts of her learning.

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 6


improve her Personal
listening skills. Student B is an ELL. She has parents that are divorced, but they are very
involved in her life and her school. Student B’s parents want their daughter to
succeed and are willing to work with the teacher to help improve Student B’s
listening skills.

E. Narrative Implications for Sub-Group’s/Focus Student’s Instruction (limited to 1 page)


My goal is to help Student A improve his social skills and help him become interested in his learning. To reach this goal, I will make sure I create

lessons that get him interested in his learning. I might tie-in something that interests him, like sports. By using one of his interests, it might make

him excited about learning. If Student A understands the concept quickly, I will have extension activities ready for Student A. This way, he will

stay challenged and interested in his learning.

To help with Student A’s social skills, I will have group work. This will help him work on his peer interactions. I will observe Student A to make

sure he is being nice to his peers and following directions. If I find that he is not working well with others, I will talk with Student A about his

actions and teach him how he should act during group work.

My goal is to help Student B improve her listening skills. I know that she is capable of learning the concepts, so I want to focus on her listening

skills during various lessons. If I see that she is talking during instruction, I will use proximity control. I will walk over to her and remind her to get

back to her learning. Before instruction, I can remind the class of our classroom rules. I can emphasize the importance of following directions and

not talking while the teacher is talking.

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 7


During group/partner activities, I can put Student B in a group that I know are model students. Seeing students following directions and listening to

the teacher might help Student B with her listening skills. If she sees her peers following directions, she might be inclined to follow in her peers’

steps.

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 8


II. Instructional Design

A. Narrative Description of Range of Objectives and Rationale for Selection (limited to 1 page)
In my unit, there was a wide range of objectives. I chose these objectives because they aligned with the standards that were being taught in this

unit. Since this unit is a math unit, I chose cognitive objectives. The objectives varied in levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Since students are at the

beginning stages of learning and understanding addition, my unit did not include the evaluation level of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Some objectives had

more than one level of Bloom’s Taxonomy because the objectives were addressing multiple items. In my unit, I have eight objectives, so I would

have one objective per lesson. These objectives were created to encompass what would be taught within each lesson.

At the beginning of my math unit, students were learning to recognize parts of a number. Since students were learning a new concept, the first

couple of objectives were broad, knowledge-based objectives. As students became familiar with number patterns and parts of a number, they were

able to apply past information to a new concept. Eventually, students were analyzing number sentences and even creating their own addition

number sentences. This allowed students to start with a lower-level of thinking and build up to a higher level of thinking.

B. State Objectives Here: Focus should be on student performance – not activities. What will students know or be able to do? (limited to 1 page)

Level(s)
Obj.
Unit Objectives (e.g. Bloom’s
No.
Taxonomy)
The students will be able to recognize two-part spatial patterns of numbers with at least 75% accuracy.
1
Knowledge
2 The students will be able to recognize parts of a number as a strategy for addition with at least 75% accuracy. Knowledge
Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 9
The students will be able to apply their knowledge of parts of a number to find ways to make 8 with at least
3
75% accuracy. Application
The students will be able to recognize parts of the number 9 and create addition number sentences with at least
4
75% accuracy. Knowledge/Synthesis
The students will be able to compute addition number sentences and recognize the two parts and whole amount
5
within a number sentence with at least 75% accuracy. Knowledge/Analysis
The students will be able to write addition number sentences and solve word problems about joining with at
6
least 75% accuracy. Application
The students will be able to create addition number sentences by using the same addends, but in a different
7
order and compare the sum with at least 75% accuracy. Analysis/Synthesis
8 The students will be able to use a variety of objects to solve addition story problems with at least 75% accuracy. Application/Analysis

C. Identify State Standards – Benchmarks Addressed by Unit Objectives – How do objectives address these standards? (limited to 1 page)
In this unit, my objectives address some of the Common Core State Standards. One objective that is addressed in this unit is 1.OA.1. This standard

is under the domain of Operations and Algebraic Thinking and states that students should be able to “use addition and subtraction within 20 to

solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions”.

Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 address standard 1.OA.1. Students are using addition within 20 to solve various problems, including word

problems. Throughout the unit, students will be using manipulatives, such as counters, to put together and create addition number sentences. Also,

students will be comparing number sentences and finding unknown parts of a number.

Another Common Core State Standard within the Operations and Algebraic Thinking domain is 1.OA.3. Standard 1.OA.3 says students should be

able to “apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract”. Objective 7 is addresses this standard. In this unit, students are learning

the commutative property of addition. Students will apply their knowledge addition in a new way. Students will learn to create addition number

sentences by using the same addends, but in a different order. Then, the students compare the sums of the addition number sentences.

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 10


Pre-Assessment: Topic 1 Pretest (5 questions consisting of multiple choice, word problem, and fill-in-the-black; 7 points total; quiz taken on 10/8)

T Lesson Formative
Instructional Activities/ Describe Specific Adaptations/
Lesson Date R Objecti Assessment
Strategies Differentiation
I ve(s) (formal/informal)
Pretest-Students completed pretest using Formative
pencil and paper. Assessment- Pretest
Lesson 1.1- Partner game/activity with
1 10/8 R, I 1-8
dominoes to introduce addition; Group Informal Assessment-
No adaptation or differentiation was needed.
discussion of math concept; Independent Group Discussion;
work with 1.1 math packet and 1.1 quiz Observation; 1.1 Quiz
Lesson 1.2- Group discussion about making
numbers from their parts (part, part, whole
amount); Think-Pair-Share when identifying
Informal Assessment-
the parts and whole amount; Independent
2 10/9 T, R 1,2
work with 1.2 math packet and 1.2 quiz;
Group Discussion; No adaptation or differentiation was needed.
Questioning; 1.2 Quiz
Students used manipulatives (counters)
when learning how two parts can make up a
number.
Lesson 1.3- Group discussion about the
different ways to make 8; Partner work- Informal Assessment-
3 10/10 T 1, 2, 3 students work together to discuss and find Questioning; No adaptation or differentiation was needed.
the different ways to make 8; Independent Observation; 1.3 Quiz
work with 1.3 math packet and 1.3 quiz.
Lesson 1.4- Group discussion about the
Informal Assessment-
different ways to make 9; Partner work-
Group Discussion,
4 10/11 T, R 1, 2, 4 students work in pairs to show parts of 9;
Think-Pair-Share, 1.4
No adaptation or differentiation was needed.
Independent work with 1.4 math packet and
Quiz
1.4 quiz
Lesson 1.5- Group discussion about creating
addition number sentences to show part- Students were split into different groups depending
Informal Assessment-
part-whole amount; Small group-use on their math knowledge level on this topic. Small
Group Discussion;
5 10/15 T 2, 5 whiteboards to write number sentences
Using Whiteboards;
groups allowed the teacher to help students with
when given only parts or only the whole varying misconceptions and allowed enrichment for
1.5 Quiz
number; Independent work with 1.5 math specific students.
packet and 1.5 quiz
Lesson 1.6- Group discussion about addition Informal Assessment- Students were split into different group depending
6 10/16 T, R 2, 5, 6 number sentences and the meaning of Group Discussion; on their needs. Some groups needed reteaching of
“joining”; Small group- students use Observation of the concept, while other groups needed enrichment.

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 11


whiteboards to write addition number Manipulative
sentences; Students used manipulatives (Counters) Use;
(counters) to show joining; Independent Whiteboards; 1.6 Quiz
work with 1.6 math packet and 1.6 quiz
Lesson 1.7- Group discussion about how to
add numbers, write addition sentences, and
Informal Assessment-
how to add the same numbers in a different
Group Discussion,
order and compare the sums; Small groups- Students were split into different groups depending
Whiteboards;
7 10/17 T, R, I 1, 2, 5, 7 use whiteboards and manipulatives
Manipulative
on their needs. Some groups needed reteaching of
(counters) to write number sentences using the concept, while other groups needed enrichment.
(Counters) use; 1.7
the same addends, but in a different order;
Quiz
Independent work with 1.7 math packet and
1.7 quiz
Lesson 1.8- Group discussion about solving
Informal Assessment-
addition story problems using objects; Small Students were divided into different groups
Group Discussion;
1, 2, 5, 6, groups- use whiteboards and manipulatives depending on their needs. Some groups needed
8 10/22 T, R
8 (counters) to solve word problems;
Whiteboards;
reteaching of the concept, while other groups needed
Manipulative Use, 1.8
Independent work with 1.8 math packet and enrichment.
Quiz
1.8 quiz
If students needed help reading directions and math
Students complete the post-test with pencil Formative
9 10/23 R 1-8
and paper. Assessment- Post-test
word problems, I read the math word problems
aloud.

Summative Assessment: Topic 1 Post-test (5 questions consisting of multiple choice, word problem, and fill-in-the-black; 7 points total)

Table 2.1 – Instructional Design – Unit Plan


T- Lesson integrates technology; R- Lesson uses reading strategies; I- Lesson demonstrates integration of content across and within content fields

Table 2.2: Narrative Description of Pre-assessment, Formative Assessments, and Summative Assessment (limited to 2 pages)
Which
objectives Identify how the assessment will be
Describe the assessment to be Explain rationale for choosing
II. D, H, and L does this scored and/or the criteria to be
used this assessment
assessment used for evaluation.
address?
The assessment used was a pencil I chose this type of assessment This assessment is 5 questions, but the
and paper test. The test consisted because I found that it would assessment is scored out of 7 points. I
of 5 questions. The type of effectively tell me what students do chose this score because some problems
D. Pre-Assessment
questions varied. There were 2 fill not know and what they already 1-8 consisted of 2 parts. If a question had
(Diagnostic) in the blank questions, 2 multiple know about addition. Since this is a two parts to it, then that specific question
choice questions, and 1word math unit, I felt that it was important would be worth 2 points. Since this is a
problem. These questions were to give students a pencil and paper pre-test, I am not assigning an actual
Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 12
based on the standards and test. This way, I could see their grade to this pre-assessment. Students
objectives. thought process when solving math will not be penalized for answers they
problems and I could see which got incorrect.
areas within the math unit students
do not understand yet.
I would ask students a question, they
would write their response on their
whiteboard, and then show me their
I informally assessed students with board. I chose to use whiteboards as
For this formative assessment, I do not
whiteboard checks. I would ask the a formative assessment throughout
H. Formative give an actual score or grade to students.
students a question and they would my unit because it was a quick and
I carefully observe the students answers
Assessment write their response on their simple way to see which students are 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
and make a mental note of who is
- Informal whiteboard. Then, they would hold understanding the lesson and which
understanding the concept and who is
up their white board for me to see. students need more practice. Also, I
struggling with the math concept.
could see misconceptions students
may have had about the specific
lesson and I could address the
misconception immediately.
I chose this type of assessment
I informally assessed the students because it shows me how each
through quizzes. After every student is doing in class. I can see
lesson, students will take a show- who understood the concept and who For this assessment, I do give a grade to
what-you-know quiz that relates to struggled with the concept. I could students. The quizzes vary in points. If a
Formative Assessment
the concept they just learned. They also see their thought process 1-8 student got a problem incorrect, then
- Formal would take their test independently through them solving math problems they will be counted off for that specific
and then turn it in to me at the end and even misconceptions students problem.
of the lesson. may have. I can use this knowledge
to see if I need to reteach a concept
to students.
I chose this type of assessment
The assessment used was a pencil
because I found that it would This assessment is 5 questions, but the
and paper test. The test consisted
effectively tell me what students do assessment is scored out of 7 points. I
of 5 questions. The type of
not know and what know about chose this score because some problems
questions varied. There were 2 fill
addition. Since this is a math unit, I consisted of 2 parts. If a question had
L. Summative in the blank questions, 2 multiple
felt that it was important to give 1-8 two parts to it, then that specific question
Assessment choice questions, and 1word
students a pencil and paper test. This would be worth 2 points. Since this is a
problem. These questions were
way, I could see their thought post-test, I am assigning an actual grade
based on the standards and
process when solving math problems to this assessment. Students will be
objectives.
and I could see which areas within penalized for answers they got incorrect.
the math unit they do not fully
Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 13
understand. The post-test is the same
as the pre-test because I want to see
if the students have improved or if
there are any changes since learning
about addition.

Narrative for Instructional Design


II. E.
The lessons are sequenced in a way that the concepts start as very broad. As the lessons continue, the

lessons become more complex. Each lesson builds upon the previous lesson. For example, in order to

Why are the lessons sequenced in this understand lesson 3, the students must understand the concepts learned in lesson 1 and lesson 2. Students
manner?
gradually become accustomed to addition through discussions, manipulatives, and various assignments. As

each lesson went on, students continued to go more in-depth with their learning.

II. F.
Various learning strategies were used in this unit. Technology was integrated through the use of the online

textbook and math-related images. This appealed to students who are visual learners. Math manipulatives,

such as counters, were used throughout the unit. This appealed to kinesthetic and visual learners. Every
What learning strategies were incorporated
into this unit? lesson, students were involved in group discussion. This discussion appealed to students who are auditory

learners. Whiteboards were incorporated into the lessons for those students who need prefer to write and

create addition math sentences.

The instructional strategies and activities addressed the learning objectives because they allowed the
How do the instructional strategies/activities
address the learning objectives for this unit? students to practice and be creative with their math. Students were able to apply what they have learned

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 14


through the use of manipulatives and whiteboards. These instructional strategies helped students build their

knowledge of addition number sentences and allowed them to practice the various concepts.

II. G.
Critical thinking and problem-solving strategies will be implemented through whole group discussion and

modeling throughout every lesson. At the beginning of each lesson, students are asked an open-ended

How will critical thinking and problem question that relates to the concept being taught. Students must think critically to solve a problem. Another
solving strategies be implemented? Give
example would be group discussion. During group discussion, the teacher models various problem-solving
specific examples of use.
strategies to the students. Then, the students get to practice these strategies, such as underlining the question

or boxing important information, during independent work or small group time.

II. I.
Technology is integrated for the teacher through the online book. The teacher can show the online book

How will technology be integrated within the through the projector. Students and teacher can interact with the online book during whole group
unit? Explain both teacher use and student
discussion. Students use technology through the use of XtraMath. When students have free time, they may
use.
use the Ipads to get on XtraMath and practice their math facts.

II. J.
This unit consists of integrating reading with math. Students must use their reading skills, like decoding, to

How does the unit demonstrate integration of read various directions and word problems. In each lesson, students are learning math vocabulary terms,
content across and within content fields?
which will help them become better readers and will help them understand math concepts.

Explain the reading strategies that will be The reading strategies that will be used throughout the unit is decoding unfamiliar words and learning new
used throughout the unit. Give specific
examples. (Remember that using text is not a math vocabulary. Students are learning new vocabulary (example: sum, addends, join) and they will
reading strategy)

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 15


constantly be reading math directions and word problems. When students are taking a quiz or completing

independent work, it is important that they know how to decode words or break apart the sounds to learn

the unfamiliar word.

II. K.
Since this is first grade, many students are emerging readers and struggle with the directions. In order to

help those who are emerging readers, I would read the directions to the students. This way, they knew what

What specific adaptations or differentiated was expected of them and would not become frustrated when working on the problems. Also, I had small
activities were used to accommodate
group instruction when needed. If I noticed that a concept would be difficult for students, I would create
individual learning needs for the whole class?
groups based on the needs of students. That way, I could work with students in a smaller group setting and

make sure everyone was getting the help they needed.

In math, there was a specific group of students who struggled with various math concepts. In order to help

those students, we met as a small group. I would have students to solve simplified math problems using

counters and whiteboards. If students were understanding the concept, I would provide students with more
What specific adaptations or differentiated
activities were used to accommodate advanced math problems. During whole group instruction, I would observe this group of students to make
individual learning needs for the identified
sub-groups / students? sure they were on task and paying attention. I would observe them to see if they are understanding the

concept or if they appear lost. If they appeared confused, I would work with them during their small group

time or independent time.

Provide a copy of two complete detailed lesson plans in Appendix B.

Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 16


III. Teaching and Learning

A. Narrative: Daily Teaching Reflections (limited to 4 pages)

Day 1: Today was the first day of introducing addition to students. Before we began the lesson, I gave the students a pretest. The
students had never taken a pretest before, so they were a little confused. Once I explained to the students that the pretest is not for an
actual grade, the students became less stressed. I explained to them that the pretest will help me determine what I need to teach the
students and how I should teach them. Also, I told the students that the pretest will help me see where students are in their learning.
Every student completed their pretest.
Once the students turned in their pretest, I introduced students to the idea of addition through a game. They really enjoyed playing a
making numbers game and I was able to quickly assess to see if students have previous knowledge of addition. When I walked around
and watched the students playing the game, I noticed that a few students were struggling to add two numbers together. As I continue
to teach this concept, I will monitor those students to see if they need extra help.
As I taught the lesson, I felt that the students were actively engaged. They really enjoyed playing the math game and I think that got
the students excited to learn the math concept. Through whole group instruction and independent work, I observed the students and
found that most of the students were understanding the concept. Also, I found that it is important to have engaging activities for
students. The more the students are engaged, the more they will learn. In my future lessons, I will have engaging math activities for
students or engaging anticipatory sets that get students thinking about what they will be learning that day.
There are some things that I would like to improve in my lessons. For example, this lesson required a lot of materials. I had counters,
number cards, dominoes, game markers, and math worksheets. I spent a lot of my teaching time passing materials out to students. In
the future, I will be more prepared with my materials. I will have all the materials set out before we begin the math lesson. This way, I
can focus on instruction, rather than materials.

Day 2: Today, students learned about the different ways to make 6 and 7. Before teaching the lesson, I thought the students would
struggle with this concept. They have learned to make 10, but I thought they would become confused about making 6 and 7. When we
began the lesson, I found that the students quickly understood the lesson. To get the students engaged in the lesson, we did a short
activity involving counters and a paper plate. I had the paper plate on the ground and I would drop counters onto the paper plate. As a
whole group, we counted how many counters landed inside the paper plate and how many counters landed outside of the paper plate.
Then, we determined the whole amount of the counters. Doing this activity with the students got the students excited about what we
would be learning. In my future lessons, I want to continue to have engaging activities before a lesson. This way, I can quickly assess
students’ prior knowledge as well as get the students excited about learning.
During the lesson, I explained the concept to the students. Then, we did a few problems together. I noticed that the students were
understanding the concept very well, so I adjusted my lesson plan. Instead of staying whole group for the majority of the lesson, I had
students complete the math packet by themselves. On more difficult questions, I had the students Think-Pair-Share. The Think-Pair-
Share was very effective because it allowed the students to discuss with their peers about a math concept. The students were able to

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get the help they need, and they were able to explain their thinking on a deeper level. As I continue with this unit, I want to use various
cooperative strategies.

Day 3: For this lesson, students were learning to make 8. I started the lesson with an open-ended question. I showed the students a
picture of 8 white balloons. Then, I told them that some of these balloons are blue and some balloons are green. The students were told
to think of different ways the balloons can be green and blue. Students worked independently and then we met as a group to share our
ideas. Having an open-ended question allowed students to think independently and allowed students to explore. This strategy was a
success.
As the lesson continued, I noticed that the students became a little disengaged. Because they became disengaged in the lesson, some
misbehavior occurred. In the future, I will make sure that I will adjust my lesson to fit the needs of my students. If I noticed that they
are understanding a concept quickly, I will allow the students to complete the rest of the work independently or in small groups. This
way, the students will not become disinterested during whole group discussion.
One thing that went well during the lesson was my questioning strategies. Instead of asking a math question and the students answered
with a number, I followed up with the students by asking, “How do you know this?”. By asking this question, I am able to see
students’ thought process when solving math problems. Also, having the students explain their answer allows other students to listen
and learn various solving strategies. I will continue to ask, “How do you know this?” throughout my math lessons.

Day 4: In lesson 1-4, students successfully made 9 in a variety of ways. Since students were understanding the math concept fairly
quickly, I decided to adjust the lesson to fit the needs of the students. To make it more challenging for the students, I had students
make a table to show the different ways to make 9. As we made the table, I called on various students. This way, I could see if there
were any misconceptions throughout the class. After we made the table of all the different ways to make 9, we had a group discussion.
We talked about all the different combinations, any patterns we noticed, and we made connections to our previous understanding of
numbers and number sense. I think that challenging students is very important in the classroom. I found that if you set high
expectations and challenge students, then they will meet you at that level. Students enjoy a challenge and I want to make sure they are
getting the education they deserve.
When students took their quiz, most of the students scored high on the quiz. This showed me that they are learning the material and
are ready for the next lesson. However, I noticed that many students missed a question that was a word problem. To help those
students who missed this specific problem, I will use more word problems throughout my lessons. This way, students will get the
practice they need with word problems.

Day 5: Lesson 1-5 introduced students to addition expressions and number sentences. This was a very important lesson for students
and I found that they understood the concept fairly well. To begin this lesson, I had students come sit down in front of the whiteboard.
Having the student up close to where I teach helped me make sure they were paying attention. If I taught the lesson and they were
seated at the desk, I believe that many students would be distracted by the items in or on their desks. When I began the lesson in a
close, whole group setting, I found that students focused more on the concepts being taught.
Since this lesson was an introduction to addition, I decided to start math groups. I grouped the students by their math knowledge and
abilities. That way, I can provide assistance to those students who need extra help and I can provide enrichment for students who need
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more challenging work. The math groups went over very well. Since I worked with small groups, I was able to make sure I had
everyone’s attention and helped those students who were struggling or had misconceptions about number sentences and expressions.
In my future classroom, I want to have differentiated math groups because I found them extremely helpful for both the teacher and the
students.

Day 6: In this lesson, we focused on word problems and the concept of joining numbers. I used differentiated math groups and they
were a success. In small groups, I allowed students to work with various manipulatives. I had students use whiteboards to write their
addition number sentences and I had counters for students to help them visually see the math problem. The whiteboards were a quick
way for me to see which students were understanding the material and which students had misconceptions about addition number
sentences. As I continue teaching, I will use various strategies and manipulatives, like whiteboards, to assess students’ understanding.
I can use the information to adjust my lesson to fit the needs of my students.
Overall, the students did well on their quiz for lesson 1-6. We have been working on word problems and I can see an improvement in
their understanding of word problems. I will continue to use word problems throughout my math lessons to make sure students are
improving.

Day 7: This lesson was a little difficult for some students. In the lesson, students were adding in any order. This concept is very new
to students and many struggled with the idea of moving addend around and they equal the same whole amount. A misconception that I
noticed was students were confused about the meaning of changing the order of the addends. Many students would write an addition
sentence and then write a different additions sentence, with different addends, but the two number sentences equaled the same whole
amount. To help students overcome this misconception, I met with students in small groups. We worked together using whiteboards
and manipulatives to show that you can change the order of the addends, but the whole amount will always be the same. The small
group setting was very successful because I was able to discuss with each student and help meet their individual needs.
I did notice that as students were working on their independent work, they were talking to their neighbors and distracting others.
Because they were talking to their neighbors, they missed some important information about the lesson. Next time, I will have a
discussion before we start math groups. In the discussion, I will go over the rules of group time and independent work and review my
expectations with the students. This way, they will have a better understanding of what is expected of them.

Day 8: Today went very well. In this lesson, we used various objects to create our own word problems. Because we have been
practicing using word problems throughout previous lessons, students successfully mastered this lesson. To make it more challenging
for the students, I gave students various picture prompts and students had to write their own word problems to match the picture
provided. Students wrote their word problems on their whiteboards. Then, they shared their problems with a partner. This activity was
very engaging, and students thought about the concept in a different way.
When I gave my students independent work, the students were supposed to read a word problem, then use counters to solve the word
problem. I did not consider the reading abilities of my students. I had many students come up to me when I was working with other
groups. They could not read the word problem and needed assistance in reading the problem. I had to stop my teaching to help other
students who were struggling. Next time, I will go over the word problems before I give them to students. By reading the problems

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and directions to students, the students will have a better understanding of what they need to do during independent work. Overall, the
students did well on the quiz. Since they did well, I think they are ready for their post-test.

Day 9: Today, the students took their post-test. Before they began taking the test, I had them sit up close to the whiteboard. This way,
I could have a discussion about the material and concepts. We reviewed the various concepts we have learned over the past 8 days. I
think that it was important to have a review over these concepts because it helps students have a better understanding of what is
expected of them on the test. After we reviewed, I gave the post-test. Students used folders as “offices” for privacy and to help reduce
cheating. I read each question to the students. Reading the questions and directions to the students was very important because some
students in the class are emerging readers who would struggle with reading the question and directions. If a student had questions, I
made sure that they were to raise their hand and to not come up to me. If they come up to me, they might be inclined to look at their
peers’ papers as they walked back to their desk.
The students did very well on this test and I can tell that they have mastered the concepts that I taught. There were a few students who
struggled with some questions, so I will meet with them in a small group setting to clear up any confusion or misconceptions.

B. Classroom Management Plan (rules, procedures, preventative strategies, supportive strategies) (limited to 1 page)
It is very important to have set clear expectations, rules, and procedures in the classroom. Before I taught this lesson, I had a group discussion with

the students about my expectations of them. I explained to the students that my rules, procedures, and expectations are the same as my cooperating

teacher. At the very beginning of the school year, the class created classroom rules. Having the students involved in the creating classroom rules

process holds them accountable for their actions. As a class, the students created these classroom rules:

 Be kind

 Share

 Keep our hands and feet to ourselves

 Tell the truth

 Do quality work

 Transition quietly

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 Follow directions the first time

 Take our time, but get our work done

 Not talk while the teacher is talking

If misbehavior is occurring while I am teaching, I will give the students a verbal warning. If they continue with the misbehavior, they will owe

minutes at recess. This means students will spend time “walking a square” at recess. Once they finish walking a square, they are to come to a

teacher and have a small discussion about the reason they had to owe minutes at recess. This discussion allows students to think about their actions

and determine how they should behave during school.

As I am teaching, I used preventative strategies. I would use proximity control if I noticed students were talking or not following directions. Usually, the

proximity control reduced the misbehavior. Another strategy I used was complementing the students following directions. By complementing and noticing those

students who were following directions, it made the other students want to do well too.

C. Student Interaction and Engagement (Strategies for promoting student to student interaction and student motivation) (limited to 1 page)
To promote student to student interaction and student motivation, I used various strategies. For example, I used Think-Pair-Share throughout my

unit. In Think-Pair-Share, I had students think about a math problem. Then I would have them pair with their shoulder partner to discuss their

answers. This discussion helps students share their knowledge and help their peers who are struggling with the math concept. Another strategy I

used was whole group discussions. In whole group discussion, I had students sit close to the whiteboard. Then, we would have an in-depth

discussion where students share their ideas and the process of solving various math problems. Also, I allowed students to come up to the

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whiteboard to share their answers. Students were very engaged in this because they were able to “be the teacher” and explain how they solved a

math problem. Individual whiteboards were another strategy I used to promote student interaction and motivation. I had each student use

whiteboards to practice their math problems. Every student was working and responding to the given math problem. They thought writing on

whiteboards was fun and I found it as a quick way to determine if students were understanding the material.

D. Student Communication (detailed description of appropriate strategies to encourage student to student communication) (limited to 1 page)
To encourage student to student communication, I had them work in small groups or partners throughout various lessons. For example, I would ask

an open-ended math question and I would have students pair up to share their ideas and solve the problem together. This peer to peer interaction

helps students build their communication skills as well as think on a deeper level with their math. Students are having to explain the math problem

and process to each other. Another strategy I used was thumbs up if you agree or thumbs down if you do not agree. I would call on students to

come to the whiteboard to solve a math problem. Then, I would ask the students if they agree that the problem is correct or not agree if the problem

is incorrect. If the problem was incorrect, we would discuss the problem and find the correct answer in a way that does not embarrass the student

who got the problem wrong. By doing this, students are working with each other and helping each other learn the math concepts.

Narrative: Analysis of Assessment


E. Pre-Assessment

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I found that the students have previous knowledge of addition. The average score on the pre-test was a

92%. I found that many know how to add, but they do not know how to explain addition. The lowest score
Overall analysis of results.
was a 57% and I had 10 students get 100% on the pre-test. Focus Student A received a 100% on the pre-test

and Focus Student B scored 85%.

I found that the students have an understanding of addition. There was one question that many students missed. This

Discuss the results in reference to question involved finding a missing part. The students were given the whole amount and given a part, but they had to
the learning objectives.
find the missing part. This question relates to objective 1, objective 2, and objective 3.

Even though the students scored high on the pre-assessment, it is still necessary for students to learn the unit. The

unit goes in-depth with addition. Before beginning the unit, students had some knowledge of addition, but they
Describe how pre-assessment data
struggled to explain their answers. As I planned my lessons, I made sure that students were gaining a deeper level of
was used to proceed with instruction
for all students. understanding addition. I also added manipulatives, such as counters and cubes to help them see the addition concepts

from a visual aspect.

To differentiate, I had various mathematical problems for students to answer. Depending on the ability of the student,

I will assign them different problems. If I noticed that a student is mastering a concept quickly, I will provide them

What is the plan to differentiate for with a more challenging task. In addition, I had guided math/math groups. I was able to teach in a small-group setting
all learners?
and fit the needs of the students. I worked with students who needed more challenging task and I worked with

students who needed extra help understanding a concept.

F. Formative Assessment

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Overall, the students did fairly well on the formative assessments. I used a variety of formative assessments to make

sure all learners were learning the material in a variety of ways. I had students use whiteboards, work with partners,
Overall analysis of results.
complete math packets, and complete Show-What-You-Know quizzes.

Based on my results, I found that the students learned what they intended to learn. The formative assessments I used
Discuss the results in reference to
the learning objectives. each day were directly related to the objectives being taught. I found that the majority of the students were learning

the material. If they were not learning the material, I would meet with a small group to help them with their
Are students learning what was
intended they learn? misconceptions and confusion about certain concepts.

Throughout my lessons, I made adaptations. If I noticed students were struggling, I would slow down and provide

Discuss any adaptations based on the additional math problems for students to practice. I would teach the concept in multiple ways to make sure all
results of formative assessments.
students were learning. In addition, I would have small-group time for reteaching a specific concept.

I used differentiation throughout my unit. There were some students, like Focus Student A, who understood the

Identify differentiation needed to lesson quickly. To help challenge the students, I would provide addition enrichment pages for the students, where
help all students meet the goals and they can take their knowledge to the next level. Also, I had some students who were struggling with various concepts,
objectives of this unit.
so I had small-group interventions with them to clear up any misconceptions about certain concepts.

G. Summative Assessment
Overall, the students comprehended the unit. The average score on the post test was a 96%. There was no pattern of

errors on the post-test. The lowest score was a 6 (86%) and 14 people scored 100%. Focus Student A received 100%
What did the disaggregated data of
the assessment reveal? on the test and Focus Student B received a 100% on the test. The students did an exceptional job on their test. This

score showed me that the students understood the unit and are ready for the next topic.

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Based on my results from the students’ test scores, I think that the students understood the objectives. The students

Discuss the results in reference to learned what needed to be learned and successfully applied their knowledge to the summative assessment. No
the learning objectives.
students’ scores decreased.

The students learned what was intended to learn. Students were supposed to learn addition and based on the results

Did all students learn what was from the formative assessments and summative assessments, I believe that they successfully learned the material. For
intended they learn? Explain.
the majority of the students, I think that the students mastered all 8 objectives.

Provide a copy of pre-assessment document and the corresponding scoring key/rubric in Appendix C.

Provide a copy of one formal formative assessment document and the corresponding scoring key/rubric in Appendix C.

Provide a copy of one informal formative assessment document and the corresponding scoring key/rubric in Appendix C.

Provide a copy of the summative assessment document and the corresponding scoring key/rubric in Appendix C.

H. Visual Representation of Disaggregated Data


Chart/Table/Graphs of disaggregated data for the Pre-assessment should be included in Appendix C.
Due to the varied nature of data collected by the teacher candidates, each candidate is asked to create a chart/table/graph that includes data for
the Whole Class, Subgroup, and Focus Students. Title the table/chart/graph and use labels to accurately portray the data.

Chart/Table/Graph of disaggregated data for the Summative Assessment should be included in Appendix C.
Due to the varied nature of data collected by the teacher candidates, each candidate is asked to create a chart/table/graph that includes data for
the Whole Class, Subgroup, and Focus Students. Title the table/chart/graph and use labels to accurately portray the data.

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IV. Self-Evaluation and Reflection

A. Narrative description of Successful Activities and future implications

Based on the analysis of all the assessment


Give more than one reason for each of the successes identified.
results, identify TWO learning objectives
from the unit students were most successful.
Objective 1: The students will be able to This objective was successful for many reasons. One reason it was successful was because we practiced

recognize two-part spatial patterns of numbers this objective in almost every lesson. This objective was very broad, so it covered the majority of the

with at least 75% accuracy. lessons. Students practiced almost every day recognizing two-part spatial patterns of numbers. Another

reason it was successful was because we applied this objective to many different things. We applied it

through practicing with whiteboards, practicing with counters, and our math packets and show what you

know quizzes.

Objective 2: The students will be able to This object was successful too. It was successful because students had a lot of practice computing

compute addition number sentences and addition number sentences and recognizing the two parts and whole amount within a number sentence.

Every day, I would write a number sentence on the board and students would have to determine the parts
recognize the two parts and whole amount
and whole amount within the number sentence. This extra practice helped students gain this
within a number sentence with at least 75%
understanding of the concept. Another reason why I know that this object was successful was because the
accuracy.
students scored high on their show what you know quizzes and every student got the problem (involving

creating number sentence and determine the parts and whole amount) correct on their summative

assessment.

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Discuss at least TWO things to do differently in the future to extend these successes to continue students’ academic growth.
In the future, I would like to have a review before we begin the next lesson. I think it would be beneficial to the students to review their previous knowledge

from the day before. This way, students might be able to use their previous knowledge gained to help them with the new lesson or concept being taught. Another

thing I would like to do differently in the future is have more variety with formative assessments. Instead of having students complete a quiz at the end, I might

have them do a different exit ticket. I might have them complete a small task to show that they understand the concept, or I might do a thumbs up if you

understand the concept, thumbs down if you do not understand the concept, and thumbs to the side if you are in between. This way, I can determine how the

students feel about themselves and the concept taught.

B. Narrative description of Least Successful Activities and future implications


Based on the analysis of all the assessment
Give more than one reason for each of the least successful objectives identified.
results, identify TWO learning objectives
from the unit students were least successful.
Objective 1: The students will be able to create This objective was the least successful because it was an abstract concept for the students. Students did

addition number sentences by using the same not comprehend that they can change the order of the addends and the sum will stay the same. There were

addends, but in a different order and compare many misconceptions about this concept and I should have spent more time addressing these

misconceptions. Also, I should have done a review day over this concept to solidify the students’
the sum with at least 75% accuracy.
understanding of this objective.

Objective 2: The students will be able to use a Students found it challenging to use a variety of objects to solve addition story problems. Before

variety of objects to solve addition story introducing this concept, students were only working with counters and writing number sentences. When I

introduced word problems involving different types of objects, students did not understand that people
problems with at least 75% accuracy.
can add different objects. I should have reviewed the previous lesson before introducing this objective.

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That way, students could apply their previous knowledge to the new concept. Also, I should have done a

review day after introducing this objective. A review day would have allowed me to meet with students

one-on-one or in a small group setting to work with them and address various misconceptions.

Discuss at least TWO things to do differently in the future to improve students’ performance.
To improve student performance, I will have review days within units. This way, I can meet with students one-on-one or in small groups after they learn a

challenging concept. The review will help students gain a better understanding of the concept and they will feel more prepared to learn the next lesson. Another

think I would like to do differently in the future is have math groups/guided math more often. I think it would have been beneficial to start the unit off with

guided math/math groups. That way, I could introduce the new topic in a small group setting and then work with students individually.

TABLE 4.1 Communication Log

Follow Up
Method of Result or Impact on (if
Date Person Contacted Contact Reason for Contact Instruction necessary)
I discussed with my cooperating
teacher about the upcoming unit. I
10/2/18 Cooperating Teacher Face-to-Face Discuss upcoming unit asked for advice and she gave me No
possible activities and
manipulatives to use within the unit.
I noticed that a student was
disengaged in a previous lesson. To
help that student, I asked my
10/8/18 Cooperating Teacher Face-to-Face Ask how to help a struggling student No
cooperating teacher for advice. She
gave me various strategies to use to
apply to the next lesson.

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Follow Up
Method of Result or Impact on (if
Date Person Contacted Contact Reason for Contact Instruction necessary)
I wanted to see how other teachers
were teaching this unit, so I asked a
team teacher how she teaches the
10/15/18 1st Grade Teacher Face-to-Face Recommendations unit. We compared how we were No
teaching and offered advice to each
other. I planned on using her
strategies in the upcoming lessons.

Add rows as needed

C. Narrative Reflection on Impact of Communications (limited to 1 page)

Communication is very important for teachers and students. I found that when I communicated with my cooperating teacher and other first grade teachers, it

made teaching the lesson within the unit more effective. I was able to collaborate with my cooperating teacher and other first grade teachers. I found that

collaboration is highly effective, and teachers can improve their understanding of a concept and strategies if they talk with other teachers. When I voiced my

concern about a student, my teacher was able to provide me with ideas as to how to help the student. Without communication, it would be difficult to teach an

effective lesson and find new ideas to better one’s teaching. Communicating with my cooperating teacher and other teachers in the first grade helped me become

a more effective teacher during math.

D. Narrative Reflection on Future Professional Development (limited to 1page)


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Identify at least TWO aspects of instruction that could be What specific professional development opportunities/activities will
improved. Explain reasoning. help to acquire that knowledge or skill?
Aspect 1: Time Management I want to improve on my time management skills. One way I can acquire this

skill is by asking my cooperating teacher for advice. She can offer me

strategies and advice as to how to manage time effectively. When I ask her, I

will take notes to remember these strategies and advice.

Aspect 2: Apply to Real-World Scenarios I want to improve of my teaching of applying knowledge or concepts taught to

the real world. I can become better at this by researching ways to apply

concepts to the real-world. I can watch videos of lessons, read articles, and

even find lesson plan examples online.

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REFERENCES

A. Atchity, personal communication, September 4, 2018.

District Overview. Olathe Public Schools. Retrieved from https://www.olatheschools.org/.

Foresman, S. & Wesley A. (2012). enVisionMATH Common Core. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Kansas State Department of Education. (2018). Kansas Report Card 2016-2017. Retrieved from

https://ksreportcard.ksde.org/.

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APPENDIX A

Ethnicity of Students in 1st Grade


African American,
Other, 4% 10%
Hispanic, 5%

White, 81%

African American Hispanic White Other

Ethnicity of Students in School


Other, 1%
Hispanic, 11%
African American,
4%

White, 84%

White African American Hispanic Other

Ethnicity of Students in School District


Other
Hispanic 1%
17%

African American
8%

White
74%

White African American Hispanic Other

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Economic Disadvantage in School District
Economically
Disadvantaged
28%

Non-Economically
Disadvantaged
72%
Non-Economically Disadvantaged Economically Disadvantaged

Economic Disadvantage in School


Economically
Disadvantaged
12%

Non-Economically
Disadvantaged
88%
Non-Economically Disadvantaged Economically Disadvantaged

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Economic Disadvantage in 1st Grade
Economically
Disadvantaged
9%

Non-Economically
Disadvantaged
91%
Economically Disadvantaged Non-Economically Disadvantaged

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APPENDIX B

Lesson Plan 1
Gradual Release of Responsibility Direct Modeling Lesson Plan Format Template
Lesson 1.1
Learner and Environmental Factors
 Grade Level: 1st
 Content Area: Math
Standards (KCCRS or Your State Standards):
 1.OA.1 Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to,
taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using
objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
 Lesson Performance Objective(s):
 The students will work with partners to recognize two-part spatial patterns of numbers with at least 75%
accuracy.
Materials:
 Pretest
 Common Core Review packets
 Making Numbers game
 2 game markers (10 sets)
 Number Cards 1-5 (10 sets)
 9 counters (10 sets)
 2 dry erase markers
 10 bags of dominoes
 1.1 math packet
 1.1 quiz
 Pencils
Background Knowledge Required:
 Knows how to read and write
 Knows numbers 1-10
 Has knowledge of part-part-whole
 Has some knowledge of number sentences
 Has some knowledge of addition
 Knows how to follow small multi-step directions
Student Grouping(s):
 Pretest- Independent
 Daily Common Core Review- Whole group
 Making Numbers game- partners
 Stage 1- Whole group
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 Stage 2- Whole group explanation; partner work with dominoes
 Stage 3- Whole group explanation; packet work is independent
 Show What You Know Quiz- Independent
Anticipatory Set and Purpose:
 Give pretest to students and remind them that this is not for a grade. It will just help me learn more about
each student and how I can help them in the future.
 Daily Common Core Review 1-1
o Dana drew this dot pattern. Which number tells how many dots Dana drew in all? 8
o Which does the ten-frame show? 8 and 2 more
o Sam put 5 strawberries on his plate. Then he put 2 more strawberries on his plate. Which plate is
Sam’s? Draw a circle around that plate. C
 Have students play Making Numbers with a partner. (10 minutes)
o Students take turns playing. Students are to place the number cards facedown and place their
markers on START.
o The students will then take turns choosing 2 cards. When a student chooses two cards, they are to
use the counters to make each number.
 Ex. One card will be yellow counters and the other card will use red counters.
o Once they make each number, they are to combine all the counters used with both cards to make
a new number. Students will then move their marker that many spaces.
o If a student lands on a red space, they are to follow the directions.
o Students keep playing until both students read FINISH.

Introduce the Lesson:

 Today, we get to find patterns for numbers that are broken into two parts!

Instruction:
Stage 1:
 Have students sit down by teacher chair.
 Draw a rectangle with a line down the middle. On the left side, have 4 dots. On the right side, have 1
dot. Use two different colored markers, one color for each set of dots.
o Ask students “Do you see any patterns that you have seen before?” It’s a part-part-whole; there
are two patterns; etc.
o Ask students “How many dots are in the first pattern? How many dots are in the other pattern?”4
dots; 1 dot
o Tell students “Another way to look at the card is to see the dots as one group. How many dots
are on the card altogether? 5
 Model for students how to count the dots. Circle each dot, so students know what dots
have already been counted.
 If students find it difficult to count from a number they recognize, have them go back and
count from one. Count with the students and circle the dots as you count them.
o Extension Question: How can I write this as a number sentence? 4 + 1 = 5
o Continue with more examples until students understand the concept.
 5 and 5
 4 and 2
 6 and 1
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Stage 2:
 Tell students “Now that we know a little bit about the patterns and how to add them together, we get to
do a fun activity!”
 Show students a baggie of dominoes. Tell students “We get to use these dominoes to help us count! You
are going to work in partners, but I am going to choose your partner. For this activity, you and your
partner will get a baggie of dominoes.” Show students the dominoes.
 Tell students “One student will take 1 domino out of the baggie. Together, you will look at the domino
and discuss the pattern that you see. How many dots are in the first pattern? How many dots are in the
other pattern? How many dots are on the domino altogether?”
 Tell students “You will take turns asking/answering these questions. One student will take the domino
out of the baggie and the other student will say the pattern and how many dots are on the domino. When
you are done using a domino, set it to the side. Do not put it back in your baggie.”
 Students take turns asking/answering domino questions.
Stage 3:
 Once they practice with all their dominoes, students return to their seats.
 Pass out 1.1 math packet and have students open to page 4 and 5.
 Read the directions to the students “Write the number that tells how many.”
o Do one example with students.
o Have students complete the remaining problems independently.
 Question 11- If students are struggling, work with students to draw the missing dots for 7.
 Have students turn to page 6.
o Read the problems to students have them answer the problem independently.
o Question 12- Mike had 3 puzzles. Now he has 5 puzzles. How many new puzzles did Mike get?
Draw more dots. Write the number. 2 new puzzles
o Question 13- Jana had 2 pens. Her dad gave her 2 more pens. Which pattern shows how many
pens Jana has now? B
o Pick three numbers. Draw their patterns. Answers will vary.
Differentiation:
 As of right now, no differentiation is needed.
Assessment/Evaluation:
 To assess students, students will complete 1.1 Show What You Know quiz with at least 75% accuracy.
Closure:
 Tell students “Now that we found patterns for numbers, we can take a Show What You Know quiz to
see if we fully understand it or if we need a little more practice.”
 Students complete 1.1 Show What You Know quiz.

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Lesson Plan 2

Gradual Release of Responsibility Direct Modeling Lesson Plan Format Template


Lesson 1.3

Learner and Environmental Factors


 Grade Level: 1st
 Content Area: Math
Standards (KCCRS or Your State Standards):
 1.OA.1 Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to,
taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using
objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
Lesson Performance Objective(s):
 The students will be able to apply their knowledge of parts of a number to find ways to make 8 with at
least 75% accuracy.
Materials:
 Common Core Review packets
 2 dry erase markers (Blue and Green)
 1.3 math packet
 Pencils
 Red and Blue crayons
 1.3 quiz
Background Knowledge Required:
 Knows how to read and write
 Knows numbers 1-10
 Has knowledge of part-part-whole and can identify parts and whole amounts
 Has some knowledge of how to write a number sentence
 Knows how to follow small multi-step directions
Student Grouping(s):
 Daily Common Core Review- Whole group
 Stage 1- Whole group
 Stage 2- Examples is whole group; Completing the packet is independent
 Stage 3- Independent
 Show What You Know Quiz- Independent
Anticipatory Set and Purpose:
 Daily Common Core Review 1-3
o Which is the same as 2 and 3? 3 and 2
o Which tells how many in all? 7

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o Write the number inside and outside. Then write the number in all. 2 inside, 4 outside, and 6 in
all.

Introduce the Lesson:

 Today, we will learn about the parts of 8!

Instruction:
Stage 1:
 Have students sit down by teacher chair.
 Show first page on board. Ask students “How many balloons are there?” 8
 Tell students “Some of these balloons are blue and some are green. One way I could show this is color 6
blue. If I colored 6 blue, how many balloons can I color green? How do you know this?” 2; Students
answers may vary.
 Ask students “How many blue balloons do I have? How many green balloons do I have? How many
balloons do I have in all?” 6 blue balloons; 2 green balloons; 8 balloons in all
 Tell students “These are parts of 8. 6 is a part of 8 and 2 is a part of 8. All 8 balloons represent the whole
set.
 Have students come up to share their ideas of making blue and green balloons.
 Ask students “Can you have the same number of blue and green balloons? How?” Yes, 4 blue and 4
green balloons make 8 balloons.
 Have 4 green balloons and 4 blue balloons. Tell students “Kami has a set of 8 balloons in all. Some are
green, and some are blue. How many balloons does Kami have? Are they all the same color?” 8; No,
some are green, and some are blue.
 Ask students “What part of the set is blue? How many balloons in the set are green?” 4 blue balloons;
4 green balloons
 Tell students “The word ‘set’ means a group or collection. We have a set of 8 balloons.”
 Ask students “What do you notice about the two parts?” 4 and 4 is a double because both parts are
the same number.
Stage 2:
 Have students go back to their seats.
 Page 2- Write the numbers to show parts of 8.
o Do examples if needed.
o Students work independently.
o Is 4 and 5 another way to show 8? Explain. No, 4 and 5 shows 9. 4 and 4 or 5 and 3 shows 8.
 Page 3- Write the numbers to show parts of 8.
o Students work independently.
o 9 and 10- Write the missing number.
Stage 3:
 Page 4
o Miko draws 5 yellow flags. Then he draws 3 red flags. How many flags does Miko draw? Use
counters to solve. 8 flags
o Jake has 2 purple fish and 6 orange fish. How many fish does Jake have in all? 8
o Draw a picture about 8 hats. Make some red and the rest blue. Use numbers to tell about the parts
and the whole.
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 Check students’ answers.
Differentiation:
 As of right now, no differentiation is needed.
Assessment/Evaluation:
 To assess students, students will complete 1.3 Show What You Know quiz with at least 75% accuracy.
Closure:
 Tell students “Now that we know all the ways to make 8, we can take a Show What You Know quiz to
see if we fully understand it or if we need a little more practice.”
 Students complete 1.3 Show What You Know quiz.

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APPENDIX C

Pre-Assessment and Summative Assessment are the same assessment

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Formal Formative Assessment

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Informal Formative Assessment

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Summative Assessment (Same as Pre-Assessment)

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Whole Class vs. Focus Student Pre-Test Scores
100
90
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70
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50
40
30
20
10
0
Pre-Test Scores

Focus Student A Whole Class Focus Student B

Whole Class vs. Focus Student Summative Test Scores


100
90
80
70
60
50
40
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20
10
0
Summative Test Score

Focus Student A Whole Class Focus Student B

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Pre-Test vs. Summative Test Results for Individual Students
100
90
80
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50
40
30
20
10
0
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R

Pre-Test Post-Test

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