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Le n to

Stitch

Beaded

Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze

Jewelry

Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze
Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze
Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze
Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze
Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze
Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze
Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze

50+ projects you'll l e to make!

Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze
Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze

Marla Salezze

Le n to

Stitch

Beaded

Jewelry

50+ projects you'll l e to make!

Marla Salezze

Le n to Stitch Beaded Jewelry 50+ projects you'll l e to make! Marla Salezze Waukesha,

Waukesha, Wisconsin

Dedication

To Mom, Dad and Nick, for always reminding me how capable, brave, and significant I am, especially when I have my doubts.

Kalmbach Books A division of Kalmbach Media 21027 Crossroads Circle Waukesha, Wisconsin 53186 www.JewelryAndBeadingStore.com

© 2018 Marla Salezze

All rights reserved. Except for brief excerpts for review, this book may not be reproduced in part or in whole by electronic means or otherwise without written permission of the publisher.

Numbered step-by-step illustrations by the author. All other photography © 2018 Kalmbach Books except where otherwise noted.

The jewelry designs in Learn to Stitch Beaded Jewelry are the copyrighted property of the author, and they may not be taught or sold without permission. Please use them for your education and personal enjoyment only.

Published in 2018

22 21 20 19 18

1 2 3 4 5

Manufactured in China

ISBN: 978-1-62700-506-7 EISBN: 978-1-62700-507-4

Editor: Erica Barse Book Design: Lisa Schroeder Technical Editor: Jane Danley Cruz Photographer: William Zuback

Library of Congress Control Number: 2017941414

contents

Introduction

Materials and Tools

4

5

Once you learn a handful of stitches, you’ll be amazed at the jewelry you can create and wear!

Quirky Quilted Drop Earrings, p. 74
Quirky Quilted Drop
Earrings, p. 74

Basic Techniques

9

PEYOTE STITCH

12

All Together Leather Tassel Earrings

13

Angular Aztec Bracelet

15

Polka Dot Paradise Necklace

18

SPIRAL ROPE STITCH

22

Winding Rivulet Bracelet

23

Lively Lentil Loop Earrings

26

Sparkle Spiral with a Twist Necklace

29

LADDER STITCH

32

Art Deco Earrings

33

Fork in the Road Necklace

36

Chutes and Ladders Bracelet

39

BRICK STITCH

43

Stepping Stone Bracelet

44

Color Blocked Collar

47

Coiled Hoop Earrings

50

HERRINGBONE STITCH

53

Confetti Bracelet

54

Woven Web Earrings

58

Colonnade Chains Necklace

62

NETTING STITCH

66

Luminous Lattice Bangle

67

Dew Drop Lariat

71

Quirky Quilted Drop Earrings

74

SQUARE STITCH

77

Garden Party Bracelet

78

Circlet Collar

81

Hula Hoop Earrings

85

RIGHT-ANGLE WEAVE

88

Cobblestone Cuff

89

Pearled Floret Earrings

92

RAW Ruffled Collar

95

BEAD EMBROIDERY

98

Doodle Cuff

99

Radiant Rivoli Earrings

103

Bead Embroidered Button Pendant

106

Acknowledgments

110

About the Author

111

Introduction

One of the things I love most about beading is its versatility. After you have learned a handful of stitches, the sky is the limit with the jewelry you can create and make. A unique bead color or shape can turn a basic beadweaving stitch into a truly spectacular piece of jewelry.

My goal in writing this book was to introduce you to some of my favorite stitches and new ways to use those stitches to create stunning beaded jewelry. Whether you are brand new to beadweaving, ready to take your beginner skills to the next level, or an experienced beader looking for a refresh on a classic stitch, the projects in this book will propel you forward on your bead journey.

I’ve organized each chapter in the book by type of stitch, and I’ve explored nine stitches to offer you 27 innovative beaded jewelry projects. Each chapter contains three projects:

a necklace, bracelet, and earrings. I also offer an alternative design option for each project so you can truly customize your beaded jewelry to your personal style preference. The alternative design options build off the techniques from the main project, and include additional skills, stitches, and embellishments to further your beading repertoire.

You can certainly flip through the book and make a project that speaks to you—or dive into a specific chapter with a stitch you love. However, if a beadweaving stitch is brand-new to you,

I encourage you to begin with the first project in that particular stitch’s chapter, as it will lay the foundation for weaving that stitch. All other projects in each chapter build from the first project, so a thorough understanding of the basic stitch from that project will give you the skills and confidence you need to successfully create the other projects in that chapter.

You will find my personal tried-and-true tips and techniques sprinkled throughout the pages of this book. My goal was to share with you as much of my beading knowledge as possible for you to use as a reference. These tips will provide assistance and guidance as you bead.

My aspiration for this book is to make you fall in love with bead weaving as much as I have, so I truly hope you enjoy learning the stitches I’ve presented and have fun beading the projects I created. You might find you like some stitches better than others—I’ll admit,

I have my favorites, too—but regardless of how you use this book, I hope it inspires your own unique beadweaving exploration.

Let it bead,

Marla

Pearled Floret Earrings design option, p. 92

seed beads cylinder beads drop beads bicone crystals Brick beads crystal pearls 5
seed beads
cylinder beads
drop beads
bicone crystals
Brick beads
crystal pearls
5

Materials and Tools

Beads

As you’ll soon discover, beads come in a wide variety of sizes, shapes, materials, colors, and finishes. The projects in this book include glass seed beads in size 150, 110, 80, and 60; glass cylinder beads in size 110 and 100; and some varying sized beads in various shapes. The most important thing to note about bead sizes is the larger the number size, the smaller the bead. For example, a 150 seed bead is small and a 60 seed bead is significantly larger.

Seed beads are round, and they are available in a variety of sizes, colors, and finishes. Cylinder beads, often referred to by the brand name Delica, are are more rectangular, or cylinder-shaped, than seed beads, but are also available in a variety of sizes, colors and finishes.

Druk beads are larger round glass beads. Crystals are glass beads with many facets (you will find Swarovski and Czech crystals, among other options). Crystals may be round, bicone (a three-dimensional diamond shape), or rondelle (a round, squat shape). Crystal pearls are man-made glass pearls that are perfectly round and great for stitching. Fire-polished beads are faceted, oblong glass beads.

Drop beads are shaped like teardrops and come in multiple sizes. Two-hole beads have two stitching holes. There are

ton of different shapes available—I’ve used Brick beads in this book.

tip

a

• When I find a color or finish on a bead I really love, I will purchase the same bead in a variety of sizes.

earring findings
earring findings

crimp beadsearring findings crimp covers toggle clasp lobster clasp S - h o o k c l

crimp coversearring findings crimp beads toggle clasp lobster clasp S - h o o k c l

earring findings crimp beads crimp covers toggle clasp lobster clasp S - h o o k

toggle clasp

lobster clasp

S-hook clasp

Findings and components

Crimp beads are small metal beads designed to be crimped with crimping pliers on beading wire to secure beads on a piece of jewelry. Crimp beads are available in

a variety of sizes and metal finishes and are either round or

rectangular in shape. The size needed is usually determined by the beading wire being used. Crimp covers are small metal beads that are closed over a crimp bead to hide the crimped crimp bead and provide a decorative element. Using crimp covers is a great way to elevate the finished look of a handmade piece of jewelry.

to elevate the finished look of a handmade piece of jewelry. jump rings You will use

jump rings

You will use clasps to finish your jewelry, and they are

available in multiple sizes and finishes. Always choose a clasp that is secure with a finish that will last. All clasps serve the same purpose of securing the beaded jewelry to a neck or wrist. Consider which clasp style will look best with

a particular piece of jewelry. Choose from lobster clasps,

multi-strand bar clasps (the spring-loaded versions are more secure and reliable then the magnetic ones), toggle and bar clasps, S-hooks, and magnetic clasps. I like to attach clasps to my beadwork with a jump ring so the clasp can easily be changed out if it breaks or does not work properly.

be changed out if it breaks or does not work properly. Accu-guards Jump rings are small

Accu-guards

Jump rings are small metal wire circles that are used to connect findings to beadwork and other components. They are available in a variety of sizes and finishes. I used unsoldered rings in this book, which means they can be opened and closed. Accu-guards are little metal horseshoe- shaped metal components that are threaded through with beading wire when bead stringing. These findings protect the beading wire from wear and tear that might lead to fraying or breaking.

Buttons come with pre-drilled holes in the center or a shank on the bottom. We will use buttons as clasps for some of the projects in this book and as a decorative component to bead around. Rivolis are crystal stones with detailed facet- ing that comes to a beveled point at the top and bottom.

beading wire
beading wire

Materials

My favorite type of thread to use is a braided beading

thread. I like this type of thread because of its durability. It is available in different weight sizes; the smaller the pound weight, the thinner the thread. The size and material of your beads will dictate which weight thread is best for that project. There is extremely limited color selection; however,

I

beads, as it easily blends in. With translucent or transparent beads and/or very light-colored beads, use crystal-colored thread. Brands include Fireline, One G, and Wildfire.

have found the smoke-colored thread works well with most

Beading wire is a type of stringing material used for beading. It comes in varying diameters and string counts. It is used to string beads to make a necklace or bracelet. The specific type of beading wire needed for a project is indicated in the supply list for that particular project. Craft wire is a base metal wire available in a variety of finishes and gauges. The gauge number indicates the wire’s thickness (large gauge = thin wire).

Tools

Beading needles come in a variety of sizes and lengths. Just like with beads, the larger the size, the smaller the needle. Depending upon which size beads you are using helps determine which size needle is best to bead with. Each project indicates which needle size is preferable to complete that particular project. Using a long or short needle is mostly a personal preference, however, sometimes the length of the needle is dictated by the type of bead stitch and/or beading supplies being used and it’s helpful to have both lengths and multiple sizes readily available while beading.

beading needles I like to have a few pairs of scissors on hand when beading—each
beading needles
I like to have a few pairs of scissors on hand when
beading—each pair solely designated for a specific
purpose. I use an inexpensive pair to cut my thread,
since Fireline is so strong, it will dull the blade. I also use
a separate, sharp pair of scissors to cut fabric, such as a
beading foundation and ultrasuede.
craft wire
thread
7
caliper
caliper
beading board roundnose pliers
beading board
roundnose pliers
a A
a
A

Needle chainnose pliers are used to open and close jump rings, to hold materials in place, to pull needles through

beadwork, and to remove unwanted beads. Roundnose pliers are used to make wire loops. Wire cutters trim wire to the desired length. Crimping pliers are used to put

a crimp on a crimp bead strung on beading wire. Using

crimping pliers is a two-step process dictated by the two small spaces on the edge of the pliers. The first space flattens the crimp bead, and the second folds it over on itself.

A thread catcher is a place to put your discarded thread

ends, broken beads, and other miscellaneous material to keep your bead surface clear and organized. A thread zapper is a handy accessory to use when ending thread within beadwork. It is a great tool because it burns the thread off, causing the thread to curl into itself and retreat invisibly into the beadwork. You must be careful not to accidentally burn thread not intended to be ended with this tool. A needle puller is a little rubber tube or thin piece of rubber that grabs around the needle and helps to pull it through the beadwork. It is gentler to use than pliers, with less risk of breaking any beads.

A retractable ruler is very helpful measuring device to keep

handy while beading so you can measure your beadwork

and determine the finished and desired length of a piece.

A bead reamer is a dull, needle-like tool that can be used

to make a bead hole larger by gently applying pressure in a bead’s exiting hole. Use a caliper when shopping for bead supplies. It determines the width and length of beads and buttons, etc. in millimeters to help you determine if the supplies are correct for the project you are beading. Small photo cases are inexpensive little plastic boxes with

snap lid. They are the perfect size to store individual bead projects and supplies.

bead mat or beading board is a work surface for your

beadwork. There are many options available on the market today, so choosing one is a complete personal preference. Look for a mat or board with a soft surface in a light color so you can easily see and pick up your beads. I like a bead mat with a ledge all around it so I can move the mat without losing any beads. Other things to consider include portability (something with a lid for travel or a sticky surface so beads do not roll around while moving) and organization (something with dividers or inserts). Little triangle trays are the perfect tool for scooping and sorting beads on your work surface.

needle chainnose pliers

Basic

Techniques

Stop bead

A stop bead is a temporary bead added to your thread at the very beginning of any

beadwork to keep newly added beads on your thread and to help maintain even tension throughout the first few rows of beading—which are often the most challenging. It gets removed before the beadwork is finished. To add a stop bead to your thread, pick up a

bead (I use an 80 seed bead in a different color than the beads in my current project. That way, there is no doubt which bead is the stop bead), and slide it down the thread, leaving

a 6–8 in. (15–20cm) tail. Sew through the bead again in the same direction to keep it from

moving. You might find it helpful to sew through the bead a few times to keep it in place.

Knots

Square knot

Cross the left-hand end of the thread over the right, and bring it under and back up. Cross the end that is now on the right over the left, go through the loop, and pull both ends to tighten.

Half-hitch knot

Pass the needle under the thread path between two beads. A loop will form as you pull the thread through. Cross back over the thread between the beads, sew through the loop and pull gently to draw the knot into the beadwork. To make a more secure half-hitch knot, I like to sew through my loop twice before pulling it closed.

Adding thread

I like to add new thread when I have about 6–8 in. (15–20cm) of my current working thread left. Cut a new piece of thread and thread it on a needle. Tie an overhand knot around an existing thread path within the beadwork, leaving a tail of about 6–8 in. (15–20cm). Sew through a few beads in the direction of where the new thread needs to be added, following the existing thread path of the beadwork, and tie two half-hitch knots. Continue sewing through beads and tying half-hitch knots through about an inch of beadwork until the new thread exits the same bead as the remaining old thread. Tie an overhand knot with the old thread and the new thread to maintain tension. Begin working with the new thread.

Ending thread

Similarly to how thread is added, sew through a few beads with the thread you wish to end, following the existing thread path of the beadwork, and tie two half-hitch knots. Continue sewing through beads and tying half-hitch knots through about an inch of beadwork. Once you are confident the thread is secure, pull it against the beadwork and cut it (or use a thread zapper).

you are confident the thread is secure, pull it against the beadwork and cut it (or

Old thread

you are confident the thread is secure, pull it against the beadwork and cut it (or

Colonnade Chains Necklace design option, p. 62

Crimping

String a crimp bead on your desired length of beading wire. String one end of the clasp on the beading wire, and pass back through the crimp bead, creating a loop around the clasp. Make sure the beading wire strands are lying parallel to each other. Place the crimp bead into the back notch of the crimping pliers, and squeeze the crimp bead. Turn the crimp bead a quarter turn, place it in the front notch of the crimping pliers, and squeeze the crimp bead a second time. This will fold the crimped bead over on itself.

second time. This will fold the crimped bead over on itself. Opening and closing a jump
second time. This will fold the crimped bead over on itself. Opening and closing a jump
second time. This will fold the crimped bead over on itself. Opening and closing a jump

Opening and closing a jump ring or earring loop

Hold a jump ring with two pairs of pliers, with one pair of pliers on each side of the split in the ring. To open the jump ring, bring the tips of one pair of pliers toward you, and push the tips of the other pair away from you. Reverse the process to close the open jump ring. When closing the jump ring, bring the ends of the split in the ring past each other, then back to flush—this will ensure a cleaner join.

ring, bring the ends of the split in the ring past each other, then back to
ring, bring the ends of the split in the ring past each other, then back to
ring, bring the ends of the split in the ring past each other, then back to

Simple wire loop

Bend the wire at the top of the bead to a 90-degree angle with pliers. Grasp the end of the wire with roundnose pliers so the wire is flush with the tool. Rotate the pliers to form a loop. Continue turning the wire until a complete loop is formed. To make perfectly sized loops each time, cut the wire to ¼ in. (6mm), and grasp the wire with the roundnose pliers ¼ in. (6mm) from the tip of the pliers. I mark my roundnose pliers with a permanent marker so I always grab the wire at the same spot with my pliers. It makes for consistent loops.

the same spot with my pliers. It makes for consistent loops. Beading Lingo Thread Path: The
the same spot with my pliers. It makes for consistent loops. Beading Lingo Thread Path: The
the same spot with my pliers. It makes for consistent loops. Beading Lingo Thread Path: The
the same spot with my pliers. It makes for consistent loops. Beading Lingo Thread Path: The

Beading Lingo

Thread Path: The existing path of thread in between each bead of the beadwork. When trying to get your needle to another point in the beadwork, always follow the existing thread path in between the beads to get there. This reinforces the beadwork, but most importantly, assures that no new thread paths are created (and exposed).

Working Thread: The end of the thread where the needle is attached.

Tail Thread: The end of the thread opposite the end where the needle is attached.

“Up” Bead: A bead in the row higher than or “up” from the current row.

Step Up: The action of passing up through the first bead(s) added in that same row to prepare the thread to be in position to start the next row. Not all stitches require a step up, but each stitch has a specific way for it to be done.

Zip Up: The action of connecting two ends of the same piece of beadwork by following the thread path of a particular stitch to create a seamless join.

Color Blocked Collar design option, p. 47

Peyote

Stitch

A basic stitch with

endless possibilities

All Together Leather Tassel Earrings Learn the basic peyote stitch by weaving flat, even-count peyote

All Together Leather Tassel Earrings

Learn the basic peyote stitch by weaving flat, even-count peyote strips that are “zipped up” around a pre-fabricated metal channel bead. Add a handmade leather tassel to the bottom end of the channel bead and a pearl to the top to create these trendy tassel earrings.

11 0 seed bead, color A 0 seed bead, color A

11 0 seed bead, color B 0 seed bead, color B

d c e b a figure 1 figure 2
d
c
e
b
a
figure 1
figure 2

Weave a peyote strip and zip it up

1. On a comfortable length of thread, attach a stop bead

(Basic Techniques, p. 9), leaving a 6-in. (15cm) tail.

2. Pick up two color A 110 seed beads, two color B 110

seed beads, and two As. These beads will shift to form the

first and second row as the third row of beads is added (figure 1, a–b).

3. Turn, pick up an A, skip the last A, and sew through the

following A (b–c).

4. Pick up a B, skip the next B, and sew through the

following B (c–d).

5. Work as in step 3 to complete the third row (d–e).

The beads added in this row are higher than the beads in

the previous row and are referred to as “up beads.”

6. Repeat steps 3–5 (figure 2) 23 more times for a total

of 26 beaded rows.

7. Wrap the beaded peyote strip around the center of

one channel bead. Match up the two ends of the peyote strip—the “up beads” from one end should alternatively align with the “up beads” from the other end. Sew through

Supplies

• 2 8mm pearls

• 6g 110 metal seed beads, color A

• 3g 110 metal seed beads, color B

• 2 13x11mm channel beads

• 2-in. (5cm) leather tassel trim, cut to two 1-in. (2.5cm) pieces

• 2 2-in. (5cm) headpins

• Pair of earring wires

• Braided beading thread, 14-lb. test

• Beading needle, size 11

• Wire cutters

• Roundnose pliers

• 2 pairs of chainnose pliers

• E6000 adhesive

the “up beads” on both ends of the beadwork, in a zigzag direction, all the way up and then all the way back down until the beadwork is “zipped up” around the channel bead (figure 3). End the threads (Basic Techniques). 8. Repeat steps 1–7 to make a second tassel unit.

Assemble the earrings

9. Apply a small dab of glue along the top edge of the leather tassel trim. Attach the headpin to the edge of the trim, and tightly wrap the trim around the headpin.

10. Apply a small dab of glue to the top rolled edge of the

trim and insert the tassel into the bottom of the channel bead. Let dry.

11. String an 8mm crystal pearl on the headpin above the

channel bead, and make a wire loop (Basic Techniques). Attach the earring to the loop of an earring wire using two pairs of needle chainnose pliers.

12. Repeat to make a second earring.

chainnose pliers. 12. Repeat to make a second earring. figure 3 figure 4 tips • To

figure 3

pliers. 12. Repeat to make a second earring. figure 3 figure 4 tips • To count

figure 4

tips

• To count the total number of rows beaded in flat, even- count peyote beadwork, add up the total number of beads in the first and second column of your beadwork. Refer to the illustration (figure 4) to see the difference between a row and a column. The tan filled/black outlined beads make up rows (horizontally) and columns (vertically). The same with the blue filled/red outlined beads.

• I used pre-cut leather tassel trim for this project, but you can take a plain, un-cut piece of leather and make a tassel trim yourself. Use a ruler to measure and cut out evenly- spaced strips, leaving ¼ in. (6mm) of un-cut leather at the top to roll around the headpin.

• Replace the 110 metal seed beads with regular 110 glass seed beads for more color options. You won’t need as many grams of As and Bs when using glass beads, as they weigh less than metal beads.

when using glass beads, as they weigh less than metal beads. No-Tassle Earrings Not a fan

No-Tassle

Earrings

Not a fan of the leather tassel? Replace the tassel with a second 8mm crystal bead.

1. Refer to the All Together Leather Tassel Earrings,

p. 13. Follow steps 1–8 to weave a peyote strip and zip it up around the channel bead.

2. When assembling the earrings, omit the leather tassel

and instead string an 8mm crystal pearl, a beaded channel bead, and a pearl on a headpin.

3. Make a simple wire loop (Basic Techniques), and attach

to the loop of the earring wire.

4. Repeat to make a second earring.

Supplies

bracelet, 6 in. (15cm)

• 5g 10 0 cylinder beads, color A

• 2g 10 0 cylinder beads, color B

• 2g 10 0 cylinder beads, color C

• 26mm sliding bar clasp

• Braided beading thread, 6-lb. test

• Beading needle, size 11

1 0 0 cylinder bead, color A 100 cylinder bead, color A

10 0 cylinder bead, color B 0 cylinder bead, color B

10 0 cylinder bead, color C 0 cylinder bead, color C

Angular

Aztec

Bracelet

Bead a bracelet using flat, even-count peyote with a geometric design while learning how to read and follow a peyote pattern using a bead and word chart. Finish the bracelet by attaching a seamless clasp.

Bead the peyote band

1. On a comfortable length of thread, attach a stop bead,

leaving a 6-in. (15cm) tail (Basic Techniques, p. 9). Starting

at the upper-left corner of the pattern, pick up 10 color A

100 cylinder beads for rows 1 and 2 (figure 1, a–b). These beads will shift to form the first two rows as the third row of beads is added.

2. Pick up an A, skip the next A, and sew through the next

A (b–c). Repeat this stitch four more times to complete the

third row (c–d).

3. Following the pattern, p. 16 or the word chart (see

beadedbymarla.indiemade.com), bead in flat, even-count peyote stitch using the appropriate color cylinder beads (figure 2), and ending and adding thread as needed (Basic Techniques). Repeat the pattern as needed to reach the desired length.

c d b a
c
d
b
a

figure 1

as needed (Basic Techniques). Repeat the pattern as needed to reach the desired length. c d

figure 2

tips • •
tips
tips • • figure 3 Attach the clasp 4. Slide the end of the bracelet through

figure 3

Attach the clasp

4. Slide the end of the bracelet through and around the bar of the clasp. Exiting from the “up bead” at the very end of the row, sew through the first “up bead” in the fourth row of the beadwork. Continue sewing back and forth through “up beads” on the end of the beadwork and within the fourth row to connect the clasp (figure 3). 5. Repeat step 4 on the other end of the beadwork.

This particular pattern makes a 6-in. (15cm) bracelet with the clasp. If you need a shorter or longer bracelet, repeat the angular pattern as necessary, or include more rows of color A beads on either side of the pattern, until the bracelet reaches the desired length.

Blank peyote pattern paper is available to print online. Have some fun designing your own peyote patterns to bead. Keep in mind that even-count peyote has an even number of columns—an important thing to remember when designing your own pattern.

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pattern

Additional Supplies

• 47 3x2mm crystal rondelles

• 1g 15 0 seed beads

Embellished

Bracelet

This project shows you how to add an embellishment to the sides of flat peyote beadwork. It adds another dimension to the finished piece of jewelry and is a clever design element that can hide crooked beads due to tension control issues.

1. Refer to the Angular Aztec Bracelet, p. 15. Follow steps

1–5 to bead the bracelet and attach the clasp.

2. After the clasp has been added to each end of the

bracelet, exit an edge cylinder bead closest to the end of the clasp.

3. Pick up two 150 seed beads, a rondelle, and two 150s,

and sew down through the third bead along the edge of the bracelet and sew up through the next bead (figure, a–b).

4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 along this edge of the bracelet

(b–c), then sew through the beads along the nearest end to exit the end cylinder bead along the other edge.

5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for this edge. End the thread

(Basic Techniques).

c a b figure
c
a b
figure
10 0 cylinder bead, color A 10 0 cylinder bead, color B 3x2mm crystal rondelle

10 0 cylinder bead, color A

10 0 cylinder bead, color B

3x2mm crystal rondelle

15 0 seed bead

Polka Dot Paradise Necklace

After you’ve mastered flat, even-count peyote, it’s time to take this stitch to the next level. Use this circular version of peyote to bezel around crystal rivolis and then connect them together with bicone crystals to create a center focal piece that is enhanced with pearl and crystal neckstraps.

Supplies

• 4 12mm crystal rivolis

• 98 4mm crystal bicones

• 86 4mm crystal pearls

• 1.5g 110 seed beads

• 1g 110 cylinder beads

• 1g 15 0 seed beads

• 2-strand clasp

• Braided beading thread,

6-lb. test

• Beading needle, size 12

12mm crystal rivoli 4mm crystal pearl
12mm crystal
rivoli
4mm crystal pearl

4mm crystal bicone12mm crystal rivoli 4mm crystal pearl 11 0 seed bead 11 0 cylinder bead 15 0

11 0 seed bead

11 0 cylinder bead 0 cylinder bead

15 0 seed bead 0 seed bead

11 0 seed bead 11 0 cylinder bead 15 0 seed bead figure 1 figure 3

figure 1

bead 11 0 cylinder bead 15 0 seed bead figure 1 figure 3 figure 2 c

figure 3

11 0 cylinder bead 15 0 seed bead figure 1 figure 3 figure 2 c b

figure 2

c b a figure 5
c
b
a
figure 5
0 seed bead figure 1 figure 3 figure 2 c b a figure 5 figure 4

figure 4

Bead around (or bezel) the rivolis

1. Thread a needle on a comfortable length of thread, and

pick up 32 110 cylinder beads. Tie an overhand knot (Basic Techniques, p. 9) with the working thread and tail thread, leaving a 6-in. (15cm) tail (figure 1). These beads will shift to become the first and second round as the third round is added.

2. Round 3: Pick up a cylinder, skip the next cylinder in the

previous round, and sew through the following cylinder. Continue this stitch for a total of 16 times. Step up by sew- ing through the first cylinder added in this round (figure 2).

3. Round 4: Pick up a 150 seed bead, skip the next cylinder

in the previous round, and sew through the following cylin- der. Continue adding 150s this way for a total of 16 times to complete the round. Step up by sewing through the first 150 added in this round (figure 3).

note

Maintain tight tension while adding the 150s in this row. The beadwork should begin to cup inwards with the addition of the smaller beads.

round. Step up by sewing through the first 150 added in this round (figure 4).

5. Sew through the beadwork, hiding the thread path, so

the needle is exiting an up-bead along the other edge of the beadwork. You will be exiting a cylinder in Round 1.

6. Place a 12mm rivoli face down into the beadwork.

7. Rounds 6–8: Repeat steps 3–5 on the back of the rivoli.

End the threads (Basic Techniques).

8. Repeat steps 1–7 three more times for a total of four

bezeled rivolis.

Connect the rivolis

9. Exiting a cylinder added in Round 2 of a bezeled rivoli

(shown in red in figure 5), pick up a 4mm bicone crystal, and sew through a center cylinder (shown in red) on the second bezeled rivoli. Continue picking up a crystal and sewing through the center cylinder (shown in red) in a bezeled rivoli until all four rivolis are connected. Then, sew through the beadwork to exit a cylinder on the side of the bezeled rivoli (figure 5, a–b). Sew through the center cylinder (shown in blue), located eight beads away from the cylinder where the inner crystals are connected.

4. Round 5: Pick up a 150, skip the next 150 from the pre-

vious round, and sew through the following 150. Continue adding 150s this way for a total of 16 times to complete the

clasp assembly

10. Pick up a crystal, and sew through the 8th center

cylinder of the next rivoli (shown in blue).

11. Repeat step 7 until all the rivolis are connected with a

crystal (b–c).

Bead the neckstraps and add the clasp

note

The beaded neckstraps will be connected to the green outlined beads in figure 6. Use a piece of thread at least 2 yd. (1.8m) long when beading EACH neckstrap, because the bead strands will need to be reinforced.

12. Exiting a green outlined bead of the left bezeled rivoli

(figure 6, point a), pick up a crystal and an 110 seed bead five times. Pick up a 4mm crystal pearl and an 110 five times. For an 18-in. (46cm) necklace, continue adding sections of five crystals and five pearls for a total of five crystal sections and four pearl sections (a–b).

13. The last bead strung on the neckstrap should be an

110. Pick up six 150s, and sew through the first loop of the

two-strand clasp. Sew back through the 110 and retrace the thread path through the beads in the strand (c–d). Connect the neckstrap to the rivoli component by sewing through the bead (shown in green) in the opposite direction in which the neckstrap strand began (d–a).

14. Retrace the thread path at least one more time to

reinforce the connection to the center rivoli component and

the clasp, ending and adding thread as necessary (Basic Techniques).

15. Repeat steps 12–14 on the right bezeled rivoli.

16. Exiting a bead (shown in green) on the right side of the

center bezeled rivoli (point e), pick up a pearl and an 110 five times. Pick up a crystal and an 110 five times. For an 18-in. (46cm) necklace, continue adding sections of five

g f b h e d figure 6 a pearls and five crystals for a
g
f
b
h
e
d figure 6
a
pearls and five crystals for a total of four pearl sections, four
crystal sections, and a final section of three pearls (e–f).

17. The last bead strung on the neckstrap should be an 110.

Pick up six 150s, and sew through the second loop of the two-strand clasp (f–g). Sew back through the 110 and the rest of the beads in the strand (g–h). Connect the neckstrap to the focal centerpiece by sewing through the bead (shown in green) in the opposite direction in which the neckstrap strand began (h–e).

18. Retrace the thread path at least one more time to

reinforce the connection to the center rivoli component and the clasp.

19. Repeat steps 16–18 on the left side of the center

bezeled rivoli. End the threads.

tips

• I alternated the neckstraps with sections of five crystals and pearls, separated by 110 seed beads. You could easily bead the neckstraps with all crystals, or all pearls, or alternate with sections of three or ten, depending upon which shape and style beads you prefer. The variety of beads you use for the neckstraps may also be determined by your desired length for the necklace. I suggest playing around with the beads and stringing all four strands separately before you connect them to the clasp.

• Replace the 4mm pearls with 4mm druk beads as I did in the Statement Necklace, p. 21.

• When working with rivolis and leaving the foiled back exposed—as in this project—protect the foil back from scratching or peeling, which can alter the appearance of the front of the crystal, by applying some clear nail polish to the back of the rivoli before beading around them.

Supplies

• 9 12mm crystal rivolis

• 52 4mm bicone crystals

• 30 4mm crystal pearls

• 2.5g 110 seed beads

• 4g 110 cylinder beads

• 2.5g 150 seed beads

• 3-strand clasp

• Braided beading thread, 6-lb. test

• Beading needle, size 12

beading thread, 6-lb. test • Beading needle, size 12 figure Statement Necklace Make a necklace with

figure

Statement Necklace

Make a necklace with more sparkle and more statement by increasing the size of the focal component. Bezel nine crystal rivolis and connect them with six strands of strung beads.

1. Refer to the Polka Dot Paradise Necklace, p. 18. Follow

steps 1–8 for a total of nine bezeled rivolis.

2. Refer to the figure: Sew through the cylinders (outlined in

red) with crystals to connect the interior rivolis. Sew through the cylinders (outlined in blue) with crystals to connect the exterior rivolis. Connect the neckstraps to the cylinders (outlined in green).

3. Work as in steps 12–18 to attach three neckstraps,

referring to the figure for placement.

tip

• To make the crystal rivolis stand out in the alternate design option, I used two different colored rivolis and arranged them together so the colors alternated. I selected colors that coordinated with the cylinder and seed beads so I could use the same materials to bead all the bezels.

spiral

rope

Weave with your round favorite and round beads

Winding Rivulet Bracelet

The winding path of beads created with the spiral rope stitch is as mesmerizing as a winding river. A series of beads stack one on top of the other and naturally meander around a center core of beads to create a spiral. Bicone crystals are added to this spiral rope bracelet to create sparkling reflection, and the druk beads flanking the spiral rope on either side really make the beadwoven work stand out.

on either side really make the beadwoven work stand out. Supplies bracelet, 7 in. (18cm) •

Supplies

bracelet, 7 in. (18cm)

• 10 6mm druk beads

• 45 4mm bicone crystals

• 1.5g 8 0 seed beads

• 2.5g 110 seed beads

• 0.25g 150 seed beads

• Toggle clasp

• 2 6mm jump rings

• Braided beading thread, 6-lb. test

• Beading needle, size 11

• 2 pairs of chainnose pliers

6mm druk bead 4mm bicone crystal 8 0 seed bead 11 0 seed bead 15
6mm druk bead
4mm bicone crystal
8 0 seed bead
11 0 seed bead
15 0 seed bead
figure 1
figure 2
figure 3

Stitch a spiral rope focal piece

1. Attach a stop bead on a comfortable length of thread

(Basic Techniques, p. 9), leaving an 18-in. (46cm) tail. (The tail thread will be used at a later time.)

2. Pick up five 80 seed beads, three 110 seed beads, a 4mm

crystal, and three 110s, and sew back through the five 80s in the same direction to create a loop (figure 1).

3. Pick up an 80, three 110s, a 4mm crystal, and three

110s, and push them all the way down towards the current beadwork. Sew through the last four 80s added in the previous round and the newly added 80 (figure 2).

note

The 80s are this spiral rope’s “core” beads. The sequence of three 110s, a 4mm crystal, and three 110s are the spiral rope’s “loop” beads. Make sure each new loop is oriented the same way—determine right away whether the core beads are on the left and the loop beads are on the right, or vice versa, and always add them the same way. Eventually the “loop” beads will begin to create a spiral around the “core” beads.

4. Repeat step 3 for 44 more rows, or approximately

5 in. (13cm), adding and ending thread as necessary (Basic Techniques). The spiral shape should become visible around the fifth row.

5. Exiting the last 80 added, pick up five druks and nine

150 seed beads. Sew back through the five druks and five 8 0 core beads, and sew through the fifth 8 0 ’s loop beads. Retrace the thread path through the druks, 150s, core, and loop beads three times to reinforce the connection (figure 3).

6. Thread a needle on the tail, and repeat step 5 to

add druks and 150s to the other end of the bracelet. End the threads.

Attach the clasp and finish

7. Open a 6mm jump ring, and attach the toggle bar and

beaded loop of 150s on one end of the bracelet (Basic Techniques). Close the ring. Open a 6mm jump ring and attach the toggle loop and beaded loop of 150s on the other end of the bracelet. Close the ring.

tips

• The instructions are written for a 5-in. (13cm) spiral focal piece and 1 in. (2.5cm) of strung beads on either side. Leaving ¾ in. (1.9cm) for the toggle clasp, this bracelet is 7¾ (19.7cm). To add or subtract length to the bracelet, increase or decrease the number of spiral rope rows you bead and add or subtract strung beads for your desired length.

• The spiral rope stitch requires multiple thread passes through the core beads, and it can get a little tight in there. I like to use 80s as core beads because the inside diameter of the holes is large enough to accommodate multiple thread passes without a struggle.

Dangle

Earrings

Using the same basic spiral rope stitch and techniques as the main project, make a pair of dangly earrings embellished with a stone bead and a small charm.

1. Refer to the Winding Rivulent Bracelet, p. 23. Follow

steps 1–3 to begin beading a spiral rope, but use the following sequence for the “loops”: Pick up two 110 seed beads, a 4mm bicone crystal, and two 110s. Repeat step 3 for a total of 12 rows.

2. Exiting the last 80 seed bead added, pick up a focal

stone bead and six 150 seed beads, and sew back through the focal bead. Retrace the thread path through the core bead, loop beads, and newly added focal bead and 150s to reinforce the connection. End the working thread.

3. Thread a needle on the tail, and pick up six 150s and a

charm. Retrace the thread path through the core bead, loop beads, and newly added 150s to reinforce the connection. End the threads.

4. Attach an earring wire to the loop of 150s above the

focal bead.

5. Repeat to make a second earring.

tips

• Use any size and/or shape bead for the focal bead. I used a 20mm square turquoise jasper stone for mine.

• Check the earring wire you are using to see if the loop that connects to the beadwork can be opened with a pair of pliers. If it can, you can add the earring wire to the beadwork after it is completed. If it is soldered closed— meaning it can’t be opened with pliers—you must pick up and add the earring wire to the beadwork with the thread as you would pick up and add a bead.

• When making a loop of beads to connect an earring wire, I like to string an even number—such as six 150s— because then the earring wire loop lays in between the third and fourth bead, and the beaded earring is centered on the wire.

fourth bead, and the beaded earring is centered on the wire. Additional Supplies • 2 stone

Additional Supplies

• 2 stone beads, approx. 20mm

• 24 4mm crystal bicones

• 0.75g 8 0 seed beads

• 1g 110 seed beads

• 0.25g 15 0 seed beads

• 2 small metal charms

• Pair of earring wires

• Braided beading thread, 6-lb. test

• Chainnose pliers

Lively Lentil Loop Earrings

As you will soon discover with this earring project, you can really get creative with the center bead you use in a spiral rope loop. I used whimsical lentil beads to add some flare to these earrings, and I connected the ends together to create an infinity spiral rope.

Supplies

• 10 12mm lentil beads

• 3g 3.4mm drop beads

• 2g 8 0 seed beads

• 3g 110 seed beads, color A

• 0.25g 110 seed beads, color B

• Pair of earring wires

• 2 11mm twisted jump rings

• Braided beading thread, 6-lb. test

• Beading needle, size 11

• 2 pairs of needle chainnose pliers

rings • Braided beading thread, 6-lb. test • Beading needle, size 11 • 2 pairs of
12mm lentil bead 3.4mm drop bead 8 0 seed bead 11 0 seed bead, color

12mm lentil bead

3.4mm drop bead

80

seed bead

11

0 seed bead, color A

11

0 seed bead, color B

Stitch a spiral rope

1. Attach a stop bead on a comfortable length of thread

(Basic Techniques, p. 9), leaving a 6-in. (15cm) tail.

2. Pick up four 80 seed beads, two color A 110 seed beads,

a 3.4mm drop bead, and two As, and sew back through the

four 80s to create a loop (figure 1).

3. Pick up an 80, two As, a drop bead, and two As, and push

them all the way down toward the current beadwork. Sew through the last three 80s added in the previous round and the newly added 80 (figure 2).

note

The 80s are this spiral rope’s “core” beads. The sequence of two 110s, a drop bead, and two 110s are this spiral rope’s “loop” beads. Make sure each new loop is oriented the same way—determine right away whether the core beads are on the left and the loop beads are on the right, or vice versa. Eventually the “loop” beads will begin to create a spiral around the “core” beads.

4. Repeat step 3 for a total of 10 rows.

5. Pick up an 80, two As, a color B 110, a 12mm lentil bead,

a B, and two As, and push them all the way down toward

the current beadwork. Sew through the last three 80s added in the previous round and the newly added 80 (figure 3).

note

The spiral rope’s “loop” beads are briefly changing: The sequence of two As, a B, a lentil bead, a B, and two As becomes the new “loop” beads for the next few rows.

As becomes the new “loop” beads for the next few rows. figure 1 figure 2 figure
As becomes the new “loop” beads for the next few rows. figure 1 figure 2 figure
As becomes the new “loop” beads for the next few rows. figure 1 figure 2 figure
figure 1 figure 2 figure 3 figure 4 figure 5 figure 6
figure 1
figure 2
figure 3
figure 4
figure 5
figure 6

6. Repeat step 5 for a total of five rows.

7. Repeat step 3 for a total of 16 rows.

Connect the spiral rope

8. To connect the ends of the spiral rope, exit the last 8 0 on

one end, and sew through the last four 80s on the other end of the spiral rope. Pick up two As, a drop bead, and two As, and sew back through three 80s to create a loop (figure 4).

9. Pick up two As, a drop bead, and two As, and sew back

through three 80s to create a loop (figure 5).

10. Repeat step 9 to complete the connection (figure 6).

End the threads (Basic Techniques).

Assemble the earrings

11. Open the twisted jump ring (Basic Techniques), and

attach the spiral rope earring and earring wire. Close the ring.

12. Repeat to make a second earring.

tips

• I used twisted jump rings to connect the beaded earrings to the earring wires—I love how the texture mimics the spiral of the beadwork. You can use a regular jump ring here, too.

• I use leverback earring wires to connect beaded earrings that are longer or heavier so they won’t fall off my ears. However, there are a variety of earring wire styles readily available, so use what earring wire you like best.

Spiral Necklace

Weave a necklace using the same technique as the main project. This necklace will include more spiral rope loops with the drop beads to make neck straps, and more spiral rope loops with lentil beads to make a larger center focal component.

1. Refer to the Lively Lentil Loop Earrings, p. 26. Follow

steps 1–3 for a total of 105 rows. (This number of rows will make a 20-in./51cm necklace. Add more or fewer rows depending upon the desired length.)

2. Work as in step 5 for a total of 35 rows.

3. Work as in step 3 for a total of 105 rows.

4. Exiting the last 80 on one end of the spiral rope, pick up

six As, and sew back through the 80, three other 80 loop beads, and newly added As to reinforce the connection.

5. Repeat step 4 on the opposite end of the spiral rope

beadwork.

6. Exiting the last 80 on one end of the spiral rope,

sew through two 110s and a drop bead. Then, sew through the next drop bead. Continue sewing through each drop bead and lentil bead in each loop for the entire length of the necklace (see “Tip”) (figure).

7. Attach a 6mm jump ring to the beaded loop on

each end of the rope, and use a jump ring to attach

a lobster clasp on one end.

tip

use a jump ring to attach a lobster clasp on one end. tip figure • To

figure

• To tighten the spiral rope, I sew through the center focal bead when using drop beads as the focal bead in a spiral rope loop. This ensures all the drops are facing upwards (sometimes they like to turn in on themselves) and makes for a tight spiral. I don’t use this technique when I’m beading a bicone as my center bead; I love the way the faceted edges of the diamond shape stack so nicely on their own as in the Winding Rivulet Bracelet, p. 23.

Supplies

necklace, 20 in. (51cm)

• 35 12mm lentil beads

• 11g 3.4mm drop beads

• 5.5g 8 0 seed beads

• 7g 110 seed beads, color A

• 1g 110 seed beads, color B

• Lobster clasp

• 3 6mm jump rings

• Braided beading thread, 6-lb. test

• Needle, size 11

• 2 pairs of needle chainnose pliers

Sparkle Spiral with a Twist Necklace

Learn how to embellish the core beads of a spiral rope stitched necklace in this project. After beading a crystal looped spiral rope, you’ll adorn the core beads with more crystals for a true sparkle spiral with a twist.

Supplies

necklace, 20 in. (51cm)

• 236 4mm crystal rondelles

• 236 3mm bicone crystals

• 6g 8 0 seed beads

• 6g 15 0 seed beads, color A

• 1g 15 0 seed beads, color B

• Lobster clasp

• 2 3mm jump rings

• 6mm jump ring

• Braided beading thread, 6-lb. and 14-lb. test

• Needle, size 11

• 2 pairs of needle chainnose pliers

4mm crystal rondelle 3mm bicone crystal 8 0 seed bead 15 0 seed bead, color

4mm crystal rondelle

3mm bicone crystal

8 0 seed bead

15 0 seed bead, color A 15 0 seed bead, color B

bead 15 0 seed bead, color A 15 0 seed bead, color B figure 1 Bead

figure 1

Bead the spiral rope

1. Attach a stop bead on a comfortable length of 6-lb. test

beading thread (Basic Techniques, p. 9), leaving an 18-in. (46cm) tail. (The tail thread will be used at a later time.)

2. Pick up four 80 seed beads, three color A 150 seed

beads, a 3mm bicone crystal, and three As, and sew back through the four 80s to create a loop (figure 1).

3. Pick up an 80, three As, a bicone, and three As, and

push them all the way down towards the current beadwork. Sew through the last three 80s added in the previous round and the newly added 80 (figure 2).

note

The 80s are this spiral rope’s “core” beads. The sequence of three 150s, a bicone, and three 150s are the spiral rope’s “loop” beads. Make sure each new loop is oriented the same way—determine right away whether the core beads are on the left and the loop beads are on the right, or vice versa. Eventually the “loop” beads will begin to create a spiral around the “core” beads.

4. Repeat step 3 for 235 more rows (see the tip on sizing),

ending and adding thread as needed (Basic Techniques). The spiral shape should become visible around the fifth row.

5. Once the desired length of the necklace is reached, exit

the last 80 on one end. Pick up seven As, and sew back through the last four 80s (figure 3, a–b).

6. Reinforce the connection by sewing through the nearest

loop beads. Continue through the seven As added in the previous step. Sew down through the last 80 (b–c). End the working thread.

7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 on the other end of the necklace.

End the tail thread.

Embellish the core beads

8. Attach a comfortable length of 14-lb. test beading thread

to the beadwork, leaving a 6-in. (15cm) tail.

9. Sew through the beadwork to exit between the first and

second 80 on one end of the beadwork. 10. Pick up a 4mm crystal rondelle and a color B 150 seed bead. Sew back through the rondelle and continue through the second 80, now exiting in between the second and third 80s (figure 4, a–b).

a a b c c b figure 2 figure 3 d
a
a
b
c
c
b
figure 2
figure 3
d

figure 4

11. Pick up a rondelle and a B, and sew through the next 80

(b–c). Repeat this step until a rondelle and a 150 have been added in between EACH core bead—80 seed bead.