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COMPETENCY-BASED LEARNING MATERIALS

SECTOR: TOURISM

QUALIFICATION: FOOD AND BEVERAGE SERVICE NC II

UNIT OF COMPETENCY: WELCOME GUESTS AND TAKE FOOD AND


BEVERAGE ORDERS
MODULE TITLE: WELCOME GUESTS AND TAKE FOOD AND
BEVERAGE ORDERS
PREPARED BY: JELLANE M. SEÑORA

INFOTECH DEVELOPMENT SYSTEMS


COLLEGES

Dunao, Ligao City


Food and Beverage Service NC II
COMPETENCY-BASED LEARNING MATERIALS

List of Competencies

No. Unit of Competency Module Title Code

Prepare the dining Preparing the dining


1. room/ restaurant area room/ restaurant area TRS512387
for service for service

Welcome guests and Welcoming the guests


2. take food and and taking food and TRS512388
beverage orders beverage orders

Promote food and Promoting food and TRS512389


3.
beverage products beverage products

Provide food and Providing food and


4. beverage services to beverage services to TRS512390
guests guests

5. Provide Room Service Providing room service TRS512391

Receive and handle Receiving and handling TRS512392


6.
guest concerns guest concerns

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
Beverage Service NC II Page 2 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
HOW TO USE THISCOMPETENCY BASED LEARNING MATERIAL (CBLM)

Welcome!
The unit of competency, “Welcome Guests and Take Food and Beverage
Orders” is one of the competencies of FOOD AND BEVERAGE SERVICE NC
II, a course which comprises the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for
a receptionist/food attendant.

The module, “Welcome Guests and Take Food and Beverage Orders”,
contains training materials and activities related to providing pre-meal
services to the dining guests as soon as they arrive in the food service
facility. It will cover the dining room or restaurant service procedures before
the food and beverage orders are serve.

In this module, you are required to go through a series of learning activities


in order to complete each learning outcome. In each learning outcome are
Information Sheets, Self-Checks, Task Sheets and Job Sheets. Follow and
perform the activities in your own. If you have questions, do not hesitate to
ask for assistance from your facilitator.

Remember to:
 Read information sheets and complete the self-checks.
Suggested references are included to supplement the materials
provided in this module.
 Perform the Task Sheets and Job Sheets until you are confident
that your outputs conform to the Performance Criteria Checklist
that follows the sheets.
 Submit outputs of the Task Sheets and Job Sheets to your

Facilitator for evaluation and recording in the Accomplishment Chart.


Output shall serve as your portfolio during the Institutional Competency
Evaluation.

When you feel confident that you have had sufficient practice, ask your
trainer to evaluate you. The result of your assessment will be recorded in
your Progress Chart and Accomplishment Chart.

You must pass the Institutional Competency Evaluation for this


competency. A Certificate of Achievement will be awarded to you after
passing the evaluation.

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
Beverage Service NC II Page 3 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
MODULE CONTENT

UNIT OF COMPETENCY: WELCOME GUESTS AND TAKE FOOD AND


BEVERAGE ORDERS

MODULE TITLE: Welcoming guests and taking food and beverage


orders

MODULE DESCRIPTOR: This unit deals with the knowledge and skills
required in providing pre-meal services to the
dining guests as soon as they arrive in the
foodservice facility. It covers the dining room or
restaurant service procedures before the food and
beverage orders are served. This unit involves the
initial steps in the sequence of service that
includes the welcoming of guests, seating the
guests, taking food and beverage orders and
liaising between the kitchen and the service area.

NOMINAL DURATION:

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

At the end of this module you MUST be able to:

LO1. Welcome and greet guests


LO2. Seat the guests
LO3. Take food and beverage orders
LO4. Liaise between kitchen and service areas

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:

1. Guests are acknowledged as soon as they arrive.


2. Guests are greeted with an appropriate welcome.
3. Details of reservations are checked based on established standard policy.
4. Guests are escorted and seated according to table allocations
5. Tables are utilized according to the number of party.
6. Guests are seated evenly among stations to control the traffic flow of
guests in the dining room.
7. Cloth napkins are opened for the guests when applicable.
8. Water is served when applicable, according to the standards of the
foodservice facility.
9. Guests are presented with the menu according to established standard
practice.

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Beverage Service NC II Page 4 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
10 Orders are taken completely in accordance with the establishment’s
standard procedures.
11 Special requests and requirements are noted accurately.
12 Orders are repeated back to the guests to confirm items.
13 Tableware and cutlery appropriate for the menu choices are provided
and adjusted in accordance with establishment procedures.
14. Orders are placed and sent to the kitchen promptly.
15. Quality of food is checked in accordance with establishment standards
16. Tableware is checked for chips, marks, cleanliness, spills, and drips
17. Plates and/or trays are carried out safely.
18. Colleagues are advised promptly regarding readiness of items for
service
19. Information about special requests, dietary or cultural requirements is
relayed accurately to kitchen where appropriate.
20. Work technology are observed according to establishment standard
policy and procedures

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 5 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
LO 1: Welcome and greet guests

CONTENTS:

 Welcoming/ greeting the guest protocol

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
1. Guests are acknowledged as soon as they arrive.
2. Guests are greeted with an appropriate welcome.
3. Details of reservations are checked based on established standard
policy

CONDITIONS:

Students/trainees must be provided with the following:

Guidelines
Company rules and regulations
Simulated environment

METHODOLOGIES:

 Modular/Self-paced
 Demonstration
 Video viewing
 Picture/photos/drawings

ASSESSMENT METHODS:
 Written test
 Observation
 Oral Questioning

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 6 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Learning Experiences

Learning Outcome 1
Welcome and Greet Guest

Learning Activities Special Instructions

Make sure to ready and understand


Read Information Sheet 2.1-1 carefully the information written in the
on welcoming/ greeting the information sheet
guest protocol
Perform Task Sheet 2.1-1 on Make Sure to Perform well the welcoming
welcoming/ greeting the guest and greeting guest.
protocol
Rate your own performance using Repeat the task if you fail to achieve the
performance criteria checklist 2.1- criteria.
1

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 7 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Information Sheet 2.1-1
Welcoming/greeting the guest protocol

Learning Objectives:

After reading the INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to

1. Enumerate the steps in welcoming/greeting the guests.

2. Explain the tips in welcoming the guest.

Introduction

Quality of service is one of the reasons customers


choose to dine at one restaurant over another. The goal
of restaurant employees is to enhance the dining
experience for customers. Therefore, when a waiter
welcomes customers to restaurant, he has an
opportunity to make the restaurant's first impression,
whether it's a repeat customer or a customer who is
dining at the restaurant for the first time. The way a
waiter greets the restaurant's customer can result in
gaining another regular customer.

The following are the steps in welcoming the guest;

1. Get in touch with the customers.

In this step you have to open the door for the guest, walk towards
them and welcome them by giving the appropriate greetings.

Remember:

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Beverage Service NC II Page 8 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 9 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
2. Take care of the guest.
In this step, you will ask if the guest has reservation. If the guest has
reservation, ask under what name and for how many guest. Then lead
the guest to their reserved table. If the guest has no reservation makes
them wait but not too long and check the availability of vacant tables.
You should also offer the guest the choice between the tables
available.

Remember:

Hostess must suggest aperitif by saying: "Would you like to sit at the
bar for an aperitif first or would you prefer to go straight to your
table, Mr./s (name of guest)?" She should follow the guest's response
and acknowledge by saying: "With pleasure Mr./s (name of guest),
this way please" Hostess should enquire about guest' preferred
section of the restaurant, by saying: "Would you prefer a smoking or
a non-smoking section of the restaurant, Mr./s (name of guest)?"
Hostess must engage in a light conversation tone with the guests
while escorting them. It should be natural and conversational way
(not overburdening with excessive conversation - conversation could
be on guests stay, which activities guests have enjoyed so far, etc.)

3. Go on taking care of the guests.

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 10 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
TASK SHEET No. 2.1-1

Title: Welcoming Guest

Performance Objective: Given required supplies and materials you


should be able to:
1. Welcome Guest according to the step given in the information
sheet.
Supplies/Materials : Reservation Form

Equipment : None

Steps/Procedure:
1. Ask your trainer to provide you with needed materials and
equipment
2. Demonstrate Welcoming Guest
3. Show it to your trainer for evaluation.

Assessment Method:
Observation
Demonstration
Interview

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 11 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Performance Criteria Checklist No. 2.3-2

CRITERIA
Did you…. YES NO

1. Acknowledge guests as soon as they arrive

2. Greet the guest with an appropriate welcome

3. Check details of reservations based on established


standard policy

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 12 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
LO2. SEAT THE GUESTS

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
1. Guests are escorted and seated according to table assignment.
2. Tables are utilized according to number of guests’.
3. Guests are seated evenly to control the traffic flow in the dining
area.
4. Cloth napkins are opened according to procedure requirements.
5. Water is served according to the standards of the foodservice
facility.

CONTENTS:
 How to seat guests
 Where to seat guests (controlling traffic flow of guests)
 Opening napkins for guests
 Procedure in serving water

METHODOLOGIES:
 Lecture-discussion
 Demonstration with return demo
 Film showing
 Visual aids like photos, lay outs, floor plans and drawings

ASSESSMENT METHODS:
 Oral questioning
 Simulation
 Practical test with oral questioning

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 13 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Learning Experiences

Learning Outcome 2
Seat the Guest

Learning Activities Special Instructions

Make sure to ready and understand


Read Information Sheet 2.2-1 carefully the information written in the
on Seat the Guest information sheet
Perform Task Sheet 2.2-1 on Seat Make Sure to Perform well the Seat the
the Guest Guest

Rate your own performance using Repeat the task if you fail to achieve the
performance criteria checklist 2.2- criteria.
1

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 14 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Information Sheet 2.2-1
How to Seat Guest

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Enumerate the steps in escorting guest
2. Enumerate the steps in seating the guest
3. Demonstrate the steps in escorting and seating the guest

In this session, you will learn the proper way of welcoming, greeting, and
seating the guests. Be sure that guests are seated in order of their arrival,
giving preference to guests with reservations at their appointed time.

Escorting the Guests

STEPS:

1. Usually the guest informs the receptionist about his


reservations and upon checking with the restaurant’s table
layout, the guest will be escorted to his reserved table by
saying: “This way please.
2. If the guest has no reservation, receptionist should ask how
many are they in the party, and if she thinks there is still a
vacant table to accommodate them, she should lead them to
that table.
3. When ushering guests to the table, walk ahead with suitable
gait. Do not get too far or they may sit in some empty spot you
have not prepared for them.
4. If the receptionist is busy, the manager, headwaiter or captain
can escort the guests.

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 15 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Seating the Guests

STEPS:

1. Avoid the use of four-seat table for one or two people


unless there are no other tables available and obviously
no smaller table will be available soon.
2. Loud, noisy parties may be placed in private rooms or
towards the back of the dining room so that they will
not disturb other guests.
3. Elderly or handicapped persons may wish to be near the
entrance of the rooms so they do not have to walk far.
4. Young couples like quiet corners and good views.
5. Well-dressed parties who are an asset to your
restaurant may be placed at center position.
6. On the other hand, should the guest requests for
specific locations, try to accommodate him.
7. In seating the guests where there are ladies in the party,
seat them with the best view.
8. Help the guests by pulling out their chair and pulling
back when guests are about to sit.

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 16 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
TASK SHEET No. 2.2-1

Title: Seating The Guest

Performance Objective: Given required supplies and materials you


should be able to:
1. Perform Seating the Guest according to the step given in the
information sheet.
Supplies/Materials : None

Equipment : Chair Table

Steps/Procedure:
4. Ask your trainer to provide you with needed materials and
equipment
5. Demonstrate Seating the Guest
6. Show it to your trainer for evaluation.

Assessment Method:
Observation
Demonstration
Interview

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
Beverage Service NC II Page 17 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Performance Criteria Checklist No. 2.2-1

CRITERIA
Did you…. YES NO

1. Escort and seat guests according to table


allocations

2. Seat guests evenly among stations to control the


traffic flow of guests in the dining room.

3. Utilize tables according to the number of party.

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 18 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Information Sheet 2.2-2
Opening Table Napkins for Guest

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Enumerate the steps in Unfolding Napkins
2. Demonstrate the steps in Unfolding Napkins

In this session, you will learn the proper way of unfolding a napkin. Opening
the napkin for your guest ensures that the napkin is out of the way when
drinks and foods are served. Some guests will open their own napkin as
soon as they sit down, others will wait for you to open it for them.

Technique in Unfolding Napkins

STEPS:

1. Pick up the napkin using the right hand from the right side of the
guest.
2. Unfold the napkin from its fold into a triangle
3. Place it across the guest's lap with the longest side of the triangle
closet to the guest
4. Move around the table opening the napkins, ladies first.

Information Sheet 2.2-2


Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 19 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Procedure in Serving Water

Learning Objectives:

After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:

In this session, you will learn the proper way of serving water. The purpose
of serving iced water is to refresh the guests' palates and allow them time to
select a pre-dinner drink. It should be available, although in some
establishments it may not be the practice to serve it unless it is asked for.

Procedure in Serving Water

STEPS:

1. Position the water glass to the right of the wine glass above the table
knife
2. Pour water from the guest's right side
3. Move around the table pouring the water, serving the host last
4. Continue to offer water throughout the meal as required

LO3. TAKE FOOD AND BEVERAGE ORDERS

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 20 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
1. Menu is presented to guest according to enterprise standard
practice.
2. Information about house specials is provided in clear explanations
and descriptions.
3. Orders are taken in accordance with the enterprise standard
procedures.
4. Orders are repeated back to the guests to confirm items.
5. Recommendations and suggestions are made to assist customers
with drink and meal selections.
6. Customer questions on menu items are answered according to
established standard practice.
7. Special requests and requirements are noted accurately.
8. Tableware and cutlery for the menu choices are adjusted in
accordance with enterprise procedures.

CONTENTS:
 Types of Menu
 Presenting the menu
 Taking food and beverage orders
 Suggestive selling
 Providing advice on food
 Providing advice on wine

METHODOLOGIES:
 Lecture-discussion
 Demonstration
 Role play

ASSESSMENT METHODS:
 Simulation/practical test with oral questioning
 Oral or written test

Learning Experiences

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 21 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Learning Outcome 3
Take Food and Beverage Orders

Learning Activities Special Instructions

Make sure to ready and understand


Read Information Sheet 2.3-1 carefully the information written in the
on Types of menu information sheet
Answer Self-Check 2.3-1 Types of Answer self-check without looking at the
Menu answer key.
Compare answer using answer Take note of the important details
key 2.3-1 especially to items that you forgot to
answer correctly.
Read Information Sheet 2.3-2 Make sure to ready and understand
on Presenting the Menu carefully the information written in the
information sheet
Perform Task Sheet 2.3-2 on Always observe proper presenting of the
Presenting the menu menu
Rate your own performance Repeat the task if you fail to achieve the
using performance criteria criteria.
checklist 2.3-2
Read Information Sheet 2.3-3 Make sure to ready and understand
on Presenting the Menu carefully the information written in the
information sheet
Read Information Sheet 2.3-4 Make sure to ready and understand
on Suggestive Selling carefully the information written in the
information sheet
Read Information Sheet 2.3-5 Make sure to ready and understand
on Providing Advice on Food carefully the information written in the
information sheet
Answer Self-Check 2.3- Answer self-check without looking at the
5Providing Advice on Food answer key.
Compare answer using answer Take note of the important details
key 2.3-5 especially to items that you forgot to
answer correctly.
Read Information Sheet 2.3-6 Make sure to ready and understand
on Providing Advice on Food carefully the information written in the
information sheet

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
Beverage Service NC II Page 22 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Information Sheet 2.3-1
Types of Menu

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Discuss what is a menu.
2. Enumerate the different types of menu

In this session, you will learn the types of menu. Menus, as a list of
prepared foods, have been discovered dating back to the Song Dynasty in
China.[1] In the larger populated cities of the time, merchants found a way to
cater to busy customers who had little time or energy to prepare food during
the evening. The variation in Chinese cuisine from different regions led
caterers to create a list or
menu for their patrons.

The word "menu," like


much of the terminology of
cuisine, is French in
origin. It ultimately derives
from Latin "minutus,"
something made small; in
French it came to be
applied to a detailed list or
résumé of any kind. The
original menus that
offered consumers choices were prepared on a small chalkboard, in French
a carte; so foods chosen from a bill of fare are described as "à la carte,"
"according to the board."

The menu first appeared in China during the second half of the eighteenth
century, or The Romantic Age. Prior to this time eating establishments or
table d'hôte served dishes that were chosen by the chef or proprietors.
Customers ate what the house was serving that day, as in contemporary
banquets or buffets and meals were served from a common table. The
establishment of restaurants and restaurant menus allowed customers to
choose from a list of unseen dishes, which were produced to order according
to the customer's selection. A table d'hôte establishment charged its
customers a fixed price; the menu allowed customers to spend as much or
as little money as they chose.[2]

Type of Menu

1. The à la carte menu

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JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
The key characteristics are:

a. A complete list of all foods served: extensive choice listing


under course headings, or type of meal or cooking
method.
b. Each dish is priced separately; shows the price of each
dish.
c. All dishes being prepared to order often containing the
exotic and high cost seasonal foods.
d. Usually more expensive: higher cost price.

2. The table d’hôte menu or set menu

The key characteristics are:

a. Restricted menu: the menu has a fixed number of courses


(3 to 4 selections).
b. There is a limited choice within each course.
c. Fixed selling price.
d. All dishes are ready to be served at a time.
e. The menu can be available during a pre-determined time.

3. Carte Du Jour
- A menu listing dishes available on a particular day.
- Menu for the Day

Content of Menu

The foods on traditional menus are grouped into categories of related foods
according to the custom and preference of the management.

1. APPETIZERS
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Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
 juices, fruits
SOUPS
 may be separate or grouped with appetizers, included
with table d’hôtel entrees.
ENTRÉE
 steaks, seafood, meat, poultry, sandwiches, salads and
specialties.
DESSERT
pies, ice cream sherbet and sundaes.
BEVERAGES
 coffee, tea, milk and other drinks.
COCKTAILS & WINES
 Red wine, White wine and other cocktail drinks.
SPECIAL OF THE DAY
 may be a left-over or a seasonal dish or chef’s specialty.
SEASONAL SPECIAL
 attached to the menu when there is abundant supply of
particular food available at a low price

Document No
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Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Classical Menu (12 Courses) 3 hours

1. Hors d’oeuvres – pronounced as “or-dov” meaning Appetizers or


Starters or First-course.
2. Potage- pronounced as “po-taaj” meaning Soups. Consommé, Crème,
Chowder, Bisque Broth or Convenience Soup.
3. Poisson- pronounced as “po-son” meaning Fish. Consists of shellfish
and any fish dishes.
4. Entrée – pronounced as “aun-trey” meaning Entry of meat course.
Small well- garnished meat dishes ready for service.
5. Releve- pronounced as “ri-lafe” meaning Main Course. Also known as
“Piece de Resistance”. Larger than entrée and usually large joints of
meat and poultry.
6. Sorbet- pronounced as “saur-bay” meaning Rest course. Rest to eat
meals or courses. Examples would be iced water or juice.
7. Roti – meaning Roast. Consists of roasted Game Birds or poultry or
animals.
8. Legume- pronounced as “lay-gume” meaning vegetable dishes.
9. Entremet –pronounced as “aun-truh-may” meaning sweet course. Hot
and Cold sweet dishes are served.
10. Savoureux – pronounced as “savoury” meaning guests who do
not wish to have sweets at the end of the meal choose savoury to close
their meal. Savoury are small tid-bits of canapé or toast or small
portion of toast with toippings on which spicy fillings are placed.
11. Fromage- pronounced as “fro-maaj” meaning Cheese. All types
of cheese are served from a cheese board or a cheese trolley.
12. Café (Beverages) – Meaning coffee. Coffee is served in a
demitasse with coffee-spoon, with or without milk.

Modern Menu (6 Courses)

1. Appetizer 4. Main Course


2. Soup 5. Dessert
3. Salad 6. Coffee

Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 26 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Self- Check No. 2.3-1

Enumeration :

1. Give the 3 types of the Menu.


2. Give the 8 content of the Menu.
3. Give at least 3 in 12 courses in Classical Menu
4. Give the 6 modern menu courses

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Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
ANSWER KEY No. 2.3-1

1. A la Carte Menu
Table de hote
Carte Du Jour

2. Appetizer
Soup
Entrée
Dessert
Beverages
Cocktails and Wines
Special of the day
Seasonal Special
3. Potage
Piosson
Releve
4. Appetizer
Soup
Salad
Main Course
Dessert
Coffee

Document No
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Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Information Sheet 2.3-2
Presenting the Menu

Learning Objectives:

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Enumerate the steps in presenting the menu.
2. Demonstrate the steps in presenting the menu.
In this session, you will learn how to present the menu. Also, you will learn
to take orders and suggest menu items to guests
Presenting the Menu

1. Present menu to each guest, ladies first.

2. In operations with folded menus, the menus should be opened as


they are offered to each guest.

3. Present the menu from the guest’s right side


4. Menu should be presented right side up, that is in a position to be
read without turning them

“Ma’am/sir, I would like to present to you our menu for your selection, I will
take your order whenever you”re ready

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 29 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
TASK SHEET No. 2.3-2

Title: Presenting the Menu

Performance Objective: Given required supplies and materials you


should be able to:
2. Present the Menu according to the step given in the information
sheet.
Supplies/Materials : MENU

Equipment : None

Steps/Procedure:
7. Ask your trainer to provide you with needed materials and
equipment
8. Demonstrate Presenting the Menu
9. Show it to your trainer for evaluation.

Assessment Method:
Observation
Demonstration
Interview

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 30 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Performance Criteria Checklist No. 2.3-2

CRITERIA
Did you…. YES NO

4. Prepare the menu in accordance to establishment


standards?

5. Present menu to each guest, ladies first.

6. Present the menu from the guest’s right side

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 31 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Information Sheet 2.3-3
Taking Food and Beverage Orders

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Discuss taking food and beverage orders
2. Enumerate the steps in taking food and beverage orders
3. Demonstrate the steps in taking food and beverage orders

Taking orders
Options available
The method of taking orders may vary from establishment to establishment,
and can vary within the one business.
Staff may be required to:
Remember orders relying solely on their memory, as
is the case at most bars and in some restaurants
Record orders on paper-based order forms such as
waiter’s dockets and order pads
Record orders using electronic means such as small
hand-held computers (PDAs – Personal Digital Assistants) which also
send the orders to the kitchen or bar and interface with point of sale
registers to facilitate account tracking, processing and payment.
The role of the order
The order serves four different purposes:
Informs the kitchen or bar staff of the order so that they can produce the
items required by the customers
Informs the service staff of any changes needed to the cutlery. Some may
need to be removed, some may need to be added or exchanged
Identifies who is eating or drinking the items ordered so that the right item
can be served to the correct guest
Provides the basis from which an account can be made up and presented to
the customer at the end of the dining experience.
Whatever the method used, orders should be taken promptly and accurately
with minimal disruption to the customers. You need to pay attention to what
is being said, and use positive body language and verbal communication
when taking the order.

Guidelines for taking the order


There are a number of rules you should try to follow when taking and
recording an order:
Document No
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Beverage Service NC II Page 32 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
 Be aware of signs given by the guests that they are ready to order.
This could be guests looking around for attention, guests who have
closed their menus or guests looking anxious
 Ensure all orders are recorded accurately and legibly.
Using the appropriate terminology and abbreviations
and making sure that the written order does not:
 Omit any important parts of the order such as how the
steak is to be cooked (see below), whether the main
course is to be entrée size or the fact that the main
meal is to be served with mash potato rather than
French fries
 Confuse the person reading or having to interpret it.
There is no point requesting ‘two fish’ from the kitchen
if there are three fish dishes on the menu. Similarly,
just asking the bar for ‘a beer’ doesn’t tell them the size brand, style,
or whether the beer is to be a packaged one or a draught one
 Orders should be taken with minimal disruption and interruption to
guests. There needs to be sensitivity in how the table and the
customers are approached so that they don’t feel they are being
pressured or their private conversations are
being listened to.
 Recommendations or suggestions are made to
the customers to assist them with drink and
meal selections. Even where you have provided
assistance when the menu or the drink list was
presented, when it comes to actually taking the
order guests may still need extra help or need
you to repeat information previously given
 Service staff should always take the guest’s order from the right. This
is an industry standard but check to see what applies where you
work. This obviously can’t happen in situations where:
 There is an obstruction – such as a wall that prevents
you standing to the guest’s right-hand side
 The guests are involved in conversation or looking at
something between them that would make it impractical, rude or
otherwise difficult to take the order
 Guests should be numbered. The host of the party or table or some
other person, as identified by you as being Guest No 1, becomes
number one and the numbering is worked clockwise around the table,
allocating every person who orders a number.

Doing this and getting this right is important as it guides both the
adjustment of covers to reflect what they have ordered, and the actual
delivery of meals and drinks to the correct person without having to
ask “Now, who’s having the veal?”
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JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
 The Number One person may be the guest who is sitting closest to the
front entrance, or they may be sitting closest to the central pillar in
the restaurant. It’s up to you to:
 Leave adequate space on hand-written food dockets, between the
entrées and mains, to clearly define the break in the order. Note that
dessert orders are usually taken after the mains have been served and
cleared away, unless otherwise stipulated
 Repeat the order to the guest to ensure you have got it right. Always
ask for clarification if unsure of a particular order.

Explaining the menu and taking the order

STEPS:

1. When the guests seem ready to order, stand near the table
2. Stand straight, with both feet on the floor
3. Offer and explain the house specialties and menu enthusiastically.
4. Answer the guests' questions honestly but without speaking badly of
any dish on the menu
5. Make suggestions and offer alternatives
6. Ask for the order. Address ladies before gentlemen, unless there is
an obvious host who may be ordering for the table
7. Hold the order-taking pad in your left hand.
8. Stand to the right of the person whose order is being taken
9. Be quick, yet courteous
10. Maintain a conversational tone even if its busy and noisy. Don’t
shout and don’t ask guests to shout their order
11. Repeat the guest order accurately
12. Always smile and be attentive

Operate the ordering system according to enterprise procedures


The ordering system in operation where you work must be used in
accordance with enterprise procedures and, where appropriate, in
compliance with manufacturer’s instructions.
Most employers will provide training on how to take orders and operate their
system even if the system is paper-based system.
Where the system is electronic, there will definitely
be in-house training (unless you have indicated you
have experience with that system on your job
application or at the job interview).

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
Beverage Service NC II Page 34 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Operating ordering systems
All transactions should be undertaken within establishment guidelines
relating to:
 Honesty and integrity. Guidelines cover policy such as not charging
for items that were not delivered or not charging person X for
something that person Y received
 Accuracy – checking all entries, extensions, additions and other
calculations to make sure that the customer isn’t overcharged and
that the venue captures all the revenue to which it is legitimately
entitled
 Speed – ensuring that accounts are compiled and presented in a
timely manner consistent with honesty and accuracy. Never sacrifice
accuracy for speed
 Explanation and description of charges. This should detail fully the
nature of all charges so that no confusion or suspicion about charges
exists
 Customer service – treating customers with the courtesy they merit in
relation to the taking of the order, processing of the order and
presentation of the account for payment.
The manual system
Dining order systems can vary greatly.
The type used largely depends on individual establishment’s preferences
based on matters such as:
 Their previous experience with using an ordering system – including
evaluation of how existing systems are performing
 The number of orders processed – bigger numbers may encourage the
establishment to use an electronic system
 Skills of staff and the availability of skilled staff – most premises
dislike having to train staff, but will do so where they have to.
 For educational purposes, the following explains how to write a
manual food order. Check what applies where you work and stick to
establishment procedures where they differ from what is presented.

Below is an example of an easy to read food docket: note how each person
has been numbered to identify their meal selections.

Date Time Table Number Server


7/5 7:30 6 6 Mary
Qty Item Cover No.

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 35 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
2x Garlic Bread
2x D/F Calamari 1, 3
1X Beef Kebabs 2
2X W-Chicken Salad 4, 5
1X S.O.D. 6
1X Seafood Bskt 1
2X Spaghetti Mar 2, 3
1X Chick-Avocado 4
1X Calamari (Ent) 5
1X Scot-Steak M/R-No 6
Sauce

Points to note about this order


The writing is clear and legible to avoid any costly mistakes
The time allows for monitoring of service
The inclusion of the server’s name allows the chef to know who placed the
order if issues arise and questions need to be asked
The number at the table allows cross-referencing with the number of items
ordered
The chef can clearly read the quantities of each menu item
Additional requirements have been noted
Abbreviations have been used
Guests have been numbered to immediately identify
who is having which meal and that changes to the
cover may be necessary
There is a sufficient gap separating the entrées from
the main meals for the kitchen to see clearly the
break between the courses.
Appropriate software applications
There are various software applications in the
workplace, many of which have been designed and developed for the
hospitality industry, with some specialising in sectors such as
accommodation and restaurants.
The sector-specific options contain many features, some of which are
brilliant, but many of which are not used.
Without doubt, the best advice is to read the manual.
There is so much variation between this software that general statements
are difficult to make. Ask your supervisor to show you the system, explain
what it does, and arrange for some down-time training before you go ‘live’.

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 36 of 98
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JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Some systems have a dedicated ‘training’ option enabling you to practice on
the actual equipment during working hours without interfering with the
working orders.
Software applications
This computerised system enables electronic management of food and
beverage orders.
A main terminal enables data input to the system. This data
comprises the menus for all the restaurants hooked up to the
system, along with prices of each item. This information could
be input by the F & B Manager or receptionist.
Each outlet has its own terminal that displays the menu. This is
a touch screen as there is no keyboard like a normal computer.
Printers are an integral part of the system and they are present
in each of the food outlets, as well as in the kitchen.
Checks must be made before shifts to ensure the screens are ‘up’, and the
printers have toner and paper.
As an order is taken by waiting staff, the order is entered into the system,
via the touch screen terminal. A ‘table tracking’ facility is activated so that
dishes can be added to the initial order, and a track can be kept of the order
for the nominated table number.
The system also has a facility for each table to have seat numbers assigned
to their particular order.
The order is then sent to the required service point, which will normally be
the kitchen and may include the bar. The order is printed out in the service
area, detailing not only the items required, but also the table number, time
and the name and/or number of the waiter.
Orders may be changed as guests change their minds, or as other
circumstances dictate.
Food and beverage orders can be entered at the one time, or using the table
tracking facility, separately by different waiters.
Items that have been incorrectly entered can be deleted and items can be
voided. Both food and beverage can be added to the account during the
meal.
Entering a dish or a beverage automatically triggers the designated selling
price.
When the guest requests their account, the system enables printing of their
bill. Various adjustments can be made to the account enabling discounts
and vouchers to be used.

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Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 37 of 98
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JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
The system allows payment by cash, cheque, and credit card or via account.
Payment may also be made by any combination, such as half in cash, half
by credit card.
At the end of the shift, a summary can be printed detailing various aspects
of the takings for that period. A breakdown of cash sales,
credit card sales, voucher sales, cheque sales, cash out,
discounts and gratuities. Sales by table and staff member
are also available.
The system also enables the handling of advanced deposits.
Normal reconciliation, cash handling and security
procedures apply during the shift, and at the end of trade.
Hand-held electronic order pads
These, as the name suggests, are small hand-held ordering devices (PDAs)
that waiters take to tables instead of using handwritten order pads.
A pointer is used to navigate the screen and ‘key in’ the order which is then
communicated to a printer:
In the kitchen to let the kitchen staff know what is required
To a point-of-sale terminal to generate the account for the customer.
Opinion appears divided as to the relative benefits and disadvantages of this
system with many users pointing to the need for sufficient training in their
use before they can be competently and professionally when taking an order.
These devices integrate with other establishment systems such as the POS
register and kitchen and bar printers and may: Reduce the errors that
occur when orders are taken
Improve customer service levels
Increase service speed.

Information Sheet 2.3-4


Suggestive Selling

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
Beverage Service NC II Page 38 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Learning Objectives:

After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:


1. Discuss the suggestive selling
2. Enumerate the tips in suggestive selling

Suggestive Selling is to increase a guest’s original order by giving them


suggestions and ideas and in turn increasing guest satisfaction and average
spend.
How To Figure Out Customers Needs And Wishes?

Eye contact – Take the extra moment, possibly with just eye contact to
affirm their importance to you and your restaurant business.

Smile – Your smile opens the door, speaks about your waiter openness as a
service person and his approach. The phrase “the customer is always right”
is a well-known rephrasing of this. Customers naturally goes to restaurants
to enjoy and don’t want to see depressed faces around them.

Greetings – „Welcome to our restaurant „ will be good start. First


impression is very important.
Waiter should come with smile and friendly approach to guest.

Positive attitude will help to achieve your goal to increase sales volume of
your restaurant, and guests will be less likely rude when rejecting a
suggestive selling.

For effective suggestive selling in restaurant you need time and continual
practice to train restaurant staff.
Trying to figure up what are customer needs is not always easy. Someone
who maybe look like vegetarian could prefer meat and steak and opposite.
Be sure that you don’t push to much your guest to order something , more
to add on something what nicely compliment his order.
When it comes to returning customers, it is a bit easier. Try to remember
what your regular customers like to eat and drink, an adjust your
recommendation according to that, or suggest something what your regular
guest still have not try and you might think that he could like it.
Encourage regular guests who always order the same dish to try new dishes
from menu. This may increase frequency of their visits. And do this
discreetly.

Wait staff training for Suggestive selling in restaurants

Wait staff are an integral part of success. Your waiter should know the best
everything about the food and beverages in your restaurant menu. But does
he have skills and knowledge to convince restaurant customers to try the
food on his recommendation?
If he does, keep him as a gold, if he does not – do some training.
Document No
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JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Suggestive selling in restaurants is not easy , your staff members need to
feel confident in their customer service skills. And to feel confident they need
to have lot of practical work. So push them into the fire. He will grant
confidence and loyalty of customers by time.
Most important thing about suggestive selling is that your wait staff need to
think about it less how much to sell something and more how to help
restaurant guest to get best experience when eating in your restaurant.

First, they need to know restaurant menu perfectly. Restaurant guests


need to be aware of all the ingredients in a dish, especially in these days of
food allergies (nuts, seafood, strawberries), violent dislikes (offal, coriander)
and vampires (garlic).

Waiter must not order food for guest, idea of suggestion selling in
restaurant is to add food or drink on ordered meal.

For example, when customer watching at restaurant menu, waiter should


ask : „ Would you start with glass of red wine, we have an excellent merlot.
It will complement that steak nicely.“

And if the guest ordered stakes for two, waiter should know that they will
wait for their meal about 20 minutes, and he helping to guest to get nice
experience with offering them salads for start because 20 minutes is much
time to wait if you are very hungry. It is all about „add on“.
And if guest want a dessert for example waiter should add on coffee or some
other drink which complements desert. The receipt will be really boosted if
your waiter succeed to add on bottle of wine to a meal. Restaurant manager
should even consider to send key servers out for sommelier training. If the
guest refuse offer waiter should not take it personally. Instead, he should try
to add something else like fresh fruits which chef brought this morning .
Knowing the restaurant menu gives more flexibility and it is the best
guide for suggestive selling.

What should waiter always recommend? Wait staff must recommend an


appetizer before the meal, fresh fruit if the customer refuses dessert,
suitable wine with the meal, low calorie meal if necessary, another bottle
when the first one is almost empty, etc.

Give your customers mouthwatering description of dishes

When explaining dishes to customers waiter should use descriptive


language. Using the right adjectives description becomes powerful tool for
suggestive selling in restaurant. This is one more reason why waiter need to
know restaurant menu perfectly. When suggesting drinks he should accent
brand names, colors and use adjective like fresh, iced, popular. This will
make that low-profit well drink sound like a high-profit premium
cocktail.

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JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
This kind of drink and dish description will make that customers feel that
they get high quality customer service instead of sales pitch. It can also
maintain customer’s loyalty.

Examples of mouthwatering description of dishes

Mouthwatering description means flavorful, succulent, gorgeous, delicious


food which gets you salivating.

“We have an excellent dry white wine that has won several recent awards,
and it will complement that fish nicely. Can I interest you in a bottle?”

„Would you like to start with a delicious tomato-basil bruschetta served with
seasoned virgin olive oil and toasted French bread.”

“Would you like a slice of our homemade chocolate layer cake layered with a
rich dark chocolate ganache and strawberry filling „?

Some phrases and expressions that can be used with suggestive selling in
restaurants ;

I can recommend today’s special ___.


Allow me to recommend ____. You will certainly like it. It is delicious.
Have you tried our _____? It is juicy and delicious.
We have an excellent dessert offer. I can recommend __ (recommend several
different desserts).

Add Finger Food In Bars

Consumers around the world seek good tasting food when choosing what to
eat between meals. Consumers in the U.S. seeking for something quick and
easy.
According to the NPD study, International Food and Beverage Habits Brazil,
Russia, India, Mexico, and China the U.S. has three peak times for between-
meal snacking, whereas in Brazil and Mexico there are two between-meal
occasions. This information can’t be ignored. It is opportunity for suggestive
selling in bars and coffee shops. Offer small bites like nachos, jalapeño
poppers and sliders an affordable prices and sell it.

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
Beverage Service NC II Page 41 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Characteristic of perfect waiter for effective suggestive selling

Proper attitude, work clothes and self-confidence will influence customers


and encourage them to order what they were recommended. Wait staff
attitude must show that they care about what customers need and not
about selling them something they did not wish to buy!
The success of suggestive selling in a restaurant depends on waiter’s skills
and knowledge of the guests and restaurant menu. A good suggestive selling
in restaurant would be achieved if waiter has characteristics such as:

Enthusiasm about making a sale


Enthusiasm is very important but how to achieve that your waiter or
bartender has it? Be sure that your waiters are motivated to increase sales
volume of your restaurant. They are usually motivated with potential bigger
tips, but you as a restaurant manager should also motivate them with
money or status.

Personal belief in the quality of recommended dish or drink


He or she must believe that the main meal. dessert or drink is exactly as it
is presented. Let your waiters to try all dishes in the kitchen. This would
help them to make a mouthwatering description of dishes and make them
believe in the quality of recommended food. And if he do not like some dish,
persuade him to try to imagine that he enjoy in the taste. Make themselves
believe that customer will enjoy that dish. In this way waiter would sound
more confidential to restaurant guests.

Handle with care


Customers must feel that the wait staff cares about their needs and works
in their interest. People like to buy and not to be sold to! They need to have
ability to understand the needs of customers . This means to recognize

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JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
customer’s preferences and other factors such as how much time they have
for a meal and how much money they can spend on dinner or lunch.

Teach waiters to deal with different states of mood


This is very useful skill for sale and for all aspects of living. If your waiter
feel tired or lack of positive energy he need to try to change the mood into
positive before he stands in front of the guests table. It is not always
possible to do that, sometimes is even contra-productive , but thinking
about alternative viewpoints already change the state of mind. Sales skills –
are partly inherent, but can also be acquired through experience and
training.

Calculate and Create smart offer

You need to have clear goal and benchmark to measure your profit. Maybe
you will make a big response if you make „free“ or „half price“ offer, but
could your restaurant afford it?
Calculate the profitability of your offer. Most expensive items from
restaurant menu are not necessarily the ones that bring in the highest
profits. When you making plan for suggestion selling focus on those dishes
which are profit drivers.
Even no profit special offer is acceptable if it could bring new customers or
make some regular once.
Special offer should be always part of your advertising. That is one of the
main reason why people buy something. You should use it for restaurant
promotion.
Would you like to serve you fries with it? Today is 50% off?
You’d be very surprised when you see the results of increased profits only
with suggestive offering of fries with a meal with or without discounts. This
could make a big positive changes in your final bottom line.

What you should avoid during suggestive selling in restaurant

Never suggest something to children. I really hate when waiter suggest to


my son what he should eat, especially when suggesting fried food and I
spent years to persuade my child to eat food like fish and vegetables. This
could make parents angry – and we don’t want that right?

It s very important that your wait staff never suggest too much items
from the menu. If waiter suggest wine, he should not suggest main meal.
Think about a dessert. If your customers likes wine, maybe he should
recommend dessert too. Waiter must develop a sense when should stop,
and when jump in and stay unobtrusive.

Never suggest something to customer who knows exactly what he want


and who finished his order with words „ „That would be all „ or „That’s it“ or
„Thank you“!

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JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Never recommend leftovers, something you would not eat yourself! I
think that something what you would not eat yourself should not be at
restaurant menu at all , but if there is something like that on menu, never
recommend it. Do that only if you want to lose your customer immediately.

Never describe the food or drink as something that is not. This can lead
to great customer’s disappointments. Always describe menu items as it is.
Possible customers reactions are different if do not receive what they were
promised, they will be dissatisfied and react in the following ways:

 they will not comment but they will also not come back;
 they will not comment, but the next time they come, they will not
listen to suggestions; instead, they will order as they wish regardless
of the efforts on the part of the wait staff;
 they will return the recommended meal or drink. It can really be very
awkward.

Important in Suggestive Selling :

1. Manner or Preparation and Basic Ingredients


Food maybe prepared in various methods – grilled, simmered ,
roasted, marinated, sautéed, pan fried, etc. The basic preparation and
the basic ingredients used are usually mentioned when describing a
dish.
2. Preparation Time

A guest maybe in a hurry or must be really hungry that he wants his


order to be served immediately.
3. Standard Portioning

The size of serving is usually measured in terms of weight , quantity,


etc. for example , a standard a la carte serving steak may be 250
grams .

4. Standard Accompaniments
This refers to the sidings that accompany the dish. The waiter must
know what goes with a set meal so that he can inform the guest right
away.
5. Complementary Items

One way of increasing sales is to push the sale of items that best
complement a food ordered. Wines, for instance are designed to
complement a dish.

6. Special Quality of the Dish

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Highlight the special qualities of the dish. Mention the features that
make it a better choice – its uniqueness, lower fat-calorie content ,
tenderness, juiciness, freshness, portion size, etc.

Use Descriptive Words that will describe the :

1. Taste – delicious, tasty , savoury , appetizing , sweet , sour


2. Color – tossed green , pearly white onions , rich red tomatoes
3. Size – sizeable/ substantial serving of prime rib
4. Texture – juicy, tender , crispy , spicy , creamy , soft fresh
5. Smell – fragrant , bouquet, sweet

Sample Phraseologies for Suggestive Selling :

“For your dinner, would you go for meat , chicken or sea foods?”

“As a steak lover, I’m sure you will love our roast prime rib, served with side
salad.”

“As a chicken lover, you will surely love our Roast Chicken, or you can try
our chicken galantia or chicken inasal.”

“I’m sure you will enjoy any of our Classic favourites like very tender Texan
BBQ US short plate beef or a roast chicken or chicken galantia.”

“Our hainanese chicken is a healthy option for you. And it goes well with a
light serving of tossed green salad.”

“Our fruit juices are truly refreshing and nutritious. They are prepared out
of fresh fruits, high in nutrients and low calories.”

“You will surely enjoy our chef’s special for the day , a very tender and juicy
baby back ribs.”

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 45 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Information Sheet 2.3-5
Providing Advice on Food

Learning Objectives:

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Discuss Providing Advice on Food
2. Discuss the Customers need and dietary and cultural needs
3. Enumerate the principles of cooking
4. Enumerate the different cuisine

One of the key areas of customer service which a waiter can provide
customers with is advice or recommendations to help ensure the customer
is able to order a food or beverage item to suit their needs.
Whilst information is often provided to customers before they decide on a
meal, its importance warrants a section which focuses solely on this
important practice.
Answer customer questions on menu items
A major part of the service staff’s role is to respond to guest questions
regarding menu items. Doing this provides not only an
opportunity to be of service but also to promote items
in line with the kitchen’s advice.
A high level of product knowledge is needed to answer
guest questions, and in the majority of cases, you will
need to ask questions yourself to make sure you have
the necessary information to pass on to customers or
guests.
All information provided to guests in response to their questions must be
truthful and conveyed in a courteous manner.
Common customer enquiries include:
Dish ingredients
Cooking / preparation time
Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
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Beverage Service NC II Page 46 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
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MSG and flavourings
Serving sizes
Freshness of ingredients (seafood)
Cooking styles
Meat or meat stocks
Menu and cookery terminology
Side dishes
Calorie/fat content.
This information is vital in enabling you to effectively promote dishes and
respond to questions from customers.
However, regardless of how much work and research you do, there will
always be occasions when you are asked a question you can’t answer. When
this happens, don’t get upset, annoyed or embarrassed. Treat it as a
learning experience and:
Apologies to the guest
Tell them you don’t know the answer to their question
Tell them you will go and find out, ask the kitchen etc.
Go back to the guest and pass on what you have found out.
As well as giving information to the kitchen and bar, you will
be required occasionally to pass on information from the
kitchen and bar to patrons.
This information can be:
Finding out from the kitchen answers to questions asked by
guests – such as the ingredients in a certain dish
Clarifying cooking methods, temperatures, side dishes or sauces that were
not recorded on an order
Passing on to guests the bad news that their mains will be delayed
Letting the guests know that unfortunately all of a certain item has been
sold out, and that they need to order something different.
Make recommendations and optimise sales
As a food and beverage attendant it is your role to
make the eating experience as enjoyable as possible.
Quite often customers experience indecision and any
helpful suggestions or recommendations from you
could be beneficial.
Customers do not have the same in depth menu
knowledge as you do so try to put yourself in the
customer’s shoes and make recommendations based on what you think they
would like.
Don’t be shy about asking probing questions to help with your
recommendation.
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Sale of additional items
It is your role to increase revenue for the outlet
and the organization as a whole. When customers
are ordering food, don’t be shy about suggesting an
additional item that would complement the meal.
Some examples include:
Side salads, vegetables or French fries
Starch foods like wedges, fries, rice or other potato
formats
Beverages to compliment meals
Additional sauces or condiments
Desserts
Upsizing/upgrading meals
Many food companies now sell different sizes of the same item to offer a
greater choice. With the incentive of a larger meal for a small increase in
price, many customers like this option.
Package meal deals
Many popular fast food companies employ this concept where for a set price
you get three or more food and beverage items. Not only does this make
ordering and preparing food easier, it also guarantees a minimum of three
items being sold.
Suggestive selling
In addition if customers are sure about a certain meal (e.g. chicken) but
aren’t sure of a specific dish, whilst you may not directly suggest the highest
price dish, many attendants know of items that have a higher profit margin,
which they may be trained to suggestive sell.
The style of cooking
Many people eating in a restaurant featuring a particular ethnic theme can
be expected to ask lots of predictable questions about what to eat. Lots of
restaurants will feature a special menu or selection that enables new diners
who are unfamiliar with the menu, foods, terms or cooking styles to ‘graze’
over a variety of dishes in order to provide a sample of all the cooking styles,
flavours etc. The nature of the dishes featured
Where the dishes offered are meals served in select countries such as roasts,
steaks, schnitzels or pasta there is little need to explain many of the items
featured to Western customers as they may already be familiar with them,
but detailed explanation may need to be offered to others who may not be
familiar with the items. Even these dishes can still require explanation even
though they are well known by customers. For example, you can expect
many diners to be familiar with lasagne and perhaps fettuccine but they
may not know the difference between penne, rigatoni or tagliatelle.
The range of items offered
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Usually the more extensive the menu, the more explanation needed. This
can relate to: Large numbers of items on the menu Extensive numbers of
courses. A seven course meal may comprise: 1. Appetisers 2. Soups 3.
Salads 4. Main courses with vegetables, potatoes and side dishes (where
applicable) 5. Desserts – hot or cold 6. Cheese platter 7. Coffee and petit
fours There are no laws that govern how many courses you should offer or
how many the guest has to eat. The traditional ‘3 course meal’ remains the
most popular with diners at dinner, with a single or two-course meal being
most popular at lunch. The age of the diners
Children sometimes need to be tempted by attractive descriptions, whether
verbal or written. Some children’s menus feature colour photos in the same
way that fast food outlets advertise their products and make them look
appealing. Older patrons who are familiar with dining out traditionally
require little or no advice, but may seek information about specials and the
origin of products. The ethnic background of the diner
Where the diner is, say, an international tourist it is to be expected that they
will require more advice and assistance, especially in situations where they
are seeking a local experience. In an ethnic restaurant, the questions from
people of that background will tend to be different to the non-ethnic diner.
The ethnic diner is more likely to understand what a dish is but will tend to
ask more incisive questions teasing out information about cooking styles,
ingredients, length of cooking, seasonings etc. The nature of the group being
served
This is an element that varies enormously between individuals and different
parties. Business clients who are dining in a group may seek to question
you extensively, perhaps just to impress their colleagues, while other diners
may just want a ‘quick meal’.
Similarly, people in groups may be ready to accept a group decision about
what to eat, while others seem to want to show off with the questions they
ask before placing their order How quickly they want to eat
Those who want to eat a quick meal are less likely to ask many questions
apart from “What’s quick?” Nearly anything will satisfy these diners
providing they can get it straightaway. All the above can impact on both the
assistance that will be sought, and the extent to which you may deem it
appropriate to offer suggestions. As with other aspects of customer service,
you should adopt a ‘horses for courses’ approach which recognises and
addresses the individuality of each customer rather than using a ‘one size
fits all’ orientation. “Push this dish!”
In addition, there will frequently be occasions when the kitchen will ask you
to ‘push’ a certain dish or two. This may be done to: Clear a specific menu
item – so that all the dishes produced can be profitably sold as opposed to
having to throw some of it out at a total loss Promote it – in order to
determine how acceptable a new or proposed dish will be, the kitchen may
ask for a special effort to sell a certain dish so that feedback about it can be
obtained Optimise profits – because the profit return from a certain dish is
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exceptional or the most profitable dish on the menu. Pasta, noodle and rice
dishes are often highly profitable menu items Provide dining variety –
because it truly is a Special dish featuring in-season produce and of a one-
off nature. When assisting your guests, you must remember that all you are
doing providing them with information. Never try to force your preferences or
the kitchen’s requirements on them. By all means assist, suggest and
recommend but never force, cajole, misrepresent or coerce!
Offer options and possible variations to customers where appropriate
Offering options and possible variations to customers is another way of
providing exceptional customer service. It is a tangible way of demonstrating
your interest in them as an individual and in their particular needs. Once
again, it is this type of service that separates your premises from the
opposition across the street.

Offering options and possible variations


It is best to determine well in advance the extent to which options and
variations can be accommodated in the kitchen and via the establishment
pricing structure. You will need to verify with the kitchen before you start
suggesting that “If sir doesn’t like cheese then I’m sure the chef will be
happy to substitute a lobster Thermidor for the lobster Mornay”. You also
need to know what effect, if any, such a suggestion is going to have on the
selling price. It is excellent to suggest Chilli Prawns as a swap for the Garlic
Prawns, but only if the kitchen is happy to do so and has the ingredients.
There is nothing worse than taking an order for a special dish for a guest
and making them very happy only to have to return to the table to explain
that it can’t be done. And, on top of that, have the kitchen staff annoyed
with you for the rest of the service. Where a customer makes a suggestion
about an option, variation or substitution to a dish, it is good standard
operating procedure to ask the guest to wait while you check it out first with
the kitchen or management. What options and variations are there?
There are as many potential options and variations as there are guests. We
have already mentioned that you should take a very individual approach to
guests. Common options and variations with the dishes listed on the menu
can include: Price reductions for a smaller serve This can be common where
the guest is a regular and knows that the ‘normal’ size serve is just too big
for them. It is important to accept this request for what it is. There are
many people who can’t or don’t want to eat too much, are on a diet, or just
get turned off when faced with a big meal. Not all these requests are
attempts by people to simply get a price reduction. Your establishment may
be quite happy to provide a smaller serve but with no corresponding price
reduction. Paying a bit extra for a bigger serve Again, where the customer is
a regular they may prefer to have a larger serve and pay extra for it because
it is so good. You need to know what is involved in the ‘bigger serve’ – is it an
extra slice, another cutlet, or just ‘a bit more’ without any specific
measurement?
Ordering an entrée as a main course

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There would appear little difficulty in accommodating some of these requests
but standardisation must be ensured. For example, how many oysters
would be appropriate for the main course serve size if there were eight
oysters in the entrée. This needs to be determined not only from a costing
perspective but also to ensure that all meals come out the same if other
people in the restaurant also order the same thing.

Ordering a main as an entrée


Sometimes this can be a little more difficult for the kitchen to accommodate,
but the issues mentioned immediately above, again apply here, too.
Standardisation is important, as is getting the price right. You also have to
know the size of the entrée compared to the main course. How many prawns
would there be in the entrée if the main course has twelve? Certain main
courses are also ‘off limits’ for downsizing from a main course to an entrée.
Items traditionally included here are steaks, roasts and other dishes
commonly served with ‘full vegetables’.
Changing sauces
This is usually not a real problem where it involves switching from one listed
sauce to another listed sauce. Where it becomes problematic is when the
guest wishes to substitute the listed sauce with one not mentioned on the
menu. This doesn’t always mean that the kitchen can’t make the sauce, but
they may not have the ingredients, or in a busy establishment, they may
simply not have the time to do so. Again, check with the kitchen before
confirming the sauce change with the guest.
Changing cooking styles
This is a fairly common request and as such should be thought through in
advance and all staff notified of what is possible and what is not. For
example, if a fish is offered pan fried, battered or with some sort of exotic
sauce, but the guest just wants it grilled – can that be done? We know it’s a
pretty basic cooking style but can it be done when the dining area is flat out
and all resources and staff are being used? Yet again, you need to be aware
if there is going to be a change to the listed menu price for the original dish.
Degrees of doneness
This is a perennial question: some places will refuse to cook a steak ‘well
done’ while there might be others who refuse to cook one ‘rare’, due to fears
relating to food poisoning).

Respond to customers with special dietary or cultural needs, and


provide accurate information and advice
The ability to respond to customers who have special dietary needs revolves
around your level of product knowledge and the information supplied by the
customers.
Their dietary and cultural needs are important to customers, not to mention
the possible health issues associated with the physical reactions some
people can experience when they eat the “wrong” food, such as nuts.
To accurately provide this necessary advice you must:
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Develop detailed product knowledge about the menu items you sell –
where they are sourced, how they are prepared and the ingredients
Investigate in more detail when customers state they have a special need.
For example, one person who advises you they are a vegetarian (see below),
may in fact eat eggs, which opens up a wider range of dishes for you to
recommend.
Dietary needs
It is extremely important to make sure that special requests that relate to
dietary issues receive extra attention and care as there can be severe
medical consequences if dietary needs are not met. Dietary needs can be
seen to include any situation where the customer/guest has mentioned that
they have special needs in relation to:
Allergies
Medications
Health-related conditions – such as diabetes, heart conditions
Specific diets that are mentioned.
These consequences such as the possibility of anaphylactic shock, increased
blood sugar levels and other reactions that diners may have to various foods
or substances, can result in the property being sued.
Remember that all properties have a common law duty of care towards their
patrons and this obligation definitely extends to situations where customers
have asked for a certain meal and are served something that does not
comply with their stated requests and when this results in injury to those
persons.
The keys in relation to this situation are:
Always check with management or the kitchen to determine whether or
not a specific stated dietary request can be accommodated or not
Make doubly sure that those preparing the dish know the specific dietary
requirements that have been requested
Never assume that the kitchen can accommodate dietary needs of patrons
– even if you have accommodated similar requests in the past
Double check with the kitchen when you pick up a dish for service to the
table – ask them if they have prepared the food as requested and obtain
positive confirmation before taking the dish to the table
Ensure appropriate emergency procedures are in place to manage
situations where customers are adversely affected by foodstuffs while on the
premises.
These procedures may be included in the Emergency Management Plan for
the premises
In many cases, customers with special dietary needs can be
accommodated simply by suggesting ‘healthy’ foods:
Meats that are lean, trimmed and fat free
Fresh salads and fresh vegetables that are cooked in a simple and plain
way such as steaming or boiling
Foods that are low in cholesterol, fat, sugar and salt.
These food items would all be acceptable where, for example, the guest
indicated a general hint that they were ‘on a diet’.

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But there is more to it than that, especially where individuals have an
allergy to certain products. It is fair to say that the vast majority of people
with special dietary needs are aware themselves of what they can and
cannot eat, and are able to order suitable dishes based on your advice as to
what is available in the kitchen.
An increasing number of guests will advise the kitchen in advance when
they make a reservation where they have special needs, and organise a
suitable dish. Some may even bring their own pre-prepared meal in where
the kitchen has difficulty meeting a specific diet-related request: in these
cases there is usually no charge to the guest but check what applies where
you work.
It is a useful tool to develop a list of dishes, either taken from the regular
menu or which can be produced ‘to order’, to cater for customers with
special dietary needs.
Low-fat meals require meats that are lean, trimmed and fat free low-fat
dairy products and the use of other low-fat ingredients and alternatives
such as margarine.
Low-salt meals require the preparation of foods without the use of salt.
Kitchen staff will use salt substitutes and other items such as herbs and
species, garlic and ginger to add flavour. Many pre-prepared items must be
avoided and all foods that are salted or pickled must also be avoided.
Low-calorie meals are similar to low-fat meals focusing on the reduction of
fat and sugar from the dishes. In addition, serve size may be a factor and
the dish may need to be of limited dimensions.
Diabetic meals should be low in fat and sugar, and conform to the portion
controlled size required by the customer.
Fresh foods, low-fat fish, lean meat and ‘plain’ cooking styles such as
steaming or grilling are most appropriate.
Gluten-free meals mean the elimination of gluten found in grains such as
wheat, rye, barley and oats, and the use of specific gluten-free foods.
Fruit and vegetables, nuts and brown rice are alternative sources of fiber,
subject to personal taste.
Vegetarians
Those who state they are vegetarians are also worthy of special
consideration, and the term ‘vegetarian’ is one that has the potential to
mean many things to many people. In truth, there are several types of
vegetarianism (see below) and it is worth asking the guest who mentions
they are vegetarian, exactly what sort of vegetarian they are. To some people,
being a vegetarian simply means not eating any meat, while to another it
means not eating any animal products at all.
The classifications of vegetarians can be quite large and include:
Vegetarian requests – this is probably the most common dietary-related
request and can include:
Lacto-ova vegetarians/Ova-lacto vegetarians – these are the majority of
‘vegetarians’. They eat dairy products and eggs but not meat of any kind of
meat, poultry or fish
Lacto-vegetarians – they don’t eat meat, poultry or fish. They don’t eat
eggs but they eat dairy products
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Pescatarians – people who don’t eat meat, poultry or animal flesh but do
eat fish
Vegan – this definition is open to various definitions so it is best to check
exactly what the diner means when they say they are a ‘vegan’.
Generally a vegan can be seen as anyone who doesn’t eat meat, poultry,
fish, eggs or dairy products and doesn’t eat foods derived from animals such
as gelatine.
The person may also stipulate that they are served only raw/unprocessed
foods, or foods that have not reached a temperature of above 46ºC because
they believe foods above this temperature have had some of their dietary
goodness removed. Other variations include vegetarians who have decided to
eat one type of meat, but not others. For example, a porco-vegetarian has
elected to consume pork and pork products but will avoid all other meat
types. Asking questions to determine the person’s exact requirements is
important, as is maintaining a positive approach to the customer and
ensuring they do not get the impression that their decision to be vegetarian
is an annoyance to us. Cultural needs
Jewish customers may wish to eat ‘kosher’ food which means food that is
deemed by them to be ‘proper’ according to Biblical beliefs and laws. A full
understanding of kosher food is complex and the following notes are
designed to provide an overview rather than a detailed study. Kosher meat
may only be sourced from certain allowed animals such as ruminants with
split hooves, domestic birds such as chicken and turkey and fish with fins
and removable scales. All ruminants must be slaughtered by special
slaughtermen according to Jewish law, and during food preparation, special
other considerations must be observed such as ensuring that milk and meat
are not mixed together.
Principles of cooking
In general terms, cooking may be seen as the application of heat to food.
There are numerous ways this heat can be applied, and a diverse range of
equipment with which to apply it. There is no doubt that many cooking
processes are similar. These are very much variations on a theme in many
cases, and yet genuinely different within their similarity. The subtle
differences have been devised to cater for specific reasons which will be
explained below. Naturally, the recipe being used will traditionally dictate
the cooking method to be used, with commonly used options including:
 Boiling Braising Steaming Baking Grilling
 Poaching Stewing Deep frying Roasting Shallow frying
There are several reasons why we cook food, and it is interesting to
understand what some of these are. They include:
To make the food palatable. This means cooking food makes it easier for
us to digest it and benefit from its nutritional properties
To enhance its sensory appeal. Cooking food produces lots of things that
we find attractive. It creates lots of tempting smells, it produces the colour
that we often take for granted when presented with a meal, and it brings
about the wonderful flavour combinations that we have come to expect from
so many of the foods we eat
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To provide us with choice. The wide variety of foods we enjoy today are
brought about, in many ways, by the huge diversity of cooking methods
available to us. Think of the humble potato and then consider all the
marvellous and different ways it can be cooked and served.

Cooking methods
Naturally, the recipe being used will traditionally dictate the cooking method
to be used, with commonly used options including:
Baking
Baking is the principle of cookery in which food is subjected to the action of
dry heat in an oven. This dry heat is modified by steam produced by the
water content of the food being baked. Some items need steam to improve
volume and crispness. Most foods can be baked. Fish, meat, vegetables and
fruit are all suitable. Other items prepared through this process include:
Meringues Egg custard Biscuits Genoese sponge Puddings
Soufflés Vol-au-vents Croissants Bread rolls Savarins Scones
Cakes Muffins.
Blanching
Blanching is the process by which food is placed in rapidly boiling water for
a very short time. The food is then refreshed by rinsing it or plunging it into
cold water to stop the cooking process. Blanching is often a preliminary
process to other cooking principles, such as sauteing, glazing, braising or
deep frying. Blanching can be done using a cold water start or a boiling
water start.
Boiling
Boiling is the principle of cookery in which food is completely immersed in
liquid and cooked at boiling point (100°C). Most foods have to be cooked in
water to become edible. Foods preserved by salting need water to become
edible: the water de-salts the food. Corned beef is a good example of this.
Dehydrated food needs liquid to reconstitute it. Some cereals and pastas are
examples of this. Boiling is the process used mainly for pasta, rice and fresh
and dried vegetables because these commodities require rapid movement of
the cooking liquid.
Braising
Braising is the principle of cookery where food is half covered with an
appropriate liquid and cooked slowly in a tightly lidded container. The food
is usually left in large pieces which are carved before serving: the cooking
liquid for the meat is often used in an accompanying sauce. However the
liquid in which vegetables are braised is not used to make a sauce, as it is
too strongly flavoured. Braising can be done in an oven or on the top of the
stove.
Deep frying
Deep frying is the principle of cookery where food is cooked by total
immersion in hot fat or oil. This method is best suited to foods which can be
cooked quickly. Most foods need to be coated before deep frying to seal in
the juices. Most foods can be deep fried as long as they have a coating to
seal in the juices.

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Poultry, meats, fish, vegetables, potatoes, cheese, yeast goods, fruit and
even ice cream can be deep fried. The important thing to remember is to
make sure the food is properly coated beforehand.
Grilling is the principle of cookery where food is cooked by radiated heat
directed from above or below. In some cases the heat can come from both
directions at once. The source of heat can be charcoal, coke, gas or
electricity.
Broiling is an American term which refers to food being grilled under a
salamander. The modern definition of barbecuing refers to food being cooked
on bars over hot coals. Gratinating refers to the process of browning or
glazing a cooked dish under a salamander or in a very hot oven. Dishes
finished in this way are usually sprinkled with breadcrumbs or cheese.
Foods suitable for grilling under a salamander (broiling) include:
Whole, small round fish, flat fish and fillets
Ham and bacon slices
Tomatoes and pineapple rings
Au gratin dishes (such as cauliflower mornay).
Foods suitable for grilling on grill plates or bars include:
Pork cutlets and medallions
Lamb chops
Beef sirloin steaks, T-bones and beef tournedos
Baby chicken
Whole, small round fish, flat fish and fillets
Ham steaks
Bacon
Liver and kidney
Mushrooms (on flat-top plates only)
Eggs (on flat-top plates only)
Sausages
Eggplant
Tomatoes
Onion
Capsicum
Zucchini
Mango
Pineapple rings.
There are numerous grill accompaniments, which include compound
butters, sauces and fruits. Compound or flavoured butters can be made
with many different flavourings. The most common and versatile compound
butter is parsley butter (beurre maitre d’hotel). Sauces can be served with
grilled food. Brown sauces accompany red meats and white sauces are best
for fish. Warm emulsion sauces are also suitable for grills. Fruits and fruit
compotes can accompany grilled foods. Grilled pineapple with ham steaks,
grilled tomatoes.
Microwaving
Microwaving is the principle of cookery in which energy is transferred to the
food by electromagnetic radiation. Microwave ovens can be used for cooking
raw food, reheating cooked food and for defrosting frozen food.
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Advantages of microwave ovens
50% to 70% faster than conventional cooking times on certain foods
A quick way to cook, reheat and defrost items
Saves electricity and labour
Can operate on a self-service basis
Meals can be made available 24 hours a day
The food cooks in its own juices so flavour and nutrition are maintained
There is minimal food shrinkage and drying out
Allows flexibility in production when combined with conventional cooking
methods.
Disadvantages of microwave ovens
Not suitable for all foods
Small oven space limits it to small quantities
Many models do not brown the food
Not all types of containers can be used in them
Microwaves can only penetrate to a certain distance (from all sides)
Microwaves can superheat foods and liquids and are therefore very
dangerous if used incorrectly.
Poaching
Poaching is the principle of cookery where food is completely submerged in
liquid just below boiling point. There should be no visible movement of the
liquid. Poaching is a gentle form of cooking which is suited to good quality,
tender food such as fish, poultry, red meat, eggs and dried or fresh fruit. For
poaching, the food must be completely immersed in the poaching liquid
throughout the cooking process. The temperature of the poaching liquid is
maintained at 93ºC–95ºC, which is just below simmering temperature.
Poaching liquids include court bouillon, stocks, stock syrups and milk.
Roasting/spit roasting
Roasting and spit roasting is the principle of cookery in which food is
cooked in an oven or while rotating on a spit. In both cases, fat is used as a
basting agent.
Basting is where a small amount of fat is poured thinly over the food during
roasting. The fat can be from the item being roasted, or it can be extra
melted dripping, lard or oil.
Spit roasting is perhaps the oldest method of cookery. All that was needed
was a joint of meat, a fire and a means of suspending and turning the meat
above the fire.
Pot roasting (poeler) is a more gentle form of roasting because the food is
initially enclosed in a container and not subjected to high, direct heat for as
long as in roasting.
Slow roasting is when food is roasted over a long period of time, such as
overnight, in specially designed ovens. Most joints of good quality, tender
meat with or without bones, game poultry and root vegetables can be
roasted. Spit roasting is best for whole carcasses or very large joints. For pot
roasting, most joints of meat, poultry and feathered game can be used.
Shallow frying, pan frying, sautéing and stir frying

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Shallow frying is the principle of cookery where food is cooked in a small
amount of fat in a pan or wok. This principle also includes pan frying,
sauteing and stir frying.
Pan frying is where food is cooked in a small amount of fat and turned with
tongs or a spatula.
Sauteing is where food is tossed in a small amount of hot fat to colour the
food evenly during cooking. It also refers to the sealing and colouring of
meat for a stew. Sauté comes from the French word ‘sauter’ which means ‘to
jump’.
Stir frying is usually associated with Asian cookery. It refers to the
technique of frying food very lightly in a small amount of oil over a medium
to high heat. Sometimes ingredients are cooked separately and combined
before serving. Ingredients which take the longest time to cook are added
first and those that require less cooking time are added last. Tender food
items are suitable for this method. Schnitzel, medallions and cutlets are
suitable. Tougher cuts of meat can be used if they are minced or chopped
finely and formed into a range of products such as hamburgers.
Simmering
Simmering is gentle boiling at a temperature of 95ºC–98ºC. The difference
between boiling and simmering is that boiling creates a faster movement of
the liquid than simmering. For simmering, liquid is heated to between 95ºC–
98ºC. You can tell when water starts to simmer because tiny bubbles of air
start to rise from the bottom of the pot and break the surface. Simmering is
used to cook meats, poultry, stocks, sauces and soups.
Steaming
An increasingly popular cooking method with the health conscious.
Steaming is the principle of cookery where food is cooked by steam, either at
atmospheric or high pressure. In steaming, a smaller amount of liquid is
used than in boiling. The food to be steamed is suspended above the liquid
which creates the steam. The steam should be contained within the cooking
vessel. Steaming is a very nutritional method of cookery as no fats or oils are
used and the natural tastes of the foods are preserved. Steaming is best
used for foods which can be cooked.
Stewing
Stewing is the principle of cookery where the food is completely covered with
liquid while it is cooking. The long cooking process gives a concentrated
flavour to the food and the sauce which are served together as a complete
dish. Food items of a tougher nature are suitable for stewing. Generally
speaking, items suitable for stewing are those of a tough nature. The
cheaper cuts of meat and chicken can be used most successfully. Fish
suitable for stewing includes fresh water, salt water and shellfish. The food
is simmered on top of the stove. It becomes tender and doesn’t dry out or
shrink. The longer cooking time allows more interchange of flavours between
food and the liquid. Both the meat and the sauce are usually served
together. Most garnishes required for the presentation of a stew are cooked
separately and added just prior to service. This avoids the problem of the
garnish breaking up.
Culinary styles
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As mentioned, most hotels will provide a wide mix of food options to cater to
the different preferences of its local and international customers.
Not only are hotels full of culturally diverse people. Most countries are a
mixing pot of people from different backgrounds and cultures. In many
cases there is not one true style of food that is unique to a region. There are
often a mix and variations of different styles.
It is without doubt that most ASEAN countries are host to a wide variety of
culinary styles. The large number of migrants to these countries and the
diversity of their backgrounds have contributed to this. This has led to the
integration and amalgamation of culinary techniques, foods and orientations
from all the culinary styles that the world has to offer. In many cases,
different cultures have not so much influenced the cuisine of each country,
but provided alternative eating styles. Nowhere is this more obvious than in
places where dishes from different countries are featured on the menu, and
incorporated into the overall offerings of the premises. Understanding
different cuisines
It is important that if you work in a dining area that features a specific
ethnic/cultural emphasis, you must research that culinary style and
develop a substantial bank of product knowledge related to that particular
country.
How can you do this? Options include:
Reading relevant books
Talking to the kitchen staff and the owners
Researching on the Net
Practice – even at home – cooking a few dishes from the different countries
to get a first-hand idea of what’s involved, how it’s done and what it tastes
like
Visit your local market or fresh produce supplier to gain an appreciation
of the staggering array of fresh produce available to support the preparation
of dishes from many different countries.
Impact of different cuisines
Thai cuisine has provided one alternative dining style, and also influenced
international menus through an emphasis on the use of chillies, spices,
herbs and fragrances. Japan has provided an alternative dining style and
provided a platform from which contrasting colour and small portion sizes
were seen as acceptable. This is somewhat of a contrast to the large serve
sizes traditionally demanded by American and English customers. Sushi
has provided a lesson in different preparation techniques and dining
options.

Cuisine in different countries


This section will explore some popular and common dishes from a variety of
countries. It is important to note that the list provided is only a snapshot of
what a specific country has to offer. All countries normally have endless

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types of dishes, with local regions having their own unique cuisines and
delicious food dishes.
Chinese cuisine
Popular dishes include: • Kung Pao Chicken • Spring Rolls/Egg Rolls •
Szechuan Hotpot • Szechuan Chicken • Mushu Pork • Fried Rice • Beef with
Broccoli • Fried Dumplings • Chinese Dumpling – Jiaozi • Hot and Sour
Soup • Dim Sum • Beef Fried Noodles • Hunan fried tofu • Chow Mein •
Wontons • Peking Duck.
Indian cuisine
Popular dishes include: Biryani Butter Chicken Vindaloo and Rogan
Josh Tandoori Chicken Idli-Dosa – Vada with Sambar Palak paneer
Chole – Bhature Dal makhani Malai Kofta Naan Samosa and
Pakodas Pav Bhaji Panipuri – Chaats Kebabs Aloo gobi Lassi –
Shakes Pickles.
Thai cuisine
Popular dishes include: Tom Yam Goong – Spicy Shrimp Soup Pad Thai
- Fried Noodle Kang Keaw Wan Gai – Green Chicken Curry Gaeng
Daeng – Red Curry Tom Kha Kai – Chicken in Coconut Milk Soup Tom
Yam Gai – Spicy Chicken Soup Moo Sa-Te – Grilled Pork Sticks with
Turmeric Som Tam – Spicy Papaya Salad Yam Nua – Spicy Beef Salad
Panaeng – Meat in Spicy Coconut Cream Por Pia Tord – Fried Spring Roll
Gai Pad Met Mamuang – Stir-Fried Chicken with Cashew Nuts Khao
Pad – Fried Rice Pak Boong – Morning Glory.
Vietnamese cuisine
Popular dishes include: Phở – Beef noodle soup Bún bò Huế – Spicy beef
and pork noodle soup Cơm tấm – Pork dish Canh chua – Sour soup
Bánh hỏi – Thin noodle dish with meat Bò lá lốt – Rolled spiced beef dish
Bánh mì thịt – Vietnamese baguette Vietnamese salad rolls Bánh
cuốn – Rice flour rolls Bánh bao – A Steamed bun dumpling Bánh
chưng – Sticky rice dish Bún măng vịt – Bamboo shoots and duck noodle
soup Bún chả – Grilled pork and vermicelli noodles dish

Japanese cuisine
Popular dishes include: Sashimi – Shin slices of raw fish Sushi – Raw
fish, served on vinegared rice Sushi roll – Filling is rolled in rice with a
covering of nori. Tempura – Seafood or vegetables dipped in batter and
deep-fried Kare Raisu – Curry Rice Soba, udon and ramen noodles
Teppanyaki – Meat, seafood and vegetables prepared in front of guests
Donburi – bowl of rice covered with one of a variety of toppings Sukiyaki –
Savoury stew of vegetables and beef Shabushabu – Thin slices of beef
dipped in a pot of boiling water and stock Okonomiyaki – Savory Japanese
pancake Yakitori – Broiled chicken Yakiniku – Grilled meat.

French cuisine
Popular dishes include: Soupe à l'oignon – French soup made of onions
and beef stock Cheeses – Brie, Camembert, Roquefort Baguette – A long
skinny loaf of French bread Boeuf bourguignon – Traditional French stew
Coq au Vin – A famous food that is simply chicken Flamiche – Pie crust
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filled with cheese and vegetables Salade nicoise Duck confit Foie Gras
– This is the very fatty liver of a goose or duck Escargots – Snails Truffes
– Expensive black mushrooms Ratatouille Crepes – Thin pancakes
Desserts – Flans, ganache, tarts, pastries, crossaints.
Italian cuisine
Popular dishes include: Pizza – cooked dough base with various toppings
Chicken parmigiana Gelato – Italian ice-cream Tiramisu – dessert
made of biscuits soaked in coffee with layers of whipped mascarpone and
egg yolks Risotto – short grain rice dish Mortadella – heat cured sausage
Spumoni – molded Italian ice cream dessert Cheeses – Mozzarella,
Parmigiano-Reggiano Pasta – Cannoli, spaghetti, penne, Fettuccine,
Linguine Lasagna Saltimbocca.
German cuisine
Popular dishes include: Bratwurst – Sausage made of mixed meats
Frankfurter – Smoked sausage made from pure pork Sauerkraut –
Fermented shredded cabbage Spätzle – Hand-made noodles Knödel –
German dumplings Kartoffelsalat – Potato salad Schweinshaxe – Pork
hock Eisbein – Ham hock usually served with Sauerkraut
Weihnachtsgans – Roasted goose Wiener schnitzel Strudel Stollen – A
bread-like cake Apfelkuchen – Apple Cake.

Greek cuisine
Popular dishes include: Baklavas – Baklava Pastry Horta Vrasta –
Boiled Leafy Greens Tyropitakia – Cheese Pie Triangles Kotosoupa
Avgolemono – Chicken and Lemon Rice Soup Revithosoupa – Chickpea
Soup Classic Dips and Spreads – Melitzanosalata, Skorthalia,
Taramosalata, Tzatziki Pastitsio or Pasticcio – Creamy Cheesy Baked
Pasta with Meat Horiatiki Salata – Greek Salad Moussakas –
Moussaka with Eggplant Arni me Patates – Roasted Lamb with Potatoes
Souvlaki – Skewered Kebabs Gyro – Sliced Rotisserie-Roasted Meat
Spanakopita or Spanakotyropita – Spinach Pie with Cheese Dolmathes or
Dolmades – Stuffed Grape Leaves Yemista me Ryzi – Meatless Stuffed
Vegetables.

Spanish cuisine
Popular dishes include: Pulpo a la Gallega – Galician Octopus Cochinillo
Asado – Roast Suckling Pig Paella – Spanish rice dish Jamon Iberico
and Chorizo – Iberian Ham and Spicy Sausage Gambas Ajillo – Garlic
Prawns Pescado Frito – Fried Fish Tortilla Española – Spanish Omelet
Gazpacho – Cold Tomato Soup or Liquid Salad Queso Manchego –
Spanish Sheep Cheese Patatas Bravas – Fried Potatoes in SpicySauce.

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Self- Check No. 2.3-4
Enumeration :

1. Give the 7 Common customer enquirie


2. Give at least 3 cooking Methods
3. Give at least 5 Different Countries Cuisine

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Answer Key 2.3-4
1. Dish ingredients
Cooking / preparation time
MSG and flavorings
Serving sizes
Freshness of ingredients (seafood)
Cooking styles
Meat or meat stocks
Menu and cookery terminology
Side dishes
2. Baking
Blanching
Braising

3. Chinese Cuisine
Japanese Cuisine
Indian Cuisine
Thai Cuisine
Vietnamese Cuisine

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Information Sheet 2.3-6
Providing Advice on Wine

Learning Objectives:

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Discuss Providing Advice on Wine
Offer, where appropriate, assistance to customers making wine
selections
Introduction
It is vital wine service staff can offer assistance to customers. This
assistance demonstrates professionalism, helps meet customer expectations
and needs, optimizes sales and encourages repeat business. The essential
underlying element on which such advice is based is product knowledge.
This section will explore the different elements of wine service that can be
provided to a customer to help them make an informed decision in regards
to selecting a wine, either to compliment a meal, or to be enjoyed on its own.
The steps associated with the actual service of wine will not be discussed in
this manual.
Offering advice on wine
Many people know what they want to buy or drink, and many more are
happy to make a selection based on something they’ve read or heard, or
even the way the bottle or label looks. Many others are interested in
learning more about wine, and will look to you to provide them with some
relevant advice. In many cases, the customer will ask you direct questions
about their needs, but in other circumstances they will just ‘hint at’
pertinent information, and you will have to ask a few questions to determine
exactly what will be appropriate for them.
Where a customer is unable or unwilling to ask you directly for help, the
following are areas you need to discuss with the person before making a
recommendation:
What are the customer’s preferences? Do they want a red or a white, a
sparkling or a still? Do they want a premium, or other, wine?
How much do they want to spend?
Who is drinking it? Does the wine have to impress others?
What food is being served with the wine?
What time of day is the wine to be drunk?
How many people will be present?
What other drinks will be offered?
What sort of get together is being held?

General production of wine


Whilst it is not essential for all wine servers to have an in-depth
understanding of the wine production process, it is certainly an advantage.
Not only does it show your commitment to your chosen profession, but the
information learnt can help identify a suitable wine for a customer and to be

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able to provide further information that may be of interest to the customer.
The following article ‘Grape to Glass’ is taken from the Australian Wine and
Brandy Corporation website at
http://www.wineaustralia.com/australia/Default.aspx?tabid=803 (accessed
10/5/09).
Wine is a popular modern beverage and it has been produced for centuries
in many parts of the world. Today the grape vine is cultivated for wine
production in more locations and conditions than at any other time in
history. The variables involved in its production are numerous and have
now been researched and refined to a very high level. But despite the
progress of science, there are some universal principles that are the same
today as they were centuries ago.
Selecting and collecting grapes
Following harvest, grapes are taken to the winery where they are
destemmed, crushed and pressed. Depending on the style of wine to be
made, different techniques are employed to manage the amount of contact
between grape skins, flesh and juice. Generally speaking, skin contact is
essential for red wine making and the grape juice is fermented with the
skins and then pressed to separate the skins from the wine; whereas only a
few white wines benefit from a period of skin contact before fermentation.
Fermentation
Every wine relies on the basic act of fermentation which involves the
conversion of sugar, released from the grape juice in the form of glucose and
fructose, to alcohol. Yeast is the agent of fermentation and these tiny
creatures process the natural grape sugars, producing aroma and flavour
compounds, alcohol, gas (carbon dioxide) and heat.
Two types of yeast are vital for fermentation as they are resistant to alcohol,
allowing all sugar to be processed, producing dry finished wine.
These two strains are:
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Saccharomyces bayanus.

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LO4. LIAISE BETWEEN THE KITCHEN AND THE DINING AREA

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

1. Orders are placed and sent to the kitchen in accordance with


enterprise procedure.
2. Quality of food is checked in accordance with enterprise standards.
3. Tableware is checked for chips, marks, cleanliness, spills, and
drips.
4. Plates and/or trays are carried out safely.
5. Readiness of items for service in accordance with enterprise
procedure.
6. Special requests, dietary or cultural requirements are relayed as to
guests’ preference.
7. Work technologies are observed according to enterprise standard
policy and procedures.

CONTENTS:

 Liaising between the kitchen and the dining area


 (Interdepartmental communication)
 Teamwork
 Types of food establishment work technology

METHODOLOGIES:

 Lecture-discussion
 Demonstration
 Role play

ASSESSMENT METHODS:

 Simulation/practical test with oral questioning


 Oral or written test

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Learning Experiences

Learning Outcome 4
LIAISE BETWEEN THE KITCHEN AND THE DINING AREA

Learning Activities Special Instructions

Make sure to ready and understand


Read Information Sheet 2.4-1 on carefully the information written in the
Liaising between the kitchen and information sheet
the dining area
Answer Self-Check 2.4-1 Liaising Answer self-check without looking at the
between the kitchen and the answer key.
dining area

Compare answer using answer key Take note of the important details
2.3-1 especially to items that you forgot to
answer correctly.
Make sure to ready and understand
Read Information Sheet 2.4-2 on carefully the information written in the
Interdepartmental communication information sheet
Make sure to ready and understand
Read Information Sheet 2.4-3 on carefully the information written in the
Team Work information sheet
Do the Work Project 2.4-3 on Make sure to pass it on time and make
Team Work sure to complete the documentation.

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Information Sheet 2.4-1

Liaising between the kitchen and the dining area

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Discuss liaising between the kitchen and dining area
2. Enumerate the tips on liaising between kitchen and dining area

Communication is critical in providing a link between kitchen and service


areas. This section provides the context for providing a link between kitchen
and service areas, gives examples of information which may need to be
relayed, identifies the staff who may be involved and presents appropriate
communication techniques.
Unit context
This unit deals with the skills and knowledge required to provide a link
between kitchen and service area in a range of settings within the hotel
industry workplace context. A person studying this unit will provide general
assistance in food operations where the staff who take orders are supported
by others who deliver the food to, and collect used items from, food service
points. The unit addresses the work of a „bus boy‟ or „food runner‟ in an
establishment.
Information to be relayed
Information from services areas to kitchen Information which may need to
be relayed from waiting staff to the kitchen can include:
General food orders – as given by guests to waiters.
The information may include:
Table number
Number of guests („pax‟)
Dishes ordered
Name of waiter – or your name

Specific guest requests for general orders which can relate to:
Timing requirements for the overall meal, for certain courses, for certain
individuals, for co-ordination of service (with other tables in the same group
and with beverage service, speeches, dancing and other activities which may
be part of the dining experience)
Special requests as they to dietary/health needs, cultural requirements,
religious issues and personal preferences Additional or side orders for the
table or individual guests:
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Rice
Chips
Salads
Details of complaints made by guests so kitchen is aware of problems as
they relate to certain foods or dishes Requests for additional items such as
more bread rolls, butter or extra salad and/or vegetables Questions about
how long food for a certain table will be Questions from guests about menu
items asking about the commodities used in dishes.
Information from kitchen to service points Information which may need to
be relayed from chefs/cooks can include:
 Advice regarding timing of meals such as delays to service
 Notification regarding availability of food such as “Only two serves of
pepper crab left”, or “The beef has run out”
 Requests for action – “Push the soup” or “Try to sell the red curry”
 Clarification of orders placed to interpret written or verbal orders so
kitchen knows exactly what is required
 Notification certain requests cannot be accommodated
 Requests for certain crockery and cutlery to be returned
 Responses to questions asked by guests.

Staff involved

When relaying information and liaising between kitchen and service


areas you will need to interact with:

 Chefs and cooks who can seek clarification of orders and/or ask you
to pass on directions to waiters

 Dishwashing staff who can ask for nominated (used) crockery and
cutlery to be returned immediately from service to the dishwashing
area so they can be cleaned and re-used or returned to service

 Stillroom staff who you may need to ask for extra butter, rolls and
condiments

 Cleaners who you may have to ask to perform clean-up duties in the
event of a major spill or a cleaning-related need in, for example, the
foyer area/entrance, the washrooms, or an area of the kitchen

 Food waiters whose directions and requests you will need to pass on
to the kitchen or relevant others

 Servers – staff who are involved in serving fast food to customers

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 Beverage waiters. Even though this unit applies directly to „food‟ it is
a reality that in the workplace you work as part of a team and need to
be prepared to assist any other staff member as required.

For example, you may pass on requests or information from drink


waiters to the bar, and work with bar attendants to facilitate drink
service where necessary

 Dining room/restaurant supervisor, manager or owner. This person


has overall control of service and may ask you to undertake certain
tasks to optimise service, prepare for reservations which have been
received or enable service recovery after an incident or problem.

Appropriate communication techniques

The following are techniques which you can use to help ensure proper
and effective communication occurs when relaying information:

 Using the most appropriate method of communication. This is usually


„verbal‟ in a face to face setting (the telephone may also be used in
some cases as a better option) but may be sign language or a hand-
written note or food order
 Writing clearly. When producing written communication make sure it
is clear enough for others to read and interpret Using open and
closed questions to gain required information about the topics being
talked about
 Paying attention and concentrating on what others are saying

 Never interrupting the other person and instead allowing them to


finish what they are saying
 Asking questions to clarify information and directions you are unsure
of
 Not trying to guess what the other person will say or infer what they
will say based on their first few words.
 Repeating back what they have told you to verify understanding of
what has been said
 Speaking slowly and clearly but naturally
 Being concise. This means giving only the required information and
avoiding unnecessary words and unnecessary information
 Using appropriate language. This can mean using simple words,
choosing your words carefully and avoiding complexity in the words
used and the phrasing. When communicating with other staff this
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can mean using industry and venue-specific terminology and/or
abbreviations.
Tips on relaying an order to the kitchen
When delivering an order from wait staff or servers to the kitchen, details
about any special orders must be passed on to the appropriate person
quickly and unambiguously.
You need to bear in mind the person you will be speaking to will have more
staff than you to deal with. You are likely to be just one of many. For this
reason you have to take the time and make the effort to get your message
across correctly, first time, every time.
To achieve this you need to make sure you:
 Have got their full attention when relaying the order. The kitchen may
require you to say „Ordering chef‟ or „Order in‟ when placing the
order at the pass
 Point out the special request on the actual docket, physically locating
the written information you have put on the docket or order. It is
standard practice in establishments using a manual ordering system
for special requests to be circled on the docket to highlight them
 Verbally describe what is needed clearly and accurately. A response
should be heard from the chef after you have placed the order. If no
response is heard, repeat the order.

If possible get them to repeat it back to you to verify they have


understood what is required.

While you need to ensure your special order is understood, you must
be sensitive to the other things going on in the kitchen or at the pass.
It may pay you to delay for 30 seconds or a minute while the kitchen
person clears some meals which are ready, helps with plating a large
order, or remedies an immediate problem.

Tips on relaying information to waiting staff


Generally the following should be observed when providing information to
wait staff:
 Never interrupt a waiter when they are talking to guests
 Never interrupt a waiter when they are taking an order or serving
 Talk to waiter away from guests so only the waiter can hear what is
said
 Use hand signals if possible to provide short and obvious
communications
 Understand when you give information to a waiter there is often a
need for them to give you information and direction as a result
 Keep communication brief but accurate

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 Try to give waiters options where possible. For example, if one dish is
unavailable provide them with relevant alternatives (as recommended
by the kitchen) to suggest to guests.

Monitor and attend kitchen service points to ensure prompt pick up of


food
Introduction
In order to ensure prompt service of food you must monitor the kitchen and
be ready to pick plated food up when it is ready and take it to the wait staff
or food service points.
This section discusses what is involved in this most important part of your
job.
Monitoring and attending duties and activities
 Monitoring and attending kitchen service points are your primary
duties with tasks which may comprise:
 Collecting meals from the service point and delivering them to the
service area or wait staff
 Clearing away food service items from service areas and returning
them to the kitchen, dishwashing area and/or stillroom or larder
 Cleaning food service areas to maintain appearances and safety
(picking up spilled food and beverages)
 Maintaining food service areas to ensure all requirements for service
(food and nonfood items) are kept supplied
 Performing any „one-off‟ food-related duties as trade, staff shortages,
demand and requests from wait staff dictate. This may include:
 Obtaining foodstuffs from the cool room, freezer or dry store as
required by kitchen staff or wait staff
 Dishwashing including the scraping, cleaning and storing of crockery
and cutlery
 Performing very basic food preparation duties such as, for example,
washing fruit and vegetables, peeling fruit and vegetables, opening
cartons, preparing basic salads, chopping and slicing food, preparing
butters
 Setting up plates and trays which may include adding vegetables to
plates, placing garnishes on menu items, adding sauces to foods,
preparing trays and requirements for gueridon cookery
 Watching what is going on at these points and being ready to take
action when required to address identified „situations arising‟ Being
available for other colleagues so you can provide them with assistance
when needed
 Being alert to the on-going potential to use your initiative to prevent a
potential problem developing into an actual problem
 Remaining as a visible presence in the area so colleagues and guests
can contact you, talk to you, give you instructions or ask for help

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 Paying extra attention to the kitchen when you have placed an order
so you are ready to transfer the food from there to the required service
point.
Being called for pick-up
Individual venues or kitchens will have their own method of calling you to
collect food which is ready for service.
Options include:
 Ringing a bell which simply indicates something is ready for
collection but does not indicate who the food is for, or what the
dishes are
 Calling out your name – such as “Daniel – take away” (meaning
Daniel is needed to collect dishes for service) Calling out a table
number – “Take away table 11” (meaning food for table 11 is ready for
collection)
 Calling out both a name and a table number – “Daniel, take away
table 11”.
Important point
Never, ever take a dish unless and until specifically directed to do so by
whoever is running the pass.
Just because a dish you have ordered is ready for service does not mean it is
your dish. It could be for another table and if you take it you will cause
confusion and service disruption for your table and to the table the dish was
originally intended for.
The need for prompt pick up of food
It is important for you to pick up food as quickly as possible after it has
been plated and is ready for service for the following reasons:
 Prompt collection of dishes enables the quicker service of food to
guests and most guests do not want to be kept waiting for their food
 Quick service enhances the guest service or dining experience which
encourages them to return for another meal, and to recommend the
venue to their friends, families and others
 Removal of food from the pass creates space for the next order to be
processed, thereby speeding up general service across the kitchen
 Prompt collection of the food optimises the likelihood food will be
served at its best, for example:
 Hot food will be served hot and not allowed to cool down
 Cold food will be served cold and not allowed to warm up
 Frozen foods will be served in a frozen state and not permitted to
melt
 The appearance of dishes only decreases the longer it sits and waits
to be served. Eye appeal of dishes is critical because guests will
always see the food before they taste it and they will start forming
impressions about what it will taste like from the moment they see
the item

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 Taste of food items is potentially compromised by long delays in
service
 Immediate collection of food when it facilitates integration of food
service with wine and beverage service which again enhances guest
satisfaction and dining experience
 There is an increased chance food may become contaminated the
longer it sits at the pass waiting to be collected.

Service points/areas

 Depending on the venue where you work you may be required to


provide service-related monitoring and responses to the following
areas. Note: not all venues will have all of the following areas. The list
is provided to give you an understanding of the potential for you to
service.
Kitchen service areas

 You need to be aware of two main service or dispensing points found


in a kitchen as follows:

Hot food area

 This is where plated food (entrées, main courses, desserts) are served
or collected from – also known in some places as the „pass‟. Most
food for a dining room or restaurant will be served from and collected
from this area. Orders are commonly also placed at this area.
Cold Area

 This area does not exist in all properties being limited mainly only to
large commercial kitchens catering for high volumes.
 The cold larder area will prepare and serve items such as cold
entrées, salads, cold desserts, and cheese platters.

Waiting stations

You may also be required to „fetch and carry‟ to waiting stations


situated in dining rooms/restaurants.

A waiting station is a place or a piece of furniture which a waiter uses


as their work base to do things such as storing items, a location to
clear plates from the guest table to, to rest items on.

They may sometimes feature heating elements and be known in this


instance as „hot boxes‟.

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You will be required to take prepared dishes from the kitchen to the
appropriate waiter stations from where wait staff will serve the dishes
to guests at table.

You will also take the dirty dishes back from the waiter‟s station to
the kitchen/dish washing area for scraping and cleaning.

See the following for examples of waiter‟s stations:


http://www.forbesindustries.com/food-beverage-catalog/service-
carts-traystands/bussing-carts-and-waiter-stations.html

Buffet areas

You may also be responsible for tending (attending and monitoring)


buffets.

In these situations, you will be required to ensure dishes are kept


topped up and kept presentable and hygienic.

Tasks will involve both food items and beverages which are included
along with the buffet (beverages such as water, juices, tea, coffee and
milk).

Duties will also include removal of empty, or near-empty dishes,


removal of empty or dirty guest dishes and removal and replacement
of service items and food which has been dropped on the floor or
which has become contaminated as a result of unsafe food handling
practices by guests.

Room service collection areas

Most venues will have dedicated room service staff but, depending on
the venue and the organization of staff, you may be required to
perform various room service functions such as:

 Clearing trays and trolleys from floors, when necessary. This involves
checking corridors on accommodation floors and returning dirty
dishes, trays and trolleys to the room service area for take-down and
cleaning
 Returning room service crockery and cutlery to other areas, such as
the main kitchen or servery, where they may be needed
 Setting up room service trays and trolleys for specific room orders, or
for generic delivery o, for example, Continental breakfasts.

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Check food in accordance with enterprise standards
Introduction
Before you take any dishes or trays of food out of the kitchen and give it to
wait staff or to guests you must undertake a series of checks to ensure the
food being served is acceptable and to make sure all necessary requirements
have been met.
This section identifies practices to follow to help make sure guests receive
exactly the food they ordered, and to ensure smooth and professional service
is provided.
Enterprise standards
In relation to checking food prior to service „enterprise standards‟ may refer
to:
 Size of the meals – the volume or quantity of food provided as an
entrée, a main course or as „extra‟
 Placement of items on a plate. Some venues will require, for
examples, vegetables for certain dishes to be placed in a nominated
sequence or location on the plate to optimise the visual appeal of the
dish. Some dishes may be centrally located in the middle of the plate
whereas other menu items will feature the main component (meat,
fish, chicken) located at a constant position on every plate
 Use of stipulated serviceware for given items. For example, it may be
a requirement a certain type or size of bowl is used for nominated
food items or accompaniments, or an underliner may be required for
identified dishes
 Service of sauces. Some venues may add sauces to the meal (directly
applying the sauce to the food), while others may provide a small jug
of sauce, a bottle of sauce or a sauce boat.

Checking the food


Before all food is taken from the kitchen you must check it (that is, visually
inspect each dish) to ensure:
 The right meal has been prepared and any requested changes have
been made to the item or dish. This means comparing the food
presented by the kitchen against the order given to them. Never
assume the kitchen will automatically get the order correct.
Remember the kitchen is a busy place and accidents and mistakes
can happen. If the order is for four meals, are there four meals being
given to you? Do the dishes you are being given match exactly the
requirements of each guests as stated in the order? It is your job to
make sure incorrect meals are not taken into the room or to the
service point. Every service plate is clean and presentable. This
means checking to ensure there are no marks, spills and drips on
plates. In some cases you may be able to clean the plate and in other
cases it may need to be returned to the chef or to the person
operating the pass

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 The quality of all items served for consumption. This includes
checking all food served on the plate to ensure it is of an acceptable
quality. For example:
 A whole fish should not have tears in the skin
 Fresh fruit must not be over-ripe
 Salad vegetables must be crisp
 There should be no obvious blemishes or visible impediments to
any food items on a plate The appearance of the food on the plate.
Issues to look for are:
 All dishes of the same type must be of the same size. There should
not be a difference in serve sizes unless requested by the guest
 Same dishes must look the same in terms of layout of vegetables,
accompaniments, serviceware, garnishes
 An appealing and appetizing appearance
 The edible portion of a steak is at the outside of a plate as opposed
to having the fat/gristle component at the rim of the plate
 Guest requests have been taken into account. This means directly
comparing the dishes against the orders. Check to ensure, for
example, rare steaks are indeed rare; dishes with vegetables do not go
out with salad on them, „extra chips‟ do have extra chips and „Thai
salad‟ is provided where requested.

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Self-Check 2.4-1

Enumeration :

1. Give at least 3 Information which may need to be relayed from waiting


staff to the kitchen.
2. Give at least 3 Appropriate Communication Techniques
3. Give at least 3 Tips on relaying information to waiting staff

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Answer Key 2.4-1

1. General food orders


Questions about how long food for a certain table will be.
Additional or side orders for the table or individual guests:
Rice Chips Salads
2. Using the most appropriate method of communication. This is
usually „verbal‟ in a face to face setting (the telephone may also be
used in some cases as a better option) but may be sign language or a
hand-written note or food order

Writing clearly. When producing written communication make sure it


is clear enough for others to read and interpret

Using open and closed questions to gain required information about


the topics being talked about

3. Never interrupt a waiter when they are talking to guests

Never interrupt a waiter when they are taking an order or serving


Talk to waiter away from guests so only the waiter can hear what is
said

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Information Sheet 2.4-2

Interdepartmental Communication

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Discuss the Interdepartmental Communication
2. Discuss the Intradepartmental Communication

Inter departmental communication is largely a formal affair. Inter


departmental communication will be effective when it is supported by good
infrastructural facilities. There are various documents used in inter
departmental communication, they are:

 A memorandum is a note or record for future use. It is convenient and


useful for informal communication. Most interdepartmental
communication is done over phone, but when the information has to
be communicated in writing then memorandums are used. Memos are
also issued in the cases of disciplinary actions to be taken against
employees. The format of a memo is almost the same.
 Office circulars are used to convey the information to a large number
of employees. It is used for internal communication, so it is brief and
formal.
 The format of office orders is similar to memorandum but the purpose
for which it is issued will differ. It is usually issued in matters
affecting rights and privileges of employees. Office order carry a
number since it will be in force till revoked.
 Suggestions are given by employees. Sometimes it is given by one
department to another. It helps in developing new ideas and policies.
But its effectiveness depends on the attitude of the management
 Complaints are a part of office routine. As the size of the organization
increases, the number of complaints also increases. In many cases
complaints may relate to lack of proper infrastructure, non
observance of rules etc.

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Food and Beverage Service Intra and Inter Departmental co-ordination

1. EXTERNALCOMMUNICATION:
It includes the communications of hotel with external sources and officers
that may be government agencies, post-office, licensing authorities, foreign
trade officers, income tax, transports, financial institutions etc.

2. INTERNAL COMMUNICATION:
It includes communication within the hotel itself, i.e. transmitting
information within the organization, its departments, sections etc. and
between the same chain.
Internal communication can be formal (or official), informal or consensus.
a) Formal or official: this line of communication is used to transmit the
official messages or information within or outside the organization. These
communication flows along prescribed channels, which the staff members
wanting to communicate are obelised to follow. Formal channels can be
horizontal or vertical.
Horizontal communication or lateral communication is between workers
and other workers, supervisors holding coffee break to discuss
organisational problem. The horizontal communication is important for
promoting understanding and co-ordination amongst various departments.
Face to face, exchange of views or telephonic conversation is very convenient
for horizontal communication. The congenial atmosphere in which oral
communication takes place allows freedom of expression. There is
immediate feedback and all doubts and misunderstanding are sorted out.

Vertical communication usually associated with formal structural


relationship of the enterprise set-ups. Vertical communication can be in the
upward or downward direction.
Upwardcommunication flows from bottom to top of a hierarchy. In this, the
managers receive information continuously stemming from levels below
them. Open door policy, suggestion complaints box, and counselling are the
best methods used. The limitation of this communication is that at times the
employees may be unenthusiastic to express themselves and fear that their
condemnation may be taken as sign of peculiar weakness and may be taken
personally by the superior.
Downward communication flow from top to bottom of hierarchy. In this,
the orders, instructions, guidelines, policy statements, job sheets, circulars
etc. are flow from top manager to concern subordinates. It can be both
verbal and written. The drawback of these types of communication are
under or over communication, delay in action, resentment by subordinate
staff and probable loss of information.

b) Informal: with formal channels of communication informal channels also


exists in every organisation. It does not arise out of organisation needs but
is an integral part of communication.it is characterised by the network of
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interpersonal relations among personnel not formally as people have
tendency to cut across formal channels, and communicate informally with
different part of organisation. Rumours that are all time spreading in any
organisation follow of communication. In this form of communication
information passes quickly. In addition, the panorama to form a social
group is high. The chances of incomplete and distorted information may be
carried as people add their personal interpretation to the evidence, these
data are fly-by-night, and information is impulsive and ambiguous.
Grapevines is of four (4) types-single strand, gossip, probability, and cluster.
c) Consensus: agreement in the judgment or opinion reached by a group as
a whole; "the lack of consensus reflected differences in theoretical positions";
"those rights and obligations are based on an unstated consensus.” The
advantage of this form of communication is that the decision is easy to
accept, preserves harmony, avoids conflicts and splits, and the hindrances
are that the rebellion is often hushed in the name of consensus.

Inter departmental coordination and communication with F and B


service and other departments

The Food and beverage service department is seen to possess a very


vigorous intra and inter departmental interactions in prospect of
accomplishing works. This has also made the functioning of the organisation
very suave. Positive mutual aid and harmonisation can be found in between
the intra departmental staffs, as they are willing to lend a helping hand
during busy operation hours and favourably exchange their ideas and views
with each other.

With f and b production: It coordinates with kitchen department for the


preparation of various food and beverage items as per the orders. The
kitchen also coordinates with food and beverage service department
regarding the functions, outdoor caterings, and promotional activities.

With housekeeping: It coordinates with housekeeping department


regarding the cleanliness of the outlets, different F&B sections and
regarding the regular supply of staff uniforms and soil linens. The
coordination of housekeeping department with the restaurants and banquet
halls is mainly concerned with the provision of linen and uniforms. The
linen room supervisor, under the supervision of the executive housekeeper,
needs to have sufficient stock of clean napery to meet the demands of the F
& B department’s restaurant and banquet function. On his/her part, the
restaurant manager should ensure that the time set for the exchange of
linen is respected; that linen is not lost or misused; and that intimation of
forthcoming banquet function is conveyed to housekeeping department well
in advance. Beside extra/special linen, housekeeping may also have to
arrange for flower decorations for banquet.
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Coordinating between two departments becomes particularly necessary in
the case of room service, so that friction does not arise over matters such as
waiters not collecting trays from guestrooms or room service staff leaving
soiled trays in the corridors or causing extra work through careless spills on
the carpet. In many hotels, housekeeping department also looks after pest
control in restaurants, kitchens, and store attached to them. Special
cleaning of this areas call for coordination with the housekeeping
department. Restaurant staff required clean uniforms on a daily basis, for
which they need to communicate with housekeeping department.

With front office department: Communication between the food and


beverage department and the front office is also essential. Some of this
communication is conveyed by relaying messages and providing accurate
information on transfers, which are forms used to communicate a charge to
a guest's account. Communication activities also include reporting predicted
house counts, an estimate of the number of guests expected to register
based on previous occupancy activities, and processing requests for paid-
outs, forms used to indicate the amounts of monies paid out of the cashier's
drawer on behalf of a guest or an employee of the hotel. These vital services
help an overworked food and beverage manager, restaurant manager, or
banquet captain meet the demands of the public. Incoming messages for the
food and beverage manager and executive chef from vendors and other
industry representatives are important to the business operation of the food
and beverage department. If the switchboard operator is given instructions
on screening callers (such as times when the executive chef cannot be
disturbed because of a busy workload or staff meetings, or vendors in whom
the chef is not interested), the important messages will receive top priority.
In a hotel that has point-of-sale terminals, computerized cash registers that
interface with a property management system, information on guest charges
is automatically posted to a guest's folio, his or her record of charges and
payments. When a hotel does not have point-of-sale terminals that interface
with PMS point-of-sale terminals, the desk clerk is responsible for posting
accurate charges on the guest folio and relies on transfer slips. Also, the
night auditor's job is made easier if the transfer slip is accurately prepared
and posted. The front office manager should work with the food and
beverage director in developing standard operating procedures and methods
to complete the transfer of charges.
The supervisors in the food and beverage department rely on the predicted
house count prepared by the front office manager to schedule employees
and predict sales. For ex- ample, the restaurant supervisor working the
breakfast shift will want to know how many guests will be in the hotel so he
or she can determine how many servers to schedule for breakfast service.
Timely and accurate preparation of this communication tool assists in
staffing control and sales predictions.
Authorized members of the food and beverage department will occasionally
ask the front office for cash, in the form of a paid-out, to purchase last-
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minute items for a banquet, the lounge, or the restaurant or to take
advantage of other unplanned opportunities to promote hospitality. Specific
guidelines concerning cash limits, turnaround time, prior approval,
authorized signatures, and the general manager and front office manager
develop purchase receipts. These guidelines help to maintain control of paid-
outs.The banquet department, which often combines the functions of a
marketing and sales department and a food and beverage department,
requires the front office to relay information to guests about scheduled
events and bill payment.
The front desk staff may also provide labour to prepare the daily
announcement board, an inside listing of the daily activities of the hotel
(time, group, and room assignment), and marquee, the curb-side message
board, which includes the logo of the hotel and space for a message. Since
the majority of banquet guests may not be registered guests in the hotel, the
front office provides a logical communications centre.
The daily posting of scheduled events on a felt board or an electronic
bulletin board provides all guests and employees with information on group
events. The preparation of the marquee may include congratulatory,
welcome, sales promotion, or other important messages. In some hotels, an
employee in the front office contacts the marketing and sales department for
the message.
The banquet guest who is unfamiliar with the hotel property will ask at the
front office for directions. This service might seem minor in the overall
delivery of service, but it is essential to the lost or confused guest. The front
office staff must know both how to direct guests to particular meeting rooms
or reception areas and which functions are being held in which rooms. Front
desk clerks, must be ready to provide information for all departmental
activities in the hotel. The person responsible for paying the bills for a
special event will also find his or her way to the front office to settle the city
ledger accounts. If the banquet captain is not able to present the bill for the
function, the front desk clerk should be informed about the specifics of food
and beverage charges, gratuities, rental charges, method of payment, and
the like.

Human resources department: The human resources management


department may rely on the F and B service staff to act as an initial point of
contact for potential employees in all departments. It may even ask the F
and B service to screen job candidates. If so, guidelines for and training in
screening methods must be provided.
Some directors of human resources management depend on the F and B
service to distribute application forms and other personnel-related
information to job applicants. The potential employee may ask for directions
to the personnel office at the F and B service. The human resources
management department may also develop guidelines for the F and B service
use in initially screening candidates. For example, the guidelines may
include concerns about personal hygiene, completion of an application,
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education requirements, experience, and citizenship status. This
information will help the executives in the human resources management
department interview potential job candidates. Each situation will describe
some communication problems between departments, trace the source of
mis-communication, analyse the communication system, and present
methods that will help improve communications. The purpose of this
method of presentation is to help future professionals to develop a
systematic way of continually improving communications.
Security department
It coordinates with security department to create a safer environment for the
guests, hotel personnel and the assets to control them properly.
It coordinates with engineering department for repairs, maintenance, and
installation of various equipment and physical features required during
operation hours and special functions.
Information system
It coordinates with information system department regarding the updating
and installing of different electronic information system. Every personal are
provide with the password as access into the computer system of the hotel
by the IS department. Similarly, the micros cards are also issued to the F&B
staffs and the degree of accessibility is governed by the rank of the staffs.
Stores: It coordinates with materials department for regular supply of food,
beverages, and essential stationeries for the outlet.
Sales and marketing department: It coordinates with sales and marketing
department for the sales of banquet halls, fixing the menu price, and
providing provisions and service as per the Banquet Event Order. F & B
personnel will do the necessary arrangement for the preparation and see to
guests needs. Get clients to hold functions using hotel facilities in banquets.
Finance department: It coordinates with finance department for payment
of salary and budget development

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Information Sheet 2.4-3

Team Work

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Discuss the team work of a establishment
2. Enumerate the tips in developing a restaurants teamwork

The process of working collaboratively with a group of people in order to


achieve a goal.

Teamwork is often a crucial part of a business, as it is often necessary for


colleagues to work well together, trying their best in any circumstance.
Teamwork means that people will try to cooperate, using their individual
skills and providing constructivefeedback, despite any personal conflict
between individuals.

Develop Your Restaurant’s Teamwork

“Work like a team,” might be a common directive in the office, and your
waiters might be nodding all throughout the meeting. But do they know
where to start? Here are tips in starting off with specific steps in developing
teamwork in the restaurant.

It is often said that a restaurant is a business that runs a system of


organized chaos. Cooks, chefs, wait staff, cashiers and managers need to be
organized and have to work as a team to steer clear of a disaster. Imagine a
server who decides to abandon his table, or a line cook who chooses to bury
the tickets. Everyone would feel the pain, especially your restaurant’s
customers.

Teamwork is one of the most talked about word in business management


today, but only a few organizations really commit to cultivate it in their
company culture, as it is seemingly a very daunting task. Fostering
teamwork is larger than the employees’ everyday job function, as it
encompasses a lot of other integral parts that management has to tie up –
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the company’s vision, the employees’ individual goals, the firm’s rules and
guidelines, each member’s specific role, leadership, communication, salaries
and benefits, incentives, along with a host of others. And all these to be
done in a serious, resolute manner to make sure that the employees take it
seriously and at the same time balancing it with joviality to make it appear
lighter and interesting–hence more motivational for the people.

One good way to start, though, is in the employees’ daily tasks. You can
start by motivating and encouraging your staff to work as a team. Just
throwing them the goal of “keeping the customers happy” might not really
get them to do it, unless there’s a little help from you regarding the specifics.

Tip No. 1: Encourage them to volunteer.

Encourage them to freely offer their services in case someone’s out and a
replacement is needed. Raise their hand, volunteer to fill-in. That’s a
perfect way of showing that they can come through in the clutch.

Tip No. 2: Advise them to make use of their time for the company.

No matter how busy a restaurant is, there are still several instances when
the staff has got plenty of time in their hands. Incite them to pitch in to
other things when you’re a little slow. The salad chef can help at the peak of
the dinner rush, or the receptionist can help in taking orders.

Tip No. 3: Teach them to compromise.

In an environment where everyone works closely with one another,


disagreements and conflicts are inevitable. Do something about it by
constantly reminding them to avoid disputes within the workplace.
Compromise. Giving-in a little wouldn’t hurt, as work is already hard
enough without adding more tension in the air.

Tip No. 4: Remind them not to take things personally.

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Not always as easy to follow, especially when one takes great pride in his
work and restaurant uniform. But it is your responsibility as manager to
remind them that when they slip up, or commit some kind of error in their
work, and they have a little “chat” with management, they should not take it
personally. Make them understand that it is just a part of ensuring that the
team functions efficiently, if not outstandingly. Learn from mistakes, and
take criticisms constructively, not personally.

Tip No. 5: Train them to follow directions thoroughly.

This is an obvious task, yet you would be amazed at how much people fail in
doing this. Emphasize to your staff time and again that correctly following
instructions is vital to their success in the business as well as the success of
the whole team. Encourage them to write difficult or hard to remember
instructions, and not be afraid to ask. Better ask than assume things. You
can come up with team exercises during meetings, if you have to.

Tip No. 6: Point out a basic thing: show up.

A common case among all workers is calling in sick when they aren’t. It’s
especially hard for people in restaurants, since if one fails to show up,
someone else is bothered to wear the other’s restaurant uniform and take
over. Encourage them to think of their team and come to work as expected.

Tip No. 7: Urge them to ask when they need help.

Cart off any inhibitions to ask for help when they need to. A shy cook may
be plating 150 diners in an hour but is just embarrassed to ask for help.
Teamwork is about cooperation, and when someone needs help, make sure
they get it.

Tip No.8: Promote friendships among the staff.

Working together for more than 8 hours a day and more than 5 days a week
ought to create strong bonds within your personnel. Be alarmed if that does

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not happen. There are many teambuilding activities that harness
camaraderie and closeness among team members, and they are quite worth
your while if you use it.

Tip No.9: Encourage self-improvement.

Commend anyone who does a good job, or makes efforts to improve on his
craft. Learning new skills is a fine move for an employee professionally, as
well as beneficial to the team. Being flexible in trying out different positions
in the restaurant is also a good way to learn and become well-rounded, and
you can encourage them to try it.

Tip No.10: Motivate them into enjoying what they do.

Highlight great testimonies of other people who succeeded in the business,


letting them know that loving their job may work wonders to how they
perform at work.

Creating teamwork can be challenging, especially at its early stages, but it is


achievable through sound leadership and dedicated commitment, requiring
time and persistence. Restaurant managers should train constantly, and
conduct meetings consistently. Successful restaurants conduct pre-shift
meetings with bussers, food servers and kitchen staff to coordinate
functions. It is in these pre-shift meetings that the above tips are useful,
subtly pounding it on the staff until the idea of cooperation and teamwork
gets into their system.

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Maintain effective relationships with colleagues

Meet needs and expectations of colleagues in accordance with organization


standards, policies and procedures and within acceptable time frames

Introduction

Your work role demands you function as part of a team.

This means meeting the needs and expectations of those with whom you
work.

This section identifies and discusses aspects of this requirement.

Importance of meeting needs and expectations of colleagues

It is vital you meet expectations your colleagues have in relation to your


personal work performance in order to:

 Help them do their job as expected by management and guests


 Demonstrate your commitment to a team approach and improving
your workplace reputation as a valued coworker
 Provide better service delivery to guests, enhancing their dining
experience and increasing the likelihood of repeat and referral
business
 Complete work others are relying on in order for them to be able to
complete their work
 Implement and maintain the standards and protocols established by
the venue for the provision of service to guests and support to other
staff
 Indirectly assist the venue meet guest needs and expectations as
created by advertisements and promotions the venue runs
 Create a more effective and efficient workplace
 Show management you are actually doing the job they expect you to
do and are paying you to do.

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Always remember you are being paid to do the things listed above and
the tasks identified on your job description. You are not doing
colleagues (or management or guests) a „favor‟ by helping them, co-
operating with them or providing them with products or services.

‘Needs’ and ‘expectations’ – examples and strategies

Management, staff and guests will have a wide variety of needs and
expectations about you and your workplace performance.

The following list identifies examples of „needs‟ and „expectations‟


your co-workers may have about your role, and identifies strategies to
ensure you meet those needs and expectations.

These needs and expectations can be expected to:

 Change between individual people. Different people are likely to have


slightly different needs and expectations
 Alter between venues or workplaces. Specific needs and wants can
change based on the type and nature of the business, products and
services offered and the profile and volume of trade
 Vary over time. The needs and wants of others at 12:05PM can be
significantly different to the needs and expectations of the same
people at 12:35PM. The needs and expectations on Monday can be
different o those on a Friday and the needs and wants during an
event or function can be different to those during days of „normal‟
trading.

Colleagues will expect you to:

 Attend for work when rostered. This means:


 Arriving 15 minutes early
 Never missing a shift
 Advising the workplace well in advance if you are unable to work
Maintain professional personal presentation by:
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 Wearing the required uniform
 Wearing clean and pressed clothes
 Applying appropriate grooming Maintain appropriate personal
hygiene by:
 Washing and bathing regularly
 Wearing appropriate make-up and/or scent Demonstrate a
positive attitude in the workplace which can be shown by:
 Co-operating with others
 Offering help instead of waiting to be asked
 Smiling
 Telling people they have done a good job, tried hard or worked well
Thanking others for their help
 Never making a big deal out of assisting others; just help them and
get on with the other work you have to do
 Show respect for others in the workplace by practices such as:
Using polite and courteous language Avoiding discriminatory
behavior and language
 Accommodating social, religious, cultural, gender and/or age-
specific differences
 Never participating in workplace gossip
 Not taking the credit for work done by other staff Communicate
effectively by using
 : Correct and appropriate verbal and non-verbal communication
techniques
 Asking open and closed questions
 Listening actively
 Clarifying ambiguities
 Confirming messages
 Seeking and providing feedback Respond promptly to:
 Requests for help and/or information from co-workers, guests and
others
 Identified situations which require action, attention and/or a
response
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 Situations arising
 Emergencies Perform allocated tasks as required for the job role
being undertaken. This can mean:
 Completing daily and routine work in a designated sequence by the
time required
 Giving priority treatment to priority requirements
 Getting work finished by a required time
 Advising colleagues when work has been completed
 Telling colleagues when you are running behind time
 Asking for help from others Maintain work area in an appropriate
condition which means keeping the area and items, utensils and
equipment:
 Clean. This includes regular cleaning of items and immediate
cleaning of spills and accidents
 Neat and tidy. This involves putting things away and returning
items to their designated location (after use, cleaning)
 Safe
 Secure
 Accommodate unscheduled tasks by:
 Integrating unexpected needs with standard work
 Helping others
 Anticipating problems and taking action to avoid or to deal with
them Comply with:
 Legislated requirements
 Internal house policies and procedures Effectively and promptly
address:
 Customer complaints
 Workplace conflict
 Emergencies Participate in workplace activities designed to:
 Investigate and resolve problems and issues
 Enable continuous improvement
 Improve service delivery and the guest experience
 Introduce initiatives intended to enhance the provision of service
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Resolution and management of issues

To resolve and manage conflict and difficulties you need to be proactive.

This means it is up to you to take action to address the situation.

Conflict and difficulties:

 Must never be ignored. Issues will never „go away‟ or resolve


themselves
 Should be addressed and resolved as soon as possible.

Strategies for resolving workplace conflict and difficulties

Preparation is critical in effectively resolving workplace conflict and issues.

Planned responses to issues always stand a far better chance of resolution


than reflex action.

Keys to resolving issues where you have determined there is a conflict or


misunderstanding with a colleague include:

 Plan what you are going to say. Think things through and determine
what you are going to say, the words you will use, the examples you
will refer to and the sequence in which you will raise issues
 Plan when you are going to address the situation. Will you talk to the
person before work or after work? It is never a good idea to bring
these matters up during work
 Plan where you will talk to the other person. Will you speak to them
in the workplace, in the staff change room or while having a coffee in
the staff canteen?
 Determine what you want from the resolution process. What do you
want the other person to do or to stop doing? The solution you
identify can be presented during discussions as a way to fix the
problem

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 Identify specific examples of the problem, issue, difficulty, problem or
conflict you want to discuss. When resolving the situation it is
important to be able to:
 Refer to specific times
 Mention specific dates and times
 Refer to specific words or terms used
 Describe the actual nature and context of the situation. The aim
here is to avoid making reference to vague generalities, avoid using
incorrect or inaccurate references and/or avoid a situation where you
are unable to provide evidence in relation to the topic to be addressed
 Speak to the colleague and ask them if they are able to meet with you
(when and where you have decided) to talk about the issue
 Meet with the person and apply standard resolution techniques to
resolve the situation which can include:
 Thanking the person for meeting with you
 Explaining why you have asked for the meeting to resolve the
situation
 Defining and describing the situation with reference to plans you
have previously made
 Explaining the impact the situation is having on you and your
workplace performance, other staff, guests
 Listening to what the other person has to say. The process must
involve two-way communication. What the other person has to say
can often: – Provide the basis for a resolution – Explain the situation
and give a different perspective on things which can mean an end to
the issue
 Telling them what you want to resolve the situation while showing
empathy with their situation (where and if appropriate)
 Being prepared to compromise and co-operate with the person to find
a mutually acceptable outcome
 Being assertive but not aggressive
 Being constructive about what can be done to address the situation
to achieve a win-win outcome
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CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
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 Exercising patience and tolerance. You have to be: – Prepared for the
other person to be upset about what you have to say – Willing to
allow the other person to have their say – Ready to hear things about
yourself and your performance you may not appreciate
 Deciding and agreeing on action to take to resolve the situation and
move things forward
 Thanking the person for their time and for participating in the
process Expressing a positive sentiment about working with the
person into the future.

Positive outcomes

The positive outcomes you need to strive for include:

 Increased levels of co-operation and assistance from the other person


 A more pleasant and harmonious workplace – less anxiety and
tension
 Reduction or elimination of previous stress or other negative
indicators
 Fewer workplace conflicts and difficulties
 Higher standards of service delivery to all „customer‟ types (internal
and external)
 Fewer mistakes and workplace problems and errors
 Less negative comments from others
 Reduction in complaints about you and your work
 Increased amounts of positive feedback from other staff and
management on your performance.

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
Beverage Service NC II Page 96 of 98
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JELLANE M.
SEÑORA
Work Projects 2.4-3

It is a requirement of this Unit that you complete Work Projects as advised


by your Trainer. You must submit documentation, suitable evidence or
other relevant proof of completion of the project to your Trainer by the
agreed date.

Prepare and submit a document or set of documents (such as a poster,


information sheets, manual or set of standard operating procedures)
suitable for use in a workplace to advise new staff regarding maintaining
effective relationships with colleagues.

The documents must address the following points:

 How they can meet the needs and expectations of colleagues at work –
that is a list of actions they should take to make sure they fulfil the
expectations of their co-workers
 How they can assist in the resolution of workplace conflict – that is, a
list of the actions they can take to resolve conflict in their workplace
in which they are involved
 How they can seek informal feedback – that is, an outline of
techniques and strategies they may implement to obtain feedback on
their personal performance and how it might be improved
 How they should handle complaints – that is, presentation of a
model describing what they should do if a co-worker makes a
legitimate complaint to them about their workplace performance and
practices
 How they can ensure they do not discriminate against co-workers in
the workplace – that is, a list of actions and protocols (with specific
examples) they could use to help ensure the workplace is free of
discrimination

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Bibliography
Adjey, Zoe & Hunter, Gary, 1966- & Mannall, Clare, 2009; Food & beverage
service: levels 1&2 S/NVQ; Cengage Learning, London. Australian Training
Products Ltd, 2004; Five star waiter supporting THH02 Hospitality Training
Package; Version 1.00, Australian Training Products, Melbourne, Vic. Cichy,
Ronald F & Hickey, Philip J, 2013; Managing service in food and beverage
operations, 4th ed; American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute,
Lansing, Mich. Davis, Bernard, 2013; Food and beverage management, 5th
ed; Routledge, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon ; New York. Lillicrap, D. R &
Cousins, John A, 2010; Food and beverage service, 8th ed; Hodder
Education, London. TAFE Frontiers (Organisation), 2002; Hospitality
operations online trainer's guide; TAFE Frontiers on behalf of the State of
Victoria, Melbourne. William Angliss Institute of TAFE, 2000; Provide a link
between kitchen and service areas; William Angliss Institute of TAFE,
Melbourne.

Website

http://www.kng.com/blog/restaurant-management/develop-your-
restaurants-teamwork/
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/teamwork.html

http://www.waseantourism.com/ft/Toolbox%20Development%20II:%2098%
20toolboxes%20for%20Front%20Office,%20F&%20B%20Services%20and%2
0Food%20Production/Submission%20to%20ASEC/3rd%20submission%20o
f%2025%20draft%20TBs_200413/Provide%20a%20link%20between%20kitc
hen%20and%20service%20area/TM_Provide_a_link_between_kit_&_ser_area
_180413.pdf

http://www.kng.com/blog/restaurant-management/develop-your-
restaurants-

http://www.waseantourism.com/ft/Toolbox%20Development%20II:%2098%
20toolboxes%20for%20Front%20Office,%20F&%20B%20Services%20and%2
0Food%20Production/Submission%20to%20ASEC/3r

Document No
Date Developed: Issued by:
CBLM on Food and June 26, 2016
Beverage Service NC II Page 98 of 98
Developed by: IDSC
JELLANE M.
SEÑORA