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Artifact #7: Learning Segment.

The seventh artifact I chose to include in my portfolio is my learning segment for grade 4

math. The focus of this five-day learning segment is for students to learn how to organize and

display data on graphs as well as interpret data on graphs to draw conclusions. I have created

lesson plans for the first three days of this segment, each of which build upon the previous lesson

to reinforce learning through repetition and ensure students are grasping the necessary skills.

There are several formative assessments and an end-of-unit summative assessment that not only

demonstrate the students’ understanding but also get them engaged in the lesson because they get

to do hands-on activities like count gummy bears and stack Lego pieces. Vygotksy’s (1978)

theory of social interaction states “learning does not occur in isolation and knowledge is created

through interactions with others”. Therefore, utilizing activities—either as a class, in groups or

independently—to emphasize interaction between students and allow for collaborative learning,

is paramount to my instructional strategy.

I chose to include this artifact because it provides a thorough overview of my ability to

successfully plan, instruct, and assess mathematics. It also showcases how I would adapt my

instructional strategies and supports to ensure all my students were learning, especially those

with learning disabilities. This exercise was extremely valuable as it allowed me to choose a

topic and then plan how I would deliver it over several days. It is the first (and only) consecutive

lesson plan we have created in our program, which is a shame because I feel this is the most real-

life example of what it is like to be an elementary teacher.

Standards.

The NYS and Ontario standards that I believe best align with my grade 3 math learning

segment are as follows:


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Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium Standards (InTASC).

Standard #4: Content Knowledge

The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the

discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the

discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.

4(a) The teacher effectively uses multiple representations and explanations that capture

key ideas in the discipline, guide learners through learning progressions, and promote each

learner’s achievement of content standards.

Standard #6: Instructional strategies.

The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in

their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision

making.

6(b) The teacher designs assessments that match learning objectives with assessment

methods and minimizes sources of bias that can distort assessment results.

6(g) The teacher effectively uses multiple and appropriate types of assessment data to

identify each student’s learning needs and to develop differentiated learning experiences.

Standard #7: Planning for Instruction

The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning

goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and

pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.

7(d) The teacher plans for instruction based on formative and summative assessment

data, prior learner knowledge, and learner interest.


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NYS Code of Ethics for Educators.

Principle 1: Educators nurture the intellectual, physical, emotional, social, and civic

potential of each student. Educators promote growth in all students through the integration of

intellectual, physical, emotional, social and civic learning. They respect the inherent dignity and

worth of each individual. Educators help students to value their own identity, learn more about

their cultural heritage, and practice social and civic responsibilities. They help students to reflect

on their own learning and connect it to their life experience. They engage students in activities

that encourage diverse approaches and solutions to issues, while providing a range of ways for

students to demonstrate their abilities and learning. They foster the development of students who

can analyze, synthesize, evaluate and communicate information effectively.

Ontario Teacher Ethical Standards.

Care: The ethical standard of Care includes compassion, acceptance, interest and insight

for developing students' potential. Members express their commitment to students' well-being

and learning through positive influence, professional judgment and empathy in practice.

NYS P-12 Common Core Learning Standards.

Mathematics, Measurement and Data. 3.MD.3: Represent and interpret data.

Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several

categories. Solve one- and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using

information presented in scaled bar graphs.


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Ontario Ministry of Education Curriculum Expectations.

Mathematics, Data Management and Probability, Grade 3: Collection and Organization

of Data.

Collect and organize categorical or discrete primary data and display the data using charts

and graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs, with labels ordered appropriately along

horizontal axes, as needed. Read, describe, and interpret primary data presented in charts and

graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs

DOE Claims and CAEP Standards.

DOE Claim 1: Medaille College graduates know the subject matter in their certification

area(s).

CAEP Standard 1: Content and pedagogical knowledge

The provider ensures that candidates develop a deep understanding of the critical

concepts and principles of their discipline and, by completion, are able to use discipline-specific

practices flexibly to advance the learning of all students toward attainment of college- and

career-readiness standards.

Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Standards.

Principle 1: Maintaining challenging expectations.

Principle 6: Using evidence, instructional data, research, and professional knowledge to

inform practice.

[Back to Table of Contents]


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Medaille College Department of Education


Learning Segment Prompts

Teacher Candidate’s Name: Tania Trifonopoulos Date: April 20, 2018

Subject/ Grade Level: 3 Learning Segment Topic: Mathematics

State your central focus and explain how your plans build on each other to help students make connections throughout the
learning segment. (edTPA Task 1, Prompt 1)

The central focus of this learning segment is for students to organize and display data on graphs as well as interpret data on graphs to draw
conclusions. The first lesson (creating and assessing pictographs) will build upon the student’s prior knowledge of collecting and organizing
data using tally charts, and displaying the data on a graph. Each of the subsequent lessons (creating and assessing bar graphs and line plots) will
build upon the previous lesson to reinforce learning through repetition, and ensure students are mastering the skills needed to represent and
interpret data. As such, this learning segment serves as the foundation to learning when and how to use appropriate graphs. It will also prepare
students for the next level of data management where they will learn more types of graphs and how to use graphs to compare data.

The ability to collect, display and make meaning of data—such as discovering useful information, making comparisons, suggesting conclusions,
and supporting decision-making—is a skill of life-long value. This skill will be particularly useful to students who choose careers in analytics or
business.

Create an assessment plan that will describe how you will use multiple forms of assessments that will provide direct evidence
to monitor your students’ progress toward meeting the central focus of the learning segment. (edTPA Task 1, Prompt 5a)

The assessment plan for this learning segment will include both formative and summative assessments. To formatively assess the students, there
are several activity sheets that they will complete – as a group and individually – that will indicate any areas in which the students are
struggling. The following is the list of formative assessment activities. These activity sheets will be reviewed by the teacher but not be marked:
o Appendix A: What do you know about collecting and displaying data? (prior knowledge assessment of using tallies to survey)
o Appendix B: Choose the right word (demonstrates understanding of vocabulary)
o Appendix C: Creating pictographs (demonstrates ability to create and interpret a pictograph)
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o Appendix D: Label that graph! (demonstrates understanding of vocabulary)


o Appendix E: Creating bar graphs (demonstrates ability to create and interpret a bar graph)
o Appendix F: Analyzing data using graphs (demonstrates ability to understand word problems to create a tally chart, then create and
interpret a bar graph)
o Appendix G: Lego graphing paper
o Appendix H: Gummy bear sorting map
o Appendix I: Graphing gummy bears activity sheet
o Appendix J: Gummy bear sorting graph
o Appendix K: Gummy bear sorting questions
To summatively assess the students, there will be an end-of-unit test. This test will consist of a tally chart from which they will have to create a
bar graph. They will be responsible for using the vocabulary words learned throughout the learning segment to correctly label the graph as well
as make three interpretations about the graph. All of these components would have been taught and practiced throughout the week, so this will
be a clear indicator of how well the students met the central focus of this learning segment.
o Appendix L: Unit test: Representing and interpreting data
o Appendix M: Data Management Rubric - Representing and interpreting data

Explain how the design or adaptation of your planned assessments allows students with specific needs to demonstrate their
learning. Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different strategies/support (e.g. students with IEPs
or 504 plans, English language learners, struggling or underperforming students or those with gaps in knowledge, and/or
gifted students). (edTPA Task 1, Prompt 5b)

In order to accommodate the students with specific needs and to demonstrate they have learned the lesson, the following accommodations and
modifications will be made for the formative and summative assessments:

1. Preferential seating
2. 1:1 assistance to review instructions
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3. Re-teaching of how to use a scale


4. Tally chart will be completed for them (Appendix A)
5. Fill-in-the-blank activity (Appendices B, C) will have half the words completed for them
6. Reduced number of questions (ex. provide one interpretation instead of three) (Appendices C, D, E)
7. Bar graph checklist will be provided to prompt the fill-in-the-blank portion (Appendix E)
8. Use of calculator permitted
9. Extra time given
10. Copy of previous completed activity sheet to be shared if student is still struggling

The key to a functional and successful classroom lies in having appropriate accommodations and modifications to support all students’ needs.
As listed above, sometimes it’s as simple as moving a distractible student to the front of the class or allowing them to use a calculator. Other
times it may involve changing the way material is presented or the way a student responds to show their learning (ex. verbal instead of written).
Regardless of the degree to which you must adapt your lesson, your goal remains the same: to help a child learn.

Describe and justify why your instructional strategies and planned supports are appropriate for the whole class, individuals,
and/or groups of students with specific learning needs. (edTPA Task 1, Prompt 3b)

My instructional strategies and planned supports are appropriate for all students because they are multifaceted and engaging. For example, I
spend a lot of time modeling how to do activities for the first time. I think aloud the steps I am taking—incorporating the vocabulary words
whenever possible—as well as call on students for the answers, which helps keep them engaged. This is especially helpful to ELL students or
those with learning needs as the demonstration paints a clear picture of what is expected for the lesson. Beyond that, I scaffold my instruction by
re-teaching the activities and giving 1:1 attention to the students who require it during the group/individual activities. With respect to the
vocabulary words, using a Word Wall for the duration of the unit and assigning activities/tests that incorporate them further enhances the
students’ literacy and fluency. The presentation component of the group activities not only exposes students to the concepts of collaboration and
public speaking but also allows ELLs to practice their English amongst peers. (*ELLs will always be paired with non-ELL students to ensure
their language skills are being strengthened.)

In terms of differentiating instruction (ex. giving IEP students activity sheets that are half completed, pairing students to allow for peer
teaching), this will help the students build their skills without having to work on something completely different than the class. This will create a
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sense of pride and security to be at the ‘same level’ as the other students. It should also alleviate the need to give these students extra time
(although they are welcome to have it!), again, so that they can feel a part of the larger group.

My instructions follow the ‘I do, We do, You do’ principle so that everyone gets a fair chance at learning, practicing and perfecting their skills.
This includes group and independent activities. Also, the use of videos, images and/or hands-on activities (ex. surveying the class to create bar
charts) helps keep all students engaged during the lesson. Of course, I will always incorporate additional supports for the students who need it,
such as preferential seating, fidget spinners, and calculators, as necessary.

Support your instructional strategies through theory and/or research. (edTPA Task 1, Prompt 3)

I have incorporated several theories into my instructional strategies. First and foremost, I have made great effort to develop activities that will
engage students. Vygotksy’s (1978) theory of social interaction states “learning does not occur in isolation and knowledge is created through
interactions with others”. Therefore, utilizing activities - either as a class, in groups or independently - to emphasize interaction between
students and allow for collaborative learning are paramount to my instructional strategy.

I have also considered Gardner’s (1983) theory of multiple intelligences, which states people have more than one way of processing
information. To accomplish this, I have allowed students to work through concepts verbally during teacher-led activities as well as with
partners, and through art (drawing graphs, building stacks with Lego blocks) and videos.

To effectively address all students’ needs, I have also incorporated a number of differentiation tactics into my instruction. This involves
modifying and adapting instruction, activity sheets, materials, and assessments to meet the learning needs of individual students. Without
making these modifications, the lessons are bound to bore some students and confuse others.

Describe anticipated common misconceptions students might have within your central focus and how you will address them.
(edTPA Task 1, Prompt 3c)

Some of the common misconceptions students might have within this central focus include:

- Not remembering to group tallies by five or less (REMEDIATION: teach students to think about their hands as being a group of
tallies, i.e. five fingers on a hand = five tallies in a group)
- Misunderstanding how to use a scale (REMEDIATION: Teach and re-teach students that data is easier to understand when
broken down into smaller groups. As such, demonstrate how to breakdown a larger group into smaller groups by using real-life
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examples; count off students by four to end up with six groups of four; give IEP students a bag of marbles and have them create
smaller groups)
- Forgetting the meaning of/how to use vocabulary words (REMEDIATION: After the teacher explains the meanings of the words
and has students use the words in a sentence, the words are added to the Mathematics Word Wall for the week. From there, the teacher
will use a number of techniques throughout the week to encourage literacy, such as, having students read the words out loud as a class
then choosing individual students to give the definition of one word; providing the definition of a word while teaching and asking a
student to name the word being referred to; giving the class a quiz at the end of the week.
- Students getting confused by the different types of graphs and when to use each (REMEDIATION: During the lessons, use a
bulletin board to create a list of all the graphs discussed, including their purpose and an image. Students can use this for
guidance during the lessons and as a reference following the learning segment by writing it down)
- How to make interpretations using “more than” and “less than” (REMEDIATION: The teacher will continually provide the class
with examples of such interpretations as well as ask students to make assessments about the activity sheets in a group
discussion. This will give students practice and let them learn from one another)
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Appendices (attached within Lesson Plans)


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Appendices (cont’d)

Appendix H
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Appendices (cont’d)

Appendix J

Scale: =

Appendix K

Look at bar graph and make 3 of your own interpretations using ‘less than’ or
‘more than’.

1. _____________________________________________________________________________________

2. _____________________________________________________________________________________

3. _____________________________________________________________________________________
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Appendix L

Unit test: Representing and interpreting data


Valentina’s new bakery was so busy on weekends, she kept running out of
certain foods. She listed the five most popular things she sold using a tally chart.
She decided it would be easier to track as a bar graph.

Part A: Draw a bar graph to represent the data. (Be sure to label your graph!)
Appendix L
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Appendix L (cont’d)

Part B:

Look at your bar graph and list 3 interpretations using ‘less than’ and ‘more than’
statements.

1. ________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

2. ________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

3. ________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
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Medaille College Department of Education
Lesson Plan

Teacher Candidate’s Name: Tania Trifonopoulos Date: March 23, 2018


Context for Learning (edTPA and Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8)

Where is the school where you are teaching located? City: ___X____ Suburb: _______ Town:_______ Rural: ______

Grade level: ____3____ Number of students in the class: ___24_____

Students with IEPs/504 Plans


Complete the charts below to summarize required or needed supports, accommodations, or modifications for your students that will affect your instruction
in this learning segment.
IEPs/504 Plans: Number of Supports, Accommodations, Modifications,
Classifications/Needs Students Pertinent IEP Goals
IEP: Learning disability 1 - Preferential seating
- Pre-teaching and re-teaching content
- Prompts during lessons to check for understanding
- Extended time for tests
- Use of a calculator allowed
- Breaking down larger lessons into smaller ones
- One-to-one teacher assistance, occasionally
Students with Specific Language Needs
Language Needs Number of Supports, Accommodations, Modifications
Students
IEP: Speech or language impairment - Preferential seating
- Pre-teaching and re-teaching of materials
- Prompts during lessons to check for understanding
- Use of visual cues
- Refocusing and redirection
Students with Other Learning Needs
Other Learning Needs Numbers of Supports, Accommodations, Modifications
Students

Lesson ___1___ of a ___5___ Day Learning Segment

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Subject and Lesson Topic: Mathematics

Grade Level: 3 Lesson Duration: 45 minutes

Central Focus of the Learning Segment


The central focus is an understanding that you want your students to develop. It is a description of the important identifiable theme, essential question, or
topic within the curriculum that is the purpose of the instruction of the learning segment (Making Good Choices, 2016).
The central focus of this learning segment is for students to organize and display data on graphs as well as interpret data on graphs to draw conclusions. This
lesson will build upon the student’s previous knowledge of collecting and organizing data using tally charts, and displaying the data on a graph. This lesson
serves as the foundation to learning when and how to use appropriate graphs. The ability to collect, display and make meaning of data—such as discovering
useful information, suggesting conclusions, and supporting decision-making—is a skill of life-long value.

Knowing Your Learners


What do you know about your students’ prior academic learning as it relates to the central focus? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 2a)

To get the most out of a lesson, activities should be engaging and relatable. For the purposes of collecting and analyzing data, activities will be based on
measuring things that interest them. This lesson’s activities will focus on different types of food.

To assess the students’ prior knowledge of tally charts and pictographs, as it relates to the central focus, the teacher will hand out the What do you know
about data assessment activity sheet (Appendix A), to be completed individually. Students will be required to create a tally chart based on their classmates’
favorite foods (five options provided) and then display the data as a pictograph. Once completed, students must analyze the data and write down one
interpretation using “more than” or “less than”. The teacher will collect the activity sheets and put them aside to review later. The teacher will then model for
the class how to complete the activity using the Smart Board, asking for the tally data from the students.

This lesson builds on Grade 2 curriculum, where students should have been taught how to collect and organize data using a tally chart, and display the data
accurately using a graph. Students should also have prior learning on how to read and describe data on a graph. The results of the Assessment activity sheet
will help the teacher better gauge the students’ background knowledge. This activity will be used for assessment purposes only and will not be graded.

How will you use this knowledge to inform your instruction? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 3a)

The students’ responses to the What do you know about data assessment activity sheet (Appendix A) will provide the teacher with an overview of the
students’ strengths and weaknesses, and identify any major gaps in their prior learning (ex. students struggle with tally charts; students fully understand how
to create a pictograph). Based on these results, the teacher will modify her instruction to meet the majority of the students’ needs. That is, if most students
know how to do a tally chart and/or display the data on a graph, then less time will be spent reviewing/re-teaching those skills, and vice versa. The goal is to
ensure the majority of students have the required prior knowledge to continue with this new lesson.

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What do you know about your students’ personal, cultural, and community assets as they relate to the central focus? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 2b)

Kids love foods they “shouldn’t eat”, like chocolate, candy, and fast food. This is important in relation to the central focus of this lesson because the activities
will focus on different types of food as the data to be organized and displayed. The school is very multicultural and, as such, the classroom is comprised of a
number of students who do not eat meat for religious reasons. (This is also important to note during any discussions around how we use animals.)

How will you use this knowledge to inform your instruction? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 3a)

The teacher will use this knowledge to inform her instruction by creating activities that include food groups that relate to all students. For example, we will
use foods like ice cream, cookies, pizza and veggie dogs as our sample data. This will also be the case during classroom discussion. I will refer to when they
practiced creating tally charts last year and how they recorded the data using pictographs. I will also clarify that it doesn’t matter why type of data you are
looking at—food items, animals, countries—the process of collecting and displaying the data remains the same.

Curriculum Standards
NYS Elementary Science Core Curriculum Grade K-4 – 3.MD.3 Represent and interpret data.
Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories.
Solve one- and two- step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs.

The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8: Mathematics – Grade 3 overall expectations for “Collection and Organization of Data”
Collect and organize categorical or discrete primary data and display the data using charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs,
with labels ordered appropriately along horizontal axes, as needed
Read, describe, and interpret primary data presented in charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs

Objectives Assessment Modifications to Assessments


Using Bloom’s Taxonomy, include statements that Using formal and/or informal assessment tools, how will If applicable, explain how you will adapt
identify what students will be able to do by the end of the you evaluate and document your students’ progress on assessments to allow students with specific needs to
lesson and are aligned to the standards identified above. each of the objectives? demonstrate their learning.
(edTPA Task 1, Prompt 5b)
At the conclusion of this lesson, students will be • Students will complete the Create a pictograph • Students will be seated at the front of the
able to organize and display data from a tally chart activity sheet (Appendix C), which requires classroom
to create a pictograph, with 90% accuracy. them to use stickers to represent the data • Teacher will re-teach the activity to the
provided in a tally chart. (selected response students one-to-one, ensuring students know
item) which operation to use to total the tallies
• Teacher will circulate the room to ask students (use of calculator allowed)
if they understand the activity and are making • Teacher will remind the students how to use
connections to the earlier activity as well as the scale (i.e. one sticker represents two
prior learning. students)
• Students can have extra time to finish

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At the conclusion of this lesson, students will be • Students will use the graphs they created in the • Teacher will walk students through the first
able to read, describe and interpret graphs to make above activity to make three interpretations interpretation to ensure understanding of the
three interpretations. using ‘less than’ and ‘more than’. (created process by talking through their ideas
response item) • Students will be required to make only two
• At the conclusion of the activity, the teacher interpretations
will have students list one of their
interpretations, ensuring all answers are
different.

Academic Language Demands Instructional Supports


(edTPA Task 1, Prompt 4c) Strategies teachers provide to help learners understand, use, and practice the
concepts (edTPA Task 1, Prompt 4d)

Function Analyze • Teacher will determine students’ prior knowledge with a What do you
Looking at your standards and objectives, know about data assessment activity sheet (Appendix A) that requires
choose the one Bloom’s word that best them to organize and display data, and then analyze it to make an
describes the active learning essential for interpretation
students to develop understanding of • Teacher will model how to do the activity so students are prepared to
concepts within your lesson.
complete additional assignments, individually
o Teacher will create a tally chart based on the survey results
“What is your favorite food?”
o Teacher will ask IEP student to add the tallies together (using
their calculator) and then display the data by creating a
pictograph on the Smart Board.
o Teacher will make one interpretation using ‘less than’ or
‘more than’ for the pictograph, and then ask two students to
do the same.
• Teacher will give students additional assignments to complete
individually to demonstrate their understanding of the lesson
• IEP students will be given more time, if necessary

Vocabulary Data • Teacher will ask students which words from the lesson they would
Key words and phrases students need to be Tally chart like to put on the Mathematics Word Wall (i.e. high frequency words,
able to understand and use Pictograph words they were/are unfamiliar with, etc.)
Title • Once the Word Wall list is compiled, teacher will review their
Labels definitions with the class, then call on students to use the words in a
Key sentence
o Teacher will use wait time and prompts to encourage students
to participate
o Teacher will ask IEP student to list any synonyms or
antonyms they can think of

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• Teacher will display words on the Mathematics Word Wall for the
week, using a number of techniques to encourage literacy
o At the beginning of each math lesson, have students read the
words out loud as a class then choose individual students to
give the definition of one word
o While teaching the lesson, instead of using the word, provide
the definition as a clue and ask a student to give you the word
o Give the class a spelling quiz of the words at the end of the
week

Syntax Students will complete a Choose the • Teacher will walk around the classroom and assist students, as
Describe ways in which students will right word activity sheet (Appendix needed
organize language (symbols, words, phrases) B) that reinforces how to label a • Teacher will provide IEP students with a completed form and ask
to convey meaning. pictograph, using the vocabulary them to highlight the key words instead
words. • Teacher will take-up worksheet in class, and answer any questions for
clarity and understanding

Discourse During the group discussion/review • Teacher will lead the discussion by reiterating the central focus of the
How members of a discipline talk, write, and of activity sheets, students will be lesson and asking what a graph tells you (is used for)
participate in knowledge construction and given the opportunity to use the • Teacher will then ask students to reflect and share with the class what
communicate their understanding of the vocabulary and language functions they think they did well and what they need to work on next time they
concepts they learned throughout this lesson. create graphs
Several assessments will also happen • Everyone is expected to use vocabulary words in their shared
throughout the week (ex. daily dialogue to encourage fluency
review and definition of words,
spelling quiz, etc.)

Instructional Process Accommodations and/or Modifications


and/or Supports
Anticipatory Set/Motivator

• Begin lesson by tapping into student’s prior knowledge about pictographs • Teacher will ask IEP student to add the
o Teacher asks: “What are different ways we can organize and display data?” tallies together (using their calculator) and
o Anticipated student responses: “Graphs, bar charts, pie charts, pictographs, tally charts, line then display the data by creating a
graphs” pictograph on the Smart Board
o Teacher acknowledges that all the answers are correct and are great examples of ways to
organize and display data • Teacher will repeat the vocabulary words
o Teacher then asks “What does a graph show?” while writing them on the pictograph
o Anticipated student responses: “Information, data, trends, how many of something”

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o Teacher commends all the different answers, providing correction where necessary, and • Teacher will praise IEP students when they
explains that different charts are used for different things make an effort to answer a question
o Teacher says, “Pictographs – or picture graphs – use pictures/images to show information; bar
graphs use bars and numbers. Both of them are used to compare things between different
groups; line graphs can be used to compare changes over a period of time; pie charts are best to
compare pieces of a whole – like slices of pizza!
o Teacher states “You will eventually learn how to use all the different types of graphs because
the ability to collect, analyze and make meaning of data is a skill of lifelong value.”
o Student asks “Why do I need to know about graphs when I am older?”
o Teacher says “Because being able to simplify and present data using a chart will make the
information easier to understand. Graphs are everywhere – when you read a magazine, when
you are comparing the weather from one year to the next, when you go to the bank to get a
mortgage for your first home. Graphs can even be used to simply help you keep track of things.
It is a basic skill that everyone will benefit from”.
• Teacher shows the following video as an introduction to pictographs: Math’s Graphs Learn
Pictographs Math Video lesson Learning Video Animation: https://vimeo.com/118890946
• Teacher suggests students do an activity to test out their data analyzing and graph creating skills
o Teacher hands out What do you know about data assessment activity sheet (Appendix A), to be
completed individually (selected response and created response item)
o Teacher uses Smart Board to display the same table used on the activity sheet; which lists five
different types of foods
o Teacher asks the class to choose ONE of the listed foods as their favorite, then to walk around
the class and share with each other their answer (*to maintain consistency, students cannot
change their answer)
o Students are given 10 minutes to complete task, and are required to track the responses by
completing the tally chart on the activity sheet
o When students get all 24 responses (including their own), students must sit down and use their
tally chart to create a pictograph to display the data
o Students must then analyze the data and write down one interpretation.
• The teacher will collect the activity sheets and put them aside to review later.
• The teacher will then model for the class how to complete the activity using the Smart Board, asking
for the answers/information from the students (ex. “How many students chose French fries? So how
many tallies do we put?” and “How many pictures does my pictograph need to if 12 students prefer
chocolate?”)
• Teacher will review what a key is and how to use it
o Teacher asks: “A key is like a scale of measurement. What key should we use for this activity?
Should we count by one, twos or fives? Why?”
o Anticipated student responses: “Ones because then our graph will be big”; “Five because it’s
my favorite numbers”; “Twos because all the responses are divisible by two”
o Teacher acknowledges all answers, correcting any incorrect answers by explaining why they
are incorrect and providing descriptive feedback, and then explains that “for this graph, they

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will use a scale of two since there are 24 students, and that would result in a very large scale so
using a scale of 12 (24/2) is a better choice”.
• Teacher will model appropriate vocabulary while drawing the pictograph, making sure to accentuate
the vocabulary words
• When the pictograph is done, the teacher will make one interpretation using “less than” or “more than”
to model how to draw a conclusion. The teacher will then ask a students to make an interpretation
• Students will return to their desks and complete the Choose the right word activity sheet (Appendix B),
based on what they just learned.

Instructional procedures • As students are working on their activity


sheets, the teacher circulates around the
• Teacher begins formal instruction by stating the purpose of the lesson: To learn how to organize and room asking questions or assisting students
display data on a pictograph, and how to read information on pictographs to make interpretations and on creating their graphs.
draw conclusions.
• Teacher states: “The first step to understanding graphs is to understand the terms associated with them.
Let’s do a quick activity to see how many terms you already know” • Teacher will provide two modified
• Teacher hands out Choose the right word activity sheet (Appendix B), to assess students’ prior versions of the Choose the right word
knowledge of graph-related terms (selected response item) activity sheet (Appendix B). The first will
• Teacher chooses a student to read the instructions, and reiterates they must write the vocabulary words be completed so student can do a two-step
from the left side in the correct spaces on the right side of the diagram activity by highlighting the words and then
• Teacher gives students five minutes to complete activity. connecting them to the list of words on the
• Teacher reviews the activity sheet with the class, calling on students to give their answers in order right side of the page. The second will
o If a student doesn’t want to give the answer, teacher will ask them to give any answer they have the vocabulary words cut out so that
want (instead of going in order) the student can move them around to help
o If a student gives the wrong answer, teacher will talk them through it and prompt them towards them figure out where they belong.
the correct answer
• Once the Choose the right word activity sheet (Appendix B) is reviewed and corrected, teacher asks the
class who got one word wrong, two wrong, three wrong, and, if necessary, four wrong (out of seven
words).
o If any students got three or more words wrong, the teacher will remediate by reviewing the
words again, their meaning and purpose on a graph. The teacher will ask if they feel
comfortable moving forward, and, if not, the teacher will give the students extra time to
complete the following activity • Teacher will provide IEP students with
• Teacher then hands out the Create a pictograph activity sheet (Appendix C) and asks students to pre-cut (in half) ice cream stickers for
complete them independently because they pre-learned this in the first activity (selected response and Create a pictograph (Appendix C) activity
created response item)
• Teacher chooses another student to read the instructions, and reminds the class the order in which to
perform the activity: (1) count the tallies, (2) use stickers to represent the data tallied

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• Teacher then hands out ice cream stickers and scissors, and asks students to complete them
independently.
• Teacher reminds them to note the key (and does not disclose why she handed out scissors, which is to
cut stickers in half to represent only one student)
• After 10 minutes, teacher reviews the activity with the students
o Teacher asks: “how many stickers did you use for each flavor of ice cream”
o Most students respond correctly. For those who did not cut the ice cream stickers in half to
represent one student, teacher explains that if one sticker represents two students, then half a
sticker represents one student
o Teacher asks students to provide some observations about the graphs
o Anticipated student responses “There are more chocolate ice cream stickers”, “Ten students
chose strawberry ice cream”, “I love ice cream!”
o Teacher corrects students who do not use “more than” or “less than” during their observation
and gives some examples to model how to do it: “I drink water more than I drink milk. I eat
cake less than I eat ice cream. Making observations is like summarizing the data in front of
you, like drawing conclusions”.
o Teacher asks class again to provide some observations
o Improved anticipated student responses “There were more children who preferred chocolate ice
cream than vanilla”
• Teacher commends students for doing a great job
Closure • After the lesson, the Teacher will provide
• Teacher reviews goal of the lesson: To learn how to organize and display data on a pictograph, and IEP students the list of vocabulary words
how to read information on graphs to make interpretations and draw conclusions. along with their definitions
• Teacher asks students which words from the lesson they would like to put on the Mathematics Word
Wall (i.e. high frequency words, words they were/are unfamiliar with, etc.)
o Anticipated student responses: Data, Tally chart, Pictograph, Key, Title, Labels
o For any word suggestions that are completely random, teacher will turn to the class and ask
them to vote by raising their hands if the word(s) should be part of the Word Wall
• Once the Word Wall list is compiled, teacher will review their definitions with the class, then call on
students to use the words in a sentence
o Teacher will use wait time and prompts to encourage students to participate.
o Teacher will ask IEP student to list any synonyms or antonyms they can think of
• Teacher displays words on Mathematics Word Wall for the week, using a number of techniques to
encourage literacy throughout the week
o At the beginning of each math lesson, have students read the words out loud as a class then
choose individual students to give the definition of one word
o While teaching the lesson, instead of using the word, provide the definition as a clue and ask a
student to give you the word
o Give the class a spelling quiz of the words at the end of the week
• Teacher asks students to think about the lesson and the activity sheets they just completed, and to
reflect on one thing they did well and one thing they need to work on next time they create a pictograph

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o Teacher pauses so they can think, then asks students to turn to their neighbor to discuss their
answers
o Teacher then asks students to share their answers with the class
o Teacher takes notes in order to adapt instruction to accommodate students’ needs
• Teacher collects completed activity sheets for further student assessment

List all materials and/or technology tools required for the lesson.
Key instructional materials must be attached. These materials might include such items as class handouts, assignments, slides, and interactive white-board
images.

• Grid transparency paper (for Smart Board activity)


• Markers (for Smart Board activity)
• Vocabulary words for Mathematics Word Wall
o Data
o Tally chart
o Pictograph
o Title
o Key
o Labels
• Activity sheets:
o Appendix A: What do you know about collecting and displaying data? (Prior knowledge assessment)
o Appendix B: Choose the right word
o Appendix C: Creating pictographs
• Ice-cream stickers in three colors to represent flavors for the pictograph
• Scissors

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MSED ELEMENTARY PORTFOLIO PROJECT 26

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Medaille College Department of Education


Lesson Plan

Teacher Candidate’s Name: Tania Trifonopoulos Date: April 6, 2018


Context for Learning (edTPA and Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8)

Where is the school where you are teaching located? City: ___X____ Suburb: _______ Town:_______ Rural: ______

Grade level: ____3____ Number of students in the class: ___24_____

Students with IEPs/504 Plans


Complete the charts below to summarize required or needed supports, accommodations, or modifications for your students that will affect your instruction
in this learning segment.
IEPs/504 Plans: Number of Supports, Accommodations, Modifications,
Classifications/Needs Students Pertinent IEP Goals
IEP: Learning disability 1
- Preferential seating
- Pre-teaching and re-teaching content
- Prompts during lessons to check for understanding
- Extended time for tests
- Use of a calculator allowed
- Breaking down larger lessons into smaller ones
- One-to-one teacher assistance, occasionally

Students with Specific Language Needs


Language Needs Number of Supports, Accommodations, Modifications
Students
IEP: Speech or language impairment 2 - preferential seating
- pre-teaching and re-teaching of materials
- frequent checks for understanding, especially during
independent work
- use of visual cues
- refocusing and redirection
- directions repeated and/or simplified
- numerous models of new skills being taught
- additional time to process new information, slower
instructional pace

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- additional time to complete longer assignments, or


modified assignments to reduce the length of the task
- graphic organizers
- visual cues (word walls, lists, directions, 'silent teachers')
- study guides
- word banks
- scaffolded/skeleton notes
- additional support to complete homework (staying after)

Students with Other Learning Needs


Other Learning Needs Numbers of Supports, Accommodations, Modifications
Students

Lesson ___2___ of a ___5___ Day Learning Segment

Subject and Lesson Topic: Mathematics

Grade Leve: 3 Lesson Duration: 45 minutes

Central Focus of the Learning Segment


The central focus is an understanding that you want your students to develop. It is a description of the important identifiable theme, essential question, or
topic within the curriculum that is the purpose of the instruction of the learning segment (Making Good Choices, 2016).

The central focus of this learning segment is for students to organize and display data using graphs as well as interpret data on graphs to draw conclusions.
This learning segment serves as the foundation to understanding when and how to use appropriate graphs. The ability to collect, display and make meaning of
data—such as discovering useful information, making comparisons, suggesting conclusions, and supporting decision-making—is a skill of life-long value. It
will help with basic organization of information, and will be particularly useful to students who choose careers in analytics or business.

Knowing Your Learners


What do you know about your students’ prior academic learning as it relates to the central focus? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 2a)

In yesterday’s lesson, students completed a number of worksheets that required them to: (1) correctly label a tally chart and pictograph using key vocabulary
words and (2) survey their classmates then create a tally chart and pictograph based on the results, and then analyze the data to write interpretations using
“more than” or “less than” statements. I reviewed all the sheets (for assessment not grading) and the class did very well.

How will you use this knowledge to inform your instruction? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 3a)

Today’s lesson will reinforce the process of collecting data using tally charts; however, the focus will now be on displaying the data using a bar graph. First, I
will assess the student’s knowledge of bar graph components with an independent activity sheet. Then I will assess their ability to create a bar graph by

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demonstrating an activity on the document camera and asking them to provide me the answers. These two activities will give an overview of the students’
strengths and weaknesses (ex. students struggle with determining scale; students fully understand how to create a bar graph). Based on these results, I will
modify my instruction to meet the majority of the students’ needs. That is, if most students know how to display the data on a bar graph, then less time will
be spent teaching that skill, and vice versa. The goal is to ensure the majority of students have the required prior knowledge to continue with this new lesson.

What do you know about your students’ personal, cultural, and community assets as they relate to the central focus? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 2b)

Kids love foods they “shouldn’t eat”, like chocolate, candy, and fast food. This is important in relation to the central focus of this lesson because the activities
will focus on different types of food as the data to be organized and displayed. Also, the school is very multicultural so the classroom is comprised of a
number of students who do not eat meat for religious reasons. (This is also important to note during any discussions around how we use animals.)

How will you use this knowledge to inform your instruction? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 3a)

The teacher will use this knowledge to inform her instruction by creating activities that include food groups that relate to all students. For example, we will
use foods like ice cream, candy, cookies, pizza and veggie dogs as our sample data. This will also be the case during classroom discussion. I will refer to
when they practiced creating tally charts last year and how they recorded the data using pictographs. I will also clarify that it doesn’t matter why type of data
you are looking at—food items, animals, countries—the process of collecting and displaying the data remains the same.

Curriculum Standards

NYS Elementary Science Core Curriculum Grade K-4 – 3.MD.3 Represent and interpret data.
Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories.
Solve one- and two- step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs.

The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8: Mathematics – Grade 3 overall expectations for “Collection and Organization of Data”
Collect and organize categorical or discrete primary data and display the data using charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs,
with labels ordered appropriately along horizontal axes, as needed
Read, describe, and interpret primary data presented in charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs

Objectives Assessment Modifications to Assessments


Using Bloom’s Taxonomy, include statements that Using formal and/or informal assessment tools, how will If applicable, explain how you will adapt
identify what students will be able to do by the end of the you evaluate and document your students’ progress on assessments to allow students with specific needs to
lesson and are aligned to the standards identified above. each of the objectives? demonstrate their learning.
(edTPA Task 1, Prompt 5b)
At the conclusion of this lesson, students will be • Students will complete the Creating bar • Teacher will re teach the activity to the
able to organize and display data from a tally chart graphs activity sheet (Appendix C), which students one-to-one, ensuring student knows
to create a bar graph, using appropriate titles and requires them to create a tally chart and then which operation to use to total the tallies
labels, with 85% accuracy. draw a bar graph using that data. (use of calculator allowed)
• Teacher will circulate the room to ask students • Teacher will remind the student how to use
if they understand the activity and are making the scale (i.e. one box represents two
students)

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the connections to the earlier activity as well as • Teacher will leave bar graph example from
prior leaning. assessment activity on Smart Board as a
reference
• IEP/ELL students can have extra time to
finish activity

At the conclusion of this lesson, students will be • Students will use the graphs they created in the • IEP/ELL students will be required to make
able to read, describe and interpret graphs to make above activity to make three interpretations only one-two interpretations
three conclusions. using ‘less than’ and ‘more than’ statements. • Teacher will walk students through the first
• At the conclusion of the activity, the teacher interpretation to encourage comprehension
will have students list one of their of the process
interpretations, ensuring all answers are • Teacher will do frequent checks for
different. understanding of the question and what is
expected

Academic Language Demands Instructional Supports


(edTPA Task 1, Prompt 4c) Strategies teachers provide to help learners understand, use, and practice the
concepts (edTPA Task 1, Prompt 4d)

Function Analyze • Teacher will assess student’s prior knowledge of bar graphs by
Looking at your standards and objectives, distributing several activity sheets to be completed independently, in
choose the one Bloom’s word that best pairs and as a class
describes the active learning essential for • Teacher will model how to create a bar graph on the document
students to develop understanding of camera, asking the students to provide the necessary information
concepts within your lesson.
o This will prepare students for next activity, which they will
complete individually
o Teacher will ask IEP student to add the tallies together (using
a calculator)
o Teacher will make one interpretation using ‘less than’ and
‘more than’ for the bar graph, and then ask two students to do
the same.
• IEP/ELL students will get activity sheets with pre-completed
components

Vocabulary Bar graph • Teacher will ask students which words from the lesson they would
Key words and phrases students need to be Horizontal axis like to put on the Mathematics Word Wall (i.e. high frequency words,
able to understand and use Vertical axis words they were/are unfamiliar with, etc.)
Scale • Once the Word Wall list is compiled, teacher will review their
definitions with the class, then call on students to use the words in a
sentence

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Reminder of yesterday’s words: o Teacher will use wait time and prompts to encourage students
Data to participate
Tally chart o Teacher will ask IEP student to list any synonyms or
Pictograph antonyms they can think of
Title • Teacher will display words on the Mathematics Word Wall for the
Labels week, using a number of techniques to encourage literacy
o At the beginning of each math lesson, students will read the
words out loud as a class then individual students will be
chosen to give the definition of one word
o While teaching the lesson, instead of using the word, teacher
will provide the definition as a clue and ask a student to name
the word
o Teacher will incorporate the vocabulary words from the
day(s) before to encourage further fluency
o Teacher will give the class a spelling quiz of the words at the
end of the week
o IEP/ELL students’ quiz will have the words jumbled so they
have the letters they need to answer the questions

Syntax Students will complete a Label that • Teacher will walk around the classroom and assist students, as
Describe ways in which students will graph activity sheet (Appendix A) needed
organize language (symbols, words, phrases) that reinforces how to label a bar • Teacher will provide IEP/ELL students with a completed form and
to convey meaning. graph, using the vocabulary words. ask them to highlight the key words instead
• Teacher will take-up worksheet in class, and answer any questions for
clarity and understanding
• Teacher will offer after school help on the last day of the learning
segment for students who need additional practice

Discourse During the group discussions/review • Teacher will lead the discussion by reiterating the central focus of the
How members of a discipline talk, write, and of activity sheets, students will be lesson and asking what a graph tells you (is used for)
participate in knowledge construction and given the opportunity to use the • Teacher will then ask students to reflect and share with the class what
communicate their understanding of the vocabulary and language functions they think they did well and what they need to work on next time they
concepts they learned throughout this lesson. create graphs
Several assessments will also happen • Everyone is expected to use vocabulary words in their shared
throughout the week (ex. daily dialogue to encourage fluency
review and definition of words, • Teacher will offer after school help on the last day of the learning
spelling quiz, etc.) segment for students who need additional practice

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Instructional Process Accommodations and/or Modifications


and/or Supports
Anticipatory Set/Motivator

• Have students sit on carpet to begin the lesson.


• Teacher has already written on the board the purpose of the lesson: To learn how to organize and
display data using a bar graph, and how to read information on bar graphs to make interpretations and
draw conclusions.
• Tap into student’s prior knowledge by reflecting on what was discussed yesterday about graphs. • Teacher will engage students in class
o Teacher asks: “Who can tell me some of the different ways we can organize and display data discussion by asking a question and
that we talked about yesterday?” pausing to give them time to respond
o Anticipated student responses: “Graphs, bar charts, pie charts, pictographs, tally charts, line
graphs” • Teacher will praise them when they make
o Teacher then asks “And, who remembers what a graph shows?” an effort to answer a question
o Anticipated student responses: “Information, data, trends, how many of something”
o Teacher commends all the different answers, providing correction where necessary, and
explains that different charts are used for different things
o Teacher says, “Well done! Yesterday we learned how to create what?”
o Anticipated student response: “Tally charts and pictographs!”
o Teacher says, “Yes! Now that you are all tally chart and pictograph experts… today we will be
learning about bar graphs.”
o Teacher points to board to read lesson objective, and then says, “Bar graphs are used to
compare things between different groups. Like if I wanted to display all the different grades in
our school, or if I wanted to show all your favorite colors and how many of you each like them.
Let’s take a look at how to do it…”
o Teacher plays “Making a Bar Graph” video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Y9n67yG9d8
• When video is over, teacher says “That was a great introduction to bar graphs but before we create one,
let’s first learn how to label one. Does everyone remember when we labeled the pictograph yesterday
using the words provided? (they all remember) Great! Now, let’s see how well you do labeling a bar
graph!”
• Students return to their desks. Teacher hands out Label that graph! activity sheet (Appendix A) for
students to complete independently. • Teacher will re-teach activity
• After five minutes, teacher projects sheet on Smart Board and reviews the answers with class, popcorn
calling on kids to respond • If having a hard time, teacher will provide
o If a student doesn’t want to give the answer, teacher will ask them to give any answer they a completed handout to them, read the
want (instead of going in order) labels with them, and ask them to review
o If a student gives the wrong answer, teacher will talk them through it and prompt them towards them independently
the correct answer
o When finished, teacher says, “Now that we know how to properly label a bar graph, let’s see if • Teacher will pre-teach and repeat the
we can create one!” vocabulary words while modeling how to
label the bar graph

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Instructional procedures

• Teacher has a helper hand out the Creating bar graphs activity sheet (Appendix B) • Teacher circulates the room answering
• Teacher says, “We are going to do an activity similar to what we did yesterday. We are going to use the questions or assisting students with
information from a tally chart to create a bar graph. Then we are going to interpret the data on the creating their graphs.
graph. You can do this activity in pairs with an elbow partner. First, let’s read the instructions”.
• Teacher chooses a student to read the instructions, and reminds the class the order in which to perform • Teacher re-teaches activity and refers to
the activity: (1) count the tallies, (2) draw the axis, (3) determine scale, (4) create bars to represent the five steps written on the board
data tallied, (5) interpret graphs using two ‘more than’ or ‘less than’ statements
• Teacher writes steps on the board • Teacher provides small building blocks for
• After 10 minutes, teacher will review the bar graphs as a class, using grid transparency paper and a students to create (and mimic) a bar
document camera to demonstrate how to create the bar chart
o Teacher asks: “how many squares did you use to create bar graph that represents pizza” • Activity sheet will have the first bar
o Some students may respond “18” while others will respond “nine” completed for them
o Teacher asks one student who responded 18 and one who responded nine to explain how they
got their answer • Only one interpretation necessary
o Student with 18 responds “There were 18 students who chose pizza so I colored one square for
every student.” • Use of calculator allowed
o Student with 9 responds “There were 18 students who chose pizza but the SCALE said one
square for every two students. As such, half of 18 is nine, so I colored nine squares.”
o Teacher asks the class who they think is correct.
o Half the students think 18 squares is correct, so teacher reiterates the process of using one
square for every two students and asks again who they think is correct
o Everyone says nine squares is correct.
o Teacher re-asks if everyone understands the scale and how to use it (if yes, move forward; if
no, repeat process of dividing sample size by scale until understood)
o Teacher asks students to raise their hands if they need to adjust the remaining two bar graphs
because of what they just learned about scale.
o Several students raise their hands so teacher gives them three minutes to make corrections, then
reviews the remaining two bar graphs with the class
o Teacher then asks students to provide some observations about the graphs
o Anticipated student responses “The pizza bar graph is bigger”, “Only a few kids liked veggie
dogs”, “What’s the difference between veggie dogs and hot dogs”
o Teacher corrects students who do not use “more than” or “less than” during their observation
and gives some examples to model how to do it: “I use my fork more than I use my spoon. I eat
ice cream less than I eat cake. Making observations is like summarizing the data in front of
you, like drawing conclusions”.
o Teacher asks class again to provide some observations
o Improved anticipated student responses “There were more children who preferred pizza than • Tally marks and totals are completed
veggie dogs”
• First bar is already plotted on the chart

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• Teacher commends students for a great job and then hands out Analyzing data using graphs activity
sheet (Appendix C). It requires students to determine tallies from a word problem, create a bar graph, • Only two interpretations necessary
and then make three interpretations.
• Students have 15 minutes to complete activity independently • Extra time will be given, if necessary
• Teacher doesn’t take activity up in class. Instead, she collects sheets for student assessment purposes
(they will not be graded)

Closure
• Teacher reviews goal of the lesson (written on board): To learn how to organize and display data using
a bar graph, and how to read information on bar graphs to interpret and draw conclusions.
• Teacher asks students which words from the lesson they think should be placed on the Mathematics
Word Wall (i.e. high frequency words, words they were/are unfamiliar with, etc.)
o Anticipated student responses: Bar graph, Horizontal axis, Vertical axis, Scale
• Once the Word Wall list is compiled, teacher will review their definitions with the class—including
yesterday’s words—then call on students to use the words in a sentence
o Teacher will use wait time and prompts to encourage students to participate.
• Teacher displays words on Mathematics Word Wall for the week, using a number of techniques to
encourage literacy throughout the week
o At the beginning of each math lesson, have students read the words out loud as a class then
choose individual students to give the definition of one word
o While teaching the lesson, instead of using the word, provide the definition as a clue and ask a
student to give you the word
o Give the class a spelling quiz of the words at the end of the week
• Teacher asks students to think about the lesson and the activities they just completed, and to reflect on
one thing they did well and one thing they need to work on next time they create a bar graph
o Teacher pauses so they can think, then asks students to turn to their neighbor to discuss their
answers
o Teacher then asks students to share their answers with the class
o Teacher takes notes in order to adapt instruction to accommodate students’ needs

List all materials and/or technology tools required for the lesson.
Key instructional materials must be attached. These materials might include such items as class handouts, assignments, slides, and interactive white-board
images.

• Laptop to play video


• Transparency grid paper to create bar graphs
• Markers
• Vocabulary words for Mathematics Word Wall
o Bar graph
o Horizontal axis
o Vertical axis

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o Scale
• Handouts:
o Appendix A: Label that graph activity sheet
o Appendix B: Creating bar graphs activity sheet
o Appendix C: Analyzing data using graphs activity sheet

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Appendix A
MSED ELEMENTARY PORTFOLIO PROJECT 38

Appendix B

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Appendix C

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Medaille College Department of Education

Lesson Plan

Teacher Candidate’s Name: Tania Trifonopoulos Date: April 13, 2018


Context for Learning (edTPA and Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8)

Where is the school where you are teaching located? City: ___X____ Suburb: _______ Town:_______ Rural: ______

Grade level: ____3____ Number of students in the class: ___24_____

Students with IEPs/504 Plans


Complete the charts below to summarize required or needed supports, accommodations, or modifications for your students that will affect your instruction
in this learning segment.
IEPs/504 Plans: Number of Supports, Accommodations, Modifications,
Classifications/Needs Students Pertinent IEP Goals
IEP: Learning disability 1
- Preferential seating
- Pre-teaching and re-teaching content
- Prompts during lessons to check for understanding
- Extended time for tests
- Use of a calculator allowed
- Breaking down larger lessons into smaller ones
- One-to-one teacher assistance, occasionally

Students with Specific Language Needs


Language Needs Number of Supports, Accommodations, Modifications
Students
IEP: Speech or language impairment 2 - preferential seating
- pre-teaching and re-teaching of materials
- frequent checks for understanding, especially during
independent work
- use of visual cues
- refocusing and redirection
- directions repeated and/or simplified
- numerous models of new skills being taught
- additional time to process new information, slower
instructional pace

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MSED ELEMENTARY PORTFOLIO PROJECT 41

- additional time to complete longer assignments, or


modified assignments to reduce the length of the task
- graphic organizers
- visual cues (word walls, lists, directions, 'silent teachers')
- study guides
- word banks
- scaffolded/skeleton notes
- additional support to complete homework (staying after)

Students with Other Learning Needs


Other Learning Needs Numbers of Supports, Accommodations, Modifications
Students

Lesson ___3___ of a ___5___ Day Learning Segment

Subject and Lesson Topic: Mathematics

Grade Leve: 3 Lesson Duration: 35 minutes

Central Focus of the Learning Segment


The central focus is an understanding that you want your students to develop. It is a description of the important identifiable theme, essential question, or
topic within the curriculum that is the purpose of the instruction of the learning segment (Making Good Choices, 2016).

The central focus of this learning segment is for students to organize and display data using graphs as well as interpret data on graphs to draw conclusions.
This learning segment serves as the foundation to understanding when and how to use appropriate graphs. The ability to collect, display and make meaning of
data—such as discovering useful information, making comparisons, suggesting conclusions, and supporting decision-making—is a skill of life-long value. It
will help with basic organization of information, and will be particularly useful to students who choose careers in analytics or business.

Knowing Your Learners


What do you know about your students’ prior academic learning as it relates to the central focus? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 2a)

Over the last two days, students completed a number of worksheets that required them to: (1) correctly label a tally chart, pictograph and bar graph using key
vocabulary words; (2) survey their classmates using a tally chart and then create a pictograph and bar graph based on the results; and (3) analyze the data in
the graphs to write interpretations using “more than” or “less than” statements.

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How will you use this knowledge to inform your instruction? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 3a)

Today’s lesson will be a review of everything students learned over the last two days regarding the process of organizing and displaying data using graphs as
well as interpreting the data on the graphs to draw conclusions. With a hands-on Lego activity and a graphing activity that uses real gummy bears, students
will be excited to review the content from the last two days.

What do you know about your students’ personal, cultural, and community assets as they relate to the central focus? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 2b)

Kids love foods they “shouldn’t eat”, such as chocolate, candy, and fast food. This is important in relation to the central focus of this lesson as the activities
will focus on different types of food as the data to be organized and displayed. Today, I will incorporate gummy bears into the activity, which they will be
able to eat when they are done their work. This is a review of the previous two lessons. and will reinforce how to collect and organize data using tally charts,
and display the data on a graph. This repetition will help students master the skills needed to represent and interpret data.

How will you use this knowledge to inform your instruction? (edTPA Handbook, Task 1, Prompt 3a)

The teacher will use this knowledge to inform her instruction by creating activities that include food groups that relate to all students. For example, we will
use foods like ice cream, candy, cookies, pizza and veggie dogs as our sample data. This will also be the case during classroom discussion. I will refer to
when they practiced creating tally charts last year and how they recorded the data using pictographs. I will also clarify that it doesn’t matter why type of data
you are looking at—food items, animals, countries—the process of collecting and displaying the data remains the same.

Curriculum Standards

NYS Elementary Science Core Curriculum Grade K-4 – 3.MD.3 Represent and interpret data.
Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories.
Solve one- and two- step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs.

The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8: Mathematics – Grade 3 overall expectations for “Collection and Organization of Data”
Collect and organize categorical or discrete primary data and display the data using charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs,
with labels ordered appropriately along horizontal axes, as needed
Read, describe, and interpret primary data presented in charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs

Objectives Assessment Modifications to Assessments


Using Bloom’s Taxonomy, include statements that Using formal and/or informal assessment tools, how will If applicable, explain how you will adapt
identify what students will be able to do by the end of the you evaluate and document your students’ progress on assessments to allow students with specific needs to
lesson and are aligned to the standards identified above. each of the objectives? demonstrate their learning.
(edTPA Task 1, Prompt 5b)
At the conclusion of this lesson, students will be • Students will complete Graphing gummy bears • Teacher will re teach the activity to the
able to create picto- and bar graphs using activity sheet (Appendix C) and the Gummy students one-to-one, ensuring student knows
appropriate titles and labels, with 85% accuracy. bear sorting graph (Appendix D) to which operation to use to total the tallies
demonstrate their ability to create a tally chart (use of calculator allowed)

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and then draw a pictograph and bar graph using • Teacher will remind the student how to use
that data. the key/scale
• Teacher will leave example on Smart Board
• Teacher will circulate the room to ask students as a reference
if they understand the activity and are making • IEP/ELL students can have extra time to
the connections to prior learning. finish activity

At the conclusion of this lesson, students will be • Students will use the graphs they create to • IEP/ELL students will be required to make
able to read, describe and interpret picto- and bar make three interpretations using ‘less than’ and only two interpretations
graphs by making three ‘more than’ or ‘less than’ ‘more than’ statements. • Teacher will walk students through the first
statements. interpretation to encourage comprehension
of the process
• Teacher will do frequent checks for
understanding of the question and what is
expected

Academic Language Demands Instructional Supports


(edTPA Task 1, Prompt 4c) Strategies teachers provide to help learners understand, use, and practice the
concepts (edTPA Task 1, Prompt 4d)

Function Analyze • Teacher will assess what the students have learned in the last two
Looking at your standards and objectives, classes regarding picto- and bar graphs by assigning activities.
choose the one Bloom’s word that best • IEP/ELL students will get activity sheets with pre-completed
describes the active learning essential for components
students to develop understanding of
concepts within your lesson.

Vocabulary Data • Teacher will ask students which words from the lesson they would
Key words and phrases students need to be Tally chart like to put on the Mathematics Word Wall (i.e. high frequency words,
able to understand and use Title words they were/are unfamiliar with, etc.)
Labels • Since Word Wall list is already compiled from last two lessons,
Pictograph teacher will review their definitions with the class throughout the
Bar graph lesson, then call on students to use the words in a sentence
Key o Teacher will use wait time and prompts to encourage students
Scale to participate
Horizontal axis o Teacher will ask IEP student to list any synonyms or
Vertical axis antonyms they can think of

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Syntax Students will complete several • Teacher will provide IEP/ELL students with activity sheets that have
Describe ways in which students will activity sheets that require them to components already completed (ex. tally marks and totals are filled
organize language (symbols, words, phrases) use the vocabulary words correctly, in, first bar is already plotted on the chart, and only two
to convey meaning. such as the interpretations necessary)
Graphing gummy bears activity • Teacher will take-up worksheet in class, and answer any questions for
sheet (Appendix C) and the Gummy clarity and understanding
bear sorting questions (Appendix E) • Teacher will offer after school help on the last day of the learning
segment for students who need additional practice

Discourse During the group discussions/review • Teacher will then ask students to reflect and share with the class what
How members of a discipline talk, write, and of activity sheets, students will be they think they did well and what they need to work on next time they
participate in knowledge construction and given the opportunity to use the create graphs
communicate their understanding of the vocabulary and language functions • Everyone is expected to use vocabulary words in their shared
concepts they learned throughout this lesson. dialogue to encourage fluency
Several assessments will also happen • Teacher will offer after school help on the last day of the learning
throughout the week (ex. daily segment for students who need additional practice
review and definition of words,
group discussions, etc.)

Instructional Process Accommodations and/or Modifications


and/or Supports
Anticipatory Set/Motivator

• Teacher has already written on the board the purpose of the lesson: To practice organizing and • Teacher re-teaches activity to IEP/ELL
displaying data using graphs, and how to read information on graphs to make interpretations and draw students and models how to stack the
conclusions. same-colored Lego square
• Teacher divides class into six groups of four by counting them off
• Teacher hands out a Ziploc bag full of Lego pieces and one Lego flat board to each group • Teacher circulates room and checks to see
• Every student gets a Lego graphing paper (Appendix A) if all groups understand how to line up the
• The teacher explains they will have 5 minutes to stack all the same colored Lego pieces on the flat stacks in a row, offering assistance where
board necessary
• Teacher displays a countdown clock on the Smart Board: https://www.online-
stopwatch.com/countdown-timer/
• After five-minutes, teacher asks the groups to re-organize their stacks in a straight line in the follow
order: red, blue, yellow, green, white
• Teacher then askes students to draw what they see on the Lego graphing paper (Appendix A) provided

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• The first five students to finish drawing their Lego stacks as a bar graph get to re-create their graphs on
the Smart Board using the “Create a Graph” website:
https://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx?ID=a0fcf36056944c6d9b9a416d6191c778
• When all students are done, teacher asks them to wash their hands and sit back down in their groups

Instructional procedures

• Teacher has a helper hand out three activity sheets to everyone in group: Gummy bear sorting mat • Teacher will re-teach activity
(Appendix B) <one per group required>, Graphing gummy bears (Appendix C) and Gummy bear
sorting graph (Appendix D) • If having a hard time, teacher will provide
• Teacher says “Since we’ve spent the last two days learning about pictographs and bar graphs, today we a completed handout and ask them to
are going to practice what we’ve learned to make sure we are ready to move on to our next type of review independently
graph: a line plot”
• Teacher refers to handouts and explains activity: “Every group will get a bag of gummies – WHICH • Teacher will repeat vocabulary words
YOU CANNOT EAT – that you must sort by color using the sorting mat handout. Once all the while creating and labeling graphs on
gummies are sorted, you will create a key to record the number of gummies in each color group using Smart Board
the tally chart. After you have totaled the number of gummies in each color, you will graph the number
of gummy bears by coloring the bears on the graph. DO NOT forget to use appropriate labels, title and • Teacher circulates the room answering
scale”. questions or assisting students with
• Teacher then hands out one small bag of gummies to each group and lets them work for 10 minutes. creating their graphs.
• Remind students NOT to eat gummies
• Teacher hands out Gummy bear sorting questions (Appendix D) and asks students to use their graph to • Tally marks and totals are filled in; first
answer the questions (10 minutes). They can work independently or within their group bar is already plotted on the chart and only
• When finished, teacher takes up the three activity sheets as a class by displaying them on the Smart two interpretations necessary
Board and using the students’ answers to complete them • Extra time will be given, if necessary
• When done, students may enjoy their gummy bears! You need to have more student dialogue to inform
the evaluator how you would react to the students comments and misconceptions.

Closure

• Teacher reviews the words from previous two days on the Mathematics Word Wall, and call on
students to define them and use them in a sentence
o Teacher will use wait time and prompts to encourage students to participate.

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• Teacher asks students to think about the today’s lesson and activities and to reflect on one thing they
did well and one thing they need to work on next time they create a bar graph
o Students to turn to their elbow partner to discuss
o Teacher then asks students to share their answers with the class (whomever wants to)
o Teacher takes notes in order to adapt instruction to accommodate students’ needs for next
lesson topic (line plots)
• Teacher lets students know tomorrow will be their end of unit text, then they will move on the line
plots

List all materials and/or technology tools required for the lesson.
Key instructional materials must be attached. These materials might include such items as class handouts, assignments, slides, and interactive white-board
images.

• Lego pieces and flat board (only square pieces in red, yellow, blue, green and white)
• Markers
• Laptop for countdown clock: https://www.online-stopwatch.com/countdown-timer/ and to create bar graphs:
https://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx?ID=a0fcf36056944c6d9b9a416d6191c778
• Six snack bags with 48 gummy bears (all bags to have equal amounts of colors – red, orange, green, white, yellow)
• Handouts:
o Appendix A: Lego graphing paper
o Appendix B: Gummy bear sorting map
o Appendix C: Graphing gummy bears activity sheet
o Appendix D: Gummy bear sorting graph
o Appendix E: Gummy bear sorting questions
o

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Appendix A

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Appendix B

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Appendix C

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Appendix D

Scale: =
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Appendix E

Look at bar graph and make 3 of your own interpretations using ‘less than’ or
‘more than’.

1. _____________________________________________________________________________________

2. _____________________________________________________________________________________

3. _____________________________________________________________________________________

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