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Issue #752 Harrisburg, PA Nov.

26, 2018

PA Environment Digest Blog​​ ​Twitter Feed​​ ​ Facebook Page

PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Takes No Action On


Stormwater Recommendations

On November 20, the ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed


Planning Steering Committee​ heard a presentation and
discussed ​recommendations by the Stormwater
Workgroup​, but took no formal action.
Among the points of discussion was how to deal
with needed nutrient and sediment pollution reductions
when the existing system for regulating stormwater
covers only 25 percent of the land area in the
Chesapeake Bay Watershed and accounts for only 4
percent of the nitrogen load that must be reduced.
These compelling numbers point to a need to consider options to expand the area affected
by regulation and/or achieve the needed reductions from agriculture or other sectors.
Also attracting a lot of discussion, but no real disagreement, was the need to expand
existing stormwater permits and MS4 areas to multi-municipal or county-level geographic areas
to avoid the problem of every borough, city and township developing their own stormwater
pollution reduction plans.
Timing was also an issue. If the scope and requirements of the existing stormwater
regulatory programs were to be changed, how would that happen when communities have
existing, approved MS4 plans, for example, they are now implementing?
DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell likened the problem to doing maintenance on an
airplane while it was flying.
Among the ​recommendations made by the Stormwater Workgroup​ were--
-- Require 1,000 industrial facilities covered by individual or PAG-03 General Permits to
implement stormwater pollution reductions needed by MS4 communities and other sectors;
-- DEP develop a county or regional permitting approach for future MS4 permits;
-- Require subsequent MS4 permits to implement green infrastructure to both reduce nutrients
and sediment, along with control the rate and volume of water with more opportunities for
county or watershed solutions;

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-- Provide incentives for establishing new riparian forest buffers outside urban areas in the MS4
permit process;
-- Credit the upgrade of existing Chapter 102 best management practices toward required
pollution reductions for a proposed development site;
-- PennVEST should create a special financing program in which counties could establish a
revolving fund to provide low interest loans to municipalities for BMP easements;
-- Authorize county and local governments to grant tax reductions to landowners who provide
easements on their property to municipalities for stormwater management;
-- Enforce the requirements in the Stormwater Management Act (Act 167);
-- Discussion of requiring stormwater pollution reductions from developed land not just
urbanized areas expanding the area to be regulated; and
-- Pass legislation to regulate fertilizer applications-- ​Senate Bill 792​.
Click Here​ for a copy of the recommendations. ​Click Here​ for a copy of the presentation.
The next meeting of the Steering Committee is on December 17 from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. in
Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building in Harrisburg. ​Click Here​ to register to attend by
webinar.
For more information, visit the ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering
Committee​ webpage.
​ hoto:​ NOT a recommended stormwater pollution reduction practice.)
(P
NewsClips:
Penn State Creates Model Golf Course Nutrient Management Plan For Chesapeake Bay
Drainage Area
How Chesapeake Conservancy AI Land Maps Help Conservation Efforts Respond To Climate
Change
Helping The Environment One Tree At A Time In Pittsburgh
Jenkintown Creek Restoration Project Comes To Cheltenham In SE PA
Refining Streambank Erosion Rates, Restoration Credits In York County
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21
Feature: Motivations Matter In Sustainable Agriculture Decisions
Western PA Conservancy Now Accepting Dominion Energy Watershed Mini Grants
Applications
PA Highlands Coalition Webinar Dec. 10: What Is Nature Worth? Return On Environmental
Studies, Economic Value Of The Outdoors
Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership Names Brenda Sieglitz New Manager
[Posted: Nov. 21, 2018]

Western PA Conservancy Now Accepting Dominion Energy Watershed Mini Grant


Applications

On November 19, the ​Western PA Conservancy​ is now accepting applications for the ​Dominion
Energy Watershed Mini Grant Program​ to support grassroots watershed groups. Applications
are due December 28.
Grants are available to support expenses related to--

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-- Water Quality Monitoring--​​ $3,000 limit;
-- Restoration Projects--​​ $3,000 limit; and
-- Organizational Promotion & Outreach--​​ $2,000 limit.
Applicants in Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Bucks, Butler, Cambria, Cameron, Centre,
Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Crawford, Elk, Fayette, Franklin, Greene, Indiana, Jefferson,
Juniata, Lawrence, Mercer, McKean, Potter, Tioga, Venango, Washington and Westmoreland
counties are eligible.
Funding for the program is provided by the generosity of the ​Dominion Energy
Charitable Foundation​.
Click Here​ for all the details and to apply.
More information is available on programs, initiatives and special events at the ​Western PA
Conservancy​ ​website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Conservancy, ​Like
them on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​, add them to your ​Circle on Google+​, join them on
Instagram​, visit the ​Conservancy’s YouTube Channel​ or add them to your ​network on Linkedin​.
Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Helping The Environment One Tree At A Time In Pittsburgh
Jenkintown Creek Restoration Project Comes To Cheltenham In SE PA
Refining Streambank Erosion Rates, Restoration Credits In York County
Penn State Creates Model Golf Course Nutrient Management Plan For Chesapeake Bay
Drainage Area
How Chesapeake Conservancy AI Land Maps Help Conservation Efforts Respond To Climate
Change
Knapp: Kiskiminetas River Makes A Comeback
Audubon PA Works In Central PA On Watershed Education
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Takes No Action On Stormwater
Recommendations
Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21
Feature: Motivations Matter In Sustainable Agriculture Decisions
PA Highlands Coalition Webinar Dec. 10: What Is Nature Worth? Return On Environmental
Studies, Economic Value Of The Outdoors
Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership Names Brenda Sieglitz New Manager
[Posted: Nov. 19, 2018]

Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21

The Department of Conservation and Natural


Resources and ​Western PA Conservancy​ will be
hosting a ​Riparian Forest Buffer Summit​​ on
February 20-21 at the Best Western Premier
Conference Center, 800 East Park Drive in
Harrisburg.
Pennsylvania has a goal of planting 95,000 acres of

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riparian buffers statewide by 2025 to improve water quality.
The objective of the Summit is to provide conservation professionals and other Riparian
Forest Buffer practitioners, decision makers and others with the latest and greatest information
on Forest Buffer science, implementation strategies, outreach, funding options, as well as to
provide networking opportunities for those working and volunteering in the forest buffer field.
DCNR and the Conservancy held the ​first Forest Buffer Summit​ earlier this year in State
College.
Questions about the Summit should be directed to Teddi Stark, DCNR's Riparian Forest
Buffer Coordinator, by calling 717-787-0656 or send email to: ​c-tstark@pa.gov​.
To learn more about buffers, visit DCNR’s ​Forest Buffers Along Waterways​ webpage.
New DCNR Grant Round
To learn more about grant opportunities to support riparian buffer, trail and recreation
projects, visit DCNR’s ​Community Conservation Grant Program​ webpage. A new grant round is
opening January 22.
NewsClips:
Penn State Extension: Risk Of Spotted Lanternfly On Christmas Trees Slight
Check Your Christmas Tree Just In Case It’s Carrying Lanternfly Eggs
Helping The Environment One Tree At A Time In Pittsburgh
WITF Smart Take: Reducing Energy Consumption; Forest Wildfire Risk
Christmas Tree Arrives In PA Capitol Building
Diseases From Ticks Made Record Jump Last Year
It May Be Getting Harder For Puerto Rico’s National Forest To Recover From Storms
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Takes No Action On Stormwater
Recommendations
Feature: Motivations Matter In Sustainable Agriculture Decisions
Western PA Conservancy Now Accepting Dominion Energy Watershed Mini Grants
Applications
PA Highlands Coalition Webinar Dec. 10: What Is Nature Worth? Return On Environmental
Studies, Economic Value Of The Outdoors
Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership Names Brenda Sieglitz New Manager
Western PA Conservancy Works To Introduce A Natural Predator To The Hemlock Woolly
Adelgid
[Posted: Nov. 22, 2018]

Governor's PFAS Action Team Public Meeting Nov. 30 In Harrisburg

On November 19, the ​Governor's PFAS Action Team​ announced it will hold a public meeting in
Harrisburg on November 30 to help residents learn more about contamination problems from
perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)​.
The meeting will feature presentations from experts from state governments and the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency about PFAS contamination and how it is managed, as well as
utilities, municipal governments, advocacy organizations, and others.
There will also include time for public comment. An open comment period for residents
to share their concerns with PFAS is also available at ​DEP’s eComment​ webpage.

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“As we explore PFAS contamination, we have asked everyone to share their knowledge,”
said Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “We need to have as
much information as we can on these chemicals and their potential impacts on health and the
environment.”
PFAS substances were commonly used in applications that include surface coating of
paper and cardboard packaging products, carpets, non-stick pans, and textiles, as well as
firefighting foams.
These substances have been detected in air, water, and soil in and around production
manufacturing facilities, and airports and military bases that used firefighting foams.
“Gov. Wolf called on the federal government to show leadership by establishing national
safe drinking water standards for PFOS and PFOA, but in the absence of federal action,
Pennsylvania will move forward aggressively to ensure Pennsylvania residents are protected,”
McDonnell continued.
Companies began phasing out the production and use of several PFAS substances in the
early 2000s, and two of the most well studied-- perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and
perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)-- are no longer manufactured or imported into the United
States. Despite the phase-out, contamination has been identified at 15 sites in Pennsylvania, each
of which are being addressed by state and federal cleanup efforts.
Gov. Wolf formed the Action Team in September of 2018 to address PFAS contaminants
across the Commonwealth and protect Pennsylvania residents.
Public Comments Accepted
There is an open comment period for residents to share their concerns with PFAS at
DEP’s eComment​ webpage.
The meeting will be held at the Rachel Carson Building starting at 9:00 a.m. The
meeting will also be available online from the ​DEP PFAS webpage​.
NewsClips:
Cusick: State To Hold Meeting Nov.30 On PFAS Contamination
PA Health Officials To Release Blood Test Results On PFAS Contamination In Bucks,
Montgomery
Related Stories:
Gov. Wolf's PFAS Action Team Outlines Public Outreach Plans, Nov. 30 Meeting
Gov. Wolf Signs Executive Order Creating PFAS Action Team
[Posted: Nov. 19, 2018]

PA Supreme Court Agrees To Review Rule Of Capture Decision Saying Taking Natural
Gas Without Permission Is Trespass

On November 20, the ​PA Supreme Court agreed to


review​ the ​PA Superior Court ruling in April​ saying
Southwestern Energy​ drilling company trespassed on the
property of Susquehanna County landowners by taking
natural gas from an adjacent property without permission
through its unconventional drilling operations.
The PA Supreme Court ​specifically rephrased the
issue​ it was reviewing this way--”Does the rule of

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capture apply to oil and gas produced from wells that were completed using hydraulic fracturing
and preclude trespass liability for allegedly draining oil or gas from under nearby property,
where the well is drilled solely on and beneath the driller’s own property and the hydraulic
fracturing fluids are injected solely on or beneath the driller’s own property?”
The PA Superior Court ruling overturned the rule of capture practice that has been in
place for as long as companies have been drilling for oil and gas and developing natural
resources.
Background
Members of the Briggs family own about 11 acres of land adjacent to an unconventional
natural gas well operated by Southwestern Energy since 2011 in Harford Township,
Susquehanna County.
The Briggs family did not lease their mineral rights to Southwestern for development.
Southwestern Energy argued and a lower court agreed there was no trespass because of
the “rule of capture.” ​Rule of capture means​ the first person to capture a natural resources owns
that resource under English common law. It can be applied to groundwater or natural resources
like oil and gas. ​Click Here​ for a Penn State Law presentation on the issue.
The Court ruled prior cases involving the rule of capture do not apply to unconventional
natural gas drilling because hydraulic fracturing is not the same as oil and natural gas freely
migrating from a reservoir and across property lines.
The Court said--
“Unlike oil and gas originating in a common reservoir, natural gas, when trapped in a
shale formation, is non-migratory in nature. Shale gas does not merely “escape” to adjoining
land absent the application of an external force.
“Instead, the shale must be fractured through the process of hydraulic fracturing; only
then may the natural gas contained in the shale move freely through the “artificially created
channel[s].”
“Further, we are not persuaded by the Coastal Oil Court’s rationale that a landowner can
adequately protect his interests by drilling his own well to prevent drainage to an adjoining
property.
“Hydraulic fracturing is a costly and highly specialized endeavor, and the traditional
recourse to “go and do likewise” is not necessarily readily available for an average landowner.
Additionally, while we are cognizant that establishing the occurrence of a subsurface trespass
determining the value of natural gas drained through hydraulic fracturing will present evidentiary
difficulties, see Coastal Oil, 268 S.W.3d at 16, we do not believe that such difficulty, in itself, is
a sufficient justification for precluding recovery.
“We additionally echo the concern raised in both the Coastal Oil dissent and Stone that
precluding trespass liability based on the rule of capture would effectively allow a mineral lessee
to expand its lease by locating a well near the lease’s boundary line and withdrawing natural gas
from beneath the adjoining property, for which it does not have a lease.
“In light of the distinctions between hydraulic fracturing and conventional gas drilling,
we conclude that the rule of capture does not preclude liability for trespass due to hydraulic
fracturing.
“Therefore, hydraulic fracturing may constitute an actionable trespass where subsurface
fractures, fracturing fluid and proppant cross boundary lines and extend into the subsurface estate
of an adjoining property for which the operator does not have a mineral lease, resulting in the

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extraction of natural gas from beneath the adjoining landowner’s property.
The Court remanded the case to lower court to allow for the Briggs family to fully
develop their trespass claim, including any estimates of the extent of the trespass and how far the
subsurface fractures extended from the unconventional gas well.
Click Here​ for a copy of the PA Superior Court opinion.
NewsClips:
Abandoned Conventional Oil Wells Hidden Under Thousands Of Local Properties
Cusick: New Website Aims To Be Clearinghouse For Shale Research
Related Story:
PA Superior Court: Taking Natural Gas Without Permission From Neighboring Property Is
Trespass, Overturning Rule Of Capture For Unconventional Gas Wells
Related Stories This Week:
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Discuss Mock Drill Pad
Restoration Project Nov. 28
Penn State Extension Webinar Dec. 13: Unconventional Oil & Gas: Bringing Trusted Science To
Decision-Making
[Posted: Nov. 21, 2018]

DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Discuss Mock Drill Pad
Restoration Project Nov. 28

DCNR’s ​Conservation and Natural


Resources Advisory Council​ is scheduled to
meet on November 28 to hear an update on
mock well pad restoration research​ by the
Bureau of Forestry in the ​Tiadaghton State
Forest​.
DCNR, in partnership with
researchers at Penn State University,
constructed a 1-acre mock well pad
demonstration site in May of 2015 to better
understand how Marcellus Shale well pad
construction techniques impact the
effectiveness of forest reclamation practices.
Ongoing data collection on the “mock well pad” will be used to test different techniques,
seed mixes, and tree and shrub species survival. ​(​Click Here​ for a video on the research.)
For more information on gas drilling on State Forest land, visit DCNR’s ​Natural Gas
Management​ ​webpage.
Also ​on the agenda​ is DCNR’s regular report to the Council and a discussion of the
committee’s recent trip to the Loyalsock Creek which was named River of the Year earlier in
2018.
The meeting will be held in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building in Harrisburg
starting at 10:00 a.m.
For more information and available handouts, visit DCNR’s ​Conservation and Natural
Resources Advisory Council​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Gretchen Leslie,

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717-772-9084 or send email to: ​gleslie@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
PA Supreme Court Agrees To Review Superior Court Rule Of Capture Decision Saying Taking
Natural Gas Without Permission Is Trespass
Abandoned Conventional Oil Wells Hidden Under Thousands Of Local Properties
Cusick: New Website Aims To Be Clearinghouse For Shale Research
Related Stories:
DCNR Releases 2nd Monitoring Report On State Forest Shale Gas Drilling
Op-Ed: DCNR Shale Gas Monitoring Report Has Good Information, But Obfuscates Forest
Policies
Related Stories This Week:
PA Supreme Court Agrees To Review Superior Court Rule Of Capture Decision Saying Taking
Natural Gas Without Permission Is Trespass
Penn State Extension Webinar Dec. 13: Unconventional Oil & Gas: Bringing Trusted Science To
Decision-Making
DCNR Opens More PA State Forest Roads For Deer Hunters This Season
Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21
[Posted: Nov. 21, 2018]

Western PA Conservancy Works To Introduce A Natural Predator To The Hemlock


Woolly Adelgid

There are dozens of ​Western PA


Conservancy​ properties where eastern
hemlocks, the state tree, dominate forests
as key ecological features.
The invasive ​Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
that feeds on and kills hemlocks was first
detected on WPC lands along Sideling Hill
Creek in Bedford County in 2008.
The HWA has now been detected at many Conservancy properties, except in the
northwestern counties of the state.
Although there are no means to eliminate the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid at this time, there
are several options for its treatment and control. Control methods include chemicals like
insecticides or biological methods, such as predators or pathogen treatments.
In order to save some hemlock trees on certain Conservancy lands, limited applications of
insecticide are being used on select trees and groves of hemlocks.
In an effort to use a non-chemical option, the Conservancy is testing a biological
approach that may potentially have wider and long lasting benefits.
It’s possible to introduce predatory species into an environment as a potential solution to
an invasive species. However, the introduction of a non-native predator as a potential solution to
an invasive pest should only be attempted after careful evaluation and testing.
Researchers must be sure the intended solution is not another invasive species problem in
disguise.
In the case of HWA, there is a non-native predatory insect that preys on the invasive

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adelgid. A species of tooth-necked fungus beetle is an aggressive predator of hemlock woolly
adelgid.
The small, 2-3 mm long beetle, called Laricobius nigrinus (Ln), is native to the northern
Rocky Mountains and Pacific Northwest, where it feeds on an insect identical to the invasive
HWA that is infesting eastern hemlocks.
Ln was one of a few insects selected for release at HWA infestation sites in some eastern
states beginning in the early 2000s. Unfortunately, Ln has never been given a common name for
us to use.
The Conservancy is working closely with the DCNR Bureau of Forestry to fight the
spread of HWA using the Ln beetle.
A challenge for such an effort is to establish the predatory beetle population in an area
before HWA can kill the hemlock trees.
Although Ln already lives in far eastern Pennsylvania and some states to the south, it is
unlikely to make its way on its own to western Pennsylvania in time to save the trees.
Acquiring an adequate supply of Ln beetles to release into the wild isn’t an easy task. It
takes many individual beetles and several attempted releases to be successful at a particular
location.
Common options for acquiring the Ln beetle include:
-- Rearing the predatory insects in a lab;
-- Collecting them in the field and transporting them to the infested area; or
-- Purchasing them from a supplier.
Instead, the Conservancy and the Bureau of Forestry decided to create a nursery habitat
that is suitable for both HWA and the predatory beetle. This allows the Ln beetles to naturally
feed on HWA and reproduce in their intended environment. This habitat is referred to as an
insectary.
WPC is establishing two Ln insectaries at ​Bear Run Nature Reserve​ in Fayettee and
Somerset counties using the following method:
-- Plant 12 young hemlock trees in a linear hedge-like configuration at two open locations, and
care for them with water and fertilizer.
-- Fence in the area so that the local deer population will not damage the young trees, while also
cutting surrounding vegetation to reduce competition for sunlight and water.
-- Trim the tree tops and longest branches to encourage a bushy growth form with lots of twigs
that are within reach.
-- Introduce HWA into the insectaries by collecting HWA infected hemlock twigs and placing
these along the branches of the young insectary hemlocks.
-- Wait at least one year to allow the HWA to spread and form a thriving colony within the
hemlock hedge.
-- Release Ln beetles into the hemlock hedge when the HWA is abundant enough to supply the
food necessary to feed a Ln colony.
-- Collect Ln beetles once a healthy colony has formed in the insectary and release these at
locations where eastern hemlock trees are already infected.
-- Check the HWA-infected hemlock trees in the landscape surrounding the insectary to
determine if Ln beetles from the insectary have dispersed on their own to prey on HWA
elsewhere.
The Conservancy anticipates the insectaries will be producing Ln beetles to fight the

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HWA by 2021.
If the Ln beetle becomes established within the newly expanding HWA range, the hope is
HWA numbers will remain low enough to allow most hemlock trees to survive.
HWA is an invasive species that is most likely here to stay. Although there is no current
solution to completely eliminate HWA, efforts are underway to control this invasive species and
lessen its damage to our forest.
For more information on the Conservancy’s efforts, visit its ​Conservation Science -
Hemlock Woolly Adelgid​ webpage.
Visit DCNR’s ​Hemlock Woolly Adelgid​ webpage to find out how Pennsylvania is
fighting this invasive species.
(​Photo:​ The Ln beetle.)
NewsClips:
Penn State Extension: Risk Of Spotted Lanternfly On Christmas Trees Slight
Check Your Christmas Tree Just In Case It’s Carrying Lanternfly Eggs
Helping The Environment One Tree At A Time In Pittsburgh
WITF Smart Take: Reducing Energy Consumption; Forest Wildfire Risk
Christmas Tree Arrives In PA Capitol Building
Diseases From Ticks Made Record Jump Last Year
It May Be Getting Harder For Puerto Rico’s National Forest To Recover From Storms
Related Story:
Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21
[Posted: Nov. 21, 2018]

KaBOOM!, Keurig Dr Pepper, Pittsburgh Penguins Announce Winners Of Let's Play


Everywhere Challenge, $200,000 In Grants Awarded In Allegheny County

On November 20, ​KaBOOM!​, the national


nonprofit dedicated to giving all kids the
childhood they deserve through great, safe
places to play, ​Keurig Dr Pepper​ and the
Pittsburgh Penguins​ announced winners of the
Let's Play Everywhere Challenge​ in Allegheny
County.
The Challenge, funded by the Keurig Dr Pepper
Let's Play initiative, ​awarded $200,000 across
ten organizations​ in the county to create lasting, scalable design installations that will provide
more opportunities to play for kids who need it most.
The Let's Play Everywhere Challenge is a call for innovative ideas that make it easier for
families to incorporate play into their everyday routines. The projects implemented through the
Challenge will help families make play the easy choice and support kids in getting the physical
activity they need to thrive.
Through the Let's Play Everywhere Challenge, ten new playspaces will be created that
will reach thousands of kids in Allegheny County by October 2019.
"We can all agree that play is an essential part of childhood, and all kids should have
opportunities to play regardless of where they live or their family's income," said James Siegal,

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CEO of KaBOOM!. "The more kids play, the more likely they are able to grow up happy,
healthy and resilient. We are grateful to Keurig Dr Pepper for bringing people together from all
walks of life to make a difference in the lives of kids in Allegheny County."
Winning entries include plans from the ​Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy​ to bring "Ping
Pong in the Plaza" to Schenley Plaza, one of the busiest greenspaces in Pittsburgh, and another
from non-profit Community Forge, in collaboration with the Pittsburgh Learning Commons,
which will create a math-themed rock climbing wall and accessible walkway in Wilkinsburg,
Pennsylvania.
"The Keurig Dr Pepper Let's Play initiative provides funding, equipment and playspaces
to help kids and families make active play a daily priority," said Vicki Draughn, vice president,
corporate communications and philanthropy. "By investing in new, unexpected opportunities for
play, especially for underserved children and their families, we're supporting innovative ideas
that can help kids build active, healthy habits for life."
Click Here​ for a list of grants awarded in Allegheny County.
To learn more about the program, visit the ​Let's Play Everywhere Challenge​ website.
(​Photo:​ Glassport Community Outreach, Inc. and Pittsburgh Fulton PTO projects awarded
grants.)
NewsClips:
Erie-Area Parks To Share $862,000 In State Grants
Allentown Secures $300K Grant For Proposed Skate Park
Allegheny Ridge Receives $202K For Canal Greenway
Lehigh County Awarded $469,900 In Local Recreation Grants From DCNR
Nov. 23 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Donor Wants To Establish Legacy Fund For Parks In Altoona
Editorial: Old PA Pike Trail Project Would Enhance Region
Editorial: Even A Little Exercise Can Have A Big Impact
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

Natural Lands: Stoneleigh Property In Montgomery County Safe From School District
Condemnation

Thanks to a groundswell of public support--


consisting of vocal community members,
Township officials, members of the General
Assembly, the ​Lower Merion Conservancy​, and
many others—​Stoneleigh: A Natural Garden​ is no
longer at risk of being developed, according to
Natural Lands​ Tuesday.
This past spring, the Lower Merion School Board
announced it had targeted the 42-acre Villanova
estate as a possible site for a new middle school
and sports complex. Despite the property being protected by a conservation easement, the School
Board was prepared to seize it using eminent domain.
On November 20, the Lower Merion School District announced it had identified an
alternative location for its ballfields and would end consideration of Stoneleigh.

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The District’s threat to seize the public garden prompted Natural Lands to launch the
#SaveStoneleigh awareness campaign.
In response, nearly 40,000 people signed an online petition, 3,000 households displayed
“Save Stoneleigh” signs in their yard, and thousands sent messages of concern to the Lower
Merion School Board. Some 350 residents attended a May School Board meeting wearing
crimson Save Stoneleigh t-shirts.
“Unfortunately, saying ‘no’ to the School District wasn’t enough,” said Natural Lands
President Molly Morrison. “But the overwhelming response of the community—from Lower
Merion and far beyond— sent a clear message: taking any inch of Stoneleigh would be a
devastating loss… one that must be avoided at all costs.”
In late June, the General Assembly ​passed House Bill 2468​ by wide margins and it was
quickly signed it into law. The new law requires that entities like school districts and local
governments seek court approval before taking property by eminent domain if it is protected by a
conservation easement.
Prompted by the threat to Stoneleigh, this extraordinary legislative success was a result of
the leadership and determination of the Bill’s original sponsors: Representatives Warren Kampf,
Kate Harper, and Marcy Toepel, along with Senator Bob Mensch and a host of bipartisan
supporters.
Perhaps best known for the iconic hare sculpture located near the intersection of Spring
Mill and County Line Roads in Villanova, Stoneleigh was once the beloved home of the Haas
family.
Following the deaths of John and Chara Haas-- whose ashes are scattered on the
property-- in an extraordinary act of generosity, the estate of John Haas donated all of Stoneleigh
to Natural Lands in 2016.
After a two-year period during which Natural Lands undertook renovations to convert the
former private estate to a public garden, Stoneleigh: A Natural Garden opened to the public in
May, 2018.
Since opening its gates, Stoneleigh has welcomed thousands of visitors who’ve come to
stroll the garden paths, admire the towering trees, and take inspiration from native garden
design—all free of charge.
“At last, we can be assured that Stoneleigh will remain a place of beauty and joy for
generations to come,” said Molly Morrison. “This has been a trying few months. However, we
have been heartened by the remarkable public support for Natural Lands and Stoneleigh. It has
been a powerful reminder that our communities’ green spaces are beloved, and that there is a
large and passionate constituency ready to stand in their defense if needed.”
Click Here​ to learn more about Stoneleigh.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Natural
Lands​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from Natural Lands and ​Like them on
Facebook​. ​Click Here​ to support their activities.
NewsClips:
Lower Merion Schools No Longer Interested In Condemning Stoneleigh Property
Rutters Dairy Looks To Build On 200-Year-Old Farm As Owners Look To Preserve Home,
Barns
[Posted: Nov. 21, 2018]

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Shop Small, Shop Sustainable During This Holiday Season In Western PA

‘Tis the season for giving! This week marks


the traditional start of the holiday shopping
season, including Small Business Saturday on
November 24.
If you’re planning to make purchases this time
of year (and really any time!), ​Sustainable
Pittsburgh​ reminds you to shop small AND
sustainable.
On average, 48 percent of each purchase at a
local independent business is recirculated
locally, compared to less than 14 percent at chain stores. Local businesses often offer a more
personal and unique shopping experience and are more likely to be invested in the community.
Of the nearly 100 formally designated ​Sustainable Small Businesses​ in southwestern
Pennsylvania, 90 percent have rehabilitated an existing space or structure instead of locating in a
newly constructed building.
These same businesses are located in historic mixed-use, walkable business districts and
85 percent are active in the community by advocating for such improvements as attractive
sidewalks, trees and benches, and helping to make the area safer for pedestrians and bicyclists.
Sustainable Small Businesses commit to being responsible stewards of the environment
and community.
While you’re out and about, consider stopping at one of the more than ​125 Sustainable
Pittsburgh Restaurants​ for a bite to eat.
Designated restaurants demonstrate their commitment to sustainability with actions like
donating food, sourcing locally, providing healthy options, and reducing or recycling their waste.
More than one-third of these restaurants are building the local farming economy by
sourcing at least half of in-season produce from within a 150 mile radius, and this same
percentage is using renewable energy sources to cut down on carbon emissions.
This holiday season, help support sustainable businesses in the southwestern
Pennsylvania region!
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Sustainable
Pittsburgh​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates. ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow
them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the ​Pittsburgh Green
Story​ website.
Related Stories:
Clean Creek Pottery Showcases Reuse Of Materials Recovered From Acid Mine Drainage
Gov. Gifford Pinchot's Grey Towers Holiday Tours, Programs In Pike County
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

Clean Creek Pottery Showcases Reuse Of Materials Recovered From Acid Mine Drainage

Looking for a holiday gift that


will please the most

13
discriminating taste and help the environment? Consider pottery products from ​Clean Creek​.
Clean Creek Products​, a division of ​Stream Restoration Inc.​, a nonprofit watershed
restoration organization, was formed to market the metals recovered in treating abandoned mine
drainage. One of the uses for these metals is in ceramic pottery glazing.
Every product you purchase from Clean Creek will not only support the artists that create
them, but also helps support watershed groups doing local projects to help restore Pennsylvania's
over 19,000 miles of polluted waterways.
Click Here​ to see a video on Clean Creek pottery. ​Note:​​ Clean Creek also has raw
product-- iron and manganese-- for sale as well.
Related Stories:
Shop Small, Shop Sustainable During This Holiday Season In Western PA
Gov. Gifford Pinchot's Grey Towers Holiday Tours, Programs In Pike County
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

Gov. Gifford Pinchot's Grey Towers Holiday Tours, Programs In Pike County

Gov. Gifford Pinchot’s Grey Towers


National Historic Site​ in Milford,
Pike County will offer guided
holiday tours of all three floors of
the decorated mansion from
December 3 through 16 from 1:00 to
3:00 p.m..
The 1886 mansion, formerly the
home of Pennsylvania Gov. Gifford
Pinchot, founder and first chief of
the US Forest Service, will once again be decorated by members of the Milford Garden Club.
These special holiday tours bring visitors to all three floors of the mansion; the upper
floors usually are not open to the public for tours.
On December 15, at 11:00 a.m., there will be a free musical performance of holiday
favorites by students of the Delaware Valley School District. Additional musical programs are
being added through the month.
In addition to the guided Holiday Tours, visitors can enjoy a Holiday Photography
Exhibit featuring photographs taken by members of the Pike Imaging Council, all creatively
depicting Grey Towers, the landscape, and forests or trees.
The Grey Towers Interpretive Gift Shop is open from December 3-16 offering a 20
percent discount on most items. The shop includes unique holiday gift items provided by Eastern
National Forests Interpretive Association and the ​Grey Towers Heritage Association​.
Guided tour fees: $8 adults; $7 seniors; $5 youth; under 12 free. Reservations are
required for groups of 10 or more and are offered before Noon each day that the mansion is open
for public tours.
Grey Towers honors Interagency Passes--
-- Every Kid in a Park (EKIP) pass: entry is free for fourth-grade pass holder and three family
members.
-- Senior pass: entry is half-price for pass holder only.

14
-- Access, Annual and Military passes: entry is half-price for pass holder only.
-- Grey Towers Heritage member pass: entry is free for pass holder only
In case of inclement weather, please call 570-296-9630 or send email to:
greytowers@fs.fed.us​ for information on any changes in schedules.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​Grey
Towers Heritage Association​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for updates from the Association, ​Like them
on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​, visit their ​YouTube Channel​, become part of their
Google+ Circle​ and ​follow them on Instagram​.
Also visit the ​Grey Towers Historic Site​ website and the ​Pinchot Institute for
Conservation​ website for information on its conservation research and policy programs. ​Click
Here​ to sign up for the Institute’s regular updates.
Related Stories:
Shop Small, Shop Sustainable During This Holiday Season In Western PA
Clean Creek Pottery Showcases Reuse Of Materials Recovered From Acid Mine Drainage
[Posted: Nov. 21, 2018]

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule [Updated]/Gov’s Schedule

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

All Bills Died

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

All Committees Were Dissolved

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate​​ [​Updated​]
January 1, 28, 29, 30
February 4, 5, 6
March 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
15
House
January 1

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

Senate Democratic Policy Committee Hearing Nov. 28 In Pittsburgh On Climate Change

On November 28, the ​Senate Democratic Policy Committee​ will hold a hearing in Pittsburgh on
Addressing Climate Change In Pennsylvania By Controlling Carbon Emissions.
The hearing is being hosted by Sen. Lisa Boscola (D-Lehigh), Chair of the Committee,
and Sen. Jay Costa (D-Allegheny).
“In the absence of federal leadership on climate change, it is imperative that Pennsylvania
continue to participate in cooperative efforts to stave off the catastrophic consequences of global
warming,” Sen. Costa said. “We need to maintain efforts to keep Pennsylvania on track to
combat climate change.”
“Infrastructure investment, technology development from research to manufacturing to
sales, workforce development, educational programs and community development can all be part
of an economic boom if we build our energy portfolio with a healthy mix of alternative fuels,”
said Sen. Costa.
Sen. Boscola added, “Controlling carbon emissions and building a strong economy are
not competing interests. There are numerous ways we can slow the devastating effects of climate
change while strengthening and expanding our economy.”
The Committee is scheduled to hear comments from--
-- George Hartenstein​​, DEP Deputy Secretary for Waste, Air, Radiation & Remediation
-- Grant Irvin​​, Chief Resiliency Officer, City of Pittsburgh
-- ​Ashley Funk​​, Plaintiff, ​Our Children’s Trust
-- Dr. Deborah Gentile,​​ Pediatric Allergy Physician
-- Rachel Gleason​​, Executive Director, ​PA Coal Alliance
-- Kevin Sunday​​, Director Of Government Affairs, PA Chamber
-- Mandy Warner, ​Senior Manager For Climate & air Policy, Environmental Defense Fund
-- Tom Schuster,​​ Sierra Club
-- Marcel Minutolo​​, Robert Morris University & ​Climate Reality Project
-- Khari Mosley​​, President ​Blue Green Alliance
-- Joelle N. Salerno,​​ National Electrical Contractors Association
The hearing will be held at ​IBEW Local #5​, 5 Hot Metal Street, Suite 100 in Pittsburgh
starting at 10:00.
Sen. Lisa Boscola (D-Lehigh) serves as chair of the Committee. She can be contacted by
sending email to: ​boscola@pasenate.com​ or calling 717-787-4236. Questions should be
16
directed to Seth Rolko, Executive Director, by sending email to: ​Seth.Rolko@pasenate.com​ or
calling 717-772-3844.
NewsClips:
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
AP: Government Climate Report Warns Of Worsening U.S. Disasters
Report: Climate Change Will Inflict Substantial Damages On U.S. Lives
Climate Change: Report Warns Of Growing Impact On U.S. Life
Americans Will Pay Billions More For Climate Change, And That’s The Best Case
U.S. Report Says Climate Change Will Batter Economy, In Clash With Trump
U.S. Climate Report Warns Of Damaged Environment, Shrinking Economy
Trump Climate Report Says Damages Are Intensifying Across The Country
Climate Change Is Already Hurting U.S. Communities, Federal Report Says
Is That Haze Or Really Smoke From California Wildfires?
Map Shows Haze In Philly Came From California Wildfire Smoke
Smoke Plume From California Wildfires Reaching PA, East Coast
California Wildfires: Smoke Spreads to New York, 3,000 Miles Away
Senate Democratic Policy Committee To Address Climate Change In Pittsburgh
How Chesapeake Conservancy AI Land Maps Help Conservation Efforts Respond To Climate
Change
Auditor General DePasquale Urges National Strategy On Climate Change
Op-Ed: UN Global Warming Report Should Be Wake-Up Call For Gov. Wolf
Kummer: Trump Administration To Release Big Climate Report On Black Friday
Climate-Heating Greenhouse Gases At Record Levels, Says UN
Related Stories:
Auditor General DePasquale Urges National Strategy On Climate Change
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

Auditor General DePasquale Urges National Strategy On Climate Change

On November 21, ​Auditor General Eugene DePasquale​ issued the


following statement calling for a national strategy on climate change
after smoke from California’s wildfires overspread the nation.
“When smoke and haze from California begin to impact air
quality in Pennsylvania and nationwide, it should set off an alarm for
policymakers at the federal level. No reasonable person can pretend
that climate change is not having a serious impact on our
environment.
“The fact that some people in Washington treat the existence
of climate change as a partisan issue is really beyond comprehension.
The obvious impacts are all around us and will only continue to get
worse unless we take strategic action on climate change, and do it
now.

17
“When people trying to protect the status quo blame wildfires on unraked forests or make
similarly outlandish excuses for inaction, it’s obvious they’re not taking the problem seriously.
Instead of trying to create a distraction, our national leaders owe us some actual leadership on
climate change.”
NewsClips:
Is That Haze Or Really Smoke From California Wildfires?
Map Shows Haze In Philly Came From California Wildfire Smoke
Smoke Plume From California Wildfires Reaching PA, East Coast
California Wildfires: Smoke Spreads to New York, 3,000 Miles Away
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
AP: Government Climate Report Warns Of Worsening U.S. Disasters
Report: Climate Change Will Inflict Substantial Damages On U.S. Lives
Climate Change: Report Warns Of Growing Impact On U.S. Life
Americans Will Pay Billions More For Climate Change, And That’s The Best Case
U.S. Report Says Climate Change Will Batter Economy, In Clash With Trump
U.S. Climate Report Warns Of Damaged Environment, Shrinking Economy
Trump Climate Report Says Damages Are Intensifying Across The Country
Climate Change Is Already Hurting U.S. Communities, Federal Report Says
Senate Democratic Policy Committee To Address Climate Change In Pittsburgh
How Chesapeake Conservancy AI Land Maps Help Conservation Efforts Respond To Climate
Change
Auditor General DePasquale Urges National Strategy On Climate Change
Op-Ed: UN Global Warming Report Should Be Wake-Up Call For Gov. Wolf
Kummer: Trump Administration To Release Big Climate Report On Black Friday
Climate-Heating Greenhouse Gases At Record Levels, Says UN
Related Story:
Auditor General DePasquale Joins Effort To Stay In Paris Climate Accord
Related Stories This Week:
Senate Democratic Policy Committee Hearing Nov. 28 In Pittsburgh On Climate Change
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
[Posted: Nov. 22, 2018]

The Feds

4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action

The federal Global Change


Research Act of 1990 mandates
that the U.S. Global Change
Research Program deliver a report
to Congress and the President no
less than every four years.
18
The report is required to “1) integrates, evaluates, and interprets the findings of the
Program…; 2) analyzes the effects of global change on the natural environment, agriculture,
energy production and use, land and water resources, transportation, human health and welfare,
human social systems, and biological diversity; and 3) analyzes current trends in global change,
both human-induced and natural, and projects major trends for the subsequent 25 to 100 years.”
The Fourth National Climate Assessment released November 23 fulfills that mandate in
two volumes-- ​Volume I is the Climate Science Special Report​ and ​Volume II focuses on the
human welfare​, societal, and environmental elements of climate change and variability for 10
regions and 18 national topics, with particular attention paid to observed and projected risks,
impacts, consideration of risk reduction, and implications under different mitigation pathways.
Where possible, NCA4 Volume II provides examples of actions underway in
communities across the United States to reduce the risks associated with climate change, increase
resilience, and improve livelihoods.
This assessment was written to help inform decision-makers, utility and natural resource
managers, public health officials, emergency planners, and other stakeholders by providing a
thorough examination of the effects of climate change on the United States.
The Assessment also localizes its findings to regions of the United States, including the
Northeast​.
Click Here​ to read both volumes of the 4th National Climate Assessment.
Overview
"Earth’s climate is now changing faster than at any point in the history of modern
civilization, primarily as a result of human activities.
"The impacts of global climate change are already being felt in the United States and are
projected to intensify in the future—but the severity of future impacts will depend largely on
actions taken to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to the changes that will occur.
"Climate-related risks will continue to grow without additional action. Decisions made
today determine risk exposure for current and future generations and will either broaden or limit
options to reduce the negative consequences of climate change.
"While Americans are responding in ways that can bolster resilience and improve
livelihoods, neither global efforts to mitigate the causes of climate change nor regional efforts to
adapt to the impacts currently approach the scales needed to avoid substantial damages to the
U.S. economy, environment, and human health and well-being over the coming decades.
"Observations from around the world show the widespread effects of increasing
greenhouse gas concentrations on Earth’s climate.
Flooding/Wildfires
"High temperature extremes and heavy precipitation events are increasing. Glaciers and
snow cover are shrinking, and sea ice is retreating. Seas are warming, rising, and becoming more
acidic, and marine species are moving to new locations toward cooler waters.
"Flooding is becoming more frequent along the U.S. coastline. Growing seasons are
lengthening, and wildfires are increasing.
"Without more significant global greenhouse gas mitigation and regional adaptation
efforts, climate change is expected to cause substantial losses to infrastructure and property and
impede the rate of economic growth over this century.
Economic Impacts
"Some aspects of our economy may see slight improvements in a modestly warmer

19
world. However, the continued warming that is projected to occur without significant reductions
in global greenhouse gas emissions is expected to cause substantial net damage to the U.S.
economy, especially in the absence of increased adaptation efforts.
"The potential for losses in some sectors could reach hundreds of billions of dollars per
year by the end of this century.
Ecosystem Impacts
"Climate change has already had observable impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems
throughout the United States that are expected to continue. Many species are shifting their
ranges, and changes in the timing of important biological events (such as migration and
reproduction) are occurring in response to climate change.
Air Quality Worsens
"Changes in temperature and precipitation can increase air quality risks from wildfire and
ground-level ozone (smog). Projected increases in wildfire activity due to climate change would
further degrade air quality, resulting in increased health risks and impacts on quality of life.
"Climate change is projected to significantly affect human health, the economy, and the
environment in the United States, particularly in futures with high greenhouse gas emissions and
limited or no adaptation.
“Recent findings reinforce the fact that without substantial and sustained reductions in
greenhouse gas emissions and regional adaptation efforts, there will be substantial and
far-reaching changes over the course of the 21st century with negative consequences for a large
majority of sectors, particularly towards the end of the century.
Mitigation
“Many activities within the public and private sectors aim for or have the effect of
reducing greenhouse gas emissions, such as the increasing use of natural gas in place of coal or
the expansion of wind and solar energy to generate electricity.
“State, local, and tribal government approaches to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions
include comprehensive emissions reduction strategies as well as sector- and technology-specific
policies
“Market forces and technological change, particularly within the electric power sector,
have contributed to a decline in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over the past decade.
“In 2016, U.S. emissions were at their lowest levels since 1994. Power sector emissions
were 25 percent below 2005 levels in 2016, the largest emissions reduction for a sector of the
American economy over this time.
“This decline was in large part due to increases in natural gas and renewable energy
generation, as well as enhanced energy efficiency standards and programs.
“Recent studies suggest that some of the indirect effects of mitigation actions could
significantly reduce—or possibly even completely offset—the potential costs associated with
cutting greenhouse gas emissions.
“Beyond reduction of climate pollutants, there are many benefits, often immediate,
associated with greenhouse gas emissions reductions, such as improving air quality and public
health, reducing crop damages from ozone, and increasing energy independence and security
through increased reliance on domestic sources of energy.”
Northeast U.S.
Some key findings in the ​Assessment about the Northeast​, which includes Pennsylvania--
-- Primary Observation:​​ “The seasonality of the Northeast is central to the region’s sense of

20
place and is an important driver of rural economies. Less distinct seasons with milder winter and
earlier spring conditions are already altering ecosystems and environments in ways that
adversely impact tourism, farming, and forestry. The region’s rural industries and livelihoods are
at risk from further changes to forests, wildlife, snowpack, and streamflow.”
-- ​Extreme, Recurring Precipitation Events: “​​The recent dominant trend in precipitation
throughout the Northeast has been towards increases in rainfall intensity, with increases in
intensity exceeding those in other regions of the contiguous United States.​ ​Urban areas are at risk
for large numbers of evacuated and displaced populations and damaged infrastructure due to
both extreme precipitation events and recurrent flooding, potentially requiring significant
emergency response efforts and consideration of a long-term commitment to rebuilding and
adaptation, and/or support for relocation where needed.”
-- Exacerbate Aging Infrastructure Problems:​​ “Much of the infrastructure in the Northeast,
including drainage and sewer systems, flood and storm protection assets, transportation systems,
and power supply, is nearing the end of its planned life expectancy. Climate-related disruptions
will only exacerbate existing issues with aging infrastructure.”
-- ​Health:​​ “Changing climate threatens the health and well-being of people in the Northeast
through more extreme weather, warmer temperatures, degradation of air and water quality, and
sea level rise. These environmental changes are expected to lead to health-related impacts and
costs, including additional deaths, emergency room visits and hospitalizations, and a lower
quality of life. Health impacts are expected to vary by location, age, current health, and other
characteristics of individuals and communities.”
Click Here​ to read the Chapter on the Northeast.
Click Here​ to read both volumes of the 4th National Climate Assessment.
(​Photos:​ Bloomsburg, Columbia County 2011, Lancaster County flooding 2018.)
NewsClips:
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
AP: Government Climate Report Warns Of Worsening U.S. Disasters
Report: Climate Change Will Inflict Substantial Damages On U.S. Lives
Climate Change: Report Warns Of Growing Impact On U.S. Life
Americans Will Pay Billions More For Climate Change, And That’s The Best Case
U.S. Report Says Climate Change Will Batter Economy, In Clash With Trump
U.S. Climate Report Warns Of Damaged Environment, Shrinking Economy
Trump Climate Report Says Damages Are Intensifying Across The Country
Climate Change Is Already Hurting U.S. Communities, Federal Report Says
Is That Haze Or Really Smoke From California Wildfires?
Map Shows Haze In Philly Came From California Wildfire Smoke
Smoke Plume From California Wildfires Reaching PA, East Coast
California Wildfires: Smoke Spreads to New York, 3,000 Miles Away
Senate Democratic Policy Committee To Address Climate Change In Pittsburgh
How Chesapeake Conservancy AI Land Maps Help Conservation Efforts Respond To Climate
Change
Auditor General DePasquale Urges National Strategy On Climate Change
Op-Ed: UN Global Warming Report Should Be Wake-Up Call For Gov. Wolf
Kummer: Trump Administration To Release Big Climate Report On Black Friday

21
Climate-Heating Greenhouse Gases At Record Levels, Says UN
Related Stories:
Auditor General DePasquale Urges National Strategy On Climate Change
Senate Democratic Policy Committee Hearing Nov. 28 In Pittsburgh On Climate Change
[Posted: Nov. 23, 2018]

PA Environmental Council: Save The Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund

With Congress returning for a lame-duck session,


one of the most important environmental issues on
their agenda is reauthorization of the federal Land
and Water Conservation Fund.
If you care about public lands, outdoor recreation,
community parks, protecting natural lands, clean
water, and preserving heritage areas, you need to
know about the importance of the Land and Water
Conservation Fund.
And, more importantly, you need to let your
representatives in Congress know now that you want to see it reauthorized and fully funded.
Created by Congress in 1964, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was a
bipartisan commitment to safeguard natural areas, water resources and cultural heritage, and to
provide recreation opportunities to all Americans.
To date LWCF has provided more than $309 million in funding support to Pennsylvania,
from well-known places like the Flight 93 National Memorial and Appalachian Trail, to local
projects like public park development and improvement in counties and municipalities across
Pennsylvania.
Click Here to take action​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​, follow ​PEC on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on
Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts. ​Click Here​ to receive regular
updates from PEC.
(​Photo:​ PA projects funded by the federal Land & Water Conservation Fund.)
Related Stories:
Gov. Wolf Urges Congress To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund
Op-Ed: Congress Needs To Permanently Reauthorize Land & Water Conservation Fund
Op-Ed: Time Is Running Out For The Federal Land And Water Conservation Fund
[Posted: Nov. 23, 2018]

News From Around The State

Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership Names Brenda Sieglitz New Manager

The ​Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership​ has named Brenda


Sieglitz as its first manager effective November 26.
As the Manager, Sieglitz will help ensure the success of
22
the Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership by synchronizing creative strategies to serve and
diversify the partners, funders, agencies, and other priority audiences.
Working closely with the Making History Campaign team, she’ll also serve as the key
internal point person to ensure the Partnership activities are effectively coordinated and
communicated.
For over a decade, Brenda has worked in the private sector where she has focused on
project management, business development initiatives, sales, and marketing.
During this time, she created and led multiple marketing and events centered on
public-private partnerships, including leading the development and launch for a biodegradable
food service disposables line in the Mid-Atlantic region.
Brenda has lent her expertise to numerous organizations; she’s the current president of
the board for the ​Susquehanna Valley Chamber​ and co-chair of ​Lancaster County Conservancy’s
Riverlands Trail Festival.
And she’s held leadership and mentor roles with organizations such as the Lancaster
County Chamber, Team Sarcoma Keepin’ it Kevin, and the National Parks Service to name a
few.
She’s also a certified ​Pennsylvania Master Naturalist​.
She’s been honored with 1st place in the 2014 North American Book Awards “Editor’s
Choice Nonfiction” category, the Yahoo! Contribution Network 2009 “Content of the Year”
award, and the Ruhland-Gilner Memorial Conestoga Township Good Citizen Award.
For more information on this important program, visit the ​Keystone 10 Million Trees
Partnership​ website. Sieglitz can be contacted through the ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA
Office in Harrisburg at 717-234-5550.
NewsClips:
Helping The Environment One Tree At A Time In Pittsburgh
Jenkintown Creek Restoration Project Comes To Cheltenham In SE PA
Refining Streambank Erosion Rates, Restoration Credits In York County
Penn State Creates Model Golf Course Nutrient Management Plan For Chesapeake Bay
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Takes No Action On Stormwater
Recommendations
Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21
Feature: Motivations Matter In Sustainable Agriculture Decisions
Western PA Conservancy Now Accepting Dominion Energy Watershed Mini Grants
Applications
PA Highlands Coalition Webinar Dec. 10: What Is Nature Worth? Return On Environmental
Studies, Economic Value Of The Outdoors
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

PA Highlands Coalition Webinar Dec. 10: What Is Nature Worth? Return On


Environmental Studies, Economic Value Of The Outdoors

The ​PA Highlands Coalition​ will host a December 10 webinar on ​What Is


Nature Worth? Return On Environmental Studies And The Economic
Value Of The Outdoors​ from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m.

23
How do we ensure that the value of nature is included in local planning decisions? Open
space and natural resources support the municipal budget and contribute to the local economy,
but these benefits are often overlooked when negotiating with landowners, policymakers, and the
public.
Join John Rogers, President of​ Keystone Conservation Trust​, and Jeanne Barrett Ortiz,
Program Manager at ​Audubon PA​ to discuss their groundbreaking Return on Environment
studies in the PA Highlands region.
This webinar will discuss the findings of the studies, as well as the ways in which this
data can be incorporated into decision-making and marketing strategies.
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about
joining the webinar.
Click Here​ to register or for more information. Questions should be directed to Margaret
Wilson, Mid-Atlantic Conservation Policy Manager, Appalachian Mountain Club, by calling
610-868-6903 or send email to: ​mwilson@outdoors.org​.
For more information on Highlands programs and initiatives, visit the ​PA Highlands
Coalition​ website.
Green Infrastructure Links:
The Economic Value Of Green Infrastructure: Calculating A Return On Investments In Parks,
Watershed Restoration, Farmland BMPs, Open Spaces
LancasterOnline: Lancaster Farmland Provides $676M In Annual Environmental Benefits
Estimated $939.2 Million Return On Investment In Protecting, Restoring Dauphin County’s
Natural Resources
Carbon County Has $800 Million Return On Investment From Natural Resources
Green Infrastructure Offers Triple Benefits, Cost Effective Solutions To Stormwater Pollution,
Reducing Flood Damage
Study: Riparian Buffers Provide Over $10,000/Year/Acre In Benefits - Reducing Erosion,
Flooding, Increased Water Purification, Habitat, Property Values, More
Meeting The Challenge Of Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Renew The State's Commitment To Keeping Pennsylvania Clean, Green And Growing
Economic Impact Of Natural Resource Conservation In Somerset County
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Takes No Action On Stormwater
Recommendations
Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21
Feature: Motivations Matter In Sustainable Agriculture Decisions
Western PA Conservancy Now Accepting Dominion Energy Watershed Mini Grants
Applications
Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership Names Brenda Sieglitz New Manager
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

Schuylkill Action Network 2018 Progress Report, 15th Anniversary Progress Report

The ​Schuylkill Action Network​ recently released


two important reports documenting progress in
meeting its water quality improvement goals--

24
-- ​2018 Annual Progress Report​ summarizes the initiatives and accomplishments of the Network
and all its partners during the last year; and
-- ​15th Anniversary Progress Report​ provides an overview of accomplishments over the last 15
years.
Among the accomplishments over the last 15 years are--
-- $14 million invested in Abandoned Mine Drainage Treatment Projects;
-- $9 million invested in nonpoint source pollution cleanups through the Schuylkill River
Restoration Fund;
-- 17.5 percent of the watershed permanently protected; and
-- 784,035 pounds of trash removed from the Schuylkill and tributaries in the Schuylkill Scrub.
The Schuylkill Action Network is a collaborative network of over 100 partners working
together to improve water resources in the Schuylkill River watershed. With "action" as SAN’s
middle name, SAN partners have been working since 2003 to implement best practices across
the Schuylkill River Watershed.
For more information on programs, initiatives, upcoming events and how you can get
involved, visit the ​Schuylkill Action Network​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates.
Like them ​on Facebook​. Follow them ​on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
Related Story:
Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21
[Posted: Nov 19, 2018]

Feature: Motivations Matter In Sustainable Agriculture Decisions

By: Shelly Dehoff, National Wildlife Federation’s ​Cover Crop Champions Program

Farming is a challenging profession. Each year there is


an ever-growing list of unknowns and risks.
“100 year” weather events are happening more
often than ever before, weed pressure is mounting and
soil is running off of fields and into the streets.
So what can farmers do?
Farmers who intentionally manage their natural
resources are able to pass the farm to the next generation
in better condition than before. Many are turning to
sustainable agriculture such as cover crops, no till and
rotational grazing to protect their farms from
ever-changing conditions.
To be prepared for the future means fortifying their soils now.
Dairy farmer, Andy Bollinger, was tired of driving around after a hard rain and watching
the water run off the fields due to compaction. Top soil is one of the most precious resources for
a farmer. Andy’s family is a firm believer in the problem solving ability of cover crops.
“We are big believers in the organic matter that is built into the soil. I want to know we
are caring for our soil the best we can,” Andy said. After years of reducing tillage and building
organic matter through cover crops such as tillage radishes, Andy notes, “After a hard rain, if I
can drive around and see no water running off the fields, or if there is water running off, but it’s

25
clean and clear, that’s a measure of success.”
According to research results summarized by Penn State Extension, each 1 percent
increase in organic matter in the soil due to no-tilling, adds approximately 19,000 gallons of
water holding capacity per acre (to a depth of over 6 inches).
That is significant, especially in drought situations. It also adds 1,100 lbs of nitrogen and
110 lbs of phosphorus and potassium, requiring less fertilizer.
The increase of 1 percent takes multiple years to achieve, but cover crop residue and the
addition of manure are essential to that increased amount.
Andy chooses cover crops and reduced tillage for his sustainable practices. Patrick and
Elisa Fleming use cover crops and no-till as well. But, their focus and passion is also on raising
their cow/calf beef herd using an intensive rotational grazing system.
Elisa and Patrick felt living life at a frenetic pace while dairy farming and running a Bed
& Breakfast should be simplified for overall health of the family and the business. They
transitioned to an intensive rotational grazing and a cow/calf beef herd of 75 animals.
Patrick explained, “The relative simplicity of the grazing model drew us to it. We are
essentially orchestrating the behavior of the animals….they graze their own food, they spread
their own manure. I like doing little things to see the animals are satisfied and healthy, and in
accord with their own nature. Rotational grazing fits well with animal health.”
Elisa added, “The animals are healthier. We don’t call the veterinarian like we used to.
They soil health is improved, and the overall health of the farming business is good. The sanity
and health of us, the farmers, is better too.”
Andy Bollinger was motivated to switch to less tillage and more cover crops because he
enjoys “…the challenge of producing good crops. I find it rewarding to reap the harvest, work
with nature, and see the life cycles come and go. But, ideally, it is to care for our soil. We want
to build the organic matter on top.”
Andy would love to know that a 4th generation can come back to the farm, because he
and his family took care of the soil, the basis of everything.
The Flemings utilize cover crops and no-till on their farm as well. They encourage
anyone who is transitioning to new management styles to, “…be patient, and stay focused on
why you want the farm to be better for future generations.”
Regarding their own operation, Patrick and Elisa noted, “Sometimes we need to remind
ourselves that in a few short years, we went from a dairy herd which was fed 90 percent corn
silage and used a modified grazing system on 5 acres of pasture, to an almost 100 percent
grass/hay cow-calf operation using intensive rotational grazing on 25 acres. We are now a total
beef operation and have grown our beef sales through all direct marketing (selling 15 steers
annually). And our lives are less busy, less frenetic, and more balanced.”
Are you considering changes for sustainable practices that protect your soil and water
resources?
Whether you would like to know more about cover crops and no-tilling, or need guidance
transitioning to a grass-based operation, contact your ​County Conservation District​ or your local
USDA ​Natural Resources Conservation Service​ offices.
Both agencies offer technical assistance for agronomic questions, pasture advice or
design assistance.
Conservation Districts and the NRCS can inform you if cost-share options are available,
and will make sure you know how to get the help you desire.

26
(​Photo:​ ​Verdant View Bed & Breakfast​, Paradise, Lancaster County.)

Shelly Dehoff​ is a ​PA Agricultural Ombudsman​. This article is presented on behalf of National
Wildlife Federation’s ​Cover Crop Champions Program​. She can be contacted by calling
717-880-0848 or by sending email to: ​shelly.dehoff@gmail.com​ or to:
shellydehoff@lancasterconservation.org​.
NewsClips:
Rutters Dairy Looks To Build On 200-Year-Old Farm As Owners Look To Preserve Home,
Barns
Time Running Out For Congress To Pass Federal Farm Bill
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Takes No Action On Stormwater
Recommendations
Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21
Western PA Conservancy Now Accepting Dominion Energy Watershed Mini Grants
Applications
PA Highlands Coalition Webinar Dec. 10: What Is Nature Worth? Return On Environmental
Studies, Economic Value Of The Outdoors
Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership Names Brenda Sieglitz New Manager
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

Stroud, PECO, Kennett Schools Bring STEM To Students In Chester County

Thanks to the support of ​PECO​, ​Stroud Water Research


Center​ in Chester County was able to share science and
STEM education to students participating in ​Kennett
Consolidated School District’s​ After-The-Bell program.
After-The-Bell is an after-school program that provides
middle school students throughout KCSD with safe,
structured, meaningful, and fun activities that promote
learning and growth at no cost to the parents.
“At PECO, we power programs and initiatives that are
helping our youth achieve a well-rounded education and
that provide a broad spectrum of opportunity,” said Mike Innocenzo, PECO President and CEO.
“We are proud to join Stroud and the Kennett Consolidated School District to provide this
important environmental educational experience for local students.”
Throughout the six sessions, the students experienced some of the ways that the Stroud
Center’s scientists study our streams and rivers.
With boots in the stream, students collected macroinvertebrates and then took them back
to the classroom to identify them and learn how they tell the story of stream health, just as the
Stroud Center’s entomologists use macroinvertebrate populations to determine stream health.
One lesson focused on the ecosystem surrounding White Clay Creek-- from riparian
buffers to best management practices, students learned how land use affects the health of a
stream.
Students also had the opportunity to watch electrofishing and learn how the Stroud

27
Center’s scientists study fish populations and why that is another important piece of the stream
health puzzle.
Chemistry, ecology, and biology aside, this wonderful partnership gave some students,
who wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity, the chance to explore their natural surroundings,
discover cool caterpillars, and learn about watersheds.
PECO’s commitment to STEM education is an essential part of helping the Stroud Center
to share their science with more students throughout the region.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Stroud Water
Research Center​ website, ​Click Here​ to subscribe to UpStream. ​Click Here​ to subscribe to
Stroud’s Educator newsletter. ​Click Here​ to become a Friend Of Stroud Research, ​Like them on
Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, include them in your ​Circle on Google+​ and visit their ​YouTube
Channel​.
NewsClips:
Audubon PA Works In Central PA On Watershed Education
Mount Carmel School District Sued Over Chemistry Class Accident
Related Stories​​:
DEP Blog: Students Explore Coal Heritage, Watershed Restoration Possibilities In
Northumberland County
PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals Accepting Applications For College Scholarships
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

DEP Blog: Students Explore Coal Heritage, Watershed Restoration Possibilities In


Northumberland County

By: Megan Lehman, ​DEP Northcentral Regional Office

Like hundreds of towns across Pennsylvania,


Kulpmont, a borough in Northumberland
County, was built around an industry that
provided a livelihood for generations of
families, but also left behind a troubling
environmental legacy as that industry receded.
This October, local students dove into
their past and took action to help build a
healthier future for their community through a
day-long field trip focused on coal mining
heritage and water quality.
“We show students their past, how this
city grew with the coal industry, the environmental debts that were left behind, what a healthy
perennial stream looks like, and what we can do to fix an impacted stream now,” said Chantel
Shambach, Watershed Specialist with ​Northumberland County Conservation District​, who
served as the event’s primary organizer.
The annual Coal Mining History and Water Quality Field Trip began in 2016 with
support from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection’s ​Environmental
Education Grant Program​, and is made possible by the Shamokin Creek Restoration Alliance

28
(SCRA) and other local business and nonprofit partners that work together to provide the
necessary resources and funding.
The watershed group sees the annual event as a prime opportunity to teach the next
generation about its goal of returning the local creeks to a healthy state and sustain native fish
and aquatic life.
The day’s schedule rotated small groups of students through stations in multiple locations
in the community, creating a fast-paced and immersive experience. Volunteers from the diverse
sponsoring organizations provided educational lessons and demonstrations at each stop.
The tour began in Kulpmont, where participants viewed a historic mural of the ​Scott
Colliery​, around which much of the once-company town was built, and learned about coal
history from SCRA volunteers; observed the site of Quaker Run, in whose channel ​coal was first
discovered in 1790​ before it was redirected and heavily impacted by the coal industry; and
walked through Veterans’ Memorial Sports Complex, built on the former colliery site after an
extensive land restoration process.
A 20-ton monument known locally as “Stonehenge” now stands at the complex to mark
the discovery of coal.
“This is a wonderful area to convey to students an idea of how the environment was
changed so drastically, how that stream was once a perennial stream and now is no longer
running unless there is a large rain event, and learn why other waterways in their area are orange
from acid mine drainage,” said Shambach.
A short bus ride to ​Weiser State Forest​ took students into a natural learning lab, with
stations demonstrating macroinvertebrate sampling and identification, forested riparian buffers,
healthy stream channels, and watershed management.
Students could instantly visually compare the natural, wooded stream at the state park
with the severely degraded Quaker Run.
The day ended with students returning to Veterans’ Memorial Sports Complex to put all
they learned into action and get their hands dirty by planting 60 trees and shrubs along Quaker
Run to help accelerate its recovery.
“It felt really good to see how much fun the students had and how they soaked up the
chance to help with environmental stewardship,” said Shambach. “We reach out to our youth
because they’re our future. We hope that when they go home at the end of the day, they’ll
continue the environmental stewardship and educate others.”
A total of 80 middle- and high-school students from Mount Carmel and Our Lady of
Lourdes Regional Catholic School participated in the October 2018 field trip. The Conservation
District and SCRA hope to include additional schools in the future.
They also plan to seek potential locations for future riparian buffer plantings, because the
Quaker Run site is nearly full, thanks to the outstanding survival rate of past years’ plantings.
“My favorite part this year was seeing the growth of the trees planted in previous years,”
said Jennifer Biddinger, a biology teacher and Envirothon Team coach at Mount Carmel Area
High School, who has brought students to the event all three years. “The field trip is so well
organized. It gives the students a chance to learn about their hometown history and experience a
field study that reinforces the environmental and biological learning standards aligned with
riparian stream buffers and reclamation. Also, on top of that, they can feel like they made a
difference to their environment.”
“This program shows how community partnerships can educate the Commonwealth’s

29
future environmental leaders about land use in their own community and how it impacts the
water quality of local streams and rivers,” said Bert Myers, DEP’s Director of Environmental
Education. “Perhaps the most admirable aspect of this field trip was the action students took by
planting trees and shrubs along the stream to improve its riparian buffer.”
Jaci Kerstetter, Conservation District Field Representative for DEP’s Northcentral
Regional Office, emphasized the value of community connections in environmental stewardship
and education. “The continued efforts of local groups planning this event for several years
running shows this town’s support for upcoming conservation leaders with real knowledge in
outdoor experiences,” said Kerstetter.
The ​2019 Environmental Education Grant round​ recently opened​, with applications
accepted through January 11, 2019.
The intent of the Pennsylvania Environmental Education Act, which created the grant
program, is to promote environmental education principles that encourage the public to promote
a healthy environment, foster an understanding of the natural world, and promote an
understanding of the necessity for environmental protection and sound resource management.
The following organizations provided support for the 2018 Coal Mining History and
Water Quality Field Trip: ​BB&T Bank​; ​Borough of Kulpmont​; ​Church of the Holy Angels​;
Kulpmont Knights of Columbus; ​Kulpmont Sportsmen Association​; Landscape Services Inc.;
Northumberland County Conservation District​; Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources/​Weiser State Forest​; Pioneer Construction Company; ​Sciccitano’s Buono Pizza​;
Shamokin Creek Restoration Alliance​; and ​Williams Atlantic Sunrise Community Grant
Program​.
For more information on environmental education, visit DEP’s ​Teaching Green​ webpage
and sign up for the Teaching Green newsletter.

Megan Lehman​ is Community Relations Coordinator at ​DEP’s Northcentral Regional Office​ in


Williamsport and can be contacted by sending email to: ​meglehman@pa.gov​.

(Reprinted from ​DEP’s Blog​.)


NewsClips:
Audubon PA Works In Central PA On Watershed Education
Mount Carmel School District Sued Over Chemistry Class Accident
Related Stories:
Stroud, PECO, Kennett Schools Bring STEM To Students In Chester County
PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals Accepting Applications For College Scholarships
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals Accepting Applications For College Scholarships

On November 19, the ​PA Association of


Environmental Professionals​ announced they are
now accepting applications for ​two $1,000 college
scholarships​. The deadline for applications is
February 4.
PAEP will award a $1,000 scholarship in

30
honor of ​Gifford Pinchot​ to college freshman or sophomores and a$1,000 college scholarship in
honor of ​Maurice Goddard​ for college juniors and seniors to students pursuing degrees in
environmental science or related field.
Both scholarships additionally include free attendance and stay at the ​2019 PAEP Annual
Conference​ at the Wyndham Garden Hotel in State College on May 8-10.
Prospective applicants please keep in mind that dependents of PAEP members and
student PAEP members receive bonus points in their application evaluation.
Click Here​ for applications and all the details. Questions should be directed to PAEP
Student and Scholarship Co-Chairs, Kristin Aiosa by sending email to: ​kalosa@jmt.com​ and
Mike Kenawell by sending email to: ​mkenawell@jmt.com​.
NewsClips:
Audubon PA Works In Central PA On Watershed Education
Mount Carmel School District Sued Over Chemistry Class Accident
Related Stories:
Stroud, PECO, Kennett Schools Bring STEM To Students In Chester County
DEP Blog: Students Explore Coal Heritage, Watershed Restoration Possibilities In
Northumberland County
[Posted: Nov. 19, 2018]

PA American Water Urges Customers To Prepare Now For Cold Weather To Avoid
Frozen Pipes

With forecasted below-freezing temperatures


coming soon, ​PA American Water​ Tuesday
urged homeowners to act now to prevent frozen
and damaged household pipes.
“Although Pennsylvania winters are difficult to
predict, we can be sure that cold weather is
coming and we need to prepare our homes and
protect areas susceptible to freezing,” said
Pennsylvania American Water Vice President of
Operations Jimmy Sheridan. “Preparing now
can save the aggravation and cost of dealing with frozen pipes and the damage they might
cause.”
Property owners are responsible for maintenance of the water service line from the curb
to the house, as well as any in-home piping. PA American Water encourages residents to take the
following precautions to reduce the risk of freezing and bursting pipes:
To prepare now:
-- Familiarize yourself with areas of your home most susceptible to freezing, such as basements,
crawl spaces, unheated rooms and outside walls.
-- Eliminate sources of cold air near water lines by repairing broken windows, insulating walls,
closing off crawl spaces and eliminating drafts near doors.
-- Locate your main water shut-off valve. If a pipe freezes or bursts, shut the water off
immediately.
-- Protect your pipes and water meter. Wrap exposed pipes with insulation or use electrical heat

31
tracing wire; newspaper or fabric might also work. For outside meters, keep the lid to the meter
pit closed tightly and let any snow that falls cover it. Snow acts as insulation, so don't disturb it.
When temperatures are consistently at or below freezing:
-- If you have pipes that are vulnerable to freezing, allow a small trickle of water to run overnight
to keep pipes from freezing. The cost of the extra water is low compared to the cost to repair a
broken pipe.
-- Open cabinet doors to expose pipes to warmer room temperatures to help keep them from
freezing.
If your pipes freeze:
-- Shut off the water immediately. Don't attempt to thaw frozen pipes unless the water is shut off.
-- Freezing can often cause unseen cracks in pipes or joints.
-- Apply heat to the frozen pipe by warming the air around it, or by applying heat directly to a
pipe. You can use a hair dryer, space heater or hot water. Be sure not to leave space heaters
unattended.
-- Do not use kerosene heaters or open flames to thaw pipes inside your home.
-- Once the pipes have thawed, turn the water back on slowly and check for cracks and leaks.
PA American Water​ also advises that sub-freezing temperatures can hasten aging water
mains to break and cause unsafe driving conditions.
In PA American Water service territories, if you see a leak, or your water service is
disrupted, please contact the company’s customer service center at 1-800-565-7292.
For more helpful tips, visit the ​PA American Water​ website and check out the ​Thawing
Frozen Pipes​ video.
NewsClips:
Cusick: State To Hold Meeting Nov.30 On PFAS Contamination
PA Health Officials To Release Blood Test Results On PFAS Contamination In Bucks,
Montgomery
Altoona Water Authority Plans Rate Overhaul
South Philly Street Collapses After Water Main Break
Millvale Water Main Break Floods Homes, Businesses
PA American Water Offers Tips To Prevent Frozen Pipes
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

DEP Holds Dec. 28 Hearing [If Needed] On Lebanon County Fine Particulate Standard
Plan

The Department of Environmental Protection is proposing to redesignate the Lebanon County


Nonattainment Area as being in compliance with the federal fine particulate air pollution
standard with the implementation of a 10 year maintenance plan. ​(f​ ormal notice)​
A hearing will be held on the proposal December 28 at the DEP Southcentral Regional
Office, 909 Elmerton Avenue in Harrisburg starting at 1:00.
Persons wishing to present testimony should contact Amanda Rodriguez by calling
717-787-9702 or sending email to: ​amarodrigu@pa.gov​ to reserve a time. The hearing will be
canceled if no person has requested to testify at the hearing by Noon on December 26.
Read the entire ​notice in the November 24 PA Bulletin​ for more information.
NewsClips:

32
Is That Haze Or Really Smoke From California Wildfires?
Map Shows Haze In Philly Came From California Wildfire Smoke
Smoke Plume From California Wildfires Reaching PA, East Coast
California Wildfires: Smoke Spreads to New York, 3,000 Miles Away
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
AP: Government Climate Report Warns Of Worsening U.S. Disasters
Report: Climate Change Will Inflict Substantial Damages On U.S. Lives
Climate Change: Report Warns Of Growing Impact On U.S. Life
Americans Will Pay Billions More For Climate Change, And That’s The Best Case
U.S. Report Says Climate Change Will Batter Economy, In Clash With Trump
U.S. Climate Report Warns Of Damaged Environment, Shrinking Economy
Trump Climate Report Says Damages Are Intensifying Across The Country
Climate Change Is Already Hurting U.S. Communities, Federal Report Says
[Posted: Nov. 22, 2018]

PUC Announces PA One Call Enforcement Actions For Hitting Pipelines, Utilities During
Construction

On November 16, the Public Utility Commission filed


disciplinary action against 68 facility owners, excavators
and project owners during the first meeting of the ​PA One
Call Damage Prevention Committee​ in Harrisburg.
Click Here​ for a list of actions taken. Among the actions
taken was--
-- Brubacher Excavating fined $500 for hitting Mariner East
2 Pipeline after it was mis-marked by Sunoco as being
deeper than it was in Delaware County in May.
The creation of the committee was authorized by ​Act 50 of 2017,​ which enhances
Pennsylvania’s Underground Utility Line Protection Act – also known as the “One Call Law.”
Each year contractors and property owners strike pipelines and underground utilities
more than 6,000 times, half of which involve natural gas pipelines. ​PA One Call​ and Act 50 are
designed to prevent those accidents.
Modeled after successful programs in other states, the focus of the committee is a
reduction in the number of “hits” on underground utilities.
The DPC will meet regularly to review alleged violations of the Act and make
determinations as to the appropriate response including, but not limited to, the issuance of
warning letters or administrative penalties.
Each month, the committee will hold a public meeting in Hearing Room 1 of the
Commonwealth Keystone Building, Harrisburg. The next meeting is scheduled for December 11.
Each meeting ​will be livestreamed online​.
For more information on the program, visit the PUC’s ​PA One Call Enforcement
webpage. Visit the ​PA One Call​ for more information on how contractors and property owners
can prevent damage to pipelines.
(​Photo:​ The result when a backhoe hit a natural gas gathering pipeline.)

33
NewsClips:
State Cites Businesses For Careless Digging Of Utility Lines
Sunoco Responds To Questions About Mariner East 2 Pipeline Safety
Hurdle: Residents Urge PUC To Halt Mariner East Pipeline Operation, Hold Hearing
Upper Bucks Residents Scrambling To Oppose Adelphia Pipeline Coming To Their Backyards
Related Story:
Sen. Baker’s Natural Gas Pipeline Safety, PA One Call Bill Signed Into Law
[Posted: Nov. 22, 2018]

Penn State Extension Webinar Dec. 13: Unconventional Oil & Gas: Bringing Trusted
Science To Decision-Making

Penn State Extension​ will host a December 13


webinar on ​Unconventional Oil & Gas: Bringing
Trusted Science To Decision-Making​ from 1:00 to
2:00 p.m.
Join Donna Vorhees, Director, ​Energy Research
Program​, ​Health Effects Institute​, to discuss the
mission of the Energy Research Program, what
studies are available on unconventional oil and gas
in regards to human health effects, and where
knowledge gaps exist.
She will provide an overview of--
-- The Energy Research program and how it’s designed to provide impartial science relevant to
decision-making
-- The exposure and health literature-- what it tells us and the knowledge gaps that remain
-- Recommendations for research that HEI has received from communities, academics, federal
and state government, NGOs, and industry
-- HEI’s approach to research planning and implementation to address important knowledge gaps
Click Here​ to register for this free program.
NewsClips:
Cusick: New Website Aims To Be Clearinghouse For Shale Research
Abandoned Conventional Oil Wells Hidden Under Thousands Of Local Properties
Related Stories:
PA Supreme Court Agrees To Review Superior Court Rule Of Capture Decision Saying Taking
Natural Gas Without Permission Is Trespass
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Discuss Mock Drill Pad
Restoration Project Nov. 28
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

DEP Holds Info Session/Hearing Dec. 12 On Amerikohl Revtai Mining, Reclamation


Project Water Quality Permit In Fayette County

On November 19, the Department of Environmental Protection announced it will hold a public
information session and hearing on December 12 on the draft discharge permit for the Amerikohl

34
Revtai mining and reclamation project in Fayette County.
The draft National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit would cover
discharges from the proposed Revtai Government Financed Construction Contract, No.
26-17-01, consisting of reclamation of abandoned mine land located in Saltlick Township,
Fayette County.
The site has four proposed NPDES outfalls located in Saltlick Township, Fayette County.
The proposed discharges are to unnamed tributaries to Little Champion Creek/Little Champion
Creek, with a designated use as Cold Water Fisheries.
An informal informational session will be held from 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. at the Saltlick
Township Municipal Building located at 147 Municipal Building Road, Melcroft, and the
hearing will follow from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Individuals will have the opportunity to present up to five minutes of oral testimony
relevant to the NPDES application and draft NPDES permit during the hearing. Those who wish
to present testimony should register in advance by contacting DEP’s community relations
coordinator Lauren Fraley by sending email to: ​lfraley@pa.gov​ or calling 412-442-4203.
Preregistration will be taken through noon on December 11. Individuals will be called to
testify in the order they registered. Time permitting, those who did not register will be given the
opportunity to testify.
DEP will record testimony and receive written comments throughout the hearing
regarding the draft NPDES permit. Testifiers should bring at least one copy of their testimony
and exhibits for submission to DEP.
Persons unable to attend the hearing may submit three copies of a written statement and
exhibits within 15 days thereafter to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection,
District Mining Operations, 131 Broadview Road, New Stanton, PA 15672. Written submittals
must contain the following:
-- Name, address and telephone number of the person submitting the comments.
-- Identification of the proposed draft NPDES Permit No. (PA0278271).
-- Concise statements regarding the relevancy of the information or objections to issuance of the
NPDES Permit.
DEP will receive written comments on the draft NPDES permit during a 30-day comment
period or anytime thereafter, up to the date of the public hearing. The draft NPDES permit was
published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin on October 6, 2018 (​page 6422​).
Copies of the draft NPDES permit are on file for public review, by appointments made
via 724-925-5500, at the Department of Environmental Protection, District Mining Operations,
131 Broadview Road, New Stanton, PA 15672.
Individuals in need of an accommodation in order to participate in the hearing, as
provided for in the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, should contact the Pennsylvania
AT&T Relay Service at 1-800-654-5984 (TDD) to discuss how DEP may accommodate your
needs.
NewsClip:
Fayette County Mine Reclamation Project Hearing Set For Dec. 12
Related Story:
Save The Date: PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit Feb. 20-21
[Posted: Nov. 19, 2018]

35
Harrisburg Capitol Complex To Save $1.2 Million Annually From Energy Efficiency
Program

On November 20, Department of General Services


Secretary Curt Topper kicked off an $18 million
energy efficiency program at the Capitol Complex in
Harrisburg that will generate an estimated $1.2
million in annual savings.
Secretary Topper was joined by Troy Geanopulos,
CEO of ​The Efficiency Network​ (TEN) for the
kick-off.
Under the ​Guaranteed Energy Savings Act (GESA)​,
the department has invested in nine projects totaling
nearly $85 million in energy efficiency measures at state facilities now and will pay for them
over time with the annual savings from reduced utility consumption, rather than using
Commonwealth funds for upfront capital investments.
“The savings from these GESA projects are two-fold,” said Secretary Topper. “We are
able to save money for the taxpayers and play a key role in saving the environment for
everyone.”
The Commonwealth currently has nine GESA projects underway.
Once complete, they will result in reduced energy consumption and carbon dioxide
emissions will be cut by approximately 17,000 tons is the equivalent of, more than 37,000 trees
planted annually and the equivalent of removing more than 3,100 cars off the road for a year and
more than 1,500 homes annual energy usage.
The Capitol Complex GESA project will replace more than 20,000 outdated,
energy-eating light fixtures with upgraded LED lighting; replace aging chillers with
higher-efficiency streamlined chillers; upgrade the Central Plant’s water loop with new pump
motors and retrofitting others; installing window film on identified areas of the Capitol Complex
that are most affected by peak summer conditions; among other conservation measures.
The project will cover the Capitol Building’s East Wing and the Labor & Industry,
Health & Welfare and North Office Buildings and is expected to be completed by Summer 2019.
In addition to the cost savings and new construction, DGS has made improvements to the
GESA program, include modernizing the bidding and awarding process to be totally electronic
from bid submission to document sharing to the signature process; prequalifying Energy Service
Companies (ESCOs) to make the bid process more efficient; and using a consultant and in-house
DGS engineer to ensure that the project scopes and measures are effective and achievable.
Visit DGSs ​GESA Program​ webpage for more information about the program.
NewsClip:
WITF Smart Take: Reducing Energy Consumption; Forest Wildfire Risk
Related Stories:
KEEA Healthcare Industry Forum On Energy Efficiency March 5-6 In State College
New Microgrid Guide To Assist Hybrid Fossil Fuel, Renewable Energy Systems, Nov. 28
Workshop
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

36
New Microgrid Guide To Assist Hybrid Fossil Fuel, Renewable Energy Systems, Nov. 28
Workshop

On November 19, Penn State’s Department of


Architectural Engineering announced the release of
an introductory guide for those in the Pennsylvania
interested in conceiving, developing and financing
‘hybrid’ fossil fuel and renewable energy systems.
Click Here​ to request the guide and
accompanying spreadsheet.
The guide, titled “CHP-Enabled Renewable
Energy in Microgrids in Pennsylvania: A Guidance
Document for Conceiving Feasible Systems," is
based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and
Renewable Energy, under the State Energy Program through a grant from the Pennsylvania
Department of Environmental Protection.
These systems can provide on-site, natural-gas-fueled electric and thermal (e.g. hot water
or steam) energy generation (combined heat and power-- CHP) in combination with renewable
energy resources such as solar photovoltaic arrays and battery storage systems.
Such systems provide an economically and environmentally attractive means to utilize
Marcellus shale gas in combination with renewable energy resources to promote economic
growth, with higher efficiency and lower emissions than conventional systems.
The target audience for such systems is owners of commercial and industrial buildings
and properties with well-defined thermal loads, including retirement communities, multi-family
buildings, hospitals, food processors and any large users of steam or hot water; commercial,
institutional and industrial parks and campuses; and municipalities and rural co-op organizations.
New combinations of these well-understood technologies are making it possible to
expand business cases.
Multi-family residential, commercial, institutional and industrial facilities may derive
value from long-term predictable costs for uninterruptible power and thermal energy for critical
processes.
System owners may also derive additional value from the ability to provide resilience and
continuity of critical community services in the aftermath of storms and natural disasters that
disrupt the regional electric grid with increasing frequency.
The guide provides the reader with a discussion of what a microgrid is, why an onsite
distributed energy powered microgrid may be desired, an overview of microgrids at the building,
campus and municipal scale, and a discussion of potential business models, economics and
financing.
A step-by-step procedure is outlined for conceiving and exploring the economic
feasibility of potential CHP projects.
Following the feasibility assessment process, readers will be equipped to discuss potential
microgrid opportunities with community stakeholders and system developers.
It is anticipated that the guide will facilitate the exploration of potential distributed
energy microgrid installations throughout Pennsylvania and will help to increase the penetration
of renewable energy resources.

37
It is also envisioned that these microgrid systems will utilize the Pennsylvania’s shale gas
resources to foster economic development in an environmentally responsible manner.
The guide and accompanying spreadsheet tool can be downloaded from ​Penn State at the
Navy Yard's​ website.
Workshop
In addition to the guide, a half-day introduction to microgrids workshop will be offered
the morning of November 28, at Penn State’s facility in the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
Workshop participants will learn the purpose, advantages and key components of
microgrids. Using Penn State’s Building 7R as a case study, participants will visit the on-site,
building-scale microgrid.
The workshop is led by Parhum Delgoshaei, assistant teaching professor of systems
engineering at Penn State Great Valley. An expert in smart energy systems, Delgoshaei
specializes in optimization and control of hybrid microgrids that utilize renewable and combined
heat and power sources.
"The workshop is designed to provide a context-based learning experience around
renewable and non-renewable distributed generation and energy storage as key enablers of
microgrids," said Delgoshaei. "The function of key interconnection and control components of a
microgrid will be discussed using a building-scale microgrid setup that can be extrapolated to
larger installations."
Registration is still open for the workshop. ​Click Here​ for more information on the
workshop.
NewsClips:
Power Outages Linger In Western PA Days After Winter’s First Blast
More Than 15,000 Customers Still Without Power In Western PA
Butler County Schools Delay, Cancel Classes As Power Outages Linger
Western PA Power Outages May Last Past Sunday
Editorial: Are Electric Companies Aware Winter Is Coming?
Editorial: Invest In Electric Grid Connections
Related Stories:
Harrisburg Capitol Complex To Save $1.2 Million Annually From Energy Efficiency Program
KEEA Healthcare Industry Forum On Energy Efficiency March 5-6 In State College

(Reprinted from ​Penn State News​.)


[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

KEEA Healthcare Industry Forum On Energy Efficiency March 5-6 In State College

The ​Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance​ will


hold a ​Healthcare Industry Forum On Energy
Efficiency​ March 5-6 at the Penn Stater Hotel
and Conference Center, State College, Centre
County.
This event is geared toward those in the
healthcare, pharmaceutical, and long-term living
communities who are interested in learning more about energy saving best practices, efficient

38
technologies, building design, health impacts of building materials, and much more!
Keynote speakers include--
-- ​Marc Mondor,​ AIA, LEED Fellow, Principal - Evolve EA & Representatives from the
Cleveland Clinic; and
-- ​Michael Pavelsky,​ Sustainability Director - The Sheward Partnership, LLC.
Click Here​ to register and a tentative agenda.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance​ website.
NewsClip:
WITF Smart Take: Reducing Energy Consumption; Forest Wildfire Risk
Related Stories:
Harrisburg Capitol Complex To Save $1.2 Million Annually From Energy Efficiency Program
New Microgrid Guide To Assist Hybrid Fossil Fuel, Renewable Energy Systems, Nov. 28
Workshop
[Posted: Nov. 19, 2018]

DCNR Opens More PA State Forest Roads For Deer Hunters This Season

On November 21, the Department of Conservation and


Natural Resources announced new ​hunting grounds in
State Forests and Parks​ will be available to
Pennsylvania deer hunters November 26, if they take
advantage of additional state forest road access in 18 of
the 20 state forest districts.
“Hunters will find more than 90 percent of all state
forestland is now within one-half mile of an open road,”
said DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn. “Since the
start of archery season in late September, the state has
opened more than 540 miles of state forest roads that normally are gated.”
More than 3,000 miles of roadway in state forest lands will be open to deer hunters into
January 2019, with the increase accounting for a roughly 20 percent increase.
DCNR teamed up with the Game Commission to offer an ​improved interactive map of
state forest and game lands​ across the state. The online map supplies information on opened
roads, timber harvesting activity, forestry office contact numbers and more.
Some roads will be open only during deer season and at the discretion of district
foresters. Others will be opened for the second week of the traditional rifle season because of
likely heavy traffic damage the first week.
Two- or three-month long openings will be in effect where there is minimal threat of
damage or deterioration to road surfaces or forest surroundings.
Many state parks, especially those in the 12-county ​Pennsylvania Wilds​ region in
Northcentral Pennsylvania, offer inexpensive camping and access to top-quality hunting in
nearby public forestlands.
Primitive camping on state forestlands gives hunters a backcountry camping or hunting
experience. Forest district managers issue required camping permits.
Many of these campsites are near state parks and forestlands enrolled in the Game

39
Commission’s ​Deer Management Assistance Program​, permitting hunters to take one antlerless
deer or more when properly licensed. Hunters should check availability.
For more information on hunting, visit DCNR’s ​Hunting In State Forests And Parks
webpage.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(​Photo:​ Deer hunters in ​Michaux State Forest​.)
NewsClips:
Schneck: Where’s The Best Deer Hunting In Pennsylvania?
Frye: This Deer Season, Hunters Urged To Seek Out Their Replacement
PA Ban On Sunday Deer Hunting Could Change
Schneck: Hunters May Be En Route To One Of PA’s Largest Bear Kills
Crable: Where Have All Of PA’s Small-Game Hunters Gone?
Related Story:
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Discuss Mock Drill Pad
Restoration Project Nov. 28
[Posted: Nov. 21, 2018]

Save The Date: April 5 Wildlife For Everyone We Love Wild Things & Wild Places Gala

The ​Wildlife For Everyone Foundation​ will host its 2019 We Love
Wild Things And Wild Places Gala on April 5.
This special event will feature live music and dinner as well as a
presentation by Game Commission wildlife biologist ​Mark
Ternent​.
To purchase tickets or sponsor this event, contact Judy Onufrak at
814-238-8138 or send email to: ​info@wildlifeforeveryone.org​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and how you can
get involved, visit the ​Wildlife For Everyone Foundation​ website.
NewsClips:
Venesky: Finances, Promoting Fishing Dominate New Fish & Boat Commission’s Leader’s
Agenda
Schneck: Hunters May Be En Route To One Of PA’s Largest Bear Kills
Schneck: Where’s The Best Deer Hunting In Pennsylvania?
Frye: This Deer Season, Hunters Urged To Seek Out Their Replacement
PA Ban On Sunday Deer Hunting Could Change
Crable: Where Have All Of PA’s Small-Game Hunters Gone?
Nature Watch: 1,300 Common Loons Crowd Presque Isle Bay
Op-Ed: Here’s What Chickadees Taught Me About Life
Knapp: Kiskiminetas River Makes A Comeback
AP: Dry Lake Inches Closer To Comeback In Crawford County
Traffic Noise Stresses Out Frogs, But Some Have Adapted
Related Story:

40
Wildlife For Everyone Foundation: First Pennsylvania Wildlife Gala In State College​ [2018]
[Posted: Nov. 20, 2018]

Emil Bove Named To Westmoreland Conservation District Board

Emil A. Bove, president of Bove Engineering Company of


Greensburg, was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of the
Westmoreland County Conservation District​.
In his work as a municipal engineer for numerous
Westmoreland County communities, Emil has been a long-time,
valuable partner of the conservation district, helping to ensure that
conservation measures are incorporated in municipal infrastructure
projects-- from streets and sidewalks to water and sewer systems.
From 2013 to 2018, Emil served as an associate director
(nonvoting) member of the District board and has been a member of
the District’s stormwater/technical programs advisory committee
since 2008.
In 2017, Bove Engineering – the family business began 50 years ago by Emil’s father,
Michael -- was awarded the Westmoreland Conservation District’s J. Roy Houston Conservation
Partnership Award for its five decades of commitment to conservation.
Emil is a professional land surveyor, an engineer-in-training, and a sewage enforcement
officer.
He is a member and past president of the ​PA Society of Land Surveyors​ and a member of
the ​PA Association of Sewage Enforcement Officers​.
A graduate of the University of Pittsburgh and a life-long resident of Westmoreland
County, Emil says he is “dedicated to the careful blending of progress and the preservation of
our natural resources.”
He lives in New Station with his wife, Sandy, and children AJ and Angelina.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the
Westmoreland County Conservation District​ website.
[Posted: Nov. 19, 2018]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​, ​Twitter Feed​ and ​add ​PaEnviroDigest Google+​ to your Circle.

Politics
AP-Levy: Wolf’s 2nd Term Comes With Evolving Republican Identity In Capitol
Thompson: Who Is Bryan Cutler, And Why Should You Care?
Link:
Click Here for a Week’s Worth Of Political NewsClips
41
Air
Is That Haze Or Really Smoke From California Wildfires?
Map Shows Haze In Philly Came From California Wildfire Smoke
Smoke Plume From California Wildfires Reaching PA, East Coast
California Wildfires: Smoke Spreads to New York, 3,000 Miles Away
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
AP: Government Climate Report Warns Of Worsening U.S. Disasters
Report: Climate Change Will Inflict Substantial Damages On U.S. Lives
Climate Change: Report Warns Of Growing Impact On U.S. Life
Americans Will Pay Billions More For Climate Change, And That’s The Best Case
U.S. Report Says Climate Change Will Batter Economy, In Clash With Trump
U.S. Climate Report Warns Of Damaged Environment, Shrinking Economy
Trump Climate Report Says Damages Are Intensifying Across The Country
Climate Change Is Already Hurting U.S. Communities, Federal Report Says
Budget
Venesky: Finances, Promoting Fishing Dominate New Fish & Boat Commission’s Leader’s
Agenda
Meyer: State IFO Projects PA’s Smooth Budget Year Is Coming To An End
Chesapeake Bay
Penn State Creates Model Golf Course Nutrient Management Plan For Chesapeake Bay
Drainage Area
How Chesapeake Conservancy AI Land Maps Help Conservation Efforts Respond To Climate
Change
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Climate
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
AP: Government Climate Report Warns Of Worsening U.S. Disasters
Report: Climate Change Will Inflict Substantial Damages On U.S. Lives
Climate Change: Report Warns Of Growing Impact On U.S. Life
Americans Will Pay Billions More For Climate Change, And That’s The Best Case
U.S. Report Says Climate Change Will Batter Economy, In Clash With Trump
U.S. Climate Report Warns Of Damaged Environment, Shrinking Economy
Trump Climate Report Says Damages Are Intensifying Across The Country
Climate Change Is Already Hurting U.S. Communities, Federal Report Says
Is That Haze Or Really Smoke From California Wildfires?
Map Shows Haze In Philly Came From California Wildfire Smoke
Smoke Plume From California Wildfires Reaching PA, East Coast
California Wildfires: Smoke Spreads to New York, 3,000 Miles Away
Senate Democratic Policy Committee To Address Climate Change In Pittsburgh

42
How Chesapeake Conservancy AI Land Maps Help Conservation Efforts Respond To Climate
Change
Auditor General DePasquale Urges National Strategy On Climate Change
Op-Ed: UN Global Warming Report Should Be Wake-Up Call For Gov. Wolf
Kummer: Trump Administration To Release Big Climate Report On Black Friday
Climate-Heating Greenhouse Gases At Record Levels, Says UN
Coal Mining
AP: When Coal Was King: Nanty Glo Struggles To Envision Change
FERC Nominee Slams Renewables, Green Groups In Feb. Video
Compliance Action
State Cites Businesses For Careless Digging Of Utility Lines
Dam Safety
AP: Dry Lake Inches Closer To Comeback In Crawford County
Editorial: Susquehanna County Tries To Withhold Dam Inspection Information
Delaware River
Delaware Riverkeeper Nov. 23 RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
Cusick: State To Hold Meeting Nov.30 On PFAS Contamination
PA Health Officials To Release Blood Test Results On PFAS Contamination In Bucks,
Montgomery
Altoona Water Authority Plans Rate Overhaul
South Philly Street Collapses After Water Main Break
Millvale Water Main Break Floods Homes, Businesses
PA American Water Offers Tips To Prevent Frozen Pipes
Education
Audubon PA Works In Central PA On Watershed Education
Mount Carmel School District Sued Over Chemistry Class Accident
Emergency Response
Penn State Researchers Develop Oil Spill Cleanup Material
Energy
Advocacy Groups Asks For Peach Bottom Nuclear Plant Relicensing Hearing
Power Outages Linger In Western PA Days After Winter’s First Blast
More Than 15,000 Customers Still Without Power In Western PA
Butler County Schools Delay, Cancel Classes As Power Outages Linger
Western PA Power Outages May Last Past Sunday
Editorial: Are Electric Companies Aware Winter Is Coming?
Editorial: Invest In Electric Grid Connections
FERC Nominee Slams Renewables, Green Groups In Feb. Video
Connecticut Moves To Keep Dominion’s Millstone Nuclear Plant Afloat
Energy Conservation
WITF Smart Take: Reducing Energy Consumption; Forest Wildfire Risk
Farming
Rutters Dairy Looks To Build On 200-Year-Old Farm As Owners Look To Preserve Home,
Barns
Time Running Out For Congress To Pass Federal Farm Bill

43
Flooding
Pittsburgh Flood Gates Disabled After Vehicle Damages Control Panel
Flood-Damaged Roads Might Take Years To Repair In York County
York Flooding Victims Who Lost Everything Just Thankful To Be Alive
Letter: Flood Victim Sees Love In Action
Federal Lawmakers Introduce Bill To Save Federal Flood Insurance Program
Flooding - ​Hurricanes
It May Be Getting Harder For Puerto Rico’s National Forest To Recover From Storms
Scientists Work To Save Wild Puerto Rican Parrot After Hurricane Maria
Forests
Penn State Extension: Risk Of Spotted Lanternfly On Christmas Trees Slight
Check Your Christmas Tree Just In Case It’s Carrying Lanternfly Eggs
Helping The Environment One Tree At A Time In Pittsburgh
WITF Smart Take: Reducing Energy Consumption; Forest Wildfire Risk
Christmas Tree Arrives In PA Capitol Building
Diseases From Ticks Made Record Jump Last Year
It May Be Getting Harder For Puerto Rico’s National Forest To Recover From Storms
Forests - ​Wildfire
AP: Trump Tours California Wildfire Area, Calls It A Really Bad One
Trump Pledges Federal Help For California Wildfires, Delivers Blame, Death Toll Rises
California Wildfires: Finland Bemused By Trump Raking Forests Comment
AP: In Smoldering Wildfire Ruins, Life Goes On For A Hardy Few
California Offers Safe Space For Firefighters To Work Thru Stress, Trauma
AP: California Wildfire Victims’ Families Urged To Give DNA
Devastated By California Wildfire, Paradise Finds A Way To Give Thanks
Is That Haze Or Really Smoke From California Wildfires?
Map Shows Haze In Philly Came From California Wildfire Smoke
Smoke Plume From California Wildfires Reaching PA, East Coast
California Wildfires: Smoke Spreads to New York, 3,000 Miles Away
Penn State Prof Uses Statistics To Better Assess California Wildfire Risks
Lehigh Valley Brewers To Make Special Beer To Aid California Fire Victims
Scranton Brewery Joining Effort To Aid Victims Of California Wildfires
Lancaster Breweries Taking Part In Effort To Aid Victims Of California Wildfires
Green Infrastructure
Helping The Environment One Tree At A Time In Pittsburgh
Jenkintown Creek Restoration Project Comes To Cheltenham In SE PA
Refining Streambank Erosion Rates, Restoration Credits In York County
Penn State Creates Model Golf Course Nutrient Management Plan For Chesapeake Bay
Drainage Area
Hazardous Substances
Cusick: State To Hold Meeting Nov.30 On PFAS Contamination
PA Health Officials To Release Blood Test Results On PFAS Contamination In Bucks,
Montgomery
Land Conservation
Rutters Dairy Looks To Build On 200-Year-Old Farm As Owners Look To Preserve Home,

44
Barns
Lower Merion Schools No Longer Interested In Condemning Stoneleigh Property
Land Recycling
Hazelwood Green Brownfield Project Moves On After Amazon HQ2
Mine Reclamation
Fayette County Mine Reclamation Project Hearing Set For Dec. 12
Oil & Gas
PA Supreme Court Agrees To Review Superior Court Rule Of Capture Decision Saying Taking
Natural Gas Without Permission Is Trespass
Abandoned Conventional Oil Wells Hidden Under Thousands Of Local Properties
Cusick: New Website Aims To Be Clearinghouse For Shale Research
New Fortress Energy Planning 2 LNG Plants In Northeast PA
UGI Denies Allegations Of Blame In Lancaster Fatal House Explosion
Monday Deadline Looms For UGI’s Response To Fatal House Explosion In Lancaster
York Firm Pays $100K To Settle Suit By Worley & Obetz Trustee
Penn State Researchers Develop Oil Spill Cleanup Material
Pipelines
Sunoco Responds To Questions About Mariner East 2 Pipeline Safety
Hurdle: Residents Urge PUC To Halt Mariner East Pipeline Operation, Hold Hearing
Upper Bucks Residents Scrambling To Oppose Adelphia Pipeline Coming To Their Backyards
State Cites Businesses For Careless Digging Of Utility Lines
PUC Announces PA One Call Enforcement Actions For Hitting Pipelines, Utilities During
Construction
Radiation Protection
Advocacy Groups Asks For Peach Bottom Nuclear Plant Relicensing Hearing
Connecticut Moves To Keep Dominion’s Millstone Nuclear Plant Afloat
FERC Nominee Slams Renewables, Green Groups In Feb. Video
Recreation
Erie-Area Parks To Share $862,000 In State Grants
Allentown Secures $300K Grant For Proposed Skate Park
Allegheny Ridge Receives $202K For Canal Greenway
Lehigh County Awarded $469,900 In Local Recreation Grants From DCNR
Nov. 23 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Donor Wants To Establish Legacy Fund For Parks In Altoona
Editorial: Old PA Pike Trail Project Would Enhance Region
Editorial: Even A Little Exercise Can Have A Big Impact
Lehigh Valley Ski Resorts Get Jump On Season For Black Friday
Diseases From Ticks Made Record Jump Last Year
Renewable Energy
FERC Nominee Slams Renewables, Green Groups In Feb. Video
Wastewater Facilities
Kiski Twp Plans To Expand Public Sewage To 700 Households
Watershed Protection
Helping The Environment One Tree At A Time In Pittsburgh
Jenkintown Creek Restoration Project Comes To Cheltenham In SE PA

45
Refining Streambank Erosion Rates, Restoration Credits In York County
Penn State Creates Model Golf Course Nutrient Management Plan For Chesapeake Bay
Drainage Area
How Chesapeake Conservancy AI Land Maps Help Conservation Efforts Respond To Climate
Change
Knapp: Kiskiminetas River Makes A Comeback
Audubon PA Works In Central PA On Watershed Education
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Wildlife
Venesky: Finances, Promoting Fishing Dominate New Fish & Boat Commission’s Leader’s
Agenda
Schneck: Hunters May Be En Route To One Of PA’s Largest Bear Kills
Schneck: Where’s The Best Deer Hunting In Pennsylvania?
Frye: This Deer Season, Hunters Urged To Seek Out Their Replacement
PA Ban On Sunday Deer Hunting Could Change
Crable: Where Have All Of PA’s Small-Game Hunters Gone?
Nature Watch: 1,300 Common Loons Crowd Presque Isle Bay
Op-Ed: Here’s What Chickadees Taught Me About Life
Knapp: Kiskiminetas River Makes A Comeback
AP: Dry Lake Inches Closer To Comeback In Crawford County
Traffic Noise Stresses Out Frogs, But Some Have Adapted
West Nile/Zika Virus
Diseases From Ticks Made Record Jump Last Year
Federal Policy
Trump Plans To Nominate Andrew Wheeler As EPA Chief
Trump To Nominate Andrew Wheeler As EPA Administrator

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

November 26--​​ ​DEP Hearing On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Pipeline Compressor Station In
Jefferson Township, Mercer County​. ​DEP’s Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street in
Meadville, Crawford County. 10:00.

November 27--​​ ​Municipal Stormwater Pollution Reduction Workshop​. Londonderry Township


Building, 783 S. Geyers Church Road, Middletown, Dauphin County. 9:00 to 2:00

46
November 28--​​ ​PA Senate Democratic Policy Committee​ Hearing On Addressing Climate
Change In Pennsylvania By Controlling Carbon Emissions. IBEW Local #5, 5 Hot Metal Street,
Suite 100, Pittsburgh. 10:00.

November 28--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On Karns City Refining RACT II Air Quality Plan,
Butler County​. ​DEP Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street in Meadville, Crawford
County. 9:00

November 28--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On Lord Corporation RACT II Air Quality Plan,
Crawford County​. ​DEP Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street in Meadville, Crawford
County. 10:00

November 28--​​ ​DEP Hearing On Bruce Mansfield Power Plant, Little Blue Run Waste
Impoundment NPDES Discharge Permit​. South Side Area School District Middle/High School
Auditorium, 4949 PA State Route 151, Hookstown, Beaver County. 6:00. ​(O​ ct. 27 PA Bulletin
page 6927)​

November 28--​​ ​DCNR Conservation and Natural Resources Advisory Council​. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DCNR Contact: Gretchen Leslie, 717-772-9084 or send email
to: ​gleslie@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

November 28--​​ ​Morris Arboretum Designing Native And Ecological Plant Communities
Workshop​. ​Morris Arboretum​, 100 E. Northwestern Avenue, Philadelphia. 9:00 to 3:30.

November 28--​​ ​NEW​. ​Penn State Dept. Of Architectural Engineering Microgrids 101 - New
Guide Workshop​. Philadelphia Navy Yard. 8:30 to Noon.

November 29--​​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice)​

November 29--​​ ​Stroud Water Research Center Water’s Edge Gala - Freshwater Excellence
Award Celebration​. ​Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library​, Winterthur, Delaware.

November 29-- ​Academy Of Natural Sciences of Drexel University​. ​Delaware Watershed


Research Conference​. Academy Offices in Philadelphia.

November 29--​​ ​PA Section-American Water Works Assn./PaWARN 3rd Annual Security &
Risk Management Symposium​. ​Doubletree By Hilton Convention Center, 209 Mall Boulevard,
Monroeville, Allegheny County. 7:30 to 4:00.

November 30--​​ ​Location Added​. ​Gov. Wolf’s PFAS Action Team Public Meeting​. Rachel
Carson Building, Harrisburg. 9:00.

December 1--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Volunteer Training Day​. ​Inn At
Lackawaxen​, 188 Scenic Drive, Lackawaxen, Wayne County. 9:00 to 1:00.

47
December 3--​​ ​DEP Webinar On How To Apply For Class 8 Truck & Transit Clean Vehicle
Grants​. 10:30.

December 4-​​- ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Lindsay Byron, 717-772-8951, ​lbyron@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice)​

December 4--​​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. The next secheduled
meeting is March 5. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143, ​mscheloske@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

December 4--​​ ​DEP Webinar On How To Apply For Class 4-7 Truck, School Bus and Other
Clean Vehicle Rebates​. 10:30.

December 4--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For East Penn
Manufacturing, Berks County​. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Ave,
Harrisburg. 10:00.

December 4--​​ ​DEP Hearing On New Adelphia Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor Station, Bucks
County​. ​West Rockhill Township Municipal Building, 1028 Ridge Road, Sellersville, Bucks
County. 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

December 4--​​ ​DEP Hearing On New Adelphia Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor Station,
Delaware County​. ​Lower Chichester Township Municipal Building, 1410 Market Street,
Linwood, Montgomery County. 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

December 5-- ​DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. ​DEP Contact: Kris Shiffer 717-772-5809 or send email to: ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

December 5-​​- ​DEP Laboratory Accreditation Advisory Committee​ meeting. DEP Laboratory
Building, 2575 Interstate Dr. Harrisburg. 9:00. DEP Contact: Aaren Alger, 717-346-8212 or
send email to: ​aaalger@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice)​

December 5--​​ ​DCNR Pinchot State Forest District Resource Management Plan Meeting​.
District Office, 1841 Abington Road, North Abington Township, Lackawanna County. 4:30 to
6:30.

December 6--​​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board​ meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Michael Maddigan, 717-772-3609,
mmaddigan@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

December 6--​​ ​Location Added​. ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ business meeting on
proposed water withdrawal permits and other actions (​Click Here​ for agenda). SRBC Office,
4423 North Front Street, Harrisburg. 9:00. SRBC Contact: Ava Stoops, 717-238-0423. ​(f​ ormal

48
notice)​ (​formal notice-correction)​ ​Click Here​ for more.

December 6-- ​Westminster College Student Symposium On The Environment​. ​Westminster


College​, ​McKelvey Campus Center, New Wilmington, Lawrence County. 5:30 to 9:00.

December 6--​​ ​10,000 Friends Of Pennsylvania Commonwealth Awards Dinner​. ​ArtsQuest​,


Bethlehem.

December 7--​​ ​Penn State Extension Understanding Dairy Business For Conservation
Professionals Workshop​. ​Lancaster Farm and Home Center​, 1383 Arcadia Road, Lancaster.
10:00 to 2:00

December 10--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA Highlands Coalition Webinar: What Is Nature Worth? Return On
Environmental Studies, Economic Value Of The Outdoors​. 10:00 to 11:30.

December 11--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Monroe Energy
Facility, Delaware County​. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street, Norristown.
10:00.

December 11--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Exelon Croydon
Power Plant, Bucks County​. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street, Norristown.
2:00.

December 11--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Arcelormittal Plate
Company, Montgomery County​. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street,
Norristown. 8:00 a.m.

December 11-- ​NEW​. ​PUC PA One Call Damage Prevention Committee​. ​Hearing Room 1,
Keystone Building, Harrisburg. 9:00? ​Online livestream available​.

December 12--​​ ​DEP State Board for Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Edgar
Chescattie, 717-772-2814, ​eshescattie@pa.gov​.

December 12--​​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ & Recycling Fund Advisory Committee
meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713,
lahenry@pa.gov​.

December 12-- ​NEW​. ​DEP Information Session/Hearing On Amerikohl Revtai Mining,


Reclamation Project Water Quality Permit In Fayette County​. Saltlick Township Municipal
Building, 147 Municipal Building Road, Melcroft. 1:00 to 3:00.

December 12--​​ ​DEP Holds Dec. 12 Hearing [If Needed] On Delaware County Nonattainment
Maintenance Plan For Fine Particulate​. ​DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street in
Norristown, Montgomery County. 10:00.

49
December 12--​​ ​DCNR State Forest District Management Plan Meetings​ - ​Bald Eagle State
Forest​, District Office, 18865 Old Turnpike Road, Millmont, Union County. 6:00 to 8:00.

December 12--​​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission​ business meeting. ​Washington Crossing
Historic Park Visitor Center​, 1112 River Road, Washington Crossing, PA.10:30. ​ Click Here​ for
an agenda. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

December 13--​​ ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to:
kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)
-- Draft regulations setting methane emission limits for oil and gas operations

December 13--​​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Sewage Advisory Committee​ meeting. DEP Contact: Janice
Vollero 717-772-5157 or send email to: ​jvollero@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice)​

December 13--​​ ​NEW​. ​Penn State Extension Webinar: Unconventional Oil & Gas - Bringing
Trusted Science To Decision-Making​. 1:00 to 2:00.

December 17--​​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 1:00. ​Click Here​ to register to join the meeting by webinar.
Participants also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 644 895 237.

December 18-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

December 18-- ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For East Penn
Manufacturing In Berks County​. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Avenue,
Harrisburg. 10:00.

December 28--​​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Hearing [If Needed[ On Lebanon County Fine Particulate Standard
Plan​. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Avenue, Harrisburg. 1:00.

January 12--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. 10:00 to 1:00,​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

January 26--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. Noon to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

January 27-30--​​ ​Partnership For The Delaware Estuary​. ​2019 Delaware Estuary Science &
Environmental Summit​. Cape May, NJ.

February 2--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. 10:00 to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

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February 6-9--​​ ​PA Association For Sustainable Agriculture​. ​Pennsylvania Sustainable
Agriculture Conference​. ​Lancaster County Convention Center​, Lancaster.

February 12-13--​​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​.


Dauphin County Agriculture & Natural Resources Center​, 1451 Peters Mountain Road, Dauphin,
Dauphin County.​ ​Click Here to register​.

February 20-21--​​ ​NEW​. ​DCNR, Western PA Conservancy. PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit​.
Best Western Premier Conference Center, 800 East Park Drive, Harrisburg.

March 2--​​ ​PA Wilds.​ ​Retailers, Producers, Public 3rd Annual PA Wilds Buyer’s Market​.
Gemmell Student Complex Multi-Purpose Room​, Clarion University.

March 5-- ​NEW​. ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Ebensburg Office, 286
Industrial Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143,
mscheloske@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

March 5-6--​​ ​NEW​. ​Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance​. ​Healthcare Industry Forum On
Energy Efficiency​. Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, State College, Centre County.

March 9--​​ ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River​. Montgomery County
Community College​ ​campus in Pottstown​.

March 21-- ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​

March 27-28--​​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​. ​Jennings
Environmental Education Center​, 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock, Butler County.​ ​Click
Here to register​.

April 5-- ​NEW​. ​Wildlife For Everyone We Love Wild Things & Wild Places Gala​.

April 7-9--​​ ​CMU Mascaro Center For Sustainable Innovation. 2019 Engineering Sustainability
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

April 29 to May 2--​​ ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National Watershed and Stormwater
Conference​. South Carolina.

May 8-10--​​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

May 16-18--​​ ​PA Land Trust Association​. ​Land Conservation Conference​. Monroe County.

July 24-26-- ​Professional Recyclers Of PA​. ​Annual Recycling & Organics Conference​.

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Harrisburg.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.


Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.
Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.
Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.
DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel
DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events
Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and
Flickr.
Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule
You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

December 1--​​ ​PHMC Historical Marker Nominations


December 1-- ​USDA Rural Community Water Infrastructure Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
December 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
December 14--​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
December 14--​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
December 14--​​ ​FEMA/PEMA Pre-Disaster & Flood Mitigation Grants
December 15--​​ ​Coldwater Heritage Partnership Grants
December 17--​​ ​Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence
December 17--​​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation 2019 Awards
December 21--​​ ​ORSANCO Ohio River Sweep Student Poster Contest
December 28--​​ ​NEW​. ​Western PA Conservancy/Dominion Energy Watershed Mini Grants
December 30--​​ ​Coca-Cola, Keep America Beautiful Public Spaces Recycling Bin Grants
December 31--​​ ​DEP County Act 101 Waste Planning, HHW, Education Grants
January 11-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
January 11-- ​PennDOT Green Light-Go Program, LED Light Upgrades
January 11-​​- ​DEP Environmental Education Grants
January 16--​​ ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund Project Funding
January 18--​​ ​South Mountain Partnership Spirit Of South Mountain Award
January 18--​​ ​PA Land Trust Assn. Lifetime Achievement Award
January 25--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
January 31--​​ ​NFWF Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Grants
February 4-- ​NEW​. ​PA Environmental Professionals College Scholarships
February 8--​​ ​DEP FAST Act Alternative Fuels Corridor Infrastructure Grants
February 11--​​ ​PA Land Trust Assn. Government Leadership Award
March 1--​​ ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Investment Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
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March 31--​​ ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
May 10-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
July 15--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
December 16--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
March 22--​​ ​DEP Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
June 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 23-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
December 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.
-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

The Department of Environmental Protection is proposing redesignating the Lebanon County


Nonattainment Area as being in compliance with the federal fine particulate standard with the
implementation of a 10 year maintenance plan. A December 28 hearing has been scheduled, if
needed. ​(​formal notice​)

Pennsylvania Bulletin - November 24, 2018

Technical Guidance -------------------

No new technical guidance was published this week.

Permits ------------

Note:​​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 30 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the November 24 PA Bulletin -
pages 7321 to 7351​.

Related Tools ----------------------

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and

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regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

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Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or
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PA Environment Digest​​ is a publication of ​PA Environment News LLC​​ and is edited by


David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. He can
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