Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 36

I.

      INTRODUCTION 1­7­1
A. Purposes .................................................................................................................................................
B. Focus on the Future ...............................................................................................................................

II. SHORT­TERM LIQUIDITY
A. Definitions .............................................................................................................................................
 1.   Current Assets ................................................................................................................................
 2.   Current Liabilities ..........................................................................................................................
 3.   Working Capital .............................................................................................................................
B. Ratios, Computational Issues, and Analysis ........................................................................................
 1. Current Ratio ..................................................................................................................................
 2. Acid­Test (or Quick) Ratio ............................................................................................................
3. Receivables Turnover ....................................................................................................................
4. Average Collection Period (or Days Sales in Outstanding) .........................................................
5. Inventory Turnover ........................................................................................................................
6. Number of Days in Inventory (or Days Sales in Inventory) .........................................................
7. Accounts Payable Turnover ...........................................................................................................
8. Days Purchases in Accounts Payable ............................................................................................
9. Operating Cycle ..............................................................................................................................
10. Cash Ratio (or Cash to Current Liabilities) ...................................................................................
11. Cash Flow Ratio .............................................................................................................................
12. Liquidity Index ...............................................................................................................................

III. CAPITAL STRUCTURE AND SOLVENCY 1­7­7


A. Definitions .............................................................................................................................................
 1.   Capital Structure ............................................................................................................................. 
 2.   Debt ................................................................................................................................................ 
 3.   Equity ..............................................................................................................................................
 4.   Solvency .........................................................................................................................................
 5.   Operating Leverage ........................................................................................................................
 6.   Financial Leverage .........................................................................................................................
B. Ratios, Computational Issues, and Analysis ........................................................................................
 1.   Financial Leverage Index (or Degree of Financial Leverage) ...................................................... 
 2.   Financial Leverage Ratio ............................................................................................................... 
 3.   Asset Coverage ...............................................................................................................................
 4.   Other Ratios Involving Owners' Equity........................................................................................
      a. Total Debt to Equity Capital (Debt/Equity Ratio) .................................................................. 
      b. Equity Capital to Total Debt ...................................................................................................
      c. Long­Term Debt to Equity Capital ......................................................................................... 
      d. Fixed Assets to Equity Capital ................................................................................................
 5.   Leverage Ratios Involving Net Tangible Assets ...........................................................................
      a. Net Tangible Assets to Long­Term Debt ................................................................................
      b. Total Liabilities to Net Tangible Assets .................................................................................
 6.   Coverage Ratios: ............................................................................................................................
a. Times Interest Earned .............................................................................................................. 
b. Earnings to Fixed Charges ...................................................................................................... 
c. Cash Flow to Fixed Charges ...................................................................................................
C. Measuring Leverage With Common­Size Statements .........................................................................
IV. RETURN ON INVESTED CAPITAL 1­7­10
A. Definitions .............................................................................................................................................
1. Invested Capital ..............................................................................................................................
2. Return on Invested Capital .............................................................................................................
3. Difficulty in Defining Invested Capital .........................................................................................
4. Difficulty in Defining Income .......................................................................................................
B. Ratios, Computational Issues, and Analysis .........................................................................................
l.    Return on Assets (ROA, or Return on Investment) ......................................................................
2.    Profit Margin .................................................................................................................................
3.    Asset Turnover ...............................................................................................................................
4.    Return on Common Stockholders' Equity (ROE) ........................................................................
C. Dupont Analysis ....................................................................................................................................
1.    Breakdown of ROA ........................................................................................................................
2.    Breakdown of ROE ........................................................................................................................
D. Sustainable Equity Growth ...................................................................................................................
V.    PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS I­7­ I 3
A. Factors Affecting Income ......................................................................................................................
1. Accounting Estimates .....................................................................................................................
2. Accounting Methods ......................................................................................................................
3. Disclosures and Presentations ........................................................................................................
4. Needs to Different Users ................................................................................................................
B. Analysis of Revenues ...........................................................................................................................
1.    importance of Source, Stability, and Trend ................................................................................... 
2.    Relationship to Receivables and Inventory. .................................................................................. 
3.    Accounting Methods ......................................................................................................................
C. Analysis of Expenses .............................................................................................................................
1.    Major Expense Categories .............................................................................................................
2.    Gross Profit Margin ........................................................................................................................
3.    Analyzing Changes in Expenses as a Percent of Revenue ............................................................
D. Analyzing Income With Common­Size Statements ............................................................................
E. Book Value Per Share ...........................................................................................................................
F. Operating Cash Flow to Income ...........................................................................................................

VI.   EARNINGS­BASED ANALYSIS 1­7­15
A. Earnings Quality and Persistence ..........................................................................................................
1.    Accounting Income (or Profit or Earnings) ................................................................................... 
2.    Economic Profit .............................................................................................................................. 
3.    Earnings Quality .............................................................................................................................
4. Earnings Persistence .......................................................................................................................
5. Estimation of Persistent Earnings (or Core Earnings) ..................................................................
B. Accounting Data and Stock Prices ........................................................................................................
1.    Book Value .....................................................................................................................................
2.    Market Value ..................................................................................................................................
3.    Price/Book Ratio ............................................................................................................................
4.    Price To Earnings (P/E) Ratio .......................................................................................................
5.    Earnings Yield ................................................................................................................................
6.    Basic Earnings per Share (EPS) ....................................................................................................
7.    Dividend Yield ..............................................................................................................................
8.    Dividend Payout ............................................................................................................................

1
VII. OTHER ANALYTICAL ISSUES 1­7­17
A. Common Size Analysis .........................................................................................................................

         1.HorEontal Common Size Analysis...................................................................................................
∙   2. Vertical Common Size Analysis ....................................................................................................
B. Comparison With Industry ....................................................................................................................
C. Inflation .................................................................................................................................................
         1.Balance Sheet .................................................................................................................................
         2. Profitability ............................................................................................................
         3. Adjusting for Inflation ...................................................................................................................
D. International Considerations .................................................................................................................
1. Accounting Methods ......................................................................................................................
2. Foreign Exchange Fluctuations .....................................................................................................
E. Non financial and Qualitative Considerations .......................................................................................
F. Limitations of Ratio Analysis ..............................................................................................................
1. Financial Statement Values ...........................................................................................................
2. Lack of Comparability. ..................................................................................................................
3. Cash Flow Timing and Risk ..........................................................................................................
4. Magnitude of Comparison Base ....................................................................................................

VIII. EXTENDED RATIO EXAMPLE 1­7­19


 

PART 1 ­ CHAPTER 7

RATIO ANALYSIS

I. INTRODUCTION

The CMA exam expects candidates to calculate, understand the purpose, and interpret ratios. Candidates
are also asked to determine how transactions might affect a ratio.

A. Purposes

Financial statement analysis highlights key relationships and trends that are often buried in the detail of the
financial statements. Most of tile parties interested in financial statement analysis are Really interested in the future
performance of the firm. They are interested in questions such as the following:

∙ Win the company generate enough profits to be able to make interest and principal payments
as they become due?
∙ Win the company be able to pay dividends or earn enough to increase the market price of the stock?
∙ Win the company generate enough profits to pay for expansion or to be able to borrow
expansion?

B. Focus on the Future

Investors and others evaluate past financial information to help them answer these types of questions. In other
words, they use past information to help them predict tile future.

11. SHORT­TERM LIQUIDITY

Short­term liquidity ratios and other measures provide information about how well a firm is able to meet its 
currently maturing obligations. This is of special interest to creditors, but also important management to know in order 
for them to be able to avoid embarrassing last minute scrambles. 15quidity refers to the composition of current assets 
and liabilities, primarily assets. A higher proportion of cash or marketable securities is more liquid than a low 
proportion.

Operating activity and cash flow ratios are analyzed as part of short­term liquidity. Operating activity  ratios
measure how  effectively and efficiently the firm is canting out its business ­ making sales, collecting on sales, and
managing inventory. Companies with slow turning inventory and slow paying customers arc less liquid. Cash flow
gives an indication of the liquidity of a company as does the speed with which non cash current assets convert to cash.

A. Definitions

1.  Current Assets:  Cash and other assets that win be converted into cash, sold, or consumed within
one ),ear or the operating cycle, whichever is longer, items are usually listed from highly liquid to less liquid. Increasing
current assets are a use of short­tem~ funds for a business. Typical categories are:
∙ cash and cash equivalents
∙ marketable securities (trading and available­for­sale­classifications at fair value) ∙ notes and accounts receivable (at net
Realizable value)
∙ inventories
∙ prepaid expenses (at unexpired cost)

1­7­1

2. Current Liabilities:  Current  liabilities are defined as liabilities to be paid within one year or the


operating cycle, whichever is longer. Items are usually presented in order of their liquidation dales and reported at tile
amount to be paid. Increasing current liabilities are a source of short­term funds for a business. Typical categories are:

∙ accounts payable arising from the acquisition of goods and services
∙ other accrued liabilities, such as wages payable and interest payable
∙ notes payable such as but not limited to commercial paper, short term bank credit  loans, factoring ∙ collections of
amounts in advance (unearned or deferred revenues)
∙ currently maturing portions of long­term debt

3.   Working   Capital:  Working   capital   is   simply   the   difference   between   Current   Assets   and   Current
Liabilities. Creditors are especially interested in working capital as it is the source from which they win be paid.

B. Ratios, Computational Issues, and Analysis

1.  Current  Ratio:  Measures  short­term   solvency   ­  tile   ability  to  meet   current  obligations.  Generally
higher is better, however tile composition of current assets is also important. A quick rule of thumb is that a company
should have a current ratio exceeding 2.0. However, many successful efficient companies run well at 1.0. Too high a
ratio, say 3.0, may indicate inefficient use of capital. Creditors often look at the trend in the Current Ratio or compare it
to other companies as gauges of liquidity.

Current Assets
Current Liabilities

Example: A company has current assets of $400.000 and current liabilities of $500.000. The company's current ratio would be
increased

a.   The purchase of $100.000 of inventory on account

b. The payment of $100.000 of accounts payable
c. The collection of $100,000 of accounts receivable
d. Refinancing a $100,000 long­term loan with short­term debt
Answer: The present current ratio is:

400.000     = 0.8
500,000

a.              5
  00.000 = 0.8
600,000

b.              3
  00.000 = 0.75
400,000

c.              No change; current assets increase and decrease by the same amount

d.              4
  00.000 = 0.67
600,000

Example: The  Solvent Corporation's current ratio is 2.0 to 1 and its bond indenture  specifics the current ratio must remain above 1.5 to 1. If


current liabilities arc 25 minion, what is the maximum new shell­term debt that can be taken out to finance inventory?

Answer: If Solvent's current ratio is 2.0 and the current liabilities arc $25 minion, then current assets must be $50 minion. The maximum 
increase to both current assets and liabilities is:
 50 4 +
    X = 1.5, or 50 + X = 1.5(25 4 X), or 0.5X = 12.5, or X = $25 minion maximum increase 
25+X

2. Acid­Test (or Quick) Ratio: Measures short­term liquidity, excluding inventory (which may be obsolete, difficult to
sell, or slow in converting to cash), prepaid expense, and other non­liquid current assets. This is a more conservative measure of tile
firm's ability to pay short­term obligations. 11 provides greater assurance to short­term lenders about the company's ability to repay
them. A quick ratio of 1.0 is often considered average and adequate. A level trend of the quick ratio over time is often a meaningful
indicator of good management.

Cash + Cash Equivalents + Receivables 4­ Marketable Securities
Current Liabilities

Example: A company has a current ratio of 2 to I and a quick ratio (acid test) of 1 to 1. A transaction that would change the
company's quick ratio, but not its current ratio is:

a. The sale of short­term marketable securities for cash that results in a profit 
b. The sale of inventory on account at cost
c. The collection of accounts receivable 
d. The payment of accounts payable

Answer:    b. Inventory is the only item mentioned that is in the current  ratio,  but not the quick ratio. The increase in accounts


receivable would affect  the quick ratio, but the sale of inventory would not. All other items would affect both
ratios in the same way.
3. Receivables Turnover: Indicates the efficiency of receivables collection and tile quality of receivables. The
higher the quality, the shorter the time between the sale and the collection of cash. credit Sales
excludes cash sales and reflects all other sales during a year(period).

Net Credit Sales
Average Trade Receivables (Net)

If no information is available about cash sales, then total sales are used as an estimate of credit sales. The average Trade Receivables 
is usually calculated as:

(Net A/R at the beginning of the period + Net A/R at tile end of the period)/2

Because companies do not usually report cash versus credit sales, turnover call be difficult Io pin down precisely. Inclusion
of cash sales win artificially increase the turnover figure. Additionally, bad debt reserves should be deducted from total AR to arrive
at net AR. Receivable turnover tales win vary widely across industries and win also be affected by credit policies, aggressiveness of
collection efforts, and economic trends.

If the ending A/R balance is used instead of the average, the ratio gives a more current snapshot of the current situation
(assuming average daily sales remains constant over the year). This may not be a good assumption for a seasonal business, but in that
case the ratio could provide better insight into seasonal variations.

4.   Average   Collection   Period   (or   Days   Sales   Outstanding):  The   average   time   in   days   that   receivables   are
outstanding (date of sale to date of collection). Because this ratio is calculated by dividing 365 days by the receivables turnover, its
interpretation is inversely related to that of the receivables turnover ratio (discussed above)­­the greater number of days outstanding,
the greater the possibility of delinquencies becoming uncollectible. This ratio should ideally be less than tile terms extended to
customers. If you offer net 30 day terms and everybody pays exactly on time, the ratio should be 30 days.

        365
        
Receivables Turnover

5. Inventory Turnover: Measures how effectively the inventory portion of working capital is being used in terms of
tile number of times inventory is replaced every year. Calculations arc similar to

receivables insofar as wanting to measure turnover (higher is better) and length of turnover (shorter is better). High inventory turnover can mean high
liquidity and/or good merchandising. It could also mean frequent stockouts and lost potential sales. Conversely, low turnover could mean obsolete
merchandise or excessive inventory accumulation.

Cost of Sales
Average Inventory
Tile average inventory is usually calculated as:

(Inventory at tile beginning of the period + Inventory at the end of the period)/2

To be meaningful, this ratio should be compared to tile standard for tile particular industry. The inventory turnover is a function of tile
technology of tile industry as well as tile operating efficiency of the enterprise. For instance, it takes a certain number of days for a farmer to raise
chickens to a certain size. no matter what else he does. Similarly, beer requires a certain amount of fermentation time no matter what. Other factors
are more controllable.

Inventory accounts include raw materials, work­in­progress, and finished goods. Analysis may be conducted oil any portion of or the
total inventory, but is usually done on the total. Inventory is valued al the lower of cost or market, not at the price for which it win be sold.

Sometimes the inventory turnover ratio is calculated using sales instead of cost of goods sold in the numerator. However, cost of
sales is a better base for calculating turnover because it eliminates any changes due solely to sales price changes.

Example: The following information is available for tine years indicated:

20x 1 20x2
Sales $1.400.000 $ 1.800.000
Inventor>.' 190,000 210.000
Bad debt Expense 12.000 10.000
Cost of Goods Sold 840.000 920,000

The inventory turnover for 20x2 is: 
a. 4.4 times
b. 4.6 times
c. 9.0 times
d. 8.0 times

Answer  b. Select only tine information actually needed.

920,000 = 920.000 = 4.6


(190.000 + 210.000)/2             200,000

Example: Earth Corporation has budgeted sales of $144,000 and costs of sales of $90,000 during a year. It is earning 11% currently on its
investment in certificates of deposit. If Best can increase inventory turnover from its present level of 9 times per year to t2 times per
year, how much can it save'?
Answer: $275, calculated below

If' inventory turnover is currently 9 times per year, then we can use the inventory turnover ratio formula and the information about cost of sales Io 
calculate average inventory:

 C ost of Sales = 9 ­) Average Inventory  =  Cost of
       Sales   =  $100.000
     =  $10,000
Average lnvcntoo, 9 9

If inventory turnover were 12 instead of 9 times per )'ear, average inventory would be:

Cost of Sales $100.000 = $7,500


9             9
The average reduction in inventory would be: $10,000 ­ $7,500 = $2,500 per year

At a rate of return of t 11%. the savings would be: $2.500 × 11%=$275

6. Number of Days in Inventory (or Days Sales in Inventory): Measures tile average length of time in days that
merchandise is in inventory (the length of time necessary to sell an item o£ inventory). Because this ratio is calculated by dividing
365 days by the inventory turnover, its interpretation is inversely related to that of the inventory turnover ratio (discussed above).

365
inventory Turnover

7. Accounts Payables Turnover: Measures how many times per period accounts payable are paid. The turnover ratio
is not used as frequently as the Day's Purchases in Accounts Payable, discussed below.

Cost of Goods Sold (COGS) 
Average Accounts Payable

8.  Days Purchases in Accounts  Payable: Measures how many days' worth of inventory purchases are stin unpaid.
This gives some information about how well a company is paying its bins to its suppliers. Previous cautions about data quality' in
receivables and inventory apply here too.

365
Accounts Payable Turnover

In theory it would be preferable to segregate inventory purchases from all other payables, but this information is
seldom given to outsiders. Therefore, COGS and A/P must be used as surrogates.

The two payables ratios are not used as frequently as the receivables and inventory ratios, but they come into play
when determining the operating cycle, below.

9. Operating Cycle: The operating cycle represents the average number of days it lakes to sell inventory and then
collect on the sales. It is a key measure of an enterprise's operating efficiency and financial health. A shorter operating cycle indicates
a company is more efficient than either it was last year or than a competitor with equivalent products and markets. A longer cycle
time indicates just the reverse. Not only are tile absolute numbers important, but the trend over time is often more important. For
instance. short­term lenders win want to know how quickly they can expect to be paid back.

Average Collection Period + Number of Days in Inventory

Example: Given the following information estimate the operating cycle.
Accounts Receivable Turnover Ratio 3.65
Inventory Turnover Ratio 3.30
Alternatives:
a. 52.5 days
b. 100.0 days 
c. 110.6 days 
d. 210.6 days
Answer: The answer is d. as calculated below.

Average collection period   365        =  365    = 100days


AR Turnover 3.65
Average days in inventory = 365 = 365 = 1 10.6 days
Inventory Turnover 3.30

Operating Cycle = 100 + 110.6 = 210.6 days

A related concept is the Cash Cycle (or Cash­to­Cash or Cash­on­Cash cycle). This simply takes the Operating Cycle and
deducts the days purchases in accounts payable. This gives recognition to the fact cash is not used to purchase inventory at the time it
is acquired. However, the longer Operating Cycle is more frequently taught and used for analysis.

Example of Cash Flow Cycle: If the average age of inventory is 60 days, the average age of accounts receivable is 4(1 days. and
average days purchases in accounts payable is 35 days, the length of the cash flow cycle is: a. 100 days b. 135 days c. 55 days d. 65 
days

Answer: 60 4 40 ­­. 35 = 65 days

10.  Cash  Ratio (or  Cash  to Current  Liabilities): Severe  liquidity problems  with receivables  and inventories,  or
pledging of those assets, may require an even more conservative analysis of liquidity. The cash ratio includes only cash and current
assets   that   are   Readily   converted   to   cash   (i.e.,   cash  equivalents  and  marketable  securities)  in  the  numerator.   Thus,   it  is  more
conservative than either the current ratio or the acid­test (quick) ratio for measuring tile company's short­term liquidity.

Cash + Cash Equivalents + Marketable Securities
Current Liabilities

11.  Cash Flow  Ratio: Measures tile cash generated from operations compared 1o the current liabilities. This ratio


looks at tile flow of cash over tile course of time rather than the static amount of cash on hand. Greater operating cash flow' leads to
a higher likelihood that sufficient cash win be generated to pay current obligations.

Cash Flow From Operations Current Liabilities

12. Liquidity Index: A more comprehensive ratio for trend analysis and comparative analysis across companies is the
liquidity index. It is measured in days and can be considered a weighted average conversion time for current assets.

Total Dollar­Days in Current Assets
Current Assets

Example: An example is the easiest way to understand the liquidity index.

CA Component $ Amount xDays to Convert to Cash = Dollar­l)ays


Cash 25,000 0 0
Marketable Securities 5,000 2 10,000
Accounts Receivable 20,000 45a 900,000
Inventory 50.000 60b 3.000.000
Total Current Assets 100,000 3.910.000

a The days to convert A/R to cash is equal to the number of days it takes to collect A/R (i.e., the average collection period)
b The days in the operating cycle (i.e., the number of days to convert inventory to cash plus the number of days it takes to collect
A/R)

Liquidity  Index = Dollar­Days = 3.910.000 = 39.1 days


Dollar Amount              100,000

This number is not necessarily meaningful in itself but it gains significance when compared to other periods or other
entities. A higher or increasing liquidity index is a sign of less liquidity, while a lower or declining index indicates greater liquidity,.

IlI CAPITAL STRUCTURE AND SOLVENCY

A. Definitions

1.  Capital Structure:  The proportions and type of permanent financing used in an organization. Tile management
choice to use debt or equity financing and the extent of debt are the critical elements of capital structure.

2. Debt: Debt must be repaid according to a preset schedule with a specified interest rate. The interest rate can be
variable according to some formula, but the formula is predetermined, interest costs of debt are tax­deductible to the corporation. It is
generally expected and assumed that tile company win earn more return on all assets than it pays in interest expenses. The date by
which a given debt must be repaid is the maturity date. One benefit of debt is that it becomes a fixed cost over the life of the debt
instrument.

Preferred   stock   is   often   treated   as   debt   when   evaluating   solvency,   because   it   often   has   dividend   or   redemption
provisions.

3. Equity: Equity is that part of capital contributed by owners of common sleek (including paid­in­surplus) and the
cumulative earnings retained in the company over time. It is the general basis of stability. There is no required or specified repayment
plan. In some periods return may be negative. Owners Equity never has a maturity date. Payment to owners is in the form of
dividends, which are not tax deductible to tile corporation, and, because, they can be changed at win (but rarely are in practice), they
represent a variable financing cost to tile company.

4. Solvency: The ability of a company to pay its obligations, both short and long­lotto. As the use  of debt increases,
so does the fixed cost of its obligations. Therefore. increased den means higher risk of insolvency.

5.  Operating Leverage:  The extent to which tile cost function is made up of fixed costs, sometimes calculated as
fixed costs divided by the sum of fixed and variable costs, High operating leverage leads to a greater risk of loss when sales decline.
It also leads to rapid profit growth once sales exceed the breakeven point.

6. Financial Leverage: The amount of debt relative to the amount of capital invested by owners. Leverage ratios
measure a firm’s vulnerability to business downturns. Firms with high debt to net worth (high leverage) are more vulnerable; but they
call be more profitable in good times. A highly leveraged company has limited capacity to assume new debt. however, expect ations
arc that the returns available to owners win be greater, albeit riskier. Tile higher tile amount leveraged, tile greater the risk assumed
by creditors. Less leverage indicates greater long­term financial safety.

B. Ratios, Computational Issues and Analysis
Leverage ratios measure the degree of financial leverage in a firm's capital structure, while coverage ratios measure a firm's
ability to service its debt obligations. These are tile long­term equivalent to liquidity ratios used for short­term analysis. Analysts use
many different types of ratios that to leverage, so there is little consensus about which ratios are most important. Below are ratios that
might appear on the CMA exam

(according to the exam content specifications). Fortunately, tile names for many of these ratios describe their calculation (e.g., Long­
Term  Debt  to  Equity  Capital).   While  studying  for  tile  CMA  exam,   memorize  ratios  when  the  formulas  are  not  obvious  (e.g.,
Financial Leverage Index). For all of the ratios listed below candidates should be prepared to calculate, interpret, or explain the
effects of changes in financial statement values.

1.  Financial   Leverage  Index   (or  Degree   of  Financial   Leverage):  The  concept   is  to   take  into   account  the   tax
deductible nature of leveraged interest expense.

Return on Equity
Adjusted Return on Assets

Return on Equity (ROE) is the standard profitability measure (discussed later). Adjusted Return on Assets (ROA ) is
similar, but it recognizes that ROA should calculated after removing the effects of financing­­in other words, the numerator in the
ROA calculation should be: Net Income + Interest Expense (1­tax rate), lf there are no liabilities, then ROE win be equal to ROA ,
and tile FLI win equal 1.0. lf FLI is >1.0, then tile effect of financial leverage is favorable. If FLI is less than 1.0, the leverage is
unfavorable and works against the company. This could be because interest rates are too high or assets are not being efficiently used.

2. Financial Leverage Ratio: This ratio is unrelated to the preceding index. It measures tile relationship between total
assets and stockholders equity. If there are no liabilities, the ratio win be 1.0. When there are liabilities, it must always be greater than
1.0. Thus, this ratio increases with the amount of debt.

Total Assets
Owners' Equity

3. Asset Coverage: This ratio is similar to financial leverage, but it relates total assets to long­term debt instead of
owners' equity,. The asset coverage ratio measures the ability to cover debt obligations with a company's assets. A higher ratio
indicates better ability to pay off debt (i.e., less leverage).

Total Assets
Long­Term Debt

Sometimes asset coverage is calculated in other ways. For example, the following formula measures the ability of tangible assets, less
current operating liabilities, to pay off long­term debt:
Total Assets ­ Intangible Assets ­ (Total Current Liabilities ­ Short­Term Debt)
Short­Term Debt + Long­Term Debt

4. Other Leverage Ratios Involving Owner's Equity: Several other leverage ratios compare balance sheet items to
owner's equity.

a. Total Debt to Equity, Capital (Debt/Equity Ratio):  Relationship between capital contributed by external
creditors and by internal owners. The ratio can vary from 0 (no liabilities) on up, depending on tile degree of financial leverage. A
higher ratio indicates higher leverage. A ratio o~' 1.0 would mean liabilities = equity, while a ratio of 2.0 would mean liabilities are
twice equity, or that financing is 2/3 debt and 1/3 equity.

Total Liabilities
Owners' Equity

This ratio is related to the financial leverage ratio. Total debt to equity capital of 1.0 would be a financial leverage
ratio of 2.0, while total debt to equity capital of 2.0 equates to financial leverage of 3.0. Tile ratios must be calculated, don't think you
call 'just add 1.0'.

b. Equity Capital to Total Debt: This is the inverse of tile Total Debt to Equity Capital ratio­­­it is a comparison
of the amount of capital contributed by owners to the amount of capital contributed by external creditors. Thus, a higher ratio means
louver leverage.

Owners' Equity 
Total Liabilities

c. Long­Term Debt to Equity Capital: This ratio is similar to tile Total debt to Equity Capital ratio, but looks
only at long­tem~ debt rather than total liabilities.

Long­Term Debt Owners' Equity

d. Fixed Assets to Equity Capital: Measures tile extent to which owners' equity is invested in fixed assets. It is
similar to financial leverage, but focuses on fixed assets rather than to total assets. A high ratio indicates that a large proportion of the
fixed assets are financed with debt. A lower ratio indicates that there is a "cushion" for creditors in tile case of liquidation.

Fixed Assets

Owners' Equity

5. Leverage Ratios Involving Net Tangible Assets: Net tangible assets­­Total assets less intangible assets­­can be
used in leverage ratios to analyze potential solvency in tile case that intangible assets become worthless or are difficult to liquidate.

a. Net Tangible Assets to Long­Term Debt:  Measures tile extent to which tangible assets are financed with
long­term debt. A higher ratio reduces the risk of long­term debt because there is a "cushion" for creditors in the case of liquidation.

Net Tangible Assets Long­Term Debt
b. Total Liabilities to Net Tangible Assets:  Measures tile relationship between total liabilities and tangible
assets. A higher ratio increases solvency risk, particularly if tile ratio is greater than 1.0.

Total Liabilities

Net Tangible Assets

6. Coverage Ratios: Coverage ratios measure a firm's ability to generate profits that can be used to meet obligations.

a. Times Interest Earned: Shows how well a company's earnings cover its interest charges. Measures the extent to
which earnings can decline and still meet annual interest obligations. A higher ratio indicates tile company is better able to cover its
interest costs.

 EBIT    =     Net income + Interest Expense + Income Tax Expen
   se

Interest Expense interest Expense
Example: Forever, Inc. had net income (after­tax) of $1,300,000, debt service payments on $1.000.000 of9% mortgage bonds 
and
$2.100.000 of 10% subordinate debentures. The corporation is subject to a 40% income tax rate. What is times
interest earned ratio'?

Answer:
Pretax: interest expense:
Mortgage bond: 1.000,000 × 9% $ 90,000
Subordinate debentures: $2,100,000 10% 210,000
Total $300.000

Pretax income:
Pretax income × (1 40%) = $1.300,000 ­> Pretax income= $1.300,000/(1 40%) $2.166.667

EBIT ­ Net income + Interest Expense + Income ]'ax Expense = Pretax income + Interest Expense = $2.166.667+$300,000 =
$2.466,667

Times Interest Earned $2.466.667/$300,000 = 8.22 times

b. Earnings to Fixed Charges: This ratio is similar to the Times Interest Earned ratio. except it measures the
relationship between earnings and both interest costs and lease charges. This ratio takes into account the widespread  use of lease
financing.

EBIT + Lease Charges  Net income + Interest Expense + Income Tax Expense + lease Cha rg
   es
Interest Expense + Lease Charges Interest Expense + Lease Charges
c. Cash Flow to Fixed Charges: This ratio looks at the ability of operating cash flow. instead of earnings (which
includes non cash amounts), to pay for fixed charges.

Cash Flow from Operations Interest Expense + Lease Charges

C. Measuring Leverage With Common­Size Statements

Common­size statements­­in particular, a common­size balance sheet­~can be used to evaluate a company's leverage. (Size the
later section in this chapter.)

IV. RETURN ON INVESTED CAPITAL

A. Definitions

1. Invested Capital: This term relates to the investment by owners and creditors in a company. Sometimes it is calculated
as total liabilities plus owners' equity, or it might be calculated in a more restricted manner as long­term debt plus owners' equity. Some
analysts measure invested capital by ret~2rring to the asset side of the balance sheet­­the sum of resources invested.

2. Return on Invested Capital: This term describes any measure that calculates a profit, or return, on the invested capital.
The ma. jot goal is to determine whether management is using the company's resources effectively and efficiently. To measure return on
invested   capital,   ratios   typically   include   some   measure   of   income   in   the   numerator   and   some   measure   of   invested   capital   in   the
denominator.

3.   Difficult),   in   Defining   Invested   Capital:  There   are   several   different   ways   to   think   about   invested   capital   when
analyzing return. For example, owners are likely to be interested in the return on their investment in a company, while creditors are most
likely interested in whether the Company is earning sufficient profits to pay their obligations. In addition, it is not clear whether to
measure investment using book values or market values. Theoretically, market values are generally preferred. However, market values
may be unavailable for many types of capital and may fluctuate from period to period, making it difficult to compare results across time
periods. Additional complications arise because seine sources of capital, such as preferred stock or convertible debt, have characteristics
of both owners' equity and debt. How should they be classified?

4. Difficulty in Defining Income: There are also difficulties in deciding which measure of income to use in evaluating
return on invested capital. Income measured using GAAP does not necessarily measure a company's economic performance. Net income
may include unusual or nonrecurring items, and its value is affected by management's estimates and choices of accounting methods, In
addition, tile cost of debt equity­­interest expense­­is deducted from net income, while tile cost of stockholders~ equity is not.
Furthermore, analysts believe that some types of expenses, such as intangible asset amortization, should be removed from the net income
calculation. To address these issues, some measures for return on invested capital make adjustments for nonrecurring items, interest
expense, amortization, or other items. Because many of these items also affect income taxes, such adjustments are often made using
after­tax values. Other adjustments include subtracting preferred dividends when measuring income attributable to common stockholders.
B. Ratios, Computational Issues, and Analysis

Given different ways to think about return on invested capital, it is not surprising that there are many different ratio formulas.
This section of the textbook focuses ell tile most common measures used h>r return on invested capital. Additional measures and issues
are discussed in later sections of this chapter.

1. Return on Assets (ROA , or Return on Investment):  Measures tile return (profits) relative to investment in total
assets, measured using book values. This ratio improves as profits get larger, relative to a firm's investment in total assets. Successful use
of debt is evidenced by the ROA  being greater than tile average cost of debt, which leads to the return on equity being greater than the
return on assets (sec tile financial leverage index). Unfavorable leverage would have the reverse effect.

Net Income (After Taxes) 
Average Total Assets

OR

Net Income + [Interest Expense × (1 ­Tax Rate)}
Average Total Assets

There are two common versions of this formula. The first version­­having only net income in the numerator­­is tile one
most commonly used. The second version is sometimes referred to as Adjusted Return on Assets. The adjustment in tile numerator is
made to remove the income effects of financial leverage (i.e., interest expense net of tile tax benefit), thus providing a better measure of'
the return on assets from operations.

The denominator is more properly calculated using average total assets as follows, however. analysts often simply using
ending total assets in tile formula. (This is particularly true for the Dupont analysis, discussed later in this section.)

(Total assets at the beginning of the period + Total assets at tile end of the period)/2

Sometimes additional adjustments are made to the numerator of the ROA  formula. For example. unusual or nonrecurring
items may be removed (after­tax).

2. Profit Margin:  Measures tile profit per dollar of sales. This ratio improves when costs are lower, relative to sales.
Improvement can be achieved by reducing costs or by generating more sales relative to costs. (Note: Although profit margin is generally
viewed as a profitability measure rather than a return on invested capital measure, it is included in this section of the text because it is
used in tile DuPont analyses, below.)
Net Income (After Taxes)
Sales

3. Asset Turnover: Measures the firm's ability to generate sales in relation to total assets. This ratio improves through
increased sales or through reductions in assets.

Gales
Average Total Assets

4. Return on Common Stockholders' Equit.v (ROE): Measures tile percentage return accruing to common shareholders
based upon the book value of tile common equity. The return is calculated after subtracting preferred dividends.

Net Income (After Taxes) ­ Preferred Dividends
Average Common Stockholders' Equity

C. Dupont Analysis

Tile Dupont Company developed this method of profitability analysis to evaluate tile performance  of their managers and
identify ways to improve ROA  and ROE.

1. Breakdown of ROA : Using tile Dupont method, ROA  Can be broken down into the following ratios. Notice that the
ROA  and Asset Turnover formulas do not typically include average balance sheet values in their denominators.

ROA  = Profit Margin x Asset Turnover

Net Income = Net Income x Sales


Total Assets Sales Total Assets

2. Breakdown of ROE: ROE can be broken down into other ratios, similar to the Breakdown tbr ROA , above. In addition
to   profit   margin   and   asset   turnover   components,   ROE   is   affected   by   financial   leverage.   Higher   ROE   may   bc   obtained   through   a
combination of higher profit margin, higher asset turnover, and higher financial leverage.

ROE = Adjusted Profit Margin x Asset Turnover × Financial Leverage

Net Income ­ Pfd. Div. = Net Income ­ Pfd. Div. x Sales × Total Assets


Total Equity Sales Total Assets Total Equity

D. Sustainable Equi
   ty
    Growth

Sustainable equity growth refers to the ability of a company to continue growing through reinvestment of earnings. A common
formula is:

Retention Ratio × ROE      = Net Income ­ Dividends × ROE
Net Income

The retention ratio represents the proportion of net income retained during the current year. Assuming that: (a) the retention remains
constant, (b) there are no changes in the capital structure, (c) no new equity is issued, and (d) ROE remains constant, then the
sustainable equity growth formula measures a permanent rate of growth for equity. These are very restrictive assumptions, so this
calculation must be interpreted carefully'.

If ROE is broken down using the Dupont formula, then sustainable equity growth is also equal to:

Retention Ratio × Adjusted Profit Margin × Asset Turnover x Financial Leverage

V. PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS

The CMA exam focuses not only on the analysis of ratios when evaluating profitability, but also on the quality of profit
measures. This section of the chapter addresses a number of issues that affect profitability, analysis.

A. Factors Affecting Income

Various income statement items are typically used when analyzing profitability. These financial statement values do not
necessarily represent a company's economic performance, thus complicating the  analysis. Below are several important factors that
affect the quality of reported income statement values.

1. Accounting Estimates:  Income is affected by a number of accounting estimates, including the allowance for
doubtful accounts, the salvage values and depreciation lives of fixed assets, lower of cost or market adjustments to inventory, and
warranty or other contingent liabilities. These accounting estimates may be influenced by managers and are also subject to uncertain
outcomes.

2. Accounting Methods:  GAAP includes certain conventions, such as historical cost and a stable monetary unit,
which may distort reported revenues and expenses. In addition, managers are allowed to adopt a variety of different accounting
methods that may reduce comparability across companies. Examples of accounting method choices include inventory cost flow
assumptions, depreciation methods, and accounting for long­term contracts.

3.   Disclosures   and   Presentation:  Substantial   leeway   exists   within   GAAP  for   the   detail   provided   in   financial
statement disclosures. Some companies combine items that  arc reported separately by others. For example, one company might
report selling costs separately from general and administration. while another company might combine these items. Also, some
managers present earnings on temporary investments as part of operating income, while other managers present it as nonoperating. In
addition, companies vary in the amount of detail provided in footnote disclosures. Differing definitions and materialitv judgments
provide opporttmilies for manages to use their discretion when preparing financial statements.

4. Needs of Different Users: As discussed in tile section on leverage, different users have different perspectives about
income. Common shareholders are primarily interested in their return on equity, while creditors are primarily interested in the ability
of a company to pay their obligations. Thus. shareholders might focus on the change in value of a company's assets, while creditors
might   focus   more   oil   liquidity.   In  addition,   some   users   are   interested   only   in   short­term   results,   while  others  have  long­tem~
investments. These differences lead to conflicting attitudes toward profitability measures. Nevertheless, most users are interested in a
company's ability to generate revenues and to control costs.

B. Analysis of Revenues

Tile analysis of revenues often focuses oi1 revenue growth, or the percent change in revenues from one period to the next.
Below are several factors that should be considered in conjunction with revenue growth.

1. Importance of Source, Stability, and Trend: Revenues are most valuable when they are expected to continue into
the future. Analysts often monitor the stability and trend of revenues as indicators of a company's ability to continue generating
revenues in the future. These analyses ma> also highlight seasonal patterns or a company's exposure to economic downturns. In
addition, some revenue sources arc riskier than others. For example, sometimes companies have sources of revenue that may no!
continue in the future, such as revenue from products subject to patents that win expire, or revenue from one­lime contracts. Some
companies rely heavily on one or more major customers, and the loss era single customer could be

devastating. Companies subject to rapidly changing technology face similar risk; products they sell today may be worthless in the 
near future.

2. Relationship to Receivables and Inventor3,: Revenues are usually analyzed in conjunction with receivables and
inventories. Negative trends often appear in these balance sheet accounts before they appear on the income statement. For example,
when sales volumes begin to drop some managers engage in "channel stuffing," in which they force their customers (particularly in
distributor relationships) to accept unneeded shipments. This type of activity generally triggers a decline in receivables turnover. A
decline   in   receivables   turnover   might   also   indicate   that   a   company's   customers   are   having   financial   difficulties.   A   decline   in
inventory turnover often indicates that managers anticipated higher sales than occurred, suggesting unforeseen sales difficulties. It
might also suggest product quality or other problems. Thus, declines in receivables and inventory turnover might indicate impending
declines in revenues.

3. Accounting Methods:  Alternative accounting methods are available for some types of revenues, such as trader
long­term contracts (completed contract versus percent of completion). Obviously, managers' choices of accounting methods can
have major effects on the analysis of revenues. In addition, the SEC investigates instances of potential financial reporting fraud
related to revenues more often than the  any other accounting area  . Sometimes managers are overly aggressive in recognizing
revenues   earlier   than   they   should   (such   as   in   the   case   of  "channel   stuffing").   Other   times   managers   are   overly   optimistic   in
accounting estimates.

C. Analysis of Expenses

1. Major Expense Categories:

Cost of sales
∙ Selling
∙ Depreciation
∙ Maintenance
∙ Amortization
∙ General and administrative
∙ Financing expenses
∙ Income taxes

2. Gross Profit Margin: Cost of sales is often analyzed using tile gross profit margin, which measures the proportion of
each sales dollar remaining after covering cost of sales.

Gross Profit Sales ­ Cost of Sales

Sales Sales

3. Analyzing Changes in Expenses as a Percent of Revenue: Expenses are often analyzed as a percent of revenues.
This form of analysis takes into account the idea that expenses are expected to fluctuate at least partly with revenues. The trend  in
expenses as a percent of revenues provides information about how well managers arc controlling costs.

CMA candidates should be prepared to identify possible ROA sons for increases over time in an expense as a percent
of revenue.

D. Analyzing Income With Common­Size Statements

Common­size   statements­­in   particular,   a   common­size   income   statement­­can   be   used   to   evaluate   a   company's


profitability. (Size the later section in this chapter.)

E. Book Value per Share

Used as a basis for evaluating changes in the net worth of a company from year to year. Remember that book
value means historical cost, not the value of the stock nor what the shareholder would receive in liquidation.

Net Assets Less Preferred Stock Redemption
Number of Common Shares Outstanding

F. Operating Cash Flow to Income

Tile ratio of operating cash flow to net income is a measure of tile strength and quality of' reporting earnings.~
In the absence of unusual income statement items, manager= manipulation, or other economic changes  this  ratio is
expected to remain fairly constant over time. Thus, changes in the ratio from year to year suggest that further analysis is
called for.

Operating Cash Flow 
Net Income

VI. EARNINGS­BASED ANALYSIS

A. Earnings Quality and Persistence

1. Accounting Income (or Profit or Earnings): Income reported on a company's financial
statements.

2.  Economic   Profit:  According   to   economic   theory,   economic   profit   is   the   wealth   created  above   a
company's cost of capital. In other words, earnings (however measured) amount to economic profit only when they
exceed a required return on invested capital.

3. Earnings Quality~: Refers to how well financial statement income relates to a company's true economic
performance.   When   earnings   quality   is   high,   income   reflects   tile   results   of   a   company's   core   business   activities.
Increases in income occur because of increased operating revenues and/or improved control of costs. Indicators of high
earnings quality include:

∙ Consistent and strong relationship between income and operating cash flow
∙ Absence of erratic, unusual, or nonrecurring items (e.g., gain on sale of subsidiary. restructuring charges, or change
in accounting method)
∙ Use of reasonable or conservative accounting methods and estimates
∙ Absence of artificial profits, such as inflation

4. Earnings Persistence: Refers to whether the components of income arc stable and continue over time.
Repeat customer business contributes to earnings persistence, as does management monitoring and control of costs.
Higher quality earnings are more likely to persist, although persistence is also a function factors unrelated to earnings
quality, such as tile nature of a company's business, economic trends, and other' factors.

5. Estimation of Persistent Earnings (or Core Earnings):  Analysts often recast a company's reported
income to estimate persistent earnings (also called "core earnings") by removing erratic, unusual, and nonrecurring
items. A major issue when adjusting reported earning is to properly treat t related income lax effects. For example, an
unusual gain on sale of assets would be subtracted from net income when estimating persistent earnings, lf the gain is
reported pretax, then the after­tax gain must be calculated before subtracting it from net income. However, if tile gain is
reported after­tax (such as the gain on a discontinued line of business), then no adjustment for income taxes is required.
Example: Estimate persistent earnings given the following income statement:

Revenues  $1,500
Cost of products sold ..............................................................................................(670)
Gross Margin ...................................................................................................................................830
Other Costs and Expenses:
Selling. administrative, and general .............................................................: .........................................(550)
Research and development .....................................................................................................................(50)
Restructuring charges ..............................................................................................................................(76)
Operating Earnings ..........................................................................................................................154
Other Income (Expense)
Interest expense .......................................................................................................................................(25)
Gain on sale of equipment ......................................................................................................................2
Earnings Before Income Taxes and Cumulative Effect of
Change in Accounting Principle ..................................................................................................131
Income Tax Expense (30%) ...............................................................................................................................(39)
Earnings Before Cumulative Effect of Change in Accounting Principle ........................................92
Cumulative Effect of Change in Accounting Principle. Net of Tax ..................................................................(58)
Net Earnings.............................................................................................................................................5; 34

Answer:

The first step is to identify~ tile items on the income statement that are not part of persistent earnings. In this case, nonrecurring items appear to be:
Restructuring charges, gain on sale of equipment, and cumulative effect of change in accounting principle. Most likely, the remaining items on the
income statement would recur year after x car.

The second step is to recast earnings without those items. One way would be to create le a new income statement. excluding the nonrecurring items.
Income tax expense would be recalculated as 30% of pretax income. Another wax is to begin with net earnings and then reverse the after­tax effects
of nonrecurring items, as follows:

Net Earnings as reported $ 34.0
Reverse pretax items (must be adjusted for income taxes): 
Restructuring charges: $76 × (1 ­30%) Gain on sale of  53.2
equipment: $2 × (I ­ 30%) (1.4)
Reverse after­tax item: 58.0
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle     $143.8
Adjusted Earnings (Estimated Persistent Earnings)
B. Accou
   n
   ting Data and Stock Prices

The market value of a company's stock is based on expectations of  future returns to shareholders. Reported
earnings and asset book values do not necessarily translate into future shareholder returns. However, financial statement
values provide information that is useful to shareholders in assessing market value.

1. Book Value: The book value of earnings is net income; on a per­share basis it is earnings pct' share is
(EPS). The book value of common stockholders' equity is equal to the book value of total stockholders' equity less any
equity accounts, such as preferred stock, that relate to other types of ownership. The calculation of book value per share
was shown in section V.E., above.

2. Market Value: When analyzing financial data, the market value is usually obtained from quoted stock
prices.

3. Price/Book Ratio: Measures the premium that shareholders are wining to pay for the company, above its
book value. It may be calculated using either total or per­share values.

 Total Market Value of Co m
   mon Stock =Market Value per Share Common Stock
Common Equity Book Value per Share

4. Price to Earnings (P/E) Ratio:  Measures the relationship between the earnings of a business and the
current market price per share. This ratio is closely watched by the stock market, and is often referred to as the earnings
multiplier ("the company's stock is selling at 12 times earnings"). An acceptable P/E ratio

will vary depending on tile market's perception of tile future prospects of tile company. A company with high growth 
opportunities can support a higher P/E ratio.

Market Value per Share Common Stock
Earnings per Share

5. Earnings Yield: This is the inverse of the P/E Ratio. This ratio is particularly useful in cases were EPS is
zero or negative (when the P/E ratio cannot be calculated or is meaningless).

Earnings per Share
Market Value per Share Common Stock

6. Basic Earnings per Share (EPS): Earnings per share of average common stock.

Net Income ­ Preferred Dividends
Weighted Average # of Common Shares Outstanding

This is a simplified look at earnings per share. In more complex capital structures, both basic (as above) and
diluted earnings per share must be computed.

7.   Dividend   Yield:   Indicates   the   short­term   rate   of   return   that   win   be   received   in   cash   dividends   From   an   equity
investment.

Dividend per Share 
Market Price per Share

8. Dividend Payout: Percentage of earnings paid out in dividends.

Dividends per Share 
Earnings per Share

VI!. OTHER ANALYTICAL ISSUES

A. Common Size Analysis

1. Horizontal Common Size Analysis:  One of tile ways to facilitate comparisons between companies or
across years for a single company is horizontal common size analysis. All financial statement figures are expressed as a
percentage of base year figures. Actual dollar amounts may also be shown. Trends may be analyzed using time series
analysis. Past trends may indicate the direction of possible future trends. Analysis may be able to determine if a change
from a prior year was part of a past trend, the start of a new trend or just normal variation in annual data.

2. Vertical Common Size Analysis: All figures are converted to percentages of 'a specific figure. Income
Statement figures, for example, would all be expressed as percentage  of sales and Balance Sheet figures could be a
percentage of total assets.

B. Comparison With Industry

Publishers of industry information, such as Dun  and Bradstreet  and  Robert  Morris Associates, analyze


financial data from thousands of companies which can be used for comparison. It can sometimes be difficult to compare a
firm to a specific industry, especially if the firm is in more than one line of business. Also, tile published ratios are
averages for tile industry. Tile disadvantage is that the industry as a whole may not be performing satisfactorily, or a large
segment may be performing poorly enough to bring~ the average down. Therefore, average may not be good. Another
problem using comparisons between companies is the

differences in accounting methods used by the various companies. However, one can generally get an indication of 
comparative performance, especially in conjunction with the firm's own past performance.

C. Inflation

Traditional financial statements prepared according to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) are
based on the historical cost concept; this requires the asset to be recorded and carried at its past historical acquisition
price, less allowable reductions such as depreciation and declines in value below cost.
1.   Balance   Sheet:  During   periods   of   inflation,   historical   cost   accounting   understates   tile   value   of
nonmonetary assets such as inventory and fixed assets. At the same time, tile purchasing power declines for monetary
assets such as cash and accounts receivable. On the other hand, it is beneficial during times of inflation to owe monetary
liabilities such as accounts payable and long­term debt.

2. Profitability': During periods of inflation, tile costs of nonmonetary resources that arc used up during a
period   (such   as   inventory   sold   and   depreciation   of   fixed   assets)   are   understated   using   historical   cost.   Suppose   an
inventory item costing $100 was sold, but must be replaced at a cost of $110. When historical cost ($100) is used on the
income statement, accounting income is overstated by $10 compared to economic profit. Ratios such as return on assets
(ROA ) can become very distorted. Under inflation, tile numerator (income) tends to be overstated, and the denominator
(total  assets) tends to be understated. Thus. inflation causes ROA   to appear artificially high. Inflation also distorts
financial statement trends. Revenues may appear to grow due simply due to inflation.

3. Adjusting for Inflation: Price indices may be used to adjust historical cost financial statement values for
inflation. In the U.S., tile Consumer Price Index (CPI) is often used as a general price index. Indices are also available for
prices within individual industries.

Example: A company had sales of $300.000 in 20xl and the price index for its industry is expected to rise from 300 in 20xl to 32(I
in 20x2. The level of sales that the company must reach in 20x2 to achieve a ROA l growth rate ot'20% is:

a. $36O,00O
b. $320.000 
c. $337.500 
d. $384.000

Answer: d. If sales are S300,000 when the price index is 300, then sales  must be $320,000 ($300.000 × 300/320) to maintain the


same relative position when the price index is 320. To achieve 20% growth, multiply $320.(10(I by 12()%. This is
$384,000.
D. International Considerations

1. Accounting Methods: When analyzing the financial data of companies from different countries, it is
necessary to take into account tile fact that accounting methods may differ across countries.

2. Foreign Exchange Fluctuations:  Companies having transactions in other currencies are exposed to
currency exchange risk. Suppose a U.S. company sells merchandise to a company in Spain for (~1.000. Between tile
time the transaction is negotiated and the time payment is received from the customer, tile exchange rate between the
U.S. dollar and the cure may become higher or lower. Some companies enter into hedging arrangements to minimize
this type of risk. In general, foreign currency exchange gains or losses are not considered part of a company's core
earnings; they tend to distort accounting profit. Foreign exchange fluctuations may also affect the quantity of product
demanded. The price of products sold internationally becomes higher or lower as currencies fluctuate. Sometimes
companies experience declining (increasing) revenues because the prices of their products become higher (lower) in
other countries.

E. Nonfinancial and Qualitative Considerations

A variety of Nonfinancial considerations can affect financial statement analysis. For example, the openness of
management disclosures or the independence of a company's board of directors may affect perceptions of earnings
quality. Some shareholders may consider factors such as environmental  management or social responsibility when
making   investment   decisions.   Additional   qualitative   factors   include   degree   of   company   innovation,   product
differentiation and quality, use of technology, distribution channels, and sustainability of barriers to entry.

F. Limitations of Ratio Analysis

1. Financial  Statement Values:  Most ratios are based on financial  statement  values, which may not


adequately represent economic values.

2.   Lack   of   Comparability:  Ratios   are   typically   compared   to   prior  year  values   or   to   industry   data.
However, such comparisons are sometimes misleading or inappropriate. For example, different accounting methods
(Life vs. FIFO inventory methods) may be used by the firm being analyzed and the average industry figures. Also, a
company's year­to­year comparisons may be distorted by business acquisitions or other changes.

3.   Cash   Flow   Timing   and   Risk:  Measures   of   profitability   such   as   return   on   equity   surlier   l'roll1
deficiencies as indicators of performance. They do not take into account tile risk or timing of cash flows.

4.  Magnitude of Comparison  Base:  In  most  instances, the analyst must  apply common sense when


examining ratios. For instance, profit margins for most companies are quite small and may appear to be in line with
industry averages. A difference of 2 percentage points between company and industry profit margins may at first appear
to be small; however, if sales are $50 minion, a 2 percentage­point­difference amounts to $1 minion in net  income,
which may be considered significant.

VIII. EXTENDED RATIO EXAMPLE

The data presented below show actual figures for selected accounts of a company for the fiscal year ended May
3 1, 20xl, and selected budget figures for the 20x2 fiscal year. The controller is in the process of reviewing the 20x2
budget and calculating some key ratios based on the budget. The company monitors yield or return ratios using the
average financial position of the company. (Round all calculations to three decimal places where necessary.)

5/31/x2 5/31/x 1
Current assets $210,000 $180,000
Noncurrent assets 275,000 255,000
Current liabilities 78.000 85,000
Long­term debt 75,000 30.000
Common sleek ($30 par value) 300,000 300.000
Retained earnings 32,000 20,000

Sales (all sales are credit sales) Administrative expense
Cost of goods sold 20x2 Operations
Interest expense $350,000
Income taxes (40% rate) 160,000
Dividends declared and paid in  3,000 48,000 60,000 67,000
20x2
Current Assets
5/31/x2 5/31/x 1
Cash $20.000 $10,000
Accounts Receivable 100,000 70,000
Inventory 70.000 80.000
Other 20,000 20.000

Questions:

1­1    The company’s current ratio for 20x2 is:
a.  1.373
b.  1.176
c.  2,692
d,  2.308

1­2. The debt to total asset ratio for 20x2 is:
a. 0.352
b. 0.315
c. 0.264
d. 0.237

1­3. The 20x2 accounts receivable turnover is:
a. 1.882
b. 3.500
c. 5.000
d. 4.118

1­4    The inventor turnover for 20x2 is: 
5' 
a.  171 days 
b. 160 days 
c. 183 days 
d. 78 days

1­5    The total asset turnover for 20x2 is:
a.  0.805
b.  0.761
c.  0 722
d.  0.348

1­6.   The 20x2 return on assets is:
a.  0.261
b.  0.148
c.  0.157
d.  0.166

1­7. The times interest earned in 20x2 is: 
a. 41 times 
b. 40 times 
c. 25 times 
d. 24 times

1­8     The 20x2 return on equity is:
a.  0.040
b.  0.217
c.  0.240
d.  0.361

1­9.  The per­share book value of the company's common stock in 20x2is: 
a. $33.20 
b. $32.00 
c. $30.00 
d. $32.60

Answers: 1­1. c. Current Assets = 210.000 = 2.692


Current Liabilities 78,000

1­2. b. Total Liabilities 153.000 = 0.315


Total Assets 487,1000

1­3. d. Net Credit Sales =  350,00 0 4.118


Average Account Receivable                 85,000

1­4. a. Cost of Goods Sold = 160.000 = 2.133 times


Average Inventory 75.000

 365          = 171 days
2.133
 
I­5. b. Sales = 350.000 = 0.7608
Average Total Assets 460.000

1­6. c.  Net Inco m
   e (After Taxes'~ = 72.000 = 0.1565
Average Total Assets 460,000

1­7. a. Earnings Before Interest and 'Faxes = 123.000 = 41 times


Interest Expense 3,000

1­8. b. Net Income 72.000 = 0.2168


Average Equity 332,000

1­9. a. Net Assets = 332,000 33.20


# Shares 10,000