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300027 Engineering Computing

Autumn 2018
Unit Details

Unit Code: 300027


Unit Name: Engineering Computing
Credit Points: 10
Unit Level: 1
Assumed Knowledge: Basic knowledge in use of computers and Windows operating system

Modes of Delivery

Note: Students with any problems, concerns or doubts should discuss those with the Unit Coordinator as early as they can.

Unit Coordinator
Name: Upul Gunawardana
Phone: (02) 9685 4608
Location: PS ED.G.122
Email: u.gunawardana@westernsydney.edu.au
Consultation Arrangement:
Parramatta: Monday 2-3 in EDG.122

Teaching Team
Name: Mazin Aouf
Location: Parramatta
Email: m.aouf@westernsydney.edu.au
Name: Kalyani Kaja
Location: Kingswood
Email: k.kaja@westernsydney.edu.au
Name: Ram Singh
Location: Kingswood
Email: r.singh@westernsydney.edu.au
Name: Sina Hassanli
Location: Kingswood
Email: s.hassanli@westernsydney.edu.au
Name: Joseph Spagnol
Location: Kingswood
Name: Hossein Moeinzadeh
Phone: Kingswood
Email: h.moeinzadeh@westernsydney.edu.au

Edition: Autumn 2018


Copyright 2018
c University Western Sydney trading as Western Sydney University ABN 53 014 069 881 CRICOS Provider No: 00917K No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the prior written permission from the Dean of the School of Computing, Engineering & Mathematics. Copyright
for acknowledged materials reproduced herein is retained by the copyright holder. All readings in this publication are copied under licence in accordance with Part VB of the Copyright Act 1968.
Contents
1 About Engineering Computing 2
1.1 An Introduction to this Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2 What is Expected of You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.3 Changes to Unit as a Result of Past Student Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

2 Assessment Information 3
2.1 Unit Learning Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2.2 Approach to Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2.3 Contribution to Course Learning Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2.4 Assessment Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.5 Assessment Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.5.1 In-Class Quiz x3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.5.2 Exam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.6 General Submission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

3 Teaching and Learning Activities 13

4 Learning Resources 14
4.1 Recommended Readings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Note: The Learning Guide Companion supplements this document

1
1 About Engineering Computing
1.1 An Introduction to this Unit
Engineering computing is an introduction to using computation to solve real problems. The unit also aims to instil sound
principles of program design that can be utilised in many units throughout the students’ course. The basic elements and
structures of a high level language are taught. Students are exposed to numerous engineering problems and are encouraged
to implement solutions using an algorithmic approach.

1.2 What is Expected of You


Study Load
A student is expected to study an hour per credit point a week. For example a 10 credit point unit would require 10 hours
of study per week. This time includes the time spent within classes during lectures, tutorials or practicals.

Attendance
It is strongly recommended that students attend all scheduled learning activities to support their learning.

Online Learning Requirements


Unit materials will be made available on the unit’s vUWS (E-Learning) site (https://vuws.westernsydney.edu.au/). You
are expected to consult vUWS at least twice a week, as all unit announcements will be made via vUWS. Teaching and
learning materials will be regularly updated and posted online by the teaching team.

No E-Learning resources required for this Unit.

Special Requirements
Essential Equipment:
Not Applicable
Legislative Pre-Requisites:
Not Applicable

1.3 Changes to Unit as a Result of Past Student Feedback


Student feedback plays a vital role in improving the quality and educational effectiveness of Western Sydney University
units and in ensuring academic staff keep in touch with student needs. You are welcome to provide feedback that is related
to the teaching of this unit. At the end of the semester you will be given the opportunity to complete a Student Feedback
on Unit (SFU) questionnaire to assess the unit. If requested by your unit coordinator, you may also have the opportunity
to complete a Student Feedback on Teaching (SFT) questionnaire to provide feedback for individual teaching staff.

As a result of student feedback, the following changes and improvements have recently been made:
– Lecture and Tutorial have seperated in to two time slots.

2
2 Assessment Information
2.1 Unit Learning Outcomes
Outcome
1 Utilise a typical software development environment.
2 Develop solutions to problems using an algorithmic approach.
3 Apply data structures of a common programming language, to translate an algorithm into a coded program.
These programming structures should include the following as a minimum - Selection and Repetition statements -
Functions - 1 & 2 dimensional Arrays - File processing
4 Implement basic features of data manipulation and graphing using a spreadsheet program, such as EXCEL.

2.2 Approach to Learning


Lecture: Engineering Computing lecture sessions will be used to introduce programming concepts using MATLAB, C++
and Excel.
Lecture Tutorial: These sessions will be used to reinforce the concepts introduced in lecture sessions by going through
examples of programming challenges.
Practical: In practical (lab) sessions, the students get to apply what they have studied in lecture sessions. Students expect
to attempt lab problems before coming to the lab classes so that students have ample time to complete their work and
seek help when necessary.

3
2.3 Contribution to Course Learning Outcomes
Key: (I)ntroduced (D)eveloped (A)ssured

3740: Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)


Course Learning Outcomes ULO 1 ULO 2 ULO 3 ULO 4
1. Possession of a comprehensive body of knowledge of scientific principles, including knowledge of Introduced Introduced Introduced Introduced
research principles and methods, necessary to solve complex engineering problems
2. An ability to independently use a systems approach to identify and solve engineering problems in Introduced
diverse contexts of specialised domains
3. The expertise to employ research skills to propose innovative solutions with some independence
4. An ability to propose sustainable solutions to local and global problems
5. An ability to effectively collaborate within multi-disciplinary teams in an ethical manner with
professional accountability
6. Effective oral and written communication skills to present a clear and coherent exposition of ideas to a
variety of audiences
7. Cognitive and technical skills with an ability to plan, execute and manage project/research work
independently
8. The skills to recognise progress in professional practice and/or scholarship in their field and the
commitment to pursue continuous professional development
4

3689: Bachelor of Engineering


Course Learning Outcomes ULO 1 ULO 2 ULO 3 ULO 4
1. A comprehensive knowledge of scientific principles applicable to solve engineering problems Introduced Introduced Introduced Introduced
2. an ability to fluently use systems approach in specialised domains Introduced
3. The expertise to employ research skills to find innovative solutions
4. An enthusiasm to actively seek and adopt sustainable solutions to local and global problems
5. An ability to engage in multi-disciplinary teams in a professional and ethical manner
6. Effective oral and written communication skills
7. Sound leadership and project management skills
8. The skills to recognize progress in their field and the commitment to pursue continuous professional
development
3690: Bachelor of Engineering Advanced (Honours)
Course Learning Outcomes ULO 1 ULO 2 ULO 3 ULO 4
1. a comprehensive and advanced body of knowledge of scientific principles applicable to solve complex Introduced Introduced Introduced Introduced
engineering problems (EA Stage 1 Competency PE1)
2. an ability to independently use systems approach to identify and solve engineering problems in diverse Introduced
contexts of specialised domains (PE1 & PE2)
3. the expertise to independently employ research skills to propose innovative solutions (PE1 & PE2)
4. an ability to propose sustainable solutions to local and global problems (PE1 & PE3)
5. an ability to effectively collaborate with multi-disciplinary teams in an ethical manner with professional
accountability (PE3)
6. effective oral and written communication skills to present a clear and coherent exposition of ideas to a
variety of audiences (PE3)
7. sound leadership skills with an ability to plan, execute and manage project/research work
independently (PE 3)
8. the skills to recognize progress in professional practice and/or scholarship in their field and the
commitment to pursue continuous professional development (PE1 & PE3)

3621: Bachelor of Engineering


5

Course Learning Outcomes ULO 1 ULO 2 ULO 3 ULO 4


1. A comprehensive knowledge of scientific principles applicable to solve engineering problems Introduced Introduced Introduced Introduced
2. An ability to fluently use systems approach in specialised domains Introduced
3. The expertise to employ research skills to find innovative solutions
4. An enthusiasm to actively seek and adopt sustainable solutions to local and global problems
5. An ability to engage in multi-disciplinary teams in a professional and ethical manner
6. Effective oral and written communication skills
7. Sound leadership and project management skills
8. The skills to recognize progress in their field and the commitment to pursue continuous professional
development
3691: Bachelor of Engineering Science
Course Learning Outcomes ULO 1 ULO 2 ULO 3 ULO 4
1. a comprehensive knowledge of scientific principles applicable to solve engineering problems (EA Stage Introduced Introduced Introduced Introduced
1 Competency PE1)
2. an ability to use systems approach to solve engineering problems in specialised domains (PE1 & PE2) Introduced
3. the expertise to employ research skills to find viable engineering solutions (PE1 & PE2)
4. an enthusiasm to adopt sustainable solutions to local and global problems (PE1 & PE3)
5. an ability to engage in multi-disciplinary teams in a professional and ethical manner (PE3)
6. effective oral and written communication skills (PE3)
7. essential leadership and project management skills (PE 3)
8. the skills to recognize progress in their field and to participate in continuous professional development
(PE1 & PE3)
6
3728: Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)/Bachelor of Business
Course Learning Outcomes 1 2 3 4
1. A comprehensive knowledge of scientific principles applicable to solve engineering problems I I I I
2. an ability to fluently use systems approach in specialised domains I
3. The expertise to employ research skills to find innovative solutions
4. An enthusiasm to actively seek and adopt sustainable solutions to local and global problems
5. An ability to engage in multi-disciplinary teams in a professional and ethical manner
6. effective oral and written communication skills
7. sound leadership and project management skills
8. the skills to recognize progress in their field and the commitment to pursue continuous professional development
9. Communicate effectively using discipline-appropriate literacy and verbal skills that are suited to audience and context
10. Collaborate effectively in teams
11. Apply critical thinking and problem solving within global Business contexts
12. Apply numeracy and information literacy skills to Business situations
13. Identify discipline-appropriate cultural issues and make recommendations for Business practice
14. Identify discipline-appropriate corporate socially responsible behaviour and make recommendations for Business practice
7
2.4 Assessment Summary
The assessment items in this unit are designed to enable you to demonstrate that you have achieved the unit learning
outcomes. Completion and submission of all assessment items which have been designated as mandatory or compulsory
is essential to receive a passing grade.

To pass this unit you must:


Score a minimum of 50% weighted score.

Item Weight Due Date ULO’s Assessed Threshold


In-Class Quiz x3 60% Weeks 5, 11 and 14 1, 2, 3, 4 No
Exam 40% During final exam weeks (18/06/2018 to 1, 2, 3, 4 No
1/07/2018)

Note: Results may be moderated before you receive your results. Moderation is a process whereby the unit coordi-
nator regulates the marking of individual markers to achieve consistency in the application of unit objectives, perfor-
mance standards and marking criteria. Marks for an individual piece of assessment will not be changed after you have
your results. You should note that, consistent with the Assessment Policy - Criteria and Standards-Based Assessment
(http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00227), the final marks for the cohort may also be adjusted if marks are
very high or low or there are inconsistencies between groups.

Feedback on Assessment
Feedback is an important part of the learning process that can improve your progress towards achieving the learning
outcomes. Feedback is any written or spoken response made in relation to academic work such as an assessment task,
a performance or product. It can be given to you by a teacher, an external assessor or student peer, and may be given
individually or to a group of students. As a Western Sydney University student, it is your responsibility to seek out and
act on feedback that is provided to you as a resource to further your learning.

In this unit, you can expect verbal feedback within a week of any assessment submission. For quizzes, on-the-spot
feedback will be provided during marking if you choose to stay after submission. For the final exam, feedback on your
performance may be available upon request.

8
2.5 Assessment Details
2.5.1 In-Class Quiz x3

Weight: 60%
Type of Collaboration: Individual
Due: Weeks 5, 11 and 14
Submission: In class via vUWS
Format: All in-class programming quizzes will be open book/open Internet. The students may
bring lecture/tutorial notes and textbooks to the class and may also use the Internet.
However, use of any form of communication via the Internet (chat, Facebook) is not
permitted.
Length: In-Class Quiz - x3 - about 1 hour each
Curriculum Mode: Quiz

Instructions:

Programming Quizzes will require access to a computer with MATLAB & C++ compiler such as Microsoft Visual Studio
which is available in all School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics Computer Labs in Kingswood Campus. Fur-
thermore, the school provides these software (MATLAB & Microsoft Visual Studio) to students free of charge, students
can download and install them by following the instructions at https://www.scem.uws.edu.au/free-software.
Quiz 1 will consist of 4 MATLAB questions, which are based on material covered in lectures 1 to 4. The students will be
asked to apply built-in MATLAB functions to perform calculations, solve linear equations or work with vectors/matrices.
Quiz 2 will consist of 4 MATLAB questions, which are based on material covered in lectures 1 to 8. The students will be
asked to create user-dened functions to solve mathematical problems, plot data/gures, or work with conditions/loops.
Quiz 3 will consist of 2 C++ questions, which are based on material covered in lectures 9 to 12. The students will be
asked to create functions to perform computations and solve problems, use input/output operators, or work with condi-
tions/loops.

Resources:
Sample quizzes.
Problems in lab classes and lectures.
Recommended textbook and related textbooks from the library.
Marking Criteria:
Sample Assessment Criteria for Quiz 1

Criteria Unsatisfactory Satisfactory Excellent Outstanding


MATLAB script [5 marks] MATLAB script file was MATLAB script file was
created with help from tutor created with the correct
(0 Marks) filename with no help from
tutor (5 Marks)
Using comments [5 marks] No comments were used(0 Some comments were Meaningful comments were
Marks) used(2 Mark) used(5 Marks)

Program execution[4 marks Program does not run; the The programruns with The program runs with no
X 4 questions] coding script contains minor warnings; the coding errors or warnings.(4 Marks)
excessive errors.The rest of script may contain minor
the quiz may not be errors or typos. (2 Marks)
marked in this scenario. (0
Marks)
Compliance with Program runs but no or few Most parts of the The program satisfies all Program satisfies
specifications[6 marks X 4 specifications are satisfied.(0 specifications are specifications, though with specifications completely
questions] Marks) implemented. (3 Marks) some minor typos which did and correctly(6 Marks)
not impact programming
principles.(5 Marks)

** If the program does not run, then compliance with the specification may not be assessed.

Sample Assessment Criteria for Quiz 2

Criteria Unsatisfactory Satisfactory Excellent Outstanding

9
MATLAB script [-5 marks] MATLAB script file was MATLAB script file was
created with help from tutor created with the correct
(-5 Marks) filename with no help from
tutor (0 Marks)
Presentation [3 Marks] Presentation is cluttered Presentation of results is
with intermediate results(0 clear with no intermediate
Marks) results shown (3 Marks)
Figures [3 Marks] Figures are not labelled Figures are labelled
appropriately or not appropriately and displayed
displayed as specified (0 on figure windows as
Marks) specified (3 marks)
Using comments [4 marks] No comments are used to Some comments are used(2 Meaningful comments are
describe the code(0 Marks) Mark) used to explain the code (4
Marks)

Program execution[4 marks Program does not run; the The programruns with The program runs with no The program runs with no
X 4 questions] coding script contains minor warnings; the coding errors or warnings. Some errors or warnings. Only
excessive errors.The rest of script may contain minor intermediate results are requested all outputs are
the question may not be errors or typos. (1 Marks) displayed or figures are not shown with no intermediate
marked in this scenario. (0 shown in figure windows as results.(4 Marks)
Marks) specified. (3 Marks)
Compliance with Program runs but no or few Most parts of the The program satisfies all Program satisfies
specifications[6 marks X 4 specifications are satisfied.(0 specifications are specifications, though with specifications completely
questions] Marks) implemented. (all figure some minor typos which did and correctly (all axes
axes are labelled where not impact programming labelled, and titles given
necessary ) (3 Marks) principles. (all axes labelled, where necessary )(6 Marks)
and titles shown where
necessary )(5 Marks)

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2.5.2 Exam

Weight: 40%
Type of Collaboration: Individual
Due: During final exam weeks (18/06/2018 to 1/07/2018)
Submission: In exam centre
Format: 2 hour closed book examination.
Length: Exam - two hours final exam
Curriculum Mode: Multiple Choice

Instructions:

The final exam is based on studying materials from week 1 to 14 (session 1 to session 13). The students are expected to
integrate programming concepts from lecture
material, experience from practical classes and programming assignments. The students may bring a calculator which has
the primary function of a calculator. It is recommended that the students bring an HB pencil and an eraser to the final
exam.
There will be 50 multiple choice questions, covering the following topics:
MATLAB (35 questions):
Built-in and user-dened functions, plotting, manipulating matrices, logical operations, symbolic math (basics)
(Chapters 1 to 7 & 11 of textbook)
C++ (13 questions):
Inputs/outputs, conditions/loops, functions, arrays, external libraries (basics)
Excel (2 questions):
Charts, formulas, matrix operations, linear regression, statistics (basics)

Marking Criteria:
The final exam is a multiple choice exam.

11
2.6 General Submission Requirements
Submission
– All assignments must be submitted by the specified due date and time, using a completed and signed Assignment
Cover Sheet provided in the Learning Guide Companion.
– Complete your assignment, attach a completed and signed Assignment Cover Sheet, and follow the individual
assessment items instructions on how to submit.
Turnitin

– The Turnitin plagiarism prevention system may be used within this unit. Turnitin is accessed via logging into vUWS
for the unit. If Turnitin is being used with this unit, this means that your assignments have to be submitted through
the Turnitin system.
– Turnitin from iParadigms is a web-based text-matching software that identifies and reports on similarities between
documents. It is also widely utilised as a tool to improve academic writing skills.
– Turnitin compares electronically submitted papers against the following:
– Current and archived web: Turnitin currently contains over 24 billion web pages including archived pages
– Student papers: including Western Sydney University student submissions since 2007
– Scholarly literature: Turnitin has partnered with leading content publishers, including library databases, text-
book publishers, digital reference collections and subscription-based publications (e.g. Gale, Proquest, Emerald
and Sage)
– Turnitin is used by over 30 universities in Australia and is increasingly seen as an industry standard. It is an important
tool to assist students with their academic writing by promoting awareness of plagiarism
Self-Plagiarising

– You are to ensure that no part of any submitted assignment for this unit or product has been submitted by yourself
in another (previous or current) assessment from any unit, except where appropriately referenced, and with prior
permission form the Lecturer/Tutor/Unit Co-ordinator of this unit.
Late Submission

– If you submit a late assessment, without receiving approval for an extension of time, (see next item), you will be
penalised by 10% per day for up to 10 days. In other words, marks equal to 10% of the assignment’s weight will be
deducted from the mark awarded.
– For example, if the highest mark possible is 50, 5 marks will be deducted from your awarded mark for each late day.
– Saturday and Sunday are counted as one calendar day each.
– Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students.
– This is consistent with Clause 51 of the Western Sydney University’s Assessment Policy - Criteria and Standards-
Based Assessment.
Extension of Due Date for Submission
Extensions are only granted in exceptional circumstances. To apply for an extension of time:
– Locate an application form via the Western Sydney University homepage or copy the following link:
http://www.westernsydney.edu.au/currentstudents/current students/forms
– Application forms must be submitted to the Coordinator.
– Requests for extension should be made no later than 3 working days before the due date of an assignment or other
assessment item including web-based quizzes.
– Appropriate, supporting documentation must be submitted with the application.
– An application for an extension does not automatically mean that an extension will be approved
– Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students.
Resubmission Resubmission of assessment items will not normally be granted if requested.

Application for Special Consideration


It is strongly recommended that you attend all scheduled learning activities to support your learning. If you have suffered
misadventure, illness, or you have experienced exceptional circumstances that have prevented your attendance at class or
your completion and submission of assessment tasks, you may need to apply for Special Consideration via the Western
Sydney University website. http://www.westernsydney.edu.au/currentstudents/current students/services and facilities/
special consideration2 or the Student Centre. Special Consideration is not automatically granted. It is your responsi-
bility to ensure that any missed content has been covered. Your lecturer will give you more information on how this must
be done.

12
3 Teaching and Learning Activities
Weeks Lecture Prac/Lab Independent Assessments Due
Week 1 Introduction and MATLAB SCEM account registration and WHS Chapters 1 and 2
05-03-2018 Fundamentals Induction Lab 1 on MATLAB

Week 2 MATLAB Fundamentals: Variables, Lab 1 on MATLAB Chapter 2


12-03-2018 Naming rules, Arithmetic operations,
Arrays, Creating M-Files
Week 3 MATLAB Decision Structures, Input Lab 2 on MATLAB Chapters 2 and 3
19-03-2018 and Output
Week 4 MATLAB Functions and Data Lab 3 on MATLAB Chapter 4
26-03-2018 Import-Export Utilities
Week 5 MATLAB Logical Vectors, Matrices and Quiz 1 on MATLAB Chapters 5 and 6 - In-Class Quiz x3
02-04-2018 Arrays
Week 6 MATLAB Loops for Repetitive Lab 4 on MATLAB Chapter 8
09-04-2018 Computations
Week 7 MATLAB Graphics Lab 4 on MATLAB Chapter 9
16-04-2018
Week 8 MATLAB: Function Files and Symbolic Lab 5 on MATLAB Chapters 7 and 17
23-04-2018 Maths

Week 9
13

30-04-2018
Week 10 MATLAB: Symbolic Mathematics Lab 5 on MATLAB Chapter 17 - In-Class Quiz x3
07-05-2018
Week 11 C++: Introduction to C++, IDE, Quiz 2 on MATLAB Download C++ compiler and practice
14-05-2018 Structure of a C++ program, Variables, compiling
Data types Basic input/output
Week 12 C++: Control Structures, Functions Lab 6 on C++ Read lecture and online material
21-05-2018
Week 13 C++: Functions, Arrays, File Lab 7 on C++ Read lecture and online material
28-05-2018 input/output
Week 14 Introduction to Excel Quiz 3 on C++ - In-Class Quiz x3
04-06-2018
Week 15 - Exam
11-06-2018
Week 16 - Exam
18-06-2018
Week 17 - Exam
25-06-2018
The above timetable should be used as a guide only, as it is subject to change. Students will be advised of any changes as they become known.
4 Learning Resources
4.1 Recommended Readings
Essential Reading

– Hahn, B & Valentine, DT 2016, Essential MATLAB for engineers and scientists, 6th edn, Elsevier Science, Saint
Louis.

Additional Reading

– Deitel, PJ & Deitel, HM 2013, C++: how to program, 9th edn, Prentice Hall, Boston.
– Etter, DM & Ingber, JA 2012, Engineering problem solving with C++, 3rd edn, Pearson, Boston.
– Gaddis, T 2012, Starting out with C++: from control structures through objects, 7th edn, Addison-Wesley, Boston.
– Hunt, BR, Lipsman, RL & Rosenberg, J 2006, A guide to MATLAB: for beginners and experienced users, 2nd edn,
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
– Larsen, RW 2013, Engineering with Excel, 4th edn, Pearson, Boston.
– Staugaard, AC 2002, Structured and object-oriented problem solving using C++, 3rd edn, Prentice Hall, Upper
Saddle River, NJ.

14