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Running head: FLIPPED LESSON 1

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY

MONTEREY BAY

Designing Flipped Lesson

CAPSTONE PROPOSAL

Submitted in partial satisfaction of requirements of the degree of

MASTER OF SCIENCE in

Instructional Science and Technology

Muhammad Farooq

09/11/2018

Capstone Approvals: (At least one advisor and capstone instructor should approve)

Dr Donald Fischer ________________________ _____________

Advisor Name Signature Date

Dr Lara _______________________ _____________

Capstone Instructor Name Signature Date


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Table of Contents

Executive Summary ............................................................................................................ 3

Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 4

Background ..................................................................................................................... 4

Problem Description ....................................................................................................... 5

Learner Analysis ............................................................................................................. 6

Environmental Scan ........................................................................................................ 7

Solution Description ........................................................................................................... 8

Proposed Solution ........................................................................................................... 8

Goals ............................................................................................................................... 8

Learning Objectives ........................................................................................................ 9

Leaning Theories and Strategies ................................................................................... 10

Instructional Strategies and Activities ...........................................................................11

Principles....................................................................................................................... 12

Training Design......................................................................................................... 12

Challenges ..................................................................................................................... 14

Methods & Procedures ...................................................................................................... 14

List of Major Deliverables ............................................................................................ 15

Timeline ............................................................................................................................ 15

Implementation Plan ..................................................................................................... 16


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Resources .......................................................................................................................... 16

Media and Delivery System Decisions ......................................................................... 16

Evaluation ......................................................................................................................... 17

Formative Evaluation .................................................................................................... 17

Summative Evaluation .................................................................................................. 17

References ......................................................................................................................... 19

Appendices ........................................................................................................................ 20

Appendix A ....................................................................................................................... 20

Urdu Results 2016-17 ................................................................................................... 20

Appendix B ....................................................................................................................... 21

Demographic Survey .................................................................................................... 21

Appendix C ....................................................................................................................... 23

I. Pre Test ..................................................................................................................... 23

II. Post Test ................................................................................................................... 26

Appendix D ....................................................................................................................... 29

Informed Consent Letter ............................................................................................... 29


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Executive Summary

The purpose of this project to identify challenges for implementation of the flipped based

approach for Urdu language at Defense Language Institute and design a training module to

facilitate implementation of newly designed flipped curriculum for Urdu. Given the changing

needs of US military linguists, the Defense Language Institute (DLI) has introduced the flipped

classroom concept to improve the students’ language proficiency to help them achieve the new

goal of 2+/2+/2 ILR level. It is very important for the Urdu teachers to not only understand the

flipped classroom concept but also learn what elements can be flipped and why. This capstone

project addresses the above-mentioned issues with the aim to help the Urdu faculty acquire

necessary training by learning how the flipped approach should be implemented to help the

department get the desired results. The project will be finished by December 2018.
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Introduction

Background

The Defense Language Institute (DLI) has been striving to achieve 2+/2+/2 ILR

proficiency levels in reading, listening and speaking skills to meet the language related security

needs of the US military in a constantly changing world. Previously, the standard for the military

students to graduate from the DLI was 2/2/1+. There were slight exceptions for their speaking

skills as some of the forces, such as the United States Army, requires soldiers to get at least a 2 in

speaking. The US Army soldiers are deployed on the ground and are required to interact with the

local population on a daily basis, so this standard caters to the mission requirements. One of the

steps DLI management took in order to achieve the new standard of 2+/2+/2 is to lay out a

comprehensive plan, phasing out the implementation of the new standard over a five-year period

which also included critical changes to the language curricula, particularly in the third semester,

with increased focus on the higher order thinking skills. Subsequently, an Urdu curriculum team

has been created to work with the DLI Curriculum Support Division to restructure Urdu third

semester course in line with the DLI-wide efforts to achieve this new standard. The purpose of

the flipped approach combined with open architecture concept is not only to prepare students for

guided practice and work in the classroom but also to give more freedom to the teaching teams to

make necessary changes to the curriculum according to the needs of the students. The purpose of

this training is to help the Urdu curriculum team deign a flipped approach-based lesson.

COL Deppert, Commandant DLIFLC (2016) stated, “Our whole organization and thus

our priorities are pointed at our ultimate shared goal of producing the best, culturally based,

professional military linguist possible,” (p.2). It is absolutely imperative for the Urdu faculty to
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figure out a way to achieve these goals sooner than later. The overall goal of the DLI is to train

the teachers to develop flipped approach-based lessons to achieve the desired results.

Problem Description

DLI Urdu students will be required by 2022 to get at least 2+/2+/2 to pass the DLPT;

therefore, the management at the DLI had decided to make changes in the way the things are

done at the institute. Implementing flipped and open architecture approaches were one of them,

as the management felt there was a potential in these approaches to achieve or get closer to the

desired results.

In 2017, 40.5% of the Urdu students scored 2+ in listening skills and 45.9% achieved 2+

in reading skills. These scores exceeded the goal of 31% for listening skills and 38% for reading

skills. This year the DLI was aiming for 40% at 2+ or higher in listening skills and 50% at 2+ or

higher in reading skills. The results; however, this year were not up to the goal, as 33% of the

students got 2+ in listening and reading skills each. It is highly critical for the Urdu program to

meet the new criteria in order to produce military linguists who are equipped to fulfill the newly

required national security needs of the United States.

The data collected through various means showed that the Urdu teachers are not

adequately trained to implement this new approach, they; as a result, still like to apply lecture-

based approaches where they can. They need more assistance to adjust to their new roles. It also

appeared that the current teaching team is comprised of the teachers with the same age group and

skillsets. At least, one teacher said if the teaching team is reshuffled or new teachers are added

who are believed to have a sound understanding of the flipped classroom approach, may help

with implementing these new changes.


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The DLI constantly expands and downsizes some languages based on the national

security needs of the country. With the US focus shifting away from Afghanistan and the region,

the number of Urdu students has dropped significantly in recent years; as a result, some language

instructors lost their jobs in recent months from June 2016 to September 2018. There is a sense

of uncertainty among the Urdu teachers regarding their job security, making it more difficult for

them to show passion and motivation on a day-to-day basis. This can be addressed at the higher

level if DLI management takes necessary steps to address the uncertainty issue.

When asked whether the faculty understood the standards they are expected to meet in

light of the new and revised goal, all the teachers said they understand their role very well in

achieving 2+/2+/2. They all agreed the management has clearly spelled out the expectations of

them and they are doing their best to meet the new standards.

To a question about how they view the role of their supervisors, they were also of the

opinion that non-native management of the Urdu program does not understand the complexities

of the language, they; therefore, are not the best people to make decisions about the program.

Sixty percent of the teachers believe if the students can translate the target language content into

English, they; as a result, should be able to answer the questions in the Defense Language

Proficiency Test (DLPT). According to them, their approach will help achieve the desired results

for the Urdu program, so why bother about these “fancy” theories.

Learner Analysis

The focus of this training will be Urdu teachers. Most of the teachers do not have the

prior language teaching experience, as their biggest strength is that they are the native speakers

of the Urdu language. Though the basic recruitment requirement for the teachers is to at least

have a bachelor’s degree, the terms flipped classroom and open architecture are new to a number
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of teachers. The military uses a lot of different technological tools and online resources, which

causes a lot of problems for some teachers.

Teachers are required to get minimum of ILR level 3 score during the Oral Proficiency

Interview which they take during the process of the hiring process. They have to pass the

Instructor Certification Course (ICC) which is mandatory for every language instructor at the

DLI to be able to continue the job beyond a one-year period. It is a 160-hour training offered by

DLI followed by an observation session to get officially certified.

Generally, the Urdu students’ extra military duties and drills in some cases do not allow

them to have plenty of time to learn Urdu in the evening. They also do not get enough chances

to immerse with the native people outside the DLI and they cannot visit Pakistan due to security

concerns, which is a potential barrier to their learning. However, most of the students are highly

motivated by their national duty and also, they are paid an extra amount each month if they pass

the DLPT. The teachers’ motivation, on the other hand, has been slightly on the downside due to

downsizing in the department.

Environmental Scan

DLIFLC is regarded as one of the finest schools for foreign language instruction in the

nation. As part of the Army Training and Doctrine Command, the institute provides resident

instruction at the Presidio of Monterey in two dozen languages, five days a week, seven hours

per day, with two to three hours of homework each night. Courses last from 26 to 64 weeks,

depending on the difficulty of the language. DLIFLC is a multi-service school for active and

reserve components, foreign military students, and civilian personnel working in the federal

government and various law enforcement agencies. The present facilities at the Presidio of

Monterey accommodate approximately 3,500 Soldiers, Marines, Sailors and Airmen, as well as
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select Department of Defense and State members. To attend DLIFLC one must be a member of

the Armed Forces or be sponsored by a government agency. DLIFLC students are taught by

approximately 1,800 highly educated instructors, 98 percent of whom are native speakers of the

languages they teach. Aside from classroom instruction, faculty also write course materials,

design tests called the Defense Language Proficiency Test, and conduct research and analysis.

Solution Description

Proposed Solution

An hour long training session might be helpful to address the teachers’ reservations about

this new system with the explanation of how it can make their job easier if implemented

properly. The session may include success stories of similar approaches in other language

programs in DLI. The part of the training will be developed through Adobe Captivate module to

help the Urdu teachers understand flipped approach in general, and its

characteristics/components, advantages and disadvantages etc. in particular. The same concept

could have been introduced through a traditional lecture-based presentation, however, if learners

are involved through an interactive multimedia e-learning product, the learners will not only

understand the concepts but also retain it to be able to apply them in their classroom teaching.

The training will involve schemata building to help learners recall the relevant background

knowledge, presentation of content preferably through an adobe captivate module on the flipped

approach, and production where learners create a model flipped lesson.

Goals

The goal of the DLI is to provide culturally based language education, training and

evaluation to enhance to national security of the United States. In order to meet the new national

security needs of the united states in an ever-changing world, the new language proficiency
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requirement for the US military linguists in intermediate courses will be 2+/2+/2 by 2020. The

Urdu department made key changes to the curriculum to make sure the Urdu students get at least

minimum of 2+/2+/2 in listening, reading, speaking by 2020. The Urdu students will have the

language proficiency beyond narration level, which will help them do their jobs better and above

all retain their jobs in the US military because a soldier can lose his/her job if he/she does not

pass the DLPT. This training session will help the teachers and students understand as to why

this new curriculum is important to achieve the 2+/2+/2 goal; and also, it will try to find a

consensus among the stakeholders with regard to the steps that are important for the

implementation phase.

Learning Objectives

There is one terminal objective and three enabling objectives to break down content into

different segments so that each section has a particular role in order to achieve the main

objective.

• Given the model flipped lesson (prepared by the instructor), the participants will

be able to create a flipped lesson for Urdu students that matches at least 80% of

the key flipped approach components.

• The Urdu teachers will be able to describe the step by step process to design a

flipped lesson that conforms the requirements given the DLI Handbook for Basic

Course Development for the elements must be present in a lesson.

• The Urdu teacher will be able to describe how the flipped approach can be applied

in the classroom on a daily basis.


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Leaning Theories and Strategies

"The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and

homework elements of a course are reversed" (Educause, 2012). This approach is student-

centered and involves active engagement of the learners. The elements of cognitivism are found

in this training module. The learners will be given a chance to activate their background

knowledge about the flipped approach. Linda Harasim (2017) notes: “Schema Perspectives hold

that learning is easier if new subject matter compared to existing knowledge,” (p. 51).

Additionally, George Bonder notes: “Piaget believed that knowledge is acquired as the result of

lifelong constructivist process in which we try to organize, structure, and restructure our

experience in light of the existing schemes of thoughts.” (p.875) Robert M. Gagne’s (1965) nine

events of instructions are visible in this training model as it is essential that the learners are

engaged in similar tasks through guided practices to enable them to produce the actual task later

on, which is to create a flipped model lesson.

In this training module, behavioral modeling in constructivist learning environment can

be seen as instructor models how to design a flipped lesson in front of the learners. For the later

part of the training, the peer learners co-construct knowledge with instructors as facilitators or

guides (Bauersfeld, 1995).

The instructor doesn’t take the leading role throughout the session but only facilitates

their discussions/activities. From the constructivist viewpoint, as noted by Harasim (2017), that

the teacher must understand the students’ pre-existing conceptions and guide the activity to

address, build on and refine pre-existing conceptions. (p.71) Social constructivism, strongly

influenced by Vygotsky's (1978) work, suggests that knowledge is first constructed in a social
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context and is then appropriated by individuals (Bruning et al., 1999; M. Cole, 1991; Eggan &

Kauchak, 2004).

Albert Bandura’s social learning theory is applied in this training module as well.

Bandura (1977) explains in his Social Learning Theory the manner in which individuals learn

new behaviors through a process that involves observation, interaction and modelling. In this

training module, the learners will be presented with a model lesson. It is important that the

leaners get more time for guided practice to learn designing flipped lessons correctly to avoid

unlearning of the wrong learning in the future. Edwin R. Guthrie’s (1935) suggested that "a

combination of stimuli which has accompanied a movement will on its recurrence tend to be

followed by that movement.” Therefore, it is necessary that the Urdu teachers are given enough

practice to master the flipped concept in this training.

Instructional Strategies and Activities

There will be a 60-minute training event that will also include a technology-based flipped

component which the participants go through individually at the time and place of their own

choice before they work in groups. The participants will receive in advance an Adobe Captivate

module detailing with the help of animated videos what “flip” is and the question based activities

will be provided to them for the guided practice. The Captivate module will also address the

topics including but not limited to history and definition of the flipped classroom and how the

flipped approach has changed the way teaching was done in the classroom where it was

implemented.

There will be short questions (Appendix D) before the training to test their understanding

of flipped approach. This test item will help assess the participants’ understanding about the

flipped approach, providing the trainer a chance to clarify any misunderstandings they may have
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and laying a solid foundation for the discussion on how flipped approach can be a solution to

their problems. An animated video will be created to show the participants an example of a

flipped lesson in Urdu. Similarly, after the training, testing will occur to assess the participants’

understanding and feedback will also be provided to them by showing the correct answers. The

participants will go through segments such as elements of a flipped classroom, tools required for

a successfully flipping a classroom and how to know if a lesson has been successfully flipped.

The hands-on exercise will occur towards the end of the training in which the participants will

create a model flipped lesson. The process will not only allow them to give each other feedback

but also provide the trainer with an opportunity to assess their understanding of the subject and

give them feedback if necessary.

Principles

The following principles will be used while creating e-learning module using adobe

captivate to ensure that the learners get a chance to get engaged with interactive learning through

a flipped classroom model.

o Multimedia Principle

o Modality Principle

o Redundancy Principle

o Continuity Principle

o Coherence Principle

Training Design

Following is the detailed training design that includes all the activities for an hour long

event

1. Part I
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A. Flipped Homework (Adobe Captivate module on flipped concept )

i. Displaying a message on screen to gain attention.

ii. Finding expectations of the participants

iii. Informing the learners of the objectives

iv. Animated videos/articles on flipped approach

2. Part II

A. Schemata Building: Recap of the materials students have covered. (5 min.)

i. Participants discuss about flipped content (review of the homework)

ii. A short video to recap what they have covered

B. Presentation: The Adobe Captivate presents the stimulus (10 min.)

i. Flipped Classroom and Language Learning (A YouTube video)

ii. Pros and Cons of the flipped approach

iii. An example or a model flipped lesson (developed by instructor)

iv. Additional content necessary for stimulating learners’ information

acquisition (if necessary)

C. Practice: Purpose to encode learning into long-term memory in a meaningful way. (15

min)

i. Worked examples of the flipped lesson, demonstrating each step to create

a flipped lesson.

ii. Guided practice based on activities to learn what elements/components

can be flipped as prior study material for learners.


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iii. A multiple-choice test item to conclude the segment on to check

participants’ understanding

D. Production: Learners create a model flipped lesson (20 min.)

i. In groups, create a model lesson in UCAT

ii. Share lessons and finalize one together using google docs or Sakai

E. Assessing Performance (5 min.)

i. Post training test

ii. Feedback

F. Wrap up

Challenges

To develop an hour-long training module within a few weeks is a challenging task. The

design and development of the project will require a considerable amount of time as it involves

back and forth communication with the learners, my advisor and instructor, receiving feedback

and making changing accordingly. The other obstacle will be to gain the learners’ trust that they

can have a meaningful learning experience through this module. Part of the reason is that I have

worked with them as their colleagues for several years so they might not take it as a serious

effort. I will have to make sure that they are engaged in the learning from the onset and they

don’t lose their interest throughout the training session.

Methods & Procedures

The participants will take the training online; however, the instructor will remain

available through Sakai to help them if needed. The instructor will play the role of a facilitator as

this will be a participant-led training session. The participants will engage in group discussions
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and hands-on activities to understand the DLI’s vision for achieving 2+/2+/2 through flipped and

open architecture approaches.

List of Major Deliverables

• Module created in Adobe Captivate as part of the flipped homework

• Two videos on flipped concepts

• Hard copies of model flipped lesson

• Hard copies of activities

• Scholarly article for reference

• Flip charts to create model lesson outline

• DLI Handbook for Basic Curriculum Development

• Multiple choice quizzes for comprehension

• Feedback survey on the course

Timeline

The development of this project will continue through the fall of 2017. The first phase

implementation began in June 2018. The project will official be launched in December 2018.

Timeline
Timeframe ADDIE Steps Description
Before September 10 Analyze Complete – Already spoken to
Urdu teachers & identified need
for training through surveys last
year.
September 12-26 Design To complete storyboard and
gather relevant materials
September 26 To October 1 Design Complete script, guidebook and
job aids outline
October 1 - 6 Evaluate Consult with advisor and
colleagues to make sure project
is on right track
October 7-20 Develop Build Captivate shell, obtain
images, and finish script
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October 21- November 1 Evaluate Get feedback form advisor and


instructor to make necessary
changes
November 2 - 20 Evaluate Pilot training session with
volunteers
November 21- December 1 Evaluation Revision based on piloting
feedback
December 3-7 Implementation Consult with the advisor on
how to launch the training
December 8-10 Implementation Launch the project

Implementation Plan

The training components/segments are self-guided; there are no additional training

requirements for the instructors and Urdu teachers who conduct the session. They are familiar

with the Adobe Captivate as they have been using it for a while, therefore, they will not have any

problem developing the module or implementing it during the session. Once the module is

finalized, the participants can access it as directed.

Resources

Media and Delivery System Decisions

A classroom will be used for this training session. This training workshop will be based

on the flipped classroom approach as the Urdu teachers will be given the materials in advance to

prepare them guided practice and work they will do in the traning. It is also a good way to model

how effective the flipped and open architecture approaches can be if conducted in a correct

manner.

Videos or visual aids, e-learning module, a flip chart, smartboard, and print materials will

be used for the training. Using visual aids for training stimulates thinking and improves the

learning environment as it always helps to do away with the monotonous learning environment.
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Videos and interactive activities also increase interactivity in the classroom because students

develop and increase their personal understanding of the topic when they find learning

environment pleasant and interactive.

Evaluation

Formative Evaluation

Interactive video quizzes will be included in the Adobe Captivate module as needed to

measure the understanding and provide an opportunity for practice for practical application of

the concept on the job. To ensure the learning effectiveness, usability, accuracy and completeness

of the training, a developmental test will be conducted with the help of a small group of teachers.

The way this training is set up, as it includes guided practices, group work, and quizzes, is to

give plenty of room for formative assessment during the training. The course will be considered

successful if the participants are able to create an outline for a model lesson that is fully in line

with the DLI guidelines.

Summative Evaluation

A questionnaire/survey (posttest) is included at the end of the course to evaluate the

learning of the participants in the course. Besides assessing their learning, a learner reaction

survey will be included to find out what they think was helpful, what was not helpful, and one

thing that they will take away with them. Statistical analysis (for example t-analysis) will be

used to compare their pre and posttests scores to determine the learning effectiveness of the

learning.

Assessment components that are already completed:

1. Pre-test
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2. Post-test

3. Interactive video quizzes


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References

Deppert, P. J. (2016). Priorities at DLIFLC: Dialogue on Language Instructions.

Guthrie E.R. (1935). The Psychology of Learning. New York: Harper & Row.

Bauersfeld, H. (1995). The Structuring of the Structures: Development and Function of

Mathematizing as a Social Practice. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers, Hillsdale,

NJ.

Handbook for Basic Course Curriculum Development. (2018). Monterey, CA: DLIFLC.

Harasim, L. M. (2017). Learning theory and online technology: How new technologies are

transforming learning opportunities. New York: Routledge.

McLeod, S. (1970, January 01). Saul McLeod. Retrieved from

https://www.simplypsychology.org/bobo-doll.html

Vygotsky’s philosophy: Constructivism and its Criticisms Examined Liu & Matthews,

International Education Journal, 2005, 6(3), 386-399.


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Appendices

Appendix A

Urdu Results 2016-17

Year Listening 2+

2016 40.5%

2017 33%
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Appendix B

Demographic Survey (Googel Forms)

1. What is your country of origin?

2. What is your age?

3. What is your level of education?

4. Is your highest degree relevant to your current profession?

5. Have you ever studied a foreign language?

6. If answer to the above question is yes, then which primary method was used in

your language class?

7. Do you know what flipped classroom is?

8. If the answer to the above question is yes, please briefly explain your

understanding of the concept of flipped classroom.

9. Have you ever taken a course that was in a flipped classroom format?
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10. Were you given adequate training to implement the curriculum based on flipped

concept?

11. Do you think new graduation standard of 2+/2+/2 is achievable in Defense

Language Institute?

12. Do you think the flipped approach is the right method to achieve 2+/2+/2 goal in

Defense Language Institute?

13. Are you interested in learning more about “flipped classroom”?


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Appendix C

I. Pre Test

1. The term “flip” is used to describe:

a) Instructional content delivery outside the classroom

b) Traditional teaching approach

c) To disrupt the flow of teaching

d) To change activities

2. The flipped classroom model aims at:

a) motivating teachers to work hard

b) increasing learner’s autonomy

c) minimizing parents’ responsibility

d) providing extra help to students

3. The flipped classroom model is:

a) teacher-centered

b) student-centered

c) based on traditional classroom

d) based on guided practice

4. In a flipped classroom, a student can:

a) engage in group activities in classroom

b) complete homework with teacher in the evening

c) review previous day’s lesson

d) only do individual tasks

5. The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which elements of a course are:


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a) revised constantly

b) reversed orderly

c) rehearsed frequently

d) repeated daily

6. All of the following statements describe flipped classroom; except:

a) Students can learn new materials at home

b) Promotes autonomous learning among students

c) Teacher teaches first and then the students do practice activities

d) It improves team building skills, collaboration, and communication.

7. Which of the following activity describes a flipped classroom?

a) Students watch 30-minute documentary on natural disaster in classroom

b) students make a relief plan for disaster victims in classroom

c) students read a 400-word passage on disaster

d) teacher presents a report on major disasters

8. Select the tools, which can be helpful in successfully flipping a classroom. Select all

that apply.

a) YouTube

b) Google Docs

c) A Video Camera

d) Study table

e) Lamp

9. The primary role of a teacher in a flipped classroom is:

a) Facilitator
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b) Corrector

c) Translator

d) Delivering lecture

10. Which one the following are teacher’s roles in the flipped classroom? Select all

that apply.

a) Identifying content (film/video)

b) Creating instructions/activities

c) Assisting students when needed

d) Working in groups to prepare task


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II. Post Test

Please choose the correct response.

1. The meanings of word flip are:

a) To turn over

b) To disrupt

c) To upside down

d) To change

2. The flipped classroom model aims at:

a) challenging teacher’s authority

b) increasing student autonomy

c) increasing parents’ role

d) providing extra help to students

3. The flipped classroom model is:

a) teacher-centered

b) student-centered

c) based on traditional classroom

d) famous for game-based learning

4. In a flipped classroom, a student can:

a) engage in group activities in classroom

b) complete homework with teacher in the evening


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c) go over previous day’s lesson again

d) only do individual tasks

5. The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which elements of course are: (1)

a) revised constantly

b) reversed orderly

c) rehearsed frequently

d) repeated daily

6. All of the following statements describe flipped classroom; except:

a) Students can learn new materials at home.

b) It promotes autonomous learning among students

c) Teacher teaches first and then the students do practice activities

d) It improves team building skills, collaboration, and communication.

7. Which of the following activity describes a flipped classroom?

a) students watch 30-minute documentary on natural disaster in classroom

b) students make a relief plan for disaster victims in classroom

c) students read a 400-word passage on disaster

d) teacher presents a report on major disasters

8. The primary role of a teacher in a flipped classroom is:

a) Facilitator

b) Corrector

c) Translator

d) Lecture provider
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9. Select the tools, which can be helpful in successfully flipping a classroom. Select all

that apply.

a) YouTube

b) Google Docs

c) A Video Camera

d) Study table

e) Lamp

10. Which one the following are teacher’s roles in the flipped classroom? Select all that

apply.

a) Identifying content (film/video)

b) Creating instructions/activities

c) Assisting students when required

d) Working in groups to prepare task


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Appendix D

Informed Consent Letter

TITLE OF STUDY

Instructional Tools for Reading

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

Muhammad Farooq

Department of Education

Pacific Grove

831-123-4567

mfarooq@csumb.edu

PURPOSE OF STUDY

You are being requested to take part in a training on flipped approach. Before you decide to

participate in this training, it is important that you understand why the training is being done and

what it will involve. Please read the following information carefully. Please ask the trainer if

there is anything that is not clear or if you need more information.

The purpose of this project to identify challenges for implementation of flipped based approach

for Urdu language at Defense Language Institute and design a training module to facilitate

implementation of newly designed curriculum for Urdu 3rd semester.

STUDY PROCEDURES

a) This project will involve questionnaires disseminated among your class to gather the
information about the flipped approach in Urdu school. These surveys will be very short
and will not take more than 15 minutes of your time.
b) The project will also require access to your grades and test scores.
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c) Your responses will not be video or audiotaped; however, a paper record will be kept for
validity of the research.

RISKS

There are no risks involved in this study; however, you may decline to answer any or all

questions and you may terminate your involvement at any time if you choose.

BENEFITS

There will not direct benefits to the participants of this study; however, it is expected that this

study may help improve the language proficiency of the future students and also train teachers

how to implement flipped concept at DLI.

CONFIDENTIALITY

Your responses to this survey will be anonymous. Therefore, you are not required to write any

identifying information. Your data will be kept safe and will not be released to anyone except the

research team.

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you have any questions about this study, or you experience adverse effects as the result of

participating in this study, you may contact the researcher at 821-123-4567 or if you do not feel

you can discuss with the researcher, please contact the Institutional Review Board at 821-123-

7654.

VOLUNTARY PARTICIPATION

Your participation is absolutely voluntary and at any point you decide to withdraw you are fee to

do so even after you have signed the consent. If you withdraw from the study, the data collected

from you will be destroyed or returned to you.


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CONSENT

I have read and I understand the provided information and have had the opportunity to ask

questions. I understand that my participation is voluntary and that I am free to withdraw at any

time, without giving a reason and without cost. I understand that I will be given a copy of this

consent form. I voluntarily agree to take part in this study.

Participant's signature ______________________________ Date __________

Investigator's signature _____________________________ Date __________