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HP OpenView Storage
Data Protector I:
Fundamentals

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HP OpenView Storage Data Protector I: Fundamentals
Student Guide
October 2003
Contents
Module 1 — Introduction
1-1. SLIDE: Welcome...................................................................................................................... 1-2
1-2. SLIDE: Agenda (1).................................................................................................................. 1-3
1-3. SLIDE: Agenda (2).................................................................................................................. 1-4
1-4. SLIDE: Additional Resources................................................................................................ 1-5

Module 2 — Data Protector Overview and Architecture


2-1. SLIDE: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector.................................................................... 2-2
2-2. SLIDE: Managed Environment ............................................................................................. 2-3
2-3. SLIDE: Backup Models .......................................................................................................... 2-4
2-4. SLIDE: Split-Mirror Backup Concept................................................................................... 2-5
2-5. SLIDE: Snapshot Backup Concept....................................................................................... 2-7
2-6. SLIDE: HP OpenView Building Block Architecture ........................................................... 2-8
2-7. SLIDE: Data Protector Architecture Components ........................................................... 2-12
2-8. SLIDE: The Cell Concept..................................................................................................... 2-16
2-9. SLIDE: Client/Server Modules ............................................................................................ 2-18
2-10. SLIDE: Platform Support................................................................................................... 2-19
2-11. SLIDE: Cell Manager .......................................................................................................... 2-20
2-12. SLIDE: Internal Database Size Limits .............................................................................. 2-22
2-13. SLIDE: Capacity Planning Spreadsheet ........................................................................... 2-24
2-14. SLIDE: Cell Console (User Interface) .............................................................................. 2-25
2-15. SLIDE: Disk Agent.............................................................................................................. 2-27
2-16. SLIDE: Media Agent ........................................................................................................... 2-28
2-17. SLIDE: Integration Agent .................................................................................................. 2-29
2-18. SLIDE: Installation Server ................................................................................................. 2-31
2-19. SLIDE: Typical Backup/Restore Session ......................................................................... 2-32
2-20. SLIDE: Inter-process Communication ............................................................................. 2-33
2-21. SLIDE: Cell Manager Directory Structure (UX) ............................................................. 2-35
2-22. SLIDE: Cell Manager Directory Structure (Windows)................................................... 2-37
2-23. SLIDE: Client Directory Structure (UX) .......................................................................... 2-39
2-24. SLIDE: Client Directory Structure (Windows) ............................................................... 2-40
2-25. SLIDE: Global Options....................................................................................................... 2-41
2-26. SLIDE: Localized Options.................................................................................................. 2-43
2-27. Review: Data Protector Architecture.............................................................................. 2-45

Module 3 — Data Protector Installation


3-1. SLIDE: Installation Sequence................................................................................................ 3-2
3-2. SLIDE: Installation Methods ................................................................................................. 3-4
3-3. SLIDE: Supported Upgrades ............................................................................................... 3-10
3-4. SLIDE: Data Protector Components .................................................................................. 3-13
3-5. SLIDE: Installation Requirements (UX) ............................................................................ 3-16
3-6. SLIDE: Installation Requirements (Windows).................................................................. 3-18
3-7. SLIDE: Installation of Cell Manager on HP-UX ................................................................ 3-20
3-8. SLIDE: Installation of Cell Manager on Windows ............................................................ 3-23
3-9. SLIDE: Installation of Cell Manager on Solaris ................................................................ 3-25
3-10. SLIDE: Installation Servers ............................................................................................... 3-27
3-11. SLIDE: HP-UX CD-ROM Contents.................................................................................... 3-29
3-12. SLIDE: Windows CD-ROM Contents................................................................................ 3-30
3-13. SLIDE: Solaris CD-ROM Contents.................................................................................... 3-31
3-14. SLIDE: Starting the UNIX GUI.......................................................................................... 3-32

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Contents

3-15. SLIDE: Starting the Windows GUI ....................................................................................3-34


3-16. SLIDE: Register Installation Servers ................................................................................3-35
3-17. SLIDE: Adding New Clients to the Cell ............................................................................3-37
3-18. SLIDE: Adding Components to Clients ............................................................................3-40
3-19. SLIDE: Importing Clients ...................................................................................................3-41
3-20. SLIDE: Deleting (Exporting) Clients ................................................................................3-43
3-21. SLIDE: Data Protector Licensing ......................................................................................3-44
3-22. SLIDE: Licenses and Part Numbers..................................................................................3-45

Module 4 — Data Protector Basics


4-1. SLIDE: Getting Started ............................................................................................................4-2
4-2. SLIDE: Data Protector GUI.....................................................................................................4-4
4-3. SLIDE: Authorizing Remote Console Access (1) .................................................................4-7
4-4. SLIDE: Authorizing Remote Console Access (2) .................................................................4-8
4-5. SLIDE: General Backup Concept.........................................................................................4-10
4-6. SLIDE: Backup Specification ...............................................................................................4-12
4-7. SLIDE: Backup Checklist......................................................................................................4-14
4-8. SLIDE: Verify Agents .............................................................................................................4-15
4-9. SLIDE: Check Default Media Pools .....................................................................................4-16
4-10. SLIDE: Configure a Device .................................................................................................4-17
4-11. SLIDE: Device Specification...............................................................................................4-18
4-12. SLIDE: Add Media to Media Pool.......................................................................................4-20
4-13. SLIDE: Format Medium ......................................................................................................4-22
4-14. SLIDE: Configure a Backup (1)..........................................................................................4-23
4-15. SLIDE: Configure a Backup (2)..........................................................................................4-24
4-16. SLIDE: Configure a Backup (3)..........................................................................................4-25
4-17. SLIDE: Configure a Backup (4)..........................................................................................4-26
4-18. SLIDE: Start the Saved Backup Specification ..................................................................4-27
4-19. SLIDE: The Scheduler .........................................................................................................4-29
4-20. SLIDE: Scheduled Backup (1) ............................................................................................4-30
4-21. SLIDE: Scheduled Backup (2) ............................................................................................4-32
4-22. SLIDE: Backup Types..........................................................................................................4-34
4-23. SLIDE: Backup Types Examples .......................................................................................4-36
4-24. SLIDE: Verify the Backup Session .....................................................................................4-38
4-25. SLIDE: Perform a Restore...................................................................................................4-39
4-26. SLIDE: Mount Request (1) ..................................................................................................4-41
4-27. SLIDE: Mount Request (2) ..................................................................................................4-42
4-28. SLIDE: Mount Request (3) ..................................................................................................4-43
4-29. SLIDE: Introduction to Reporting......................................................................................4-44
4-30. SLIDE: Reporting .................................................................................................................4-45

Module 5 — Tape Library Configuration and Implementation


5-1. SLIDE: Objectives ...................................................................................................................5-2
5-2. SLIDE: Library Terminology..................................................................................................5-3
5-3. SLIDE: Library Introductions (hp MSL)...............................................................................5-5
5-4. SLIDE: Magazines — Mail Slots ............................................................................................5-8
5-5. SLIDE: Rear Panel — 10U Model........................................................................................5-10
5-6. SLIDE: Tape Drives for HP MSL Libraries.........................................................................5-12
5-7. SLIDE: SCSI Interface ..........................................................................................................5-13
5-8. SLIDE: Library Performance ...............................................................................................5-16
5-9. SLIDE: Fibre Channel — SCSI Router ...............................................................................5-18
5-10. SLIDE: Library Operations/Configuration .......................................................................5-21

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Contents

5-11. SLIDE: Menu Screen .......................................................................................................... 5-23


5-12. SLIDE: Configure Network Access .................................................................................. 5-25
5-13. SLIDE: Setting SCSI IDs .................................................................................................... 5-26
5-14. SLIDE: Remote Management Interface ........................................................................... 5-28
5-15. SLIDE: Web-based Remote Library Management .......................................................... 5-29
5-16. SLIDE: Configuring the NSR ............................................................................................. 5-30
5-17. SLIDE: Fibre Channel Mapping (per host client) ........................................................... 5-33
5-18. SLIDE: HBA Connectivity (topology) .............................................................................. 5-34
5-19. SLIDE: Server Considerations .......................................................................................... 5-36
5-20. SLIDE: Logical Device Files .............................................................................................. 5-37
5-21. SLIDE: RMS Enabled for Windows 2000 ......................................................................... 5-39
5-22. SLIDE: Disable RSM for Library on Windows 2000 ....................................................... 5-40
5-23. SLIDE: RSM Disabled for Tape Library ........................................................................... 5-41
5-24. SLIDE: Windows SCSI Device Paths................................................................................ 5-42
5-25. SLIDE: HP 9000 Hardware Addressing ............................................................................ 5-44
5-26. SLIDE: Verify Library Robotic Control Using L&TT ...................................................... 5-49
5-27. SLIDE: L&TT Connectivity Verification .......................................................................... 5-51
5-28. SLIDE: Device Analysis Test............................................................................................. 5-54
5-29. SLIDE: Library Exercise Test............................................................................................ 5-55
5-30. LAB: MSL Library ............................................................................................................... 5-56

Module 6 — Media Management


6-1. SLIDE: Media Management ................................................................................................... 6-2
6-2. SLIDE: The Media Pool.......................................................................................................... 6-5
6-3. SLIDE: Creating Media Pools................................................................................................ 6-7
6-4. SLIDE: Media Pool Properties .............................................................................................. 6-9
6-5. SLIDE: Media Pool Characteristics .................................................................................... 6-10
6-6. SLIDE: Loose or Strict Allocation?..................................................................................... 6-15
6-7. TEXT PAGE: Media Allocation and Usage........................................................................ 6-17
6-8. SLIDE: Free Pool Concept .................................................................................................. 6-22
6-9. SLIDE: Media Life................................................................................................................. 6-24
6-10. SLIDE: Media Operations .................................................................................................. 6-25
6-11. SLIDE: Formatting Media.................................................................................................. 6-27
6-12. SLIDE: Media Duplication ................................................................................................. 6-30
6-13. SLIDE: Automated Media Operations.............................................................................. 6-32
6-14. SLIDE: Configuring a Post-Backup AMO ........................................................................ 6-34
6-15. SLIDE: Configuring Scheduled Media Copy (AMO)....................................................... 6-36
6-16. SLIDE: Scheduled Media Copy Example......................................................................... 6-40
6-17. TEXT PAGE: The omniamo Command and Configuration Files ................................. 6-41
6-18. SLIDE: Media Vaulting Operations................................................................................... 6-44
6-19. SLIDE: Vaulting Locations ................................................................................................ 6-45
6-20. SLIDE: Vaulting with Media Pools ................................................................................... 6-46
6-21. TEXT PAGE: Automated Media Vaulting ........................................................................ 6-48
6-22. Review Questions............................................................................................................... 6-50

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Contents

Module 7 — Logical Devices


7-1. SLIDE: The Logical Device ....................................................................................................7-2
7-2. SLIDE: Logical Device Types ................................................................................................7-3
7-3. SLIDE: Device Configurations...............................................................................................7-8
7-4. SLIDE: Configuration Methods ...........................................................................................7-11
7-5. SLIDE: Adding a Device (manual method)........................................................................7-12
7-6. SLIDE: Physical Device Selection.......................................................................................7-15
7-7. SLIDE: Library Repository Configuration..........................................................................7-17
7-8. SLIDE: Library Drive Configuration ...................................................................................7-18
7-9. SLIDE: Media Type and Default Pool .................................................................................7-20
7-10. SLIDE: Advanced Options .................................................................................................7-21
7-11. SLIDE: Device Concurrency ..............................................................................................7-24
7-12. SLIDE: Data Protector Tape Format ................................................................................7-26
7-13. SLIDE: Mount Notification ................................................................................................7-29
7-14. SLIDE: Library Sharing.......................................................................................................7-32
7-15. SLIDE: Autoconfigure a Device (1) ..................................................................................7-34
7-16. SLIDE: Autoconfigure a Device (2) ..................................................................................7-35
7-17. SLIDE: Autoconfigure a Device (3) ..................................................................................7-36
7-18. SLIDE: Library Scanning....................................................................................................7-38
7-19. SLIDE: Library Slot Operations.........................................................................................7-40
7-20. SLIDE: External Control ....................................................................................................7-42
7-21. SLIDE: GRAU and StorageTek Libraries..........................................................................7-45
7-22. Review Questions ...............................................................................................................7-47

Module 8 — Backup
8-1. SLIDE: Performing Backups...................................................................................................8-2
8-2. SLIDE: Backup Specification Types ......................................................................................8-5
8-3. SLIDE: The Backup Specification (datalist).........................................................................8-7
8-4. SLIDE: Backup Specification Contents.................................................................................8-9
8-5. SLIDE: Backup Specification Sequence..............................................................................8-11
8-6. SLIDE: Creating Backup Specifications..............................................................................8-12
8-7. SLIDE: Load Balancing..........................................................................................................8-14
8-8. SLIDE: Static Device Allocation...........................................................................................8-16
8-9. SLIDE: Load Balancing — Object Allocation .....................................................................8-17
8-10. SLIDE: Interactive Backup Specifications........................................................................8-19
8-11. SLIDE: Source ......................................................................................................................8-20
8-12. SLIDE: Destination ..............................................................................................................8-22
8-13. SLIDE: Backup Specification Options..............................................................................8-24
8-14. SLIDE: Pre- and Post-Execution .......................................................................................8-27
8-15. SLIDE: Pre- and Post-Exec Script Failures......................................................................8-29
8-16. SLIDE: Reconnect Broken Sessions .................................................................................8-33
8-17. SLIDE: File System Options ..............................................................................................8-35
8-18. SLIDE: Object Summary ....................................................................................................8-41
8-19. SLIDE: Object Properties...................................................................................................8-42
8-20. SLIDE: Parallel Data Streams from Object ......................................................................8-44
8-21. SLIDE: Configure Parallel Data Streams..........................................................................8-45
8-22. SLIDE: The Backup Process Flow ....................................................................................8-46
8-23. SLIDE: Templates and Groups ..........................................................................................8-48
8-24. SLIDE: Preview ...................................................................................................................8-50
8-25. Review Questions ...............................................................................................................8-61

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Contents

Module 9 — Restore
9-1. SLIDE: Performing Restores .................................................................................................. 9-2
9-2. SLIDE: Restore Objects .......................................................................................................... 9-4
9-3. SLIDE: Restore from a Session.............................................................................................. 9-6
9-4. SLIDE: Parallel Restore .......................................................................................................... 9-7
9-5. SLIDE: Restore Sequence....................................................................................................... 9-9
9-6. SLIDE: Restore Source ......................................................................................................... 9-10
9-7. SLIDE: Restore Object Properties....................................................................................... 9-13
9-8. SLIDE: Destination................................................................................................................ 9-15
9-9. SLIDE: Restore Options........................................................................................................ 9-17
9-10. SLIDE: Restore Devices...................................................................................................... 9-19
9-11. SLIDE: Restore Media......................................................................................................... 9-20
9-12. SLIDE: Restore Summary................................................................................................... 9-21
9-13. SLIDE: Parallel or Single Restore...................................................................................... 9-22
9-14. SLIDE: Point in Time Restore ............................................................................................ 9-23
9-15. Review Questions ................................................................................................................ 9-25

Module 10 — Internal Database


10-1. SLIDE: Internal Database (IDB) ....................................................................................... 10-2
10-2. SLIDE: Configuring the Database..................................................................................... 10-5
10-3. SLIDE: IDB Information Storage ...................................................................................... 10-6
10-4. SLIDE: IDB Tablespaces.................................................................................................... 10-8
10-5. SLIDE: External Binary Files .......................................................................................... 10-10
10-6. SLIDE: Directory Structure ............................................................................................. 10-13
10-7. TEXT PAGE: Transaction Logs ...................................................................................... 10-15
10-8. SLIDE: Database Size Limits (Review) .......................................................................... 10-17
10-9. SLIDE: Recommended Distribution............................................................................... 10-19
10-10. SLIDE: Managing Database Growth............................................................................. 10-21
10-11. SLIDE: Internal Database GUI ...................................................................................... 10-24
10-12. SLIDE: IDB Size Report ................................................................................................. 10-25
10-13. SLIDE: Database Maintenance ..................................................................................... 10-26
10-14. Text Page: Data Protector Commands ........................................................................ 10-27
10-15. SLIDE: Database Cleanup ............................................................................................. 10-28
10-16. SLIDE: Adding Filename Extensions ........................................................................... 10-29
10-17. SLIDE: Adding DCBF Locations................................................................................... 10-30
10-18. SLIDE: Preparing for Database Recovery ................................................................... 10-31
10-19. SLIDE: Back Up the Database ...................................................................................... 10-32
10-20. SLIDE: Manual Restore of the Database ..................................................................... 10-34
10-21. SLIDE: Manual Restore Using the GUI ........................................................................ 10-37
10-22. SLIDE: Automated Restore of the Database ............................................................... 10-38
10-23. SLIDE: Recovery from Corruption............................................................................... 10-40
10-24. TEXT PAGE: omnidb ..................................................................................................... 10-44
10-25. TEXT PAGE: omnidbutil ............................................................................................... 10-47
10-26. TEXT PAGE: IDB Maintenance Commands ............................................................... 10-54
10-27. Review Questions ........................................................................................................... 10-56

Module 11 — Monitoring and Reporting


11-1. SLIDE: Monitoring and Reporting .................................................................................... 11-2
11-2. SLIDE: Monitoring Current Sessions ............................................................................... 11-4
11-3. SLIDE: Viewing Previous Session Details ....................................................................... 11-6
11-4. SLIDE: Reporting Possibilities.......................................................................................... 11-8
11-5. SLIDE: Report Categories ................................................................................................. 11-9

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11-6. SLIDE: Reporting Overview.............................................................................................11-11


11-7. SLIDE: Reporting GUI ......................................................................................................11-13
11-8. SLIDE: Web Reporting Interface.....................................................................................11-15
11-9. SLIDE: Reporting Command ...........................................................................................11-17
11-10. SLIDE: Report Groups....................................................................................................11-19
11-11. SLIDE: Report Group Schedule ....................................................................................11-20
11-12. SLIDE: Adding a Report to a Report Group.................................................................11-22
11-13. SLIDE: Service Management Integrations Overview..................................................11-24
11-14. SLIDE: Service Level Management ...............................................................................11-27
11-15. Monitor Review Questions ............................................................................................11-32
11-16. Reporting Lab Review Questions..................................................................................11-33

Module 12 — Event Notifications


12-1. SLIDE: Monitoring, Reporting and Notifications ............................................................12-2
12-2. SLIDE: Notification Concept .............................................................................................12-3
12-3. SLIDE: Data Protector Event Logging..............................................................................12-8
12-4. SLIDE: Default Notifications ...........................................................................................12-10
12-5. SLIDE: Web Notifications GUI ........................................................................................12-11
12-6. SLIDE: Notification Format.............................................................................................12-12
12-7. SLIDE: Report or Event Notification..............................................................................12-15
12-8. Notifications Lab Review Questions ..............................................................................12-16

Module 13 — Access Control and Security


13-1. SLIDE: Access Control and Security .................................................................................13-2
13-2. SLIDE: Access Control ........................................................................................................13-3
13-3. SLIDE: User Groups ............................................................................................................13-4
13-4. SLIDE: The Admin Group ...................................................................................................13-5
13-5. SLIDE: The Operator Group ...............................................................................................13-6
13-6. SLIDE: The User Group.......................................................................................................13-8
13-7. SLIDE: Custom Groups .......................................................................................................13-9
13-8. SLIDE: Group Permissions ...............................................................................................13-11
13-9. SLIDE: Adding Users and Groups....................................................................................13-13
13-10. SLIDE: Changing the Web Password.............................................................................13-15
13-11. SLIDE: Client Security.....................................................................................................13-16
13-12. SLIDE: Network Access — inet (HP-UX) .....................................................................13-18
13-13. SLIDE: Firewall Support .................................................................................................13-20
13-14. Review Questions ...........................................................................................................13-23

Module 14 — Disaster Recovery


14-1. SLIDE: Disaster Recovery..................................................................................................14-2
14-2. SLIDE: Disaster Recovery — Data Protector ..................................................................14-4
14-3. SLIDE: DR Terminology.....................................................................................................14-5
14-4. SLIDE: Data Protector 4-Phase Approach to DR ............................................................14-7
14-5. SLIDE: Supported Recovery Options (5.0) ....................................................................14-10
14-6. SLIDE: Supported Recovery Options (5.1) ....................................................................14-11
14-7. SLIDE: Manual DR Preparation Source .........................................................................14-12
14-8. SLIDE: Cell Manager Configuration Files (DR) ............................................................14-13
14-9. SLIDE: Cell Manager Manual DR Preparation (1) ........................................................14-14
14-10. SLIDE: Cell Manager Manual DR Preparation (2) ......................................................14-15
14-11. SLIDE: Manual Update to Client SRD ..........................................................................14-16
14-12. SLIDE: Manual DR Diskette Content (SRD added) ....................................................14-17
14-13. SLIDE: Assisted Manual DR Procedure .......................................................................14-18

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14-14. SLIDE: One Button Disaster Recovery ........................................................................ 14-20


14-15. SLIDE: OBDR Preparation ............................................................................................ 14-22
14-16. SLIDE: OBDR Wizard (1)............................................................................................... 14-23
14-17. SLIDE: OBDR Wizard (2)............................................................................................... 14-24
14-18. SLIDE: OBDR Session.................................................................................................... 14-25
14-19. SLIDE: Enhanced Automated Disaster Recovery ...................................................... 14-26
14-20. SLIDE: Copy DR Image to the Cell Manager............................................................... 14-29
14-21. SLIDE: Choose the Image Source (1) .......................................................................... 14-30
14-22. SLIDE: Select the Image Set (2).................................................................................... 14-31
14-23. SLIDE: Volume Selections (3)....................................................................................... 14-32
14-24. SLIDE: Create the ISO Image (4).................................................................................. 14-33
14-25. SLIDE: Image Ready to Burn to CD (5) ....................................................................... 14-34
14-26. SLIDE: Booting the DR Image....................................................................................... 14-35
14-27. SLIDE: Automated System Recovery Overview ......................................................... 14-39
14-28. SLIDE: ASR Procedure Overview with DP.................................................................. 14-41
14-29. SLIDE: Recovery Procedure Phase 0 ........................................................................... 14-43
14-30. SLIDE: Create the ASR Set............................................................................................ 14-45
14-31. SLIDE: ASR Set — Volume Selection .......................................................................... 14-47
14-32. SLIDE: ASR Copy Location ........................................................................................... 14-48
14-33. SLIDE: Recovery Procedure Phase 1 (1) ..................................................................... 14-49
14-34. SLIDE: Recovery Procedure Phase 1 (2) ..................................................................... 14-51
14-35. SLIDE: Recovery Procedure Phase 2 ........................................................................... 14-52
14-36. SLIDE: Recovery Procedure Phase 3 ........................................................................... 14-54
14-37. TEXT PAGE: Requirements/Limitations ..................................................................... 14-55
14-38. SLIDE: drstart.exe (interaction)................................................................................... 14-56
14-39. SLIDE: Recovering Clients with Disk Delivery........................................................... 14-59
14-40. SLIDE: HP-UX Clients.................................................................................................... 14-66
14-41. SLIDE: HP-UX Cell Server............................................................................................. 14-68

Module 15 — Manager of Managers


15-1. SLIDE: Manager of Managers............................................................................................. 15-2
15-2. SLIDE: Features................................................................................................................... 15-4
15-3. SLIDE: Concepts.................................................................................................................. 15-6
15-4. SLIDE: Configuration Steps ............................................................................................... 15-8
15-5. SLIDE: MoM GUI ............................................................................................................... 15-11
15-6. SLIDE: Communication .................................................................................................... 15-14
15-7. SLIDE: Distributed MMDB and CDB .............................................................................. 15-16
15-8. SLIDE: Central MMDB ...................................................................................................... 15-18
15-9. SLIDE: Central Licensing ................................................................................................. 15-22
15-10. TEXT PAGE: Added Functionality (MoM GUI)........................................................... 15-25
15-11. Review Questions............................................................................................................ 15-27

Module 16 — Troubleshooting
16-1. SLIDE: Log Files .................................................................................................................. 16-2
16-2. SLIDE: Execution Tracing.................................................................................................. 16-4
16-3. SLIDE: Message Details .................................................................................................... 16-12
16-4. SLIDE: Network Connectivity ......................................................................................... 16-14
16-5. SLIDE: Services ................................................................................................................. 16-18
16-6. TEXT PAGE: User Interface Startup Problems ............................................................ 16-23
16-7. SLIDE: Backup Devices .................................................................................................... 16-26
16-8. SLIDE: Backup and Restore............................................................................................. 16-33
16-9. SLIDE: omnihealthcheck.................................................................................................. 16-39

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Contents

16-10. SLIDE: HealthCheck Config File....................................................................................16-40


16-11. SLIDE: omnihealthcheck.log ..........................................................................................16-42
16-12. SLIDE: omnitrig -run_checks .........................................................................................16-43
16-13. TEXT PAGE: Debugging UNIX Pre- and Post- exec Scripts.......................................16-43

Module 17 — Customizing
17-1. SLIDE: Customizing............................................................................................................17-2
17-2. TEXT PAGE: Contents of the globals File .......................................................................17-4
17-3. TEXT PAGE: Contents of the omnirc.TMPL File..........................................................17-21

Appendix A — Lab Exercises

Appendix B — HP-UX Library Configuration

Solutions to Review Questions

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Overview

Course Description
This course is designed for system administrators and consultants who will be implementing,
planning or administering the HP OpenView Storage Data Protector product on HP-UX,
Windows NT/2000 and Solaris systems.

OmniBack versus OmniBack II versus Data Protector


HP’s first foray into the market of network backup solutions resulted in the original
OmniBack product. This product contained such commands as nbsbackup/nbsrestore
and bears absolutely no resemblance to the product HP OpenView OmniBack II. In 2002 the
Omniback-II product was replaced by the next generation product, HP OpenView Storage
Data Protector 5.0.

Throughout this course, we will refer to HP OpenView Storage Data Protector simply as Data
Protector for simplicity.

Course Goals
• This course is targeted at system administrators who are responsible for managing the
system backup and recovery in a heterogeneous networked environment with HP
OpenView Storage Data Protector software.

• This course teaches system administrators and network administrators how to install,
configure, and customize the HP OpenView Storage Data Protector product.

Student Performance Objectives


• Install HP OpenView Data Protector product.
• Distribute the HP OpenView Storage Data Protector software on the network.
• Configure the HP OpenView Storage Data Protector product.
• Use the HP OpenView Storage Data Protector product to backup, restore, and monitor
from the GUI and command line.
• Manage the HP Openview Storage Data Protector Internal Database
• Create custom reports and notification procedures

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Overview

Student Profile and Prerequisites


This course is designed for students at the system administrator level.
• For HP-UX, this course requires HP-UX System and Network Administration I (H3064S)
or equivalent experience. Other recommended HP Education courses:

HP-UX System and Network Administration II (H3065S)(for students who will be working
in the UNIX environment)

POSIX Shell Programming (H4322S) is strongly recommended, but is not a prerequisite

• For Windows NT/2000, this level equates to Microsoft Windows Server administration or
equivalent experience.
• For Solaris, system and network administration training or equivalent experience.
• Networking knowledge and backup device knowledge is also recommended.

Conventions
For convenience, we will refer to specific product directory names by their logical names
rather than the fully qualified paths.

Unix
Logical Name Directory Path Usage
$OMNIHOME or /opt/omni Binaries, man pages, etc.
<OMNIHOME>
$OMNICONFIG or /etc/opt/omni Configuration directory
<OMNICONFIG>
$OMNIVAR or /var/opt/omni Database and log files
<OMNIVAR>

Windows NT/2000
Logical Name Default Directory Path Usage
$OMNIHOME or C:\program files\Omniback The product root directory
<OMNIHOME>
$OMNICONFIG or C:\program files\Omniback\config Configuration directory
<OMNICONFIG>
$OMNIVAR or C:\program files\Omniback The product root directory
<OMNIVAR>

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Overview

Agenda

Day 1
Module 1 — Introduction
Module 2 — Data Protector Overview and Architecture
Module 3 — Data Protector Installation
Module 4 — Data Protector Basics

Day 2
Module 5 — Tape Library Configuration and Implementation
Module 6 — Media Management
Module 7 — Logical Devices
Module 8 — Backup

Day 3
Module 9 — Restore
Module 10 — Internal Database
Module 11 — Monitoring and Reporting
Module 12 — Event Notification
Module 13 — Access Control and Security

Day 4
Module 14 — Disaster Recovery
Module 15 — Manager of Managers
Module 16 — Troubleshooting
Module 17 — Customizing

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Overview

U1610S B.00 4 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 1 — Introduction
Objectives
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:
• Describe the content and flow of this course.

• Get additional information about Data Protector.

http://education.hp.com 1-1 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 1
Introduction

1–1. SLIDE: Welcome

Welcome

HP OpenView Storage Data Protector 1: Fundamentals


• Introductions
• Logistics

Student Notes
Welcome to HP Education, and the HP OpenView Storage Data Protector 1: Fundamentals
course (U1610S). This course is designed for system administrators who will be responsible
for the installation, configuration, and management of the Data Protector storage
management software.

This course covers the HP OpenView Storage Data Protector product functionality for
version 5.1, released June 2003. Throughout this course, the product name “HP OpenView
Storage Data Protector” will be shortened to just Data Protector or DP for simplicity.

U1610S B.00 1-2 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 1
Introduction

1–2. SLIDE: Agenda (1)

Agenda (1)

• Architecture
• Installation
• DP Basics
• Library Implementation
• Media Management
• Logical Devices
• Backup
• Restore

Student Notes
The main topics in this course are listed on the slide.

http://education.hp.com 1-3 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 1
Introduction

1–3. SLIDE: Agenda (2)

Agenda (2)

• Internal Database
• Monitoring and Reporting
• Event Notification
• Cell Security
• Disaster Recovery
• Manager of Managers
• Troubleshooting

Student Notes

U1610S B.00 1-4 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 1
Introduction

1–4. SLIDE: Additional Resources

Additional Resources

• Product documentation

• Web sites

• Support services

• Consulting services

• Users’ group

Student Notes
Hewlett Packard provides several additional resources designed to make you successful with
our products. These include:
• Product documentation
− Soft copy (Acrobat format) is included with the software distribution as well on the
on the web.
− Suggested reading:
− HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Administrator’s Guide
− HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Concepts Guide
− HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Installation and Licensing Guide
• Web Sites
− http://education.hp.com
− http://openview.hp.com
− http://itresourcecenter.hp.com
• Support services
− HP Response Center
− Account Support Organization
• Consulting services
− HP Consulting & Integration

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 1
Introduction

In addition to the support and services available from HP, there is an HP sponsored user
group called OpenView Forum. They typically have yearly conferences and have several
other benefits available to members. Their information is available via the web at:
http://ovforum.org.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2 — Data Protector Overview and
Architecture
Objectives
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:
• Identify the environment in which Data Protector operates.

• Identify the components of the Data Protector cell.

• Describe the operational concepts of the Data Protector client/server architecture.

• Plan the layout for an installation.

http://education.hp.com 2-1 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–1. SLIDE: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector

HP OpenView Storage Data Protector

What is it?
• Software that provides automated data protection for businesses
with 24x7 availability needs.
What does it do?
• Data Protection: copies data onto a storage device, so that in
case of a disaster, data can be easily recovered and made
accessible.
• Media management: easily manages the library catalogues to
keep track of all media and copies of data for fast recovery.
Most important features:
• Automated backups that scale from small workgroups to multi-
site, heterogeneous SAN & NAS environments with thousands of
servers.
• Fully-integrated Zero-Downtime backup with Instant-Recovery.

Student Notes
HP OpenView Storage Data Protector is a new generation of HP OpenView software that
manages data protection as an integral component of an overall IT service.

By managing data protection as a set of services rather than a set of data objects and IT
resources, Data Protector helps you meet your service level objectives (SLO) with increased
staff efficiency. This in particular addresses the SLM requirements of service providers.

Data Protector builds upon the capabilities of its predecessor, HP OpenView Omniback II, for
tape management, backup, and disaster recovery, and establishes a new focus on recovery
and service-centric management.

U1610S B.00 2-2 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–2. SLIDE: Managed Environment

Managed Environment

Student Notes
The typical IT environment today consists of many systems distributed across the enterprise.
The traditional data center has experienced tremendous change and become a server and
storage farm. The systems that operate today’s’ corporations are very numerous and contain
huge quantities of data.

The picture above is representative of the IT environment today. Many systems from the
desktop to the data center, connected via high-speed local area networks (LANs).

Behind these systems are increasingly large and complex data storage systems. As the need
to access data from multiple systems and the quantity of data increases, companies are
turning to large storage systems, such as the HP StorageWorks disk arrays for on-line storage
and automated tape systems for near-line storage. Many storage devices are either directly
connected to a host or connected via a Storage Area Network (SAN) to meet data storage
accessibility needs.

Managing the complexities of the IT infrastructure today requires an even more capable
solution to meet the ever changing IT Service Management environment.

http://education.hp.com 2-3 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–3. SLIDE: Backup Models

Backup Models

direct-attached backup snapshot backup


management Application Server
application
server
media
disk host
host

Backup Server
tape

network backup split-mirror backup


management Application Server

media
host P
disk
host S S S

tape
Backup Server

Student Notes
To protect data from all risks of loss, Data Protector offers a variety of ways to back it up and
recover it including Zero Downtime Backup (ZDB) and Instant Recovery (IR). Data Protector
offers several models for data security and backup including:
• Direct attached storage
• Zero Downtime Backup with Split-Mirror (StoragWorks XP)
• Zero Downtime Backup with Snapshot (StorageWorks EVA, VA, MSA)
• Heterogeneous network backup
• Storage Area Network (SAN) attached online and nearline storage
• Network Attached Storage (NAS, using Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP)
• Direct backup using X-Copy (extended copy)

Data Protector’s Instant Recovery (IR) is capable of recovering terabytes of data in minutes
rather than hours. Unlike traditional tools that focus exclusively on backup to tape, Data
Protector enables a variety of techniques to create recovery images using disk resources as
well as tape. These techniques can maximize information availability and minimize
application impact, by incorporating near zero-impact, zero-downtime backup or Direct
Backup (server-less backup from disk to tape), depending on your business needs and
available hardware.

U1610S B.00 2-4 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–4. SLIDE: Split-Mirror Backup Concept

Split-Mirror Backup Concept

• True online backup for


integrated applications
• Split mirrors may used for
instant recovery or resynced
Application host XP
• No performance impact on
applications during backup
P
• Mirror synchronization before
or after backup
• Automatic mirror rotation
• API based integration
M M M
0 1 2 Backup host

P – primary LDEV
M – mirror copy (MU0-2)

Student Notes
The general idea behind split mirror backups is to stream the backup from the mirror instead
of the production disk. The mirror is typically connected to a separate host (called the
backup host) with a tape device attached. Usually, hardware mirror technologies such as
Business Copy XP or Continuous Access XP are used to create the mirror.

Before a backup of a mirror can be started, a valid point in time disk image needs to be
created. The disk image needs to be consistent so that it can be fully restored. The mirror is
not created at backup time but needs to be established ahead of time. To create the backup
image, the mirror will simply be split off the production disk at backup time.

As the application host and backup host are different, it is very important that all cached
information (database cache, filesystem cache) on the host is flushed to the disk before the
mirror is split off. One of the following options achieves this (depending upon the type of
data to backup):

• Databases could be put into backup mode


• Databases could be taken offline
• A filesystem could be unmounted

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

The above must occur prior to the split of the mirror to guarantee that the backup image will
be consistent.

In case of a plain filesystem backup, it won’t be required to unmount the filesystem first. The
split-mirror backup will complete successfully also with the filesystem mounted. However, a
successful restore of all files and directories cannot be guaranteed since cached data won’t
be written to disk prior to the split. It’s therefore recommended to unmount a filesystem
before performing a spit-mirror backup.

In case a database is running on a filesystem, there will be no need to unmount the filesystem
as the database controls the write to the disk and ensures that data is really written to the
disk and not to the filesystem cache.

For the online database backup, the backup image alone cannot be restored. The archive log
files from the application host are also needed. The archive log backup can be started when
the database is taken out of backup mode. This will happen right after the mirrors were
successfully split off their productive disks. The backup duration (from the perspective of the
application) is only the time required to perform the split, during which the consistent
backup copy is created. The backup and the resynchronization of the mirrors do not affect
the production database’s I/O performance as they happen inside of the XP Disk Array.

The HP Education course, U1611S, covers the concept of Zero Downtime Backup and Instant
Recovery within a hands-on SAN environment.

Mirror Rotation
Mirror rotation relies on Business Copy’s capability to maintain up to three independent
secondary volumes (S-Vols) of one primary volume (P-Vol). The different S-Vols are labeled
as Mirror Units (MU#0, MU#1 and MU#2).

Data Protector can perform split mirror backups from each of the split mirrors.
Administrators can either supply one dedicated S-Vol or multiple S-Vols for backup. If two or
more mirrors are available, Data Protector will automatically use them in a cyclic fashion. At
the end of the backup, the S-Vol used will be left split off the P-Vol thus keeping the backup
versions on the S-Vol available for Instant Recovery. For the next backup, another S-Vol will
be used. This provides a high level of data protection.

U1610S B.00 2-6 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–5. SLIDE: Snapshot Backup Concept

Snapshot Backup Concept

• Similar to split-mirror backups


• Snapshots get created on the fly
or are reused
Application host
• Backup host processes the data
P P • Snapshot information is stored in
VA Instant Recovery database for
VA, EVA, MSA
EVA
MSA • API based integration

S S

Backup host

P – primary LUN
S – snapshot / child

Student Notes
The snapshot backup concepts are similar to those of the split-mirror backup. The snapshot
backup currently is supported with the HP StorageWorks Virtual Arrays, VA71xx and
VA74xx, the HP StorageWorks Enterprise Virtual Array, EVA3000 and EVA5000 as well as the
HP StorageWorks Modular Storage Array, MSA 1000 (MSA available later).

Snapshots may be created on the fly within the array, or they may be designated for re-use for
backup utilizing a rotation strategy.

Snapshots may be designated for use with the Instant Recovery capabilities of Data
Protector. (At the time of this printing, Instant Recovery is only supported for the HP VA
products. It is expected that the EVA and MSA will be supported via a patch release due later
in 2003).

The HP Education course, U1611S, covers the snapshot integration in detail along with
Instant Recovery within both a file system and RDBMS environment.

http://education.hp.com 2-7 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–6. SLIDE: HP OpenView Building Block Architecture

Hp Openview Building Block Architecture

• OpenView Enterprise Console


• OpenView Operations:
Event and Problem Management
Network, Systems, Application and Database Management Management
Service Level Management Repository

~200 Openview Partner Solutions

systems network performance application service


management management management management management
• Operations • Network Node • GlancePlus • SMART Plug-Ins: • Internet Services
• Data Protector Manager • Performance • Apps, DBs • Service Desk
• data backup • Customer Views • Reporter • Web/App • Internet Usage
• data recovery • PolicyXpert • Web Transaction Servers Manager
• Storage Area • Internet Services Observer • Mgmt Server • Service Reporter
Manager • Internet Services • Managed • WebQoS
• Media Operations Nodes • Service Info. Portal

Network
Desktop Network Access Servers Databases Applications
Managing Distributed UNIX and Windows Environments, End-to-End

Student Notes
Illustrated above is the current OpenView building block architecture.

What sets OpenView apart from other solutions is the flexible architecture that allows you to
build an IT management environment according to needs and requirements.
Our different product offerings can be used as standalone products or in an integrated
fashion. Network Node Manager (NNM) and OpenView Operations (OVO) are the most
common integration points for HP and third-party management products. The flexible OVO
and Service Navigator consoles also function as one of the OpenView Enterprise Consoles.

The Service Desk and Service Information Portal products form the service management
umbrella and add a service management process layer and functionality on top of the
integrated OpenView solution to complete the service management product offering.

There are over 400 OpenView products. This course obviously will not cover all of the
products, but it will focus on the Data Protector storage management product.

HP OpenView Storage Data Protector offers comprehensive backup and restore


functionality specifically tailored for global, enterprise-wide, and distributed environments.
Unparalleled in the industry, Data Protector is operationally efficient; as of this printing HP

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

Storage Data Protector holds the backup performance record of 3.6TB/hour. It supports
business and IT alignment, and offers turnkey control to create one complete, integrated
backup solution for heterogeneous environments.

Data Protector and IT Service Management


Data Protector provides unique capabilities that support IT service management in the areas
of data backup and restore.

IT managers are equipped with the key data to enable proactive monitoring and planning of
backup and data recovery operations.

Deep integration from Data Protector along with the OpenView Operations centric
environment provides unmatched service level management capabilities.

Integration with other HP OpenView service management solutions through the Application
Response Measurement (ARM) API and utilization of Data Source Integration (DSI) allows
data to be leveraged into service availability and recovery planning activities that are critical
to maintaining service level agreements in a heterogeneous environment.

With HP OpenView Data Protector 5.0 (OV DP) there are four new Service Management
Integrations introduced which aggregate data and reduces complexity in a large scale, global
data center.

Enterprise IT departments are increasingly using service management tools, techniques, and
methods to set service level expectations, measure service delivery against those
expectations, and to justify future service expansion. In short, the IT department now is run
like a business.

Part of IT’s business is managing the risk of data loss. Threats ranging from user error, to
viruses or other unauthorized data access and modification, or to the occasional failure of the
storage device itself put data at risk twenty four hours a day. Business critical data loss can
cost the enterprise thousands, even millions of dollars per hour of downtime. While all data is
at risk, not all data justify equal recoverability. IT department must protect the business
critical data to a higher level of protection than the less valuable data, and do so cost
effectively.

Service providers use Service Level Agreements (SLAs) to document the provider-customer
contractual expectations. SLAs typically establish availability and performance objectives.
Using this model, a provider can offer multiple service levels each at its own cost structure.
By identifying the relative value of data placed within its care, IT department can set service
expectations on backup and recovery consistent with the protected data’s business value.

Backup and recovery now is managed like the enterprise itself: that is, like a business.
Demonstrating SLA compliance requires constant monitoring and periodic reporting to show
whether SLA expectations have been met. Data Protector out of the box has monitoring,
notification, and reporting tools to document backup and recovery operations. Data
Protector integration with other OpenView service management products consolidates
service views, service performance data and other capabilities into one console, giving a
service provider better information and insight into the overall IT service delivery.

http://education.hp.com 2-9 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

Data Protector provides the following service management integrations:


• HP OVO is a software solution designed to help service providers and their system
administrators detect, solve, and prevent problems occurring in networks, systems, and
applications in any enterprise. It is a central management point for various remote
OpenView applications. Collects and analyzes data, automates critical response, as well
as message forwarding to other services.

• OVO DP SPI (OpenView Operations Data Protector SMART Plug In) is a package
containing components of Data Protector that are fully integrated into OVO. The
integration includes users, message groups, node groups, applications, reports, service
definitions and command executables. Installation of the Data Protector cell manager
onto the OVO management server is required for the enterprise console functionality and
scalability that this integration provides.

• OVO SN (OpenView Service Navigator) is a system that maps messages to services to


ease the control of complicated systems.

• OV SIP (OpenView Service Information Portal) aggregates information collected


from various services, such as data protection services, networks, and so forth. The
information is presented and formatted through various portal components and is made
available through a web page. Portal components, modules, include Service Browser,
Service Graph, and Service Cards.

• OVR (OpenView Reporter) is a reporting service that further analyzes, inspects, and
collects data gathered by OVO and formats them into a human readable and usable web-
based presentation.

• OVSD (OpenView Service Desk) is a central management point for products,


applications, and services. It standardizes and manages issue management and makes it
possible to maintain consistent service levels.

• DP – OVR integration integrates DP 5.0 with HP OVO, OVSN, OVP Agent and OV
Reporter
The integration of DP 5.0 with HP OVO is extended by adding HP OpenView Reporter
(OVR 3.0 English version). With OVR service providers can generate reports from data
obtained from the OVO management server. An IT Service Provider can use these reports
to demonstrate to a customer its SLA compliance. For example, “DP Transaction
Performance” Report consists of the service performance metrics (one of the IT SLA
parameters). In addition to SLA compliance reports, an IT Service Provider can generate
monthly operational reports for DP5.0 environment. For example, “DP5.0 Operational
Error Status” report aggregates the “problem” data and can be used by an IT service
provider for operational planning.
• DP – OVSIP integration integrates DP 5.0 with HP OpenView Service Information
Portal (OV SIP).
OV SIP gives an IT service provider customer visibility into the services that they are
outsourcing. OV SIP instead of giving the customer a generalized view of the service
provider’s infrastructure, personalizes that information for each customer and shows
status and business information specific to customer’s outsourced environment. OV SIP
contains a portal foundation and a range of management information modules. The Data

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

Protector module on OV SIP extracts status information from DP 5.0. With this module,
an IT service provider can give its customers a view into the status of their outsourced
data protection operations.
• DP – OVSD integration integrates DP5.0 with HP OpenView Service Desk (OV SD).
OV SD is a help desk solution. It enables the IT support organization to implement
configuration, help desk, incident resolution, problem resolution, and change
management processes into a single workflow. OV SD automates and regulates IT
troubleshooting processes. It stores SLAs and monitors support service compliance to
them. When integrated with DP5.0, OV SD (without a human involvement) monitors the
time taken to resolve backup-related problems, such as adding media or restarting a
failed backup, increasing DP’s monitoring and measuring capabilities. OV SD manages
service help desk workflow, measures service quality levels, and generates reports
demonstrating SLA compliance. DP 5.0’s integration with OV SD gives support personnel
access to DP5.0 data for a timely response and resolution of operational problems before
they affect vital data protection service.

http://education.hp.com 2-11 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–7. SLIDE: Data Protector Architecture Components

Data Protector Architecture Components

manager of distributed OpenView operations


managers GUI console

cell
cell
manager
manager

cell
cell
clients
clients

Student Notes
The basic HP Data Protector implementation utilizes only two architecture layers, the Cell
Manager, and the Cell Client layers.

Data Protector can be managed in larger environments by implementing the Manager of


Managers (MOM) or OpenView Operations (OVO) layers.

Scalable Client/Server Architecture


The Data Protector architecture consists of specialized modules that can be implemented in
wide and varied configurations.

The architecture is highly scalable and lends itself to the simplest single system
configuration, right up to the most complex multi-system, multi-site enterprise-wide solution.

Data Protector is available as a Single Server Edition, designed for smaller environments.

With centralized administration capabilities (managed locally or remotely) and a


client/server-based architecture, Data Protector provides the ability to globally support
automated backup and restore for thousands of enterprise-wide network systems.

U1610S B.00 2-12 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

The Data Protector client/server architecture provides multiple manager layers, which offers
tremendous flexibility and adjusts easily to organizational needs and changes.

Enterprise Console
The Data Protector integration with HP OpenView Operations provides the concept of the
Enterprise Console. HP OpenView Operations allows remote administration and monitoring
of one or more Data Protector cells from a single Enterprise Console.

Manager of Managers—MoM
An existing Data Protector Cell Manager can be configured as the Manager of Managers
(M.o.M.) which allows remote administration and monitoring of many cells from a single
consolidated GUI. A centralized media management database (CMMDB), cross-cell device
sharing as well as central license management may also be configured with MoM.

Cell Manager and Clients


The Cell Manager is the heart of the Data Protector backup environment. The clients are
controlled from the Cell Manager system. We will cover these later in this module.

Key product features:


Central Administration
Data Protector allows you to administer your complete backup environment from one single
system via a GUI. This GUI can be installed on various systems to allow multiple
administrators or operators to access Data Protector via a locally installed console. It is
possible to administer multiple Data Protector environments from a single GUI, which comes
with the Data Protector Manager of Manager.

High Performance Backup


Data Protector allows backup to many devices simultaneously and supports a large range of
today’s’ fast backup devices, including the most popular libraries and auto-changers. Data
Protector also supports integration with key storage products to allow for zero-downtime
backup.

Online Application Backup


With Data Protector, you can perform on-line back up for
• SAP R/3
• Informix
• Sybase
• Oracle (Backup and Restore GUI)
• IBM DB2
• MS Exchange (Single mailbox backup and restore)
• MS SQL
• MS VSS (Volume Shadow Copy Service, Windows Server 2003 only)
• Lotus Domino

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

Firewall Support
Data Protector has support for backups to be managed through a firewall. This gives
administrators more control for remote managed environments.

SAN Support
Data Protector is used today in several different SAN implementations. As this technology is
evolving, consult the OpenView web site for the latest information about the supported
environments.

Scalability
Data Protector is used in environments from one system (which could be a data server) to
environments with thousands of systems. Through its architecture, it is highly scalable and
suitable for nearly any kind of environment.

Easy-to-Use
Data Protector comes with an easy-to-use cross-platform consistent Windows style GUI and
allows easy administration of a complex environment.

Disaster Recovery
Data Protector allows easy disaster recovery of a complete Windows system.

One Button Disaster Recovery (OBDR)


Data Protector allows easy disaster recovery of a complete Windows system. OBDR allows
for automated boot and recovery from supported tape drives and servers.

NDMP Support
Data Protector allows the backup of data stored on an NDMP server such as NetApp filers.

NetApp Filers have their own operating system, called ONTAP, and contains a NDMP server
implementation, which is used by Data Protector to perform a backup and restore on such a
system.

Open File Backup Support


The Data Protector Open File Manager (OFM 8.1) is a utility that enhances the Data Protector
backup ability to manage open files on MS Windows and Novell Netware systems. It allows
for the successful capturing of open files even if they are changing during the backup. Open
File Manager is an add-on product for use with Data Protector and requires an additional
license.

Tape-Library-Support
Data Protector supports multiple tape libraries, which allow for fast unattended backup
times.

Flexible

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

Because of multiple backup and restore options, Data Protector is very flexible. It fits all
kinds of end-users and administrator requirements.

Multi-Vendor Support
The various Data Protector agents (Disk Agent, Media Agent, and Online Application
Integration Agents) are supported on various platforms, making Data Protector truly a
backup solution for multivendor environments.

Sophisticated Media Management


Data Protector comes with an integrated database that stores information about each Data
Protector medium and the data on it. Data Protector Media Management allows tracking and
vaulting of media.

Integrations
In addition to the online backup integrations, Data Protector offers integrations with
OpenView Operations, OpenView Media Operations, MC/ServiceGuard, MS Clusters, and
OmniStorage. Data Protector also integrates into the Microsoft Management Console for
more convenient access.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–8. SLIDE: The Cell Concept

Cell Concept

• Backup domain
• Logical organization of systems
• Can match your organization
• Heterogeneous system support
• Independent but can be centrally
managed

Student Notes
The Data Protector architecture breaks down the size and complexity of the enterprise
network by defining Data Protector Cells.

A Data Protector Cell consists of a Cell Manager system and all of the systems that are to
have backup managed by it. A cell can be all the systems within a department, or all systems
within one room or building. It is also possible to have a cell that contains only one system
(called a single-system cell).

The Data Protector Cell configuration can reflect the organization within a company, with
each department having its own administrators. However, there is no reason that two
machines, thousands of miles apart, cannot be in the same cell.

Note: A system may belong to only one cell.

U1610S B.00 2-16 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

There is no enforced limit to the number of systems per Data Protector Cell, but the cell size
may be limited by a number of factors:
• The maximum supported number of systems is 1000, although 100 is recommended
• The size of the Data Protector internal database
• The quantity of backups that can be effectively managed

The Data Protector internal database can grow to be many GB. A good rule of thumb is that
you should allocate enough disk space to allow the internal database be approximately 2% of
the quantity of data that is backed up. You may find that if you are backing up many large
files (50 MB–100 MB each), then the percentage size of the database compared to data can be
as little as 0.25%; this is especially true when backing up large database files. Backing up
many small files means more records in the database, which means more space is required
for the database.

Later in this module you will see how to estimate more accurately the size of your Data
Protector internal database. (The module on Database Management will give more specifics
about how to plan for and manage database growth.)

Which Factors Should Be Considered when Defining Cells?


• Systems that have a common backup policy
• Systems that are on the same LAN
• Systems administered by the same people
• Systems within the same time zone
• Systems should use time synchronization
• Systems in the same Windows Domain (for simpler administration)

Cells are generally independent parts of the enterprise network. They are administered and
operate independently of each other. Data Protector has the capability to monitor and
administer all the cells from a central administration point utilizing the Cell Console or
Enterprise Console or the Manager of Managers console.

NOTE: If systems in the same cell are in different time zones, some of the Data
Protector messages can be confusing. In addition, all backups are configured
according to the Cell Manager’s clock.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–9. SLIDE: Client/Server Modules

Client-Server Modules

cell console
cell manager (CC)
(CM)

media agent
(MA)

disk agent
(DA)

Student Notes
Data Protector is composed of separate modules, each of which performs a specialized task.
The major component is the Cell Manager; it is responsible for the control of the entire Data
Protector Cell and the invocation of the specialized agent processes.

Client/Server Architecture
The basis of the client/server model is that the Data Protector software consists of client
modules and a server module. These modules can all be installed on a single node (a single
node cell) or be distributed across many nodes.

Communication between modules is accomplished via TCP/IP sockets.

U1610S B.00 2-18 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–10. SLIDE: Platform Support

Platform Support

Cell Manager:
• HP-UX Application (Integration) Agents
• Windows • Oracle
• Solaris Catalog/Media Database: • Informix
• files, versions, hosts • IBM DB2 UDB
Disk Agent: • media, drives, libraries • Sybase
• HP-UX 11.X • SAP R/3
• HP OpenVMS • Baan IV on Oracle, Informix
• HP Tru64 UNIX • Lotus Domino
• HP MPE/iX • MS SQL Server
• Win NT, XP • MS Exchange Server
• Win 2000, 2003 • MS VSS
• Sun Solaris 7,8,9 • MS Cluster Server
• SunOS • HP MC ServiceGuard
• IBM AIX • HP OpenView Operations
• Linux Redhat/SuSE/Caldera • HP OpenView OmniStorage
• Novell NetWare Media Agent:
• SGI IRIX • Windows
• Windows NT-Alpha • HP-UX
• SCO OpenServer • Sun Solaris
• SCO Unixware • IBM AIX
• SNI SINIX • Linux Redhat/SuSE
• NCR MP-RAS • Novell NetWare
• Sequent DYNIX • HP MPE/iX
• Additional platforms via NFS / shared disk (CIFS) • SCO OpenServer
• SNI Sinix

Student Notes
The Data Protector product consists of several product components: the Manager of
Manager, the Cell Manager, Backup Device Manager (with the Media Agent), Backup Agent
(with the Disk Agent) and various Application Agents.

Included in the product documentation you will find several release specific documents
describing the supported platforms and integrations.

This document (found in the Docs/doc directory) contains


details about platforms supported for Data Protector 5.1,
Platform_Integrtn_SptMtx.pdf
including all integrations with third party software products.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–11. SLIDE: Cell Manager

Cell Manager

z HP-UX, Windows, Solaris


Cell Manager
z Manually installed
Daemons
(Services)
z Provides:
CRS Cell Console
z Background daemons/services
RDS IDB
z manage with omnisv
MMD
z stop,start,status options

z Internal database
Session Managers
z Session managers

z Scheduler
Disk, Media and Integration
z Cell Console and agents Agents

z Installation server (optional)

Student Notes
The Cell Manager is the key component of a Data Protector Cell. It contains the Data
Protector database, and is responsible for the starting of backup, restore, and media
management sessions.

The UNIX Cell Manager system always has three daemon processes running to provide Data
Protector services:
crs Cell Request Server
mmd Media Management Daemon
rds Raima Database Server

The Windows Cell Manager system always has three service processes running to provide
Data Protector services:
Data Protector CRS Cell Request Server
Data Protector Inet Remote Connection Server
Data Protector RDS Raima Database Server
In the Windows environment, the MMD runs as an application process, (mmd.exe) not as a
service.

U1610S B.00 2-20 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

Daemon/Service Control
The manager programs will reside in /opt/omni/lbin directory on Unix, and the
C:\Program Files\Omniback\bin directory on Windows. The three services/daemons
will normally be started when the system boots up. A program has been provided to stop,
start, and check on the status of these services, the program name is omnisv. There are
three options available for the omnisv program, they are: -stop, -start, -status.

Default program locations:


(UNIX) /opt/omni/sbin/omnisv
(Windows) C:\Program Files\Omniback\bin\omnisv

Note: omnisv replaces the omnisv.sh program used in previous versions

Sample output from omnisv:

C:\Program Files\OmniBack\bin>omnisv -status


ProcName Status [PID]
===============================
rds : Active [3348]
crs : Active [3040]
mmd : Active [1400]
omniinet: Active [3312]
Sending of traps disabled.
===============================
Status: All Data Protector relevant processes/services up and
running.

Session Managers
The Cell Manager listens for session requests and starts the appropriate Session Manager,
which in turn starts the required clients. A dedicated Session Manager controls the clients for
each operation. If a new session is started, an additional Session Manager is generated.

bsm Backup Session Manager


rsm Restore Session Manager
dbsm Database Session Manager
msm Media Session Manager
asm Administration Session Manager

These session manager programs will reside in the /opt/omni/lbin directory on UNIX and
C:\Program Files\Omniback\bin (default) on Windows, once they are installed with the
Cell Manager.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–12. SLIDE: Internal Database Size Limits

Internal Database Size Limits

• File Versions (10x # of file names)


• 50 directories (containing binary files)
• 4 GB per directory
DCBF
• 10,000 files per directory

• 700 Million File Names Unix (est.)


• 450 Million File Names on Windows (est.)
CDB (32 GB HP-UX & Windows, 30 GB Solaris)

• 40,000 Media per pool


• 500,000 Media
MMDB • 1,000,000 Sessions (max 2,000 per day)
• 100 parallel backup sessions (UX, 60 Win)

Student Notes
The Data Protector Internal Database (IDB) is comprised of several structures that store
data. The three main structures are shown above, they are:

DCBF The detail catalog binary files


CDB The catalog database
MMDB The media management database

The IDB has several defined, supported limits. These limits should not be exceeded under
any circumstances. The limits illustrated on the slide are also available from the product
Release Notes document that ships with the product.

The file names database file is initialized with a 2GB (2047MB) maximum size by default, but
may be extended in up to 2 GB (2047MB) increments to a maximum of 32 GB. The minimum
size per extension is 1MB.

The file versions stored in the DCBF is initially configured as one directory capable of storing
up to 4 GB, but may be extended in up to 4 GB increments to a default maximum of 10
directories. To reach the 50 directory limit changes to the global options file (covered later)
must be made. Each extension directory may contain up to 10,000 files; the limit for file

U1610S B.00 2-22 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

versions is set to allow approximately 10 times the number of filenames. This represents
approximately 80% of all the data stored by Data Protector.

The size of the MMDB will only be approximately 20-30 MB.

http://education.hp.com 2-23 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–13. SLIDE: Capacity Planning Spreadsheet

Capacity Planning Spreadsheet

Student Notes
The capacity planning worksheet (spreadsheet) shown above is included in the Data
Protector product distribution. The spreadsheet contains macros, which will help in planning
future database growth potential. Simply plug-in the appropriate data and the macros will
calculate the amount of disk space that is needed.

The spreadsheet is installed in the UX: doc or Windows: Docs directory on the cell manager
and is called IDB_capacity_planning.xls.

Note! The spreadsheet must be copied to an appropriate system to view and use the tool.

An alternate approach to using the spreadsheet is to use the documented formulas for
estimating the disk space needed. The Data Protector Concepts Guide documents the
formula for each part of the database. The spreadsheet is the preferred method.

U1610S B.00 2-24 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–14. SLIDE: Cell Console (User Interface)

Cell Console (User Interface)

z HP-UX, Windows, Solaris

z Present on all cell managers

z Provides:
z Graphical user interface
z Command-line interface
z Web reporting java interface

z May be further distributed from:


z Cell manager
z Media

z No additional license required

Student Notes
Data Protector provides user interfaces for the UNIX and Windows platforms. The user
interface is commonly referred to as the Cell Console. Both UNIX and Windows platforms
include the following components:
• Graphical user interface
• Command line interface
• Java based reporting interface

The user interface is installed as a Data Protector software component onto the Cell Manager
system, but it may also be installed on any number of clients within the cell. A system
administrator or a backup operator will use the cell console to control the cell. Therefore, it
should run on the platform that will simplify the configuration and administration of Data
Protector. It is common practice to install the Cell Console user interface on both UNIX and
Windows clients within the same cell.

Once you have installed the user interface on a system in the cell, you can access the Cell
Manager remotely from the local machine. You do not have to use the Cell Manager as the
central graphical user interface system, although the user interface is installed there by
default. The Data Protector graphical user interface for Windows can be installed on any
Windows NT/2000/XP/2003 system, and the Data Protector graphical user interface for UNIX

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

(Motif) can be installed on any HP-UX or Solaris system in the cell. You can have an HP-UX
Cell Manager, with the user interface installed on a Windows system.

Data Protector provides a rich and powerful command line interface. The commands can be
used in situations where a GUI is not available, for example, when dialing in to a system for
remote support, or when writing shell scripts or batch files. Most of the Data Protector
commands will reside in the bin directory. Some additional platforms support a subset of the
cell console in order to control some of the local integrations with Data Protector. In many
cases the support is for parts of the command line interface only.

NOTE: The distributed Cell Console must be authorized from the User Manager
interface running on the Cell Manager. Details are covered in the User
Configuration module

U1610S B.00 2-26 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–15. SLIDE: Disk Agent

Disk Agent

z May be installed from:


z Cell manager

z Media

z Invoked by session manager HP- UX


Tru64
OpenVMS
z Provides disk access NT/2000/XP/2003
(read/write) Novell
Sun Solaris
Sun SunOS
z Multi-vendor support IBM AIX
Linux
Sequent DYNIX
z Exchanges data with media Digital UNIX
agents SCO Openserver
Silicon Graphics
NCR
others…

Student Notes
The Disk Agent module is responsible for all read and write actions to disk storage
performed by the Data Protector backup and restore managers. Therefore, in order to back
up or restore a client node, you must have a Disk Agent module installed on the client
system. The Disk Agent module consists of specialized processes that are started on demand
by the respective Backup or Restore Manager process. These programs are installed in the
/opt/omni/lbin directory on HP-UX and
C:\Program Files\Omniback\bin on Windows.

vbda Volume Backup Disk Agent


vrda Volume Restore Disk Agent
rbda Raw Backup Disk Agent
rrda Raw Restore Disk Agent
fsbrda File system Browser Disk Agent
dbbda Database Backup Disk Agent (for internal database)

NOTE: Refer to the Platform_Integration_SptMtx.pdf for a list of currently supported


platforms.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–16. SLIDE: Media Agent

Media Agent

z May be installed from:


z Cell manager
HP- UX
NT/2000/XP
z Media Novell
Linux
z Invoked by session manager Sun Solaris
IBM AIX
Siemens SINIX
z Provides media access
z Multi-vendor support.
z Exchanges data with disk agents

Student Notes
The Media Agent module is responsible for all read and write actions performed to tape by
the Data Protector backup, restore and media managers. Therefore, in order to utilize such
devices for backup or restore, a Media Agent module must be installed on the client system
to which the backup device is physically attached.

The Media Agent module consists of specialized processes that are started on demand by the
respective Backup, Restore or Media Manager process. . These programs are installed in the
<omnihome>/lbin directory on Unix and <omnihome>\bin on Windows:

bma Backup Media Agent


rma Restore Media Agent
mma Media Management Agent
cma Copy Media Agent
uma Utility Media Agent

NOTE: Refer to the Platform_Integration_SptMtx.pdf for a list of the currently


supported platforms.

U1610S B.00 2-28 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–17. SLIDE: Integration Agent

Integration Agent

z Distributed by cell server


z Database and application
integrations
z Integrates with vendors
API/ backup and restore tools SAP
SAP R/3
R/3
Oracle
Oracle
Informix
Informix
z Invoked by session manager DB2
DB2
Sybase
Sybase
z Executed during backup and MS
MS SQL
SQL
restore of databases MS
MS Exchange
Exchange
Lotus
Lotus Domino
Domino
z Works with disk and media agents IT/Operations
IT/Operations
Manage/X
Manage/X
z Multi-vendor support OmniStorage
OmniStorage
MC/ServiceGuard
MC/ServiceGuard
MSCluster
MSCluster
StorageWorks
StorageWorks XP,
XP, VA,
VA, EVA,
EVA,
MSA
MSA
EMC
EMC

Student Notes
Data Protector provides a set of integration modules that enable data to be exchanged
between the most popular databases and Data Protector. Data Protector hooks into the
vendors API in order to perform online backups and restores. The ability to perform online
backups is a highly desirable feature in mission-critical, high-availability environments.

Data Protector also provides integrations with many other applications that assist in areas
such as high availability, system control, and monitoring.

Database Integrations
• SAP R/3
• Oracle
• Informix
• IBM DB2 UDB
• Sybase
• MS SQL
• MS Exchange
• Lotus Notes/Lotus Domino

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

Application/Device Integrations
• HP OpenView Operations
• HP OpenView Manage/X
• HP OpenView OmniStorage
• HP MC/ServiceGuard
• HP StorageWorks Disk Array (Zero Downtime backup)
• MS Cluster
• MS Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS; Windows 2003 only)
• EMC Symmetrix (Fastrax)
• GRAU DAS
• StorageTek ACSLS

Data Protector and High Availability


The Data Protector Cell Manager system integrates with the HP MC/ServiceGuard and MS
Cluster Server products to provide high levels of application availability. Both products are
cluster solutions that allow the Data Protector Cell Manager to be a virtual server. No
additional license is needed for the integrations. Additionally, Data Protector clients may be
cluster members with HP MC/ServiceGuard, MS Cluster Server, and Veritas clusters.

HP StorageWorks and EMC Symmetrix integrations provide special capabilities to allow data
on their disks to be backed up without downtime. These integrations require special licenses
in order to operate.

NOTE: Refer to thePlatform_Integration_SptMtx.pdf for a list of the currently


supported versions of databases, platforms, and applications.

This Document is located in the C:\Program


Files\OmniBack\Docs\support_matrices directory on Windows,
and /opt/omni/doc/C/support_matrices on UNIX.
Platform_Integrtn_SptMtx.pdf

U1610S B.00 2-30 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–18. SLIDE: Installation Server

Installation Server

z Manually installed
z Repository for agent software
z Must be registered with cell
manager
z HP-UX, Windows, and Solaris
platforms
HP-UX
z Used separately by UNIX and
Windows clients
z Distributes the installation load Solaris
z May be used by multiple cells

Windows

Student Notes
The Installation Server acts as a repository for the agent software modules. The Installation
Server does not need to be a client/agent of the Data Protector cell for which it provides
installation services. The Installation Server must be registered as such with a Cell Manager,
and may provide installation services for more than one cell.

When the Cell Manager system pushes agent software to a client system, the particular
Installation Server from which the software is to be obtained is specified. Unix and Windows
Cell Managers must maintain two separate Installation Servers, one for each platform.

Data Protector software patches must be applied to the Installation Servers(s) and then
distributed to clients during an update/push from the Cell Manager.

The following platforms may be used for the Installation Server:


• Windows NT 4.06, Windows XP PRO, Windows 2000, Windows 2003 (32-bit)
• HP-UX 11.0, 11.11, 11.20
• Solaris 7, 8 & 9

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–19. SLIDE: Typical Backup/Restore Session

Typical Backup/Restore Session

cell server
request read/write
crs rds
start
cell console
connect
session IDB
bsm catalog

control/report control/report

media agent disk agent


data
ma da
write read

Student Notes
There are several processes that execute while backup or restore jobs are executing. The
slide above illustrates the location of the processes that execute on the various systems, as
well as their roles.

NOTE: Data from the backup flows directly between the agents, and does not flow
through the manager.

Acronyms:

CRS Cell (Request) Server


RDS (Raima) Database Server
BSM Backup Session Manager
IDB Data Protector Internal Database
DA Disk Agent
MA Media Agent

U1610S B.00 2-32 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–20. SLIDE: Inter-process Communication

Inter-process Communication (IPC)

cell console

network local
backup/restore backup/restore

disk agent
disk agent tcp/ip
tcp/ip

cell manager
shared
scheduler
tcp/ip memory
session session
manager manager

media agent tcp/ip tcp/ip media agent

Student Notes
Data Protector is a distributed application and relies heavily on multiple cooperating local
and remote processes. Its IPC mechanisms are designed and implemented with great care to
maximize system response time and data throughput. Data Protector concentrates on simple
bi-directional messaging for both data and message transfer.

As both network capacity and backup device speed are expected to increase significantly
during the lifetime of the Data Protector product, all IPC channels are carefully designed to
avoid communication bottlenecks. Data Protector uses the following fast and reliable IPC
mechanisms, available on all major platforms today:

Shared Memory (shmem) + Pipe/Socket (Local)


When data is transferred between Disk and Media Agent processes that reside on the same
system, shared memory is used for transferring data. Notification and control is implemented
via a pipe mechanism. This significantly increases the overall data throughput rate for a
backup session.

For this reason, a local backup is always preferable to a network backup.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

Standard TCP/IP Socket Interface (Remote)


The Data Protector session manager processes use the inetd daemon (on Unix) to start up
remote agents. On Windows systems, there will be a Data Protector Inet service running to
handle network requests on the defined listening port, 5555. The stream socket connections
are a natural message-passing medium for them. Stream sockets are also used for Disk and
Media Agent data transfer if the agents do not reside on the same host. Full network
transparency is accomplished with the networking software.

Starting Remote Processes


Data Protector uses the standard inet (inetd) facility to start up remote processes. This
mechanism requires that a fixed port number be allocated for Data Protector.

Within a Data Protector Cell, all systems must have the same port number configured, but it
may vary from cell to cell. The default port number used is 5555. If this port is already in
use, Data Protector can use another port number. This number must be identified in the
global (in addition to the Windows Registry) file before installing the clients.

The Data Protector session manager invokes specific agent processes, depending on the
request it has received, and uses the following mechanism to achieve this:

1. The session manager connects to the system on which it wants to start a media or disk
agent process via the predefined port number, 5555.
2. At the Unix Agent host, the inetd daemon process is listening on port 5555 and starts
the HP Data Protector inet process, as defined in the /etc/inetd.conf. (This
assumes the system security). On the Windows platforms, the Data Protector inet service
is already running on port 5555 to handle incoming requests.
3. The session manager sends a control block that informs the remote system exactly what
agents to start and what ports are to use for communication, etc.
4. The Data Protector inet process then starts the desired agents.

Windows registry path for the global port (5555):

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE
-SOFTWARE
-Hewlett-Packard
-OpenView
-OmniBackII
-Common
-Parameters
InetPort 5555

U1610S B.00 2-34 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–21. SLIDE: Cell Manager Directory Structure (UX)

Cell Manager Directory Structure (UX)

/etc/opt/omni /var/opt/omni /opt/omni

options cell db40


doc sbin bin databases
devices rid tmp
java lbin lib newconfig
datalists dr
log
schedules users vendor
install utilns gui
dlgroups integ

dltemplates dr arm build man sam nls


rptgroups amo

rptschedules amoschedules

barlists

barschedules
sap cc win ma opc sybase
snmp
acs oracle oracle8 da das stk informix
mom Note: these directories contain the installation server components

Student Notes
The following table outlines the directories used by Data Protector on the Unix Cell Manager
system.

Directory Path Contents


/opt/omni <OMNIHOME> (documentation convention)
/opt/omni Data Protector home directory
/opt/omni/bin Commands and GUIs
/opt/omni/sbin Admin only tools
/opt/omni/lbin Local binaries (agents, etc.)
/opt/omni/databases Software depots
/opt/omni/lib Shared libraries
/opt/omni/lib/man Man pages
/opt/omni/doc Product documentation

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

/opt/omni/java Web Reporting (Java) components


/opt/omni/newconfig Extra copies of Data Protector configuration files,
including an Data Protector database
/opt/omni/gui Data Protector GUI components
/opt/omni/.omnirc.TMPL Local startup options template for agents
/etc/opt/omni <OMNICONFIG>(documentation convention)
/etc/opt/omni/amo Automatic media operations definitions
/etc/opt/omni/amoschedules Automatic media operations schedules
/etc/opt/omni/users User configuration directory
/etc/opt/omni/cell Cell configuration directory
/etc/opt/omni/devices Device templates directory
/etc/opt/omni/dr Disaster Recovery data for Windows clients
/etc/opt/omni/datalists Backup specifications directory
/etc/opt/omni/schedules Backup specification schedules
/etc/opt/omni/snmp SNMP configuration directory
/etc/opt/omni/options Global options directory
/etc/opt/omni/sg ServiceGuard configuration
/etc/opt/omni/rptgroups Report groups directory

/etc/opt/omni/rptschedules Report schedules directory

/etc/opt/omni/HealthCheckCon File for periodic configuration checking


fig (customizable)
/etc/opt/omni/Notifications Event Notifications
/etc/opt/omni/barlists/ Backup and Restore lists for integrations
/etc/opt/omni/barschedules Schedules for barlists
/var/opt/omni <OMNIVAR>(documentation convention)
/var/opt/omni/log Log files
/var/opt/omni/tmp Temporary file area
/var/opt/omni/db40 Data Protector database

U1610S B.00 2-36 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–22. SLIDE: Cell Manager Directory Structure (Windows)

Cell Manager Directory Structure


(Windows)

<product_home>

bin Config java db40 Docs tmp Depot


log NewConfig obdr help lib

amo Barlists CDROM cell Datalists devices dlgroups i386


amoschedules Barschedules Schedules xcopy
dltemplates Install Integ options dr rid rptgroups

Users tmp Sessions mom SNMP rptschedules

utilns

setupdir sap cc win ma opc sybase

acs oracle ost da das stk

Note: these directories contain the installation server components.

Student Notes
No files are outside the <OMNIHOME> tree. The database and all log files are kept under the
<OMNIHOME> tree.

Directory Path Contents

<OMNIHOME> (default install dir) Data Protector home directory (default, may be
(C:\Program Files\Omniback relocated during installation process)

<OMNIHOME>\bin Commands and GUIs


<OMNIHOME>\bin\install Installation scripts
<OMNIHOME>\db40 Data Protector Database
<OMNIHOME>\config\ Configuration directory
<OMNIHOME>\config\cell Cell configuration directory
<OMNIHOME>\config\CDROM Driver for disaster recovery

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

<OMNIHOME>\config\users User configuration


<OMNIHOME>\config\amo Automatice Media Operations definitions
<OMNIHOME>\config\amoschedules Automatic Media Operations schedules
<OMNIHOME>\config\dr Disaster Recovery data for cell clients
<OMNIHOME>\config\devices Device templates
<OMNIHOME>\config\Datalists Backup specifications
<OMNIHOME>\config\Schedules Backup specification schedules

<OMNIHOME>\config\Barlists Backup and restore lists for integrated 3rd party


products
<OMNIHOME>\config\Barschedules Barlist schedules
<OMNIHOME>\config\mom Manager of Managers configuration
<OMNIHOME>\config\Integ Configurations for 3rd party products

<OMNIHOME>\config\rid Recovery information data used for disaster


recovery (Omniback 4.x)
<OMNIHOME>\config\schedules Backup schedules

<OMNIHOME>\config\snmp SNMP trap destination and OVO configuration


directory
<OMNIHOME>\config\options Data Protector global options
<OMNIHOME>\config\Oracle Oracle configuration
<OMNIHOME>\config\SNMP SNMP trap delivery configurations
<OMNIHOME>\java Integrated Web Reporting java client
<OMNIHOME>\Docs Product manuals in PDF format
<OMNIHOME>\depot Software depot files for Installation Server
<OMNIHOME>\man Data Protector help pages (word-pad files)
<OMNIHOME>\help Online help files

<OMNIHOME>\NewConfig Unmodified copies of the configuration files and


Data Protector database
<OMNIHOME>\OBDR One-Button disaster recovery files
<OMNIHOME>\tmp Temporary files
<OMNIHOME>\log Data Protector log files

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–23. SLIDE: Client Directory Structure (UX)

Client Directory Structure (UX)

/etc/opt/omni /var/opt/omni /opt/omni

cell log
bin lbin databases
install tmp
newconfig lib lib sbin
customize

vendor
nls

sap cc win ma opc sybase

acs oracle oracle8 da das stk informix

Note: these directories contain the installation server components.

Student Notes
The directories used on the Unix clients are a subset of the directories used by Data
Protector on the Unix Cell Manager system.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–24. SLIDE: Client Directory Structure (Windows)

Client Directory Structure (Windows)

<product_home>

bin config Depot db40 Docs tmp java

log NewConfig obdr help


man bin

dltemplates Install cell tmp i386

utilns
setupdir sap cc win ma opc sybase

acs oracle ost da das stk

Note: these directories are part of the installation server.

Student Notes
The directories used on the Windows clients are a subset of the directories used by the Data
Protector on the Windows Cell Manager system.

U1610S B.00 2-40 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–25. SLIDE: Global Options

Global Options

• Centrally managed
• Product defaults (documented)
• Customizable

<config_dir>

options

global

Student Notes
In most situations, the Data Protector default configuration and options are adequate for
everyone. However, many options can be changed to affect the behavior of the product for
large and more complex environments.

Global Options File


Global options cover various aspects of Data Protector, typically time-outs, and limits and
affect the entire Data Protector cell. All global options are explained in the global
options file. The global options file, which allows you to customize Data Protector, is
found in the following locations:

On Unix Systems
<OMNICONFIG>/options/global

On Windows NT Systems
<OMNICONFIG>\options\global

How Global Options Work

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

Option settings from this file are available to all user interface programs (Windows, Motif,
and the command line interface) and all Cell Manager programs. These options are not
directly distributed to disk or media agents.

This file may be modified whenever the need to affect the options in the file is necessary. The
options file contains many of the Data Protector defaults, but is only used if the items are
uncommented. Each option currently in the file has a hash mark, or pound sign (#), which
comments out the option. This means that it does not affect Data Protector.

How To Use Global Options


To use a global option, uncomment the line that has the option name and set appropriate
value. To uncomment a line, simply remove the ”#” mark. Average users should be able to
operate the product without changing them.

Commonly Used Variables


The following list includes the most often used global variables. See the Global file for a
complete description.

DailyMaintenanceTime Scheduled daily maintenance time (default, 12:00)


DailyCheckTime Scheduled daily cell checking (default, 12:30)
Port Default listening port for the inet process.
MediaView: Change the fields and their order in the Devices & Media
context.
MaxBSessions: Increase the default limit of five concurrent backups.
InitOnLoosePolicy: Prevents Data Protector from automatically initializing blank or
unknown tapes when using a loose media policy. (default 0)
MaxMAperSM: Increases the default limit of 32 concurrent devices per backup
session (maximum is 64).
SmWaitForDevice: The amount of time spent waiting for a device, this is the
backup queuing time. (default is 60 minutes)
ExecScriptOnPreview: Determines if pre/post execs are executed during the preview
mode. (default is 0, off)
ScriptOutputTimeout: The amount of time that the SM will wait for a pre/post exec
script to complete. (default is 15 minutes)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–26. SLIDE: Localized Options

Localized Options

• Locally managed
• Agent parameters
• Customizable

<product_home>

omnirc/.omnirc omnirc.tmpl

copy/modify

Student Notes
Using omnirc Options
The omnirc variables are most useful for troubleshooting or overriding other settings,
affecting the behavior of the Data Protector client only.

Even advanced users should not use them unless specifically required by documentation or
an HP support representative. The Disk and Media Agents use the values of these options ad
environment variables. These variables are found in the following locations:

/opt/omni/.omnirc on HP-UX and Solaris


/usr/omni/.omnirc on other UNIX clients
<omnihome>\omnirc on Windows NT clients
sys:\usr\omni\omnirc on NetWare clients

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

How to Use omnirc Options


Installation provides a template for omnirc file (.omnirc.TMPL or omnirc.TMPL,
depending on the platform). This file is not active. To create an active omnirc file, copy the
template file to omnirc (or .omnirc) and edit it. To use a specific option, uncomment the
line (remove the # character) and edit the value if necessary. When creating the omnirc file
(either by copying or by using an editor), verify its permissions. On UNIX, permissions will be
set according to your umask settings and may be such that some processes may be unable to
read the file.

Set the permissions to 644 manually.

When changing omnirc file, the Data Protector services/daemons on the affected system
must be restarted. This is mandatory for the crs daemon on UNIX and recommended for
Data Protector CRS and Data Protector Inet services on NT. Specifically on NT, restarting is
not required when adding or changing entries, only when removing entries (or renaming the
file).

Most Often Used Variables


Some commonly used omnirc variables include:

OB2BLKPADDING Allows specification of blocks to be pre-pended to all tapes of a


certain type to overcome length mismatches while copying.

OB2VXDIRECT: Enables direct (without cache) reading for Advanced VxFS file
systems, as well as improving performance.

OB2ENCODE: Allows a user to always turn on data encoding regardless how


the backup options are set in the backup specification.

OB2OEXECOFF: Allows a user to restrict or disable any object pre- and post-exec
scripts defined in backup specifications for a specific client.

OB2REXECOFF: Allows a user to disable any remote session pre- and post-exec
scripts for a specific client.

OB2DEVSLEEP: Changes the sleep time between each retry while loading a
device.

OB2RECONNECT_RETRY: Defines how long Data Protector should wait before trying to
reconnect after a socket connection has been broken (the default
is 1200 seconds). In other words, the WAN line between the
Backup Session Manager and agents cannot be down more than
OB2RECONNECT_RETRY seconds.
OB2RECONNECT_ACK: Defines how long Data Protector should wait for
the message of acknowledgement (default 600
seconds). In other words, if the agent does not
get an acknowledgement in OB2RECONNECT_ACK
seconds, then it will assume that the socket
connection is no longer valid.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

2–27. Review: Data Protector Architecture

1. What are the names of the five main components of the Data Protector architecture?

__________________________________________

__________________________________________

__________________________________________

__________________________________________

2. Describe the function of each of the components listed above:

3. What is the Data Protector cell comprised of?

4. What, if any, is the limit to how many systems may be in the Data Protector cell?

5. How many Data Protector cells may an individual system be configured into?

6. Which network port must be available for Data Protector?

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 2
Data Protector Overview and Architecture

7. Which process or service starts the Data Protector agents?

8. What are the main directories for the Data Protector programs:

Unix:

Windows:

U1610S B.00 2-46 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3 — Data Protector Installation
Objectives
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:
• Install the Data Protector Cell Manager.

• Install and configure installation servers.

• Distribute Data Protector agents to client systems.

• Understand the basic upgrade concepts

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–1. SLIDE: Installation Sequence

Installation Sequence

Plan the layout of the Cell

Check hardware and software requirements

Install Cell Manager and Installation Server from CD

Install Clients from Installation Servers using the Cell


Manager GUI, or locally from CDROM

Request and Install the Permanent License

Student Notes
Planning
Before you start to install the Data Protector software, it is helpful to understand how your
Data Protector Cell should be assembled.

One of the systems within your Data Protector Cell must be the Cell Manager. If you are
running Data Protector in a mixed environment, you need at least two installation servers,
one for Windows and one for UNIX. The Cell Manager is typically used as an installation
server; this is an option available during the Cell Manager installation.

Hardware and Software Requirements


Installation Servers and Cell Managers have certain hardware and software requirements,
which you should check and verify before you start installing the software.

Install Cell Manager and Installation Servers


Cell Manager and Installation Servers are installed directly from CD.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Install Clients
After you have installed the Cell Manager and Installation Servers, you may install the agents
on the client systems using the Data Protector GUI, or manually from the local CD-ROM.

Licensing
An Instant-On license is automatically created when the product is first installed. This gives
you usage for 60 days, during which time you must apply for and install a permanent license.

NOTE: Three symbolic names may be used throughout the rest of this manual for
paths to various files and directories.

<OMNIHOME> represents:
Unix: /opt/omni
Windows: C:\program files\Omniback

<OMNICONFIG> represents:
Unix: /etc/opt/omni
Windows: C:\program files\Omniback\config

<OMNIVAR> represents:
Unix: /var/opt/omni
Windows: C:\program files\Omniback

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–2. SLIDE: Installation Methods

Installation Methods

Target Installation tools Installation Server


platform Unix Windows
HP-UX swinstall, swremove √
Solaris pkgadd, pkgrm √
Other Unix omnisetup √1
Windows Microsoft Installer √
(setup.exe)
OpenVMS PCSI installation file
(dpvmskit)
Alpha Setup program
(setup.exe)
MPE/iX ftp, unpack
Novell Install script
(nwinstall)
1) Installation server does not support Dynix, SCO Unixware 7.1.1 client

Student Notes
Planning
Installation of the Data Protector A.05.10 version uses native installation tools on major
platforms: HP-UX, Solaris, and Windows (MSI 2.0).
The above table summarizes installation methods and Install Server availability.
Unix Installation server can be hosted on HP-UX 11.x or Solaris 7, 8, 9 platforms. They all are
capable of supporting every supported Unix client with the following exceptions:
• Dynix client

• SCO Unixware 7.1.1


Windows Installation Servers should be in the same Windows domain with the clients that
are to be installed.

No installation server is capable of supporting Novell or MPE/iX clients in any way. These
clients must be installed and maintained locally.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Omnisetup.sh (install clients manually or upgrade cell manager)

The following types of local manual installations are supported with omnisetup.sh:
• New installation of Data Protector 5.1

• Upgrade of Data Protector 5.0

• Upgrade of Omniback-II 4.x

• Upgrade of Omniback-II 3.5x

• New local installation (upgrade) of Unix clients


Usage:
omnisetup.sh [-source directory] [-server name] [-install component-list]
− directory is the location where installation CD is mounted. If not specified, current
directory is taken.
− name is an optional name of the cell server host.
− component-list is a comma-separated list of component codes. No spaces are
allowed, and core and core-integ components need not to be specified.

• Located on CD for HP-UX or Solaris, in sub-directory: LOCAL-DP-AGENT-INSTALL

• Only ksh shell is supported

• Detects and upgrades previously installed components including the Cell Manager and
Internal Database

• Checks and validates specified components

• Client host can be imported automatically


The new installation script omnisetup.sh for local installation of Unix clients performs all
required steps.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Omnisetup will attempt to install the subset of the following components. The exact list of
the components is subject to availability on the particular platform.

cc Cell Console
da Disk Agent
das DAS Media Agent
acs ACS Media Agent
ma Media Agent
informix Informix Integration
lotus Lotus Notes Integration
oracle8 Oracle8 Integration (also used for Oracle 9)
oracle Oracle7 Integration
sap SAP R/3 Integration

In case of a new installation:


The omnisetup.sh script walks through the list of available components (listed above). For
each component that can be installed on the host, it checks the presence of the component
name in the -install parameter. If the -install parameter is not specified, the user is
prompted similar to the following:

Install (da) Disk Agent (YES, no, quit)?

Default answer is YES for da, generic ma, and cc components, and NO for any other
component – all subject to availability of the component on the host.

YES Install this component


No Do not install this component
Quit Do not install this component, and none of the remaining ones

In case of an upgrade to DP 5.1:

If DP 5.1 exists on the system and a specified component is already installed, the omnisetup
script provides a prompt, e.g.
(da) Disk Agent is already installed.
Reinstall (da) Disk Agent (YES, no, quit)?
If -install option is specified, or if a component is not found on the system, then the
behavior is as it would be a new installation.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

In case of an upgrade of Omniback II components:


If an Omniback II version has been detected a prompt will be displayed:
An older version of the product already exists on the system. It
must be removed before data protector A.05.10 is installed.
You can remove existing product manually, or proceed with the
installation script that will do it for you. For automatic removal,
make sure that no related process runs.
How would you like to remove existing product (MANUAL,automatic)?

Manual
If manual removal is selected, the script ends with brief instructions on how to remove
previous product and where to obtain additional information.
To remove a previous version of data protector:

1. make sure no related processes are running


2. save any user settings (such as omnirc file, devtab file…)
created after installation of the product by the user
3. execute rm –fr /usr/omni

Please refer to Installation Guide for additional information

Automatic
If automatic removal is selected, the script saves the omnirc file, then it compiles a list of
already installed components (in -install parameter format). Finally, it removes /usr/omni
(or /opt/omni) directory. If not successful, it aborts with the message:
Removal of previous installation FAILED. This is most likely because
some process is running and is blocking deletion of files. Please
remove the product manually.
If an automated removal of previous version is successful, omnisetup continues as it were a
new installation. However, if -install parameter was not specified, a list compiled before
product removal is used (and no further prompt is issued).

The first time any component is selected for installation or reinstallation, CORE component
is automatically installed (reinstalled if already there). In other words, the only way that the
script does not install CORE component is that user selects no component for installation or
reinstallation (always answers NO). Subsequent components do not trigger installation of
CORE component.
Similarly, the first time any integration component is selected for installation or
reinstallation, CORE-INTEG component is automatically installed (reinstalled if already
there).
If user confirms, the component is unpacked and installed. After the component is installed, a
message appears:
(da) Disk Agent installed.
Once a media agent is selected, subsequent media agents are not prompted for.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

If the cell server host name was specified, installed client is automatically imported into the
cell.
Installation completed. Client was imported into a cell.
If host name was not specified, but cell_server file is available, host name will be taken
from there.
If the host specified cannot be contacted, or if no host was specified and cell_server file is
not available, user is reminded to import client into cell:
Installation completed, but client was not imported into a cell.
Please import a client manually.
Alternatively, user will be able to list components that are to be installed as a parameter.
./omnisetup.sh –server testbox –install da,ma,cc,informix
Parameters are NOT checked. For each component that is installed a message will appear
(as stated above). Misspelled components and components that do not apply to the system
are skipped with no message. If several media agents are specified, only the first is installed
(in the order stated in the above table - if all are specified, “das agent” is selected). In exactly
the same manner Oracle8 Integration overrides Oracle Integration.

Automating Windows Installation


• Scriptable installation on windows system using ‘msiexec’

• Capable to install DP 5.0 CM, IS or clients with specific components

msiexec /i “hp OpenView Storage DataProtector 5.0”


INSTALLTYPE=type
INSTALL=components
OMNI_PATH=home-directory
USERNAME=crs-account
PASSWORD=crs-password
HOSTNAME=cell-server
log-file

It is possible to install hp OpenView Storage DataProtector A.05.10

1. Cell Manager or
2. Client or
3. Installation Server

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

From the command line (or batch file) using the following sytax:

msiexec /I "hp OpenView Storage DataProtector 5.1" INTALLTYLE=type


INSTALL=components OMNI_PATH=home-directory USERNAME=crs-account
PASSWORD=crs-password HOSTNAME=cell-server /qn /L!* log-file

Applies to
Value Description Cell Install.
Client
Manager Server
CM........... ...Local installation of Cell Manager √
Type CLIENT….Local installation of client √
IS…….Local installation of Installation server √
List of components. Each component is
preceded by a hyphen (dash) and followed by
Components √ √
a component version. Enclose list in double
quotes.
home- Folder where Data Protector A.05.00 is
√ √ √
directory to be installed.
crs-name Name of the account under which CRS service

runs.
crs-password Password for the account under which CRS

runs.
cell-server Name of the host that acts as a cell server. √ √
log-file Name of the log file √ √ √

Examples for CM, client and IS installation

msiexec /i “hp OpenView Storage DataProtector 5.1.msi”


INSTALLTYPE=CM INSTALL=”-da A.05.10 –ma A.05.10 –gui A.05.10 –
is A.05.10” OMNI_PATH=”c:\Program files\OmniBack”
USERNAME=<CRS account name> PASSWORD=<CRS account Password>
/qn /L!* <log-file>

msiexec /i “hp OpenView Storage DataProtector 5.1.msi”


INSTALLTYPE=CLIENT INSTALL=”-da A.05.10 –ma A.05.10 –gui
A.05.00” OMNI_PATH=”c:\Program files\OmniBack” /qn /L!* <log-
file>

msiexec /i “hp OpenView Storage DataProtector 5.1.msi”


INSTALLTYPE=IS INSTALL=”-is A.05.10 –ma A.05.10”
OMNI_PATH=”c:\Program files\OmniBack” /qn /L!* <log-file>

Only basic error checking is performed. In case of an error, the installation is aborted.
<log-file> contains further information on this.
msiexec is part of Microsoft Installer.

However, when installing a Cell Manager, a password for CRS account must be
specified in clear text.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–3. SLIDE: Supported Upgrades

Supported Upgrades

HP-UX version 3.50 HP-UX version 4.0, 4.1, 5.1

Windows version 3.50 Windows version 4.0, 4.1, 5.1

Solaris version 3.51 Solaris version 5.0, 5.1

HP-UX version 4.0 HP-UX version 4.1, 5.0, 5.1

HP-UX version 4.1 HP-UX version 5.0, 5.1

Windows version 4.0 Windows version 4.1, 5.0, 5.1

Windows version 4.1 Windows version 5.0, 5.1

all platforms version 5.0 (same platform) version 5.1


Note: 5.1a is a patch release for version 5.1

Student Notes
Data Protector 5.1 is supported as an upgrade from previous versions of OmniBack as well as
Data Protector as shown above. Versions of OmniBack prior to 3.5 are not supported for
upgrade directly to 5.1.

To upgrade UX Cell Mangers, stop the OmniBack or Data Protector daemons


(/opt/omni/sbin/omnisv –stop) then use the omnisetup.sh script on the CD-ROM as described
earlier. This will prompt for the automatic or manual update procedures. When automatic is
chosen, the operating system software management utilities will be used to remove
(swremove/pkgrm) and then install (swinstall/pgkadd) the Data Protector components. The
installation server is automatically updated as well.

Windows Cell Managers will automatically detect and upgrade Omniback or Data Protector
while running the setup.exe from the CD-ROM. Similar to the UX Cell Manager, the older
product will be removed and the 5.1 product will be installed.

When the Cell Manager is upgraded the software is replaced by the new version and the
Internal Database is also migrated. In the case of the 3.5 to 5.1 upgrade the database is
converted in two steps; first the core part of the database is converted to the new structure,

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

then the administrator may upgrade the detail part by using Data Protector utilities described
in the following sections.

Upgrading from version 3.5 to 5.1

Much of the 3.5 database will remain in the <OMNIVAR>/db directory, while the new
database is initialized in the <OMNIVAR>/db40 directory. The name db40 is used to represent
the Internal Database architecture which was developed for OmniBack 4.0. The 3.5 directory
<OMNIVAR>/db/catalog has to be changed since the IDB (Velocis) has been upgraded to its
version 3.5, and is not compatible with the old catalog contents. Before the changes are made
to the <OMNIVAR>/db/catalog it is copied to <OMNIVAR>/db/catalog.old.

Note: The old 3.5 database may be removed at any time after the core and detail
parts of the database are upgraded.

Core Database Upgrade

The core part of the database upgrade from 3.5 to 5.1 will transfer all vital data from the old
to the new database; this is started unconditionally as part of the upgrade. The entire MMDB
as well as the session information is transferred. Session messages, filenames and file
versions are not transferred during the core upgrade.

After the database core upgrade is completed, all Data Protector functionality is available
except browsing single files and directories as well as session message reporting.

Detail Database Upgrade

Data Protector offers the administrator both a GUI as well as command line interface for the
upgrade of the detail parts of the IDB (these should be executed after the core part has
completed):

UX GUI xomnidbupg
Windows GUI idbupgwiz.exe
CLI omnidbupgrade -udp

These utilities shown above process all of the details from the CDB and import the data in the
5.1 IDB. The session messages are also imported. The sessions having media that was
overwritten or exported from the MMDB are removed. Catalogs for unprotected objects are
skipped. The number of objects skipped is reported in the <OMNIVAR>log/upgrade.log file.
On Unix there are two files, upgrade.log and Upgrade.log. The upgrade.log is generated by
the binary files and the Upgrade.log is produced by the scripts used for the upgrade.

The Global Options File

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

When the Cell Manager is upgraded from 3.5, 4.x, or 5.0 to version 5.1, the contents of the
existing global file is merged into the new 5.1 global file as listed below, the old file is
renamed to global.#, where # is the next available integer starting with one:
• Uncommented parameters in the old file (active) are copied into the new file and
annotated with the string “This value was automatically copied from previous version.”

• Obsolete parameters are merged, but converted to comments and annotated with the
string “This variable is no longer in use.”

• Parameters that contain values in a range no longer supported are converted to


comments and annotated with the string “This variable cannot be transferred
automatically. The previous setting was ….”

• Comments from the old global file are not transferred to the new file.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–4. SLIDE: Data Protector Components

Data Protector Components

Manual
Installation/
Windows Update HP- UX/Solaris
Cell Manager Cell Manager
Installation Server Novell Windows 98 Installation Server
Agents Disk Agent CM
CM
IS
IS
CC CC

MPE/iX
push push
Agents

HP-UX Solaris
Agents Agents
Windows Application
Agents Agents
Unix Application
Agents Agents

Student Notes
Planning the Cell

• Which system will be the Cell Manager?

• Which systems will be the Installation Servers?

• Which systems will be Clients?

The Cell Manager must be one of the following: HP-UX 11.x, Windows NT/2000/XP Pro/2003
or a Solaris (7,8,9) system. The Cell Manager system should be reliable and ideally configured
with high availability characteristics (RAID, Disk Mirroring, etc). The Cell Manager and
Internal Database must be available for backup operations to be performed.

In the previous slide, the Cell Manager systems are installed from local media. Depending
upon the platform, this may be accomplished by way of a network depot or shared drive
accessible to the native installation utilities for the respective operating systems.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Any supported system can be the Installation Server, as it is not confined to a single cell
usage. In a mixed environment, allocate one system to be the Installation Server for UNIX
platforms and one for Windows platforms. Creating more than one installation server for a
large environment can help distribute the installation load during updates or patches to the
Data Protector software.

After the Cell Manager and Installation Servers have been installed manually, most of the
agents can be installed on the systems via the Data Protector GUI. In most cases, the agents
are pushed from the Installation Server under the direction of the User Interface.

The OpenVMS, Novell, MPE/IX, and Windows 98 agents must all be installed manually from
the product media. This is because they do not support receiving software from an
installation server.

Installation of the OpenVMS Client

The installation procedure of the OpenVMS client has to be performed on the OpenVMS
system. You can install the Data Protector Disk Agent, Media Agent, and CLI Interface on
systems running OpenVMS/Alpha 7.3-1 or above. The product is called Data Protector (DP),
but the files and directories placed on the disk are named OMNI*. This is historical due to
the name change from OmniBack to Data Protector.

Prerequisites

Before you install Data Protector on the OpenVMS platform, check the
following:

o Make sure that TCPIP is configured and is running.

o Set the TIMEZONE features of your system by executing


SYS$MANAGER:UTC$TIME_SETUP.COM.

o Log into the SYSTEM account of the OpenVMS system.

o Make sure that you have access to the OpenVMS client


installation kit.

For additional details, see the release notes document (DPVMSKIT) on the Windows CD-
ROM in the OpenVMS folder.

Installing Linux Clients


For remote installation of Linux clients, the root user must have rights to access the system
by using the exec or shell services. These may enabled temporarily for the duration of the
installation and then removed if desired. Additionally the manual installation of the agents
may be accomplished by using the omnisetup.sh from the HP-UX CD-ROM. See the HP
OpenView Storage Data Protector Installation and Licensing Guide for more details.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Installing Netware Clients


The installation procedure of the Novell NetWare clients has to be performed from a
supported Windows system that is connected to the Novell network. The Data Protector Disk
Agent and the Media Agent may be installed on the systems running Novell NetWare 4.x or
later.

There are many pre-requisites that must be satisfied before starting the installation; see the
HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Installation and Licensing Guide for more details
and configuration steps to backup the NDS database.

The installation procedure can be performed from the Data Protector Windows CD-ROM.
Note that the Novell NetWare installation is not a part of the Installation Server functionality.
To install Data Protector on the Novell NetWare server, proceed as follows:
1. Run a command prompt on your Windows system and change the current path to the
CD-ROM root directory, then to the NetWare sub-directory.
2. Run the installation script:

NWInstall <target server name> <NetWare version> <ALL|DA|MA> <port_number>

The second parameter is Novell NetWare target server version.


The third parameter defines which part of the Data Protector Novell Client will be installed:
• Type ALL to install the whole Data Protector Novell NetWare client functionality.
• Type DA to install only the Data Protector Disk Agent for Novell NeWare.
• Type MA to install only the Data Protector Media Agent for Novell NeWare.
• The port number is optional, and will default to 5555 if not specified.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–5. SLIDE: Installation Requirements (UX)

Installation Requirements (UX)

UNIX platforms: HP-UX 11.0, 11.11, 11.20


Solaris 7, 8, 9
Cell Component RAM (MB) Disk Space (MB)

Cell Manager 256, recommended 512* 240 HP-UX + IDB


220 Solaris + IDB
Installation Server 64 340 HP-UX
380 Solaris
User Interface 64 150

Disk Agent 64, recommended 128 10

Media Agent 64, recommended 128 20

Integration 64, recommended 128 15


Modules

•The required memory (RAM) depends on the number of parallel sessions


(backup requires 40MB RAM per session)

Student Notes
General Requirements
• Networking software (TCP/IP) is installed and running.
• Port 5555 is available for the Data Protector services.
• Hostname resolution mechanism is implemented (consistent across all systems).
• FTP service is enabled.
• Kernel parameter: maxdsiz set to a minimum of 128MB.

Cell Manager considerations:


The DP 5.1 Cell Manager on HP-UX 11.0, 11.11, 11.20 or SUN Solaris 7, 8, or 9 must meet the
following minimum requirements:
• Free TCP/IP port: 5555 (default)

• 256 MB RAM (512 MB recommended)


For each parallel backup session you require 40 MB of RAM and 5 -8 MB of data segment
size. Example: if you want to run 60 parallel backup sessions you require 3 GB of RAM
and 512 MB of data segment size.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

• 220 MB on HP-UX or 240 MB on Solaris of available disk space +approximately 2% of


planned data to be backed up for use by the IDB.

Installation Server considerations:

The DP 5.1 Installation Server must meet the following minimum requirements:
• 64 MB RAM (minimum)

• 340 MB of disk space on HP-UX and 380 MB of disk space on Solaris

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–6. SLIDE: Installation Requirements (Windows)

Installation Requirements (Windows)

Windows platforms: NT4.0, 2000, XP Pro and Server 2003

Cell Component RAM (MB) Disk Space (MB)

Cell Manager 256, recommended 512* 190 + IDB

Installation Server** 64 250

User Interface 64 100

Disk Agent 64, recommended 128 10

Media Agent 64, recommended 128 20

Integration Modules 64, recommended 128 15

•The required memory (RAM) depends on the number of parallel sessions


(backup requires 40MB RAM per session)

Student Notes
General Requirements

• Networking software (TCP/IP) is installed and running.

• Port 5555 is available for the Data Protector services.

• Hostname resolution mechanism is implemented (consistent across all systems).

Cell Manager considerations:


The DP 5.0 Cell Manager on Windows NT4.0, 2000, XP or 2003 must meet the following
minimum requirements:
• Free TCP/IP port: 5555 (default)

• 256 MB RAM (512 MB recommended).


For each parallel backup session you require 40 MB of RAM. Example: if you want to run
60 parallel backup sessions you require 3 GB of RAM.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

• 190 MB of disk space + approximately 2% of planned data to be backed up (for use by the
IDB)

• 100 MB of free space for the User Interface components

• Windows NT 4.0, Service Pack 6 or later, TCP/IP protocol from Microsoft

• 16 MB of disk space needed on system drive

• Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.x or later

Installation Server considerations:


The DP 5.1 Installation Server on Windows must meet the following minimum requirements:
• 64 MB RAM

• 250 MB of disk space

• Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 with Service Pack 6 or higher

• Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 2

• Microsoft Windows XP Professional

• Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.x or later

• Free TCP/IP port: 5555 (default)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–7. SLIDE: Installation of Cell Manager on HP-UX

Installation of Cell Manager on HP-UX

Configure/Check hostname resolution (DNS)

Install software using swinstall

Verify /etc/services for "omni 5555/tcp" and


/etc/inetd.conf for omni entry.

Check system startup file /etc/rc.config.d/omni

Check if daemons are running (crs,mmd,rds)

Student Notes
All Data Protector configuration files and directories, as well as the Data Protector internal
databases reside on this Cell Manager system. If the Installation Server will also be installed
on this system (the default option), allow approximately 750 MB of disk space in
/opt/omni.

The software is installed from CD with swinstall. Within the swinstall utility you can
select the Data Protector bundle or manually select the required products, sub-products or
filesets. There are sub-products for all integrations. You need to install only the components
required in your environment. You can skip the components for the integrations that you do
not need.

During installation a number of files are generated or changed:


• The Data Protector software is installed in the following directories:
• /opt/omni, /etc/opt/omni and /var/opt/omni
• The omni service is added to the /etc/inetd.conf file.
• Port 5555 with service omni is added to the /etc/services file (omni 5555/tcp).
• System startup and shutdown scripts for Data Protector are added.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

The Data Protector installation procedure configures an automatic start and shutdown of all
Data Protector processes whenever a system is rebooted. The following files are
automatically configured:

/sbin/init.d/omni Data Protector daemon start-up script. This script is


uses the /opt/omni/sbin/omnisv command to
stop and start the Data Protector daemons.

/sbin/rc1.d/K162omni Symbolic link to /sbin/init.d/omni script for Data


Protector daemon shutdown.

/sbin/rc2.d/S838omni Symbolic link to /sbin/init.d/omni script for


startup of Data Protector daemons.

/etc/rc.config.d/omni The startup control file. Set the OMNI variable to 1 to


automatically start the Data Protector processes at
boot time. Default is 1.

Installation Steps

1. Insert the CD-ROM in the drive and mount it as a file system.

2. Run the utility /usr/sbin/swinstall as user root.

3. Specify the source as Local Directory and enter the mount point of the CD-ROM
drive followed by DP_DEPOT/DP_A0510_UX11x.sd_depot; Click OK to open the
Install - Software Selection window.

4. Select the B6960MA bundle, then click Actions -> Mark for Install. (This will
install the cell manager, installation server and all of the on-line documentation)

5. Select Actions -> Install (analysis) to start the install process.

Post Installation Checks

1. After you’ve installed the software, you can check that the Data Protector daemon
processes are running:
/opt/omni/sbin/omnisv –status
2. Check the swinstall log file /var/adm/sw/swagent.log for errors.
Then start the Data Protector GUI.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Some Key Files

• The /etc/opt/omni/cell/cell_server file consists of only one line with the cell
manager name. This file exists on all systems within the cell.

• The /etc/opt/omni/cell/omni_info file has information about which agents and


Data Protector version are installed on the local system. This file exists on all systems
within the cell.

• The /etc/opt/omni/cell/cell_info file exists only on the cell manager system. It


has a list of all systems belonging to that cell and what software components are installed
onto each system.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–8. SLIDE: Installation of Cell Manager on Windows

Installation of Cell Manager on Windows

Make sure, that Microsoft TCP/IP is installed and running.

Check if node name resolving is enabled(DNS)

Install product from CD

Check for automated startup of services

Check if crs, rds and inet are services running,


if not, start them manually

Student Notes
If you want to install a Windows system as Data Protector Cell Manager or installation server,
you must install the software from CD-ROM.

To install Data Protector Windows client systems, you can either install the software from
CD or you can use the Data Protector GUI and define from which Windows installation
server you want to install Data Protector client systems. On the CD-ROM, execute (run) the
Windows Installer Package (setup.exe, located in the i386 folder or the IA64 folder as
appropriate) and you will get three options for the installation:
• Cell Manager (includes agents and option for installation server)

• Installation server (only)

• Data Protector client (plus optional installation server)


Select one of these options to continue. During the installation procedure, determine under
which user (in the administrator group) the Data Protector services are started, and select
which Data Protector components (for example, Disk Agent, Media Agent, Oracle/SAP
Integration) you want to install.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Installation Steps
The installation procedure consists of the following steps:
1. Run the Windows Installer Package and install the Cell Manager. If you deselect the
default option to install the Installation Server on the Cell Manager, then you must install
the Installation Server to another system before you are able to push agent software to
client systems.
You must also install the Installation Server on an HP-UX or Solaris system if you have a
mixed (Unix/Windows) environment.
2. Use the Data Protector user interface to distribute the agent software to the client
systems.
During the installation, a number of Data Protector registry entries are added to the
Windows registry, and three Data Protector services are configured and started:

− Data Protector CRS


− Data Protector RDS
− Data Protector inet

The Media Management daemon runs as an application process on windows, not as a


service. Check the task manager for the mmd.exe process to ensure that it is running.

NOTE: You can check the status of these services with the Control Panel. They
should be set to start automatically. You may also use the
<OMNIHOME>/bin/omnisv –status command to verify their status

On Windows systems, Data Protector runs all the services under a default system account
or the one specified during the installation.

A special Data Protector service user must be created to back up shared Windows disks
or integrations with databases and applications, such as MS SQL, MS Exchange, Oracle,
etc.

NOTE: See the Installation and Licensing Guide for more details.

After a successful installation, start the Data Protector GUI with the start button:

Start->Programs->HP OpenView Storage Data Protector ->Data Protector Manager

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–9. SLIDE: Installation of Cell Manager on Solaris

Installation of Cell Manager on Solaris

Configure/Check hostname resolution (DNS)

Install software using pkgadd

Verify /etc/services for "omni 5555/tcp" and


/etc/inetd.conf for omni entry.

Check system startup file /etc/rc.config.d/omni

Check if daemons are running (crs, mmd, rds)

Student Notes
Follow the procedure below to install the Cell Manager on a Solaris
system:
1. Insert the Solaris installation CD-ROM.
2. Change to the main <package_source> directory, i.e. the directory that contains the
installation depot file (in this case <Mount_point>/DP-DEPOT).

The following sub-product packages related to Cell Manager installation are included in the
product:
OB2-CORE Data Protector Core software.
OB2-C-IS Installation Server Core software.
OB2-CC Cell Console software. This contains the graphical userinterface and the
command-line interface.
OB2-CS Cell Manager software.
OB2-DA Disk Agent software. This is required, otherwise it is not possible to back up
the IDB.
OB2-MA Media Agent. This is required if you want to attach a backup device to the Cell
Manager.
OB2-DOCS Data Protector online manuals.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Use the pkgadd facility to install the above packages in the order in which they are listed,
using the following command in each case:

pkgadd -d DP_A0510_SUN78.pkg <package_name>

If you want to install an Installation Server for UNIX on your Cell Manager, you can do it at
this point. Refer to “Installing an Installation Server for UNIX” later in this module for the
additional steps required.

The Installed Directory Structure


When the installation completes, the core Data Protector software is located in the
/opt/omni/bin directory and the Installation Server for UNIX in the
/opt/omni/databases/vendor directory.

IMPORTANT If you want to install Data Protector to linked directories, for instance:
/opt/omni/ -> /<prefix>/opt/omni/
/var/opt/omni/ -> /<prefix>/var/opt/omni/
/etc/opt/omni/ -> /<prefix>/etc/opt/omni/
you must create the links before the installation and ensure that the
destination directories exist.

Configuring Automatic Startup and Shutdown


The Data Protector installation procedure configures an automatic startup and shutdown of
all Data Protector processes whenever a system is restarted. Some of this configuration is
operating system dependent.

Solaris The following files are automatically configured:


/etc/init.d/omni A script with startup and shutdown procedures.
/etc/rc1.d/K09omni A link to the /sbin/init.d/omni script that shuts down Data Protector.
/etc/rc2.d/S97omni A link to the /sbin/init.d/omni script that starts up Data Protector.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–10. SLIDE: Installation Servers

Installation Servers

Installation Server on Windows


• May be installed with Cell Manager software (default)
• May be installed with a client
• Client (agents) may not be remotely installed after installation
server
• Required if UNIX Cell Manager needs to push software to
Windows clients

Installation Server on UNIX


• May be installed with UX Cell Manager software (default)
• May be installed after a client
• Client (agents) may not be manually installed after installation
server
• Required if Windows Cell Manager needs to push software to
UNIX clients

Student Notes
Installation Servers allow for distributed client software installations. Because the Cell
Manager is not responsible for the installation, remote installations can complete faster in
complex network environments. Thus, the Cell Manager is free for tasks that are more
important. In mixed UNIX and NT environments, an installation server of each type should be
installed to avoid manual client installations. However, this does not apply to Novell and
MPE/IX; these require manual client installations.

Installation Server Choices


You may use both HP-UX and Windows installation servers within the same cell.

The choice for which platforms to use for the installation server depends largely upon the
cell clients. If you are using UX clients, then you will need the HP-UX installation server; this
may also be the Cell Manager system. If you are installing Windows clients, you will need at
least one Windows installation server; otherwise, you will have to install all of the clients
from the distribution media, or set up a network share.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

After the Data Protector Installation Server is installed, it may no longer possible to remotely
install only the Data Protector Agent software onto the same system. (this is a older Windows
limitation that does not affect other newer versions of Windows).

In all cases, install the Data Protector client software before installing the Data Protector
Installation Server depot.

Troubleshooting DNS
The Data Protector 5.1 version introduces a new tool to help troubleshoot DNS problems
associated with clients within the cell.

The following command may be used to check for DNS mismatches:

omnicheck –dns –host <client> -verbose

Example-1 checking an individual client:

root@r848c61 [/opt/omni]
# omnicheck -dns -host r848c61 -verbose
DNS check: checking connection between r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com and dlthost.atl.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c76.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c77.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between dlthost.atl.edunet.hp.com and r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c76.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c77.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: all checks completed successfully.

Example-2 checking all cell clients:


root@r848c61 [/opt/omni]
# omnicheck -dns -full -verbose
DNS check: checking connection between r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com and dlthost.atl.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c76.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c77.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between dlthost.atl.edunet.hp.com and r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c77.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c76.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c76.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between dlthost.atl.edunet.hp.com and r848c77.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c76.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c77.dow.edunet.hp.com and dlthost.atl.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c77.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between dlthost.atl.edunet.hp.com and r848c76.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c77.dow.edunet.hp.com and r848c61.dow.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: checking connection between r848c76.dow.edunet.hp.com and dlthost.atl.edunet.hp.com
DNS check: all checks completed successfully.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–11. SLIDE:HP-UX CD-ROM Contents

HP-UX CD-ROM Contents

Student Notes
The Data Protector software products are shipped on three separate CD-ROMs for the
supported Cell Manager platforms. They are:
• HP-UX
• Windows
• Solaris

This graphic above illustrates the HP-UX CD-ROM contents. Included are:
ADOBE contains instructions for obtaining the Acrobat Reader for HP-UX
DOCS contains the complete set of Data Protector Manuals
DP_DEPOT contains the software depot used for swinstall
LOCAL_DP_AGENT_INSTALL contains the omnisetup.sh script for local agent install
and cell manager upgrade
MISC some unsupported tools
OV_INTEGRATIONS contains the software for the OV Integrations
ReadMe.UX contains an overview of the CD-ROM

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–12. SLIDE: Windows CD-ROM Contents

Windows CD-ROM Contents

Student Notes
Shown above are the contents of the Data Protector for Windows CD-ROM. Included are:
Adobe contains an installable version of the Acrobat reader
Alpha contains the agent installation components for the Alpha platform
Docs contains the complete Data Protector manual set as PDF files
DP_Demo contains product demonstration material
i386 contains the setup.exe and all of the binaries for the Windws-Intel 32-bit
platform
ia64 contains the setup.exe and all of the binaries for the Windows-Intel 64-bit
platform
License Checker contains tools to help with licensing
MPE contains the components to install the agents on the MPE/IX platform
NetWare contains the components to install the agents on the Netware platform
OFM_8.1 contains the installation tools to load the Open File Manager version 8.1
OPENVMS contains the components to install the agents on the HP OpenVMS platform
OV_Integrations Contains the software to install the Openview integrations
Product_Information
autorun the executable invoked when the CD-ROM is inserted into a Windows system

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–13. SLIDE: Solaris CD-ROM Contents

Solaris CD-ROM Contents

Student Notes
This graphic above illustrates the HP-UX CD-ROM contents. Included are:
ADOBE contains instructions for obtaining the Acrobat Reader for HP-UX
DOCS contains the complete set of Data Protector Manuals
DP_DEPOT contains the software depot used for swinstall
LOCAL_DP_AGENT_INSTALL contains the omnisetup.sh script for local agent install
and cell manager upgrade
MISC some unsupported tools
OV_INTEGRATIONS contains the software for the OV Integrations
ReadMe.Solaris contains an overview of the CD-ROM

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–14. SLIDE: Starting the UNIX GUI

Starting the UNIX GUI

# /opt/omni/bin/xomni &

Student Notes
The Cell Console (user interface) on HP-UX and Solaris is called xomni, and it is located in
the /opt/omni/bin (<OMNIHOME>/bin) directory.
The Data Protector GUI may be started with the /opt/omni/bin/xomni command.

The Data Protector GUI has several administration contexts, including:


• Clients (install)
• Users
• Devices and Media
• Backup
• Monitor
• Restore
• Instant Recovery
• Reporting
• Internal Database

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

While the GUI is the recommended tool for configuring Data Protector, it is possible to make
configuration changes by using the command line interface or by editing the configuration
files in the /etc/opt/omni/cell and /etc/opt/omni/users directories.

The users that have access to the Cell Manager are registered in the
<OMNICONFIG>/uses/UserList file. This file will need to be modified to allow all
distributed GUI’s to access the cell manager. If there is no local GUI running on the Cell
Manager, then this file should be edited before any remote GUI will be able to connect to the
Cell Manager. To get started, add a new entry (on a single line) containing four asterisk
characters separated by spaces, followed by the string admin.

Example:

* * * * admin

This will allow any GUI client to connect to the Cell Manager, and is not recommended as a
long term solution. This entry should be removed once a remote cell console is able to
connect to the cell manager.

When Data Protector is installed, the /etc/PATH file is updated to contain the
<OMNIHOME>/bin directory. This will allow all of the Data Protector commands in
<OMNIHOME>/bin to be available after a new login session is started. In addition, the
/etc/MANPATH file is updated to allow for easy access to the man-pages.

The Data Protector administrator may want to add the <OMNIHOME>/sbin directory to the
PATH on the cell manager system. This will allow simpler access to the binaries for some cell
management tasks.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–15. SLIDE: Starting the Windows GUI

Starting the Windows GUI

Start -> Programs -> HP OpenView Storage Data Protector -> Data Protector Manager

Student Notes
The user interface on Windows systems is accessed via the Start button. The actual
program running is the <OMNIHOME>/bin/manager.exe. The <OMNIHOME>/bin
directory is not added to the system PATH by default. The Administrator may want to add the
“bin” directory to the system Path for simpler access to the Data Protector executables.

Additional commands exist in this directory for command-line execution; simply make the
<OMNIHOME>/bin your working directory, and execute the programs by name if the
directory is not added to the Path.

All of the programs that make up the command line interface are documented in the
<OMNIHOME>/Docs/MAN directory in a single file named CLIReference.pdf.

U1610S B.00 3-34 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–16. SLIDE: Register Installation Servers

Register Installation Servers

Client
context

Student Notes
Adding an Installation Server
When the Cell Manager is installed, the Installation Server software is also installed. This
default Installation Server does not need to be registered with the cell manager in order to be
used. Additional Installation Servers needed by the Cell Manager must each be registered
after they are installed. This is true for Windows Installation Servers and HP-UX Installation
Servers in the cell.

Adding a Windows Installation Server


As with the Cell Manager installation on Windows, load the CD-ROM and run setup.exe
located within the i386 (IA64) folder. Select the Installation Server as the system type.
Data Protector will automatically create a Windows shared directory that may be accessed
from the network. To utilize the Installation Server, it must be registered with the Cell
Manager.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Proceed as follows to register the Installation Server:


1. Within the Data Protector GUI, switch to the client context.

2. Select: Edit -> Add -> Import Installation Server from the Menu Bar.

3. Add the name of the Windows server in the Name Field or select it by Browsing the
Microsoft Windows Network, and click Finish.

NOTE: You cannot remotely install a Data Protector client on the Windows
installation server system. To use the same system as both an installation
server and a client, install the client components first and check the feature to
include the installation server.

Adding an HP-UX Installation

1. As with the cell manager installation for HP-UX, run swinstall. This time, select only
the sub-product of Data Protector, called OB2-IS, and complete the installation.

2. Within the Data Protector GUI, select the Client context.

3. Select: Edit -> Add -> Import Installation Server

4. Add the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) of the HP-UX server in the Name Field,
and select Finish .

U1610S B.00 3-36 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–17. SLIDE: Adding New Clients to the Cell

Adding New Clients to the Cell

Clients
context

Cell
Actions

Student Notes
The Data Protector user interface supports cross platform client installation. Software is
distributed to clients using the Data Protector user interface (GUI)

In the Data Protector Client context, select Clients, and Add Clients from the pop-up menu.
Select an installation server to use, then select which components to install on which system.
Possible components are the disk agent, media agent, the cell console (GUI and command
line interface), as well as the various integration components.

The GUI shows which agents and versions are installed on the client systems. This
information is also stored in the <OMNICONFIG>/cell/cell_info file, which can be used
if the GUI is not available.

The next set of slides illustrates the various installation and deinstallation options that are
available for these clients through the supported GUIs.

http://education.hp.com 3-37 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Updating to New Versions of Data Protector


To update to a new version of Data Protector or single Data Protector components that have
been submitted as a patch, the new software must be installed manually on the cell and
installation servers, then pushed to the client systems. To initiate the distribution process,
use the Update instead of the Add Client menu selection.

Adding UNIX Clients


The Data Protector GUI can be used to install UNIX or Windows hosts. Switch to the Client
context, to access the menu above. Choosing Edit -> Add -> Clients allows you to
select UNIX or Windows clients, as well as which installation server to use. For a Windows
client, a Windows NT installation server must already be configured in the cell.

Client Installation — HP-UX


For every system, the cell manager performs these steps:
1. Reads the list of client components you want to install.
2. Uses IP address resolution to find the IP address of the system via its hostname.
3. Determines whether you are installing locally or on a remote host. If local, then the
loopback address is used for the IP address, and shortcuts are used to speed the
installation process.
4. Pings the system to check connectivity.

If the system is remote, rlogin is attempted as the root user. If this is a first time
installation of Data Protector, a password is requested. If Data Protector has previously
been installed (version 3.1 or greater), it does not require a password.

5. Checks that the time difference is no more than 10 seconds.


6. Checks the version of the OS on the client system and that it is compatible with the agent
software being installed.
7. Checks on the client system that it can resolve the hostname and IP address back to the
Cell Manager, using nslookup/ping.
8. An archive containing utility scripts is copied to the remote system via rcp/ftp. The
archive is then unpacked (by a special Data Protector tool, omnirexec) and the
appropriate install utility is executed. (swinstall on HP-UX)

Typically the following checks are performed:

1. Checks to see if the client already has the agent software installed. If so, what version it
is.
2. Determines if available disk space on the client system meets the needs requested in the
require.dat file.
3. Copies the package containing the software onto the client system. If client system is in
the .rhosts file, a normal rcp command is used. An ftp script is generated if the client
system is not in the .rhosts list, and ftp is executed to copy the files.
4. Installs software. Next, the installation procedure found in the utils package is used to
install the software on the remote system (omni_rinst.sh).

U1610S B.00 3-38 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

5. Updates information about currently installed software packets and configuration on the
client system. From this information, Data Protector can determine which version of the
software is currently running on the client system and from which cell manager it was
installed.

Files:
<OMNICONFIG>/cell/cell_server
<OMNICONFIG>/cell/omni_info

6. The script performs some cleanups and deletes all temporary scripts, utilities, and files
created on the client system.
7. Prints a summary for every packet requested to be installed on the client system.

Adding Windows Clients


The following prerequisites must be met for installation of Windows NT/2000/XP/2003:
• Administrator rights on the remote machine (for accessing the remote registry)
• A shared disk that corresponds to the destination directory (for copying files)

From within the Windows GUI, right clicking on the Clients icon accesses the new client
window. Alternately, the Add New Client icon can be selected from the Tool Bar in the
top right-hand corner of the same screen.

Client Installation — Windows NT/2000/XP/2003


Performs the following steps for every system:
1. Gets information on which systems should be installed.

2. Asks which components to install.

3. Starts setup with the option -components component1 component2 -client host1 host2
host3 ...

4. Setup checks for access permission to the remote registry. If it fails, it proceeds with the
next host.

5. Setup checks if Data Protector has already been installed (update). If not, it asks in
which directory the software should be installed.

6. Setup copies all the files to the destination directory. If the destination directory is not
available as the default shared disk (\\hostname\C$ for C: and \\hostname\D$
for D:), the user is prompted to give the correct shared disk.

7. Using the remote service manager, it starts the inet service on the remote host.

8. When started, inet contacts the Cell Manager and instructs it to import the host into the
cell. (In some cases, a manual import may still be necessary to complete the registration
process.)

9. Gives a summary after installation.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–18. SLIDE: Adding Components to Clients

Adding Components to Clients

Select
client

Pop-up menu
using mouse
right-button

Student Notes
The Add Components option is used when a client already exists within the cell, but more
agents or integrations are required. An example might be if an HP-UX server has been
installed with disk and media agents (i.e., it has data to be backed up and contains a backup
media of some sort). If it has an Oracle database added to it, then a further integration is
required for online backups to occur. This is achieved via the Add Components screen.

U1610S B.00 3-40 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–19. SLIDE: Importing Clients

Importing Clients

Select
clients, use
pop-up menu

omnicc –import_host <hostname>

Student Notes
Importing an HP-UX Client
To move a system from one cell to another cell (or to remove a system from your local
network), use the export/import actions. These actions do not install or delete the Data
Protector client software; they simply amend the configuration on the cell manager and client
machines. An option is available to remove the Data Protector software if this is necessary.
The relevant files for export and import are:

<OMNICONFIG>/cell/cell_server On the client system


<OMNICONFIG>/cell/cell_info On the cell manager

The <OMNIHOME>/bin/omnicc command may be used to import or export clients. The


options -import_host and -export_host support client management.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

Importing a Cluster
Data Protector supports the HP MC/ServiceGuard clusters running on HP-UX. The Data
Protector clustered systems must be installed locally from the CD-ROM on every system
within the cluster, and then manually imported to the Data Protector cell using the graphical
user interface and specifying the virtual names for floating IP addresses. Use the Import
Cluster feature in the GUI for this function.

Importing Windows Clients/Clusters


As with HP-UX client imports, Windows also has the same functionality. The import updates
the files:

<OMNICONFIG>\cell\cell_server On the client system


<OMNICONFIG>\cell\cell_info On the Cell Manager

On Windows the cell_server information is also kept in the registry, if entered incorrectly
during the installation process, this entry may be altered manually using regedit:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\
SOFTWARE\
Hewlett-Packard\
OpenView\
Omniback II\
Site\ [fully qualified name of the cell manager]

Note: During the Windows client installation, specifying the name of the Cell
Manager is optional, simply leave the field empty and continue the install
process. In this way the import must be used to register the client with the
Cell Manager.

Importing a Cluster
Data Protector supports the Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) for Windows. The Data
Protector cluster-aware clients must be installed locally from the CD-ROM on every system
within the cluster, and then manually imported to the Data Protector cell using the graphical
user interface; select “MS Clusters” in client context, and use the Import Cluster tool or pop-
up menu in the GUI.

U1610S B.00 3-42 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–20. SLIDE: Deleting (Exporting) Clients

Deleting (Exporting) Clients

Option
to delete
software

omnicc –export_host <hostname>

Student Notes
Exporting (Deleting) Clients
Exporting a client system from the Data Protector cell removes the client references from the
Data Protector database and configuration files on the Cell Manager and client system
without uninstalling the software on the client computer (unless selected). This can be done
using the GUI or the omnicc -export_host command. A client export may be required in
the following situations:
• The client needs to be moved to another cell.

• The administrator wants to remove any systems from the Data Protector cell
configuration that are no longer part of the network.

The software components may be deleted when a client is exported from the cell when using
the Data Protector GUI. If the client is to be imported into another cell, do not remove the
software.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–21. SLIDE: Data Protector Licensing

Licensing

Evaluation
120 Days
Permanent
Instant-On
60 Days
Emergency
14 Days

Default installed
with product
Installed using :
• GUI
• Command Line Interface
• Editing lic.dat

Student Notes
When you install Data Protector for the first time, it runs with an instant-on license, which is
valid for 60 days. Furthermore, in special cases you may be provided with a temporary
license which is valid for three months. This means that you can use Data Protector for up to
three months without any permanent license. During this time, you should set up and
configure your Data Protector environment, and request your permanent license string.

In the event of a loss of the Cell Manager and subsequent recovery using a new system, an
emergency license valid for 14 days may be obtained from HP Customer Support.

After you receive the permanent license string, you can install it with the Data Protector
Installation GUI, or using the command-line interface. You can also use an editor to type the
string into the license file, <OMNICONFIG>/cell/lic.dat. You must then issue the
omnicc command to activate and verify the changes.

Use the command omnicc -query to display the current license information, and the
omnicc -password_info for a more extensive report.

U1610S B.00 3-44 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

3–22. SLIDE: Licenses and Part Numbers

Licenses and Part Numbers

Student Notes
Shown above are the licenses available for Data Protector 5.1. The Starter Packs are for the
Cell Manager including a single drive license with unlimited clients.

NOTE: All Omniback 3.5, 4.0, 4.1 and Data Protector 5.0 licenses will work with Data
Protector 5.1. To take advantage of new product features, additional licenses
must be purchased.

The Cell Manager installation includes a license.txt file which may be printed and then faxed
to the HP Password Delivery Center to obtain a permanent license keys.

Visit the HP website: http://webware.hp.com for more information.

NOTE: For further information on licensing refer to the HP OpenView Storage Data
Protector Installation and Licensing Guide. B6960-90079

http://education.hp.com 3-45 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 3
Data Protector Installation

U1610S B.00 3-46 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4 — Data Protector Basics
Objectives
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:
• Describe the general concepts behind Data Protector backup.

• Configure a device for Data Protector usage.

• Initialize a tape for Data Protector.

• Perform an interactive backup.

• Schedule a backup.

• Perform a simple restore.

• Execute basic reports

http://education.hp.com 4-1 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–1. SLIDE: Getting Started

Data Protector Basics

Purpose
Gain familiarity with the GUI
Authorize remote administration
Understand the backup concept
Add a simple tape device into the cell
Format media for backup
Perform a simple backup
Schedule a backup
Perform a restore
Respond to a mount request
Execute a report

Student Notes
The purpose of this module is to gain familiarity with the Data Protector product and its
associated GUI. This module will serve as a tutorial to the basic concepts behind Data
Protector backup.

At this point you have installed the product and created a cell, this module will guide you to a
point at which a simple backup can be initiated. Several steps are required; some are simple
checks; others are configuration tasks. The end-to-end process will introduce many of the
initial features within the main Data Protector GUI. Each of the features and functions will be
discussed in much greater detail in later topics in this training. The purpose of this module is
to have you explore the functionality of Data Protector by configuring the cell to perform a
simple backup and restore.

The steps include:


• Checking that the appropriate agents exist on the client

• Checking that the appropriate media pool exists

• Creating a logical device (i.e., adding a tape drive to the cell)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

• Using the new logical device to initialize a tape into a media pool

• Creating a backup specification (a list of objects to backup to the tape)

• Starting the backup or scheduling the backup

• Monitoring the backup

http://education.hp.com 4-3 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–2. SLIDE: Data Protector GUI

Data Protector GUI

Menu bar

Tool bar

Context list
Results
area

Scoping
pane

Navigation
tab Results
tabs Status bar

Student Notes
HP OpenView Data Protector Main GUI
The slide above depicts the main Data Protector GUI provided when an administrator
executes the xomni(UNIX) or manager(windows) command. The GUI contains several
contexts, each designed to allow for control of a specific functional area.

To use the graphical user interface of Data Protector, enter:

UNIX: /opt/omni/bin/xomni
Windows: Start -> Programs -> HP OpenView Storage Data Protector -> Data Protector Manager
or c:\program files\Ominback\bin\manager

The Context List: Controls access to a given functional area.

The Scoping Pane: Provides a tree-like structure of items that may be selected to allow for
configuration or properties for the selected item.

The Results Area: Provides properties for selected items as well as configuration
procedures for the selected items in the Scoping Pane.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

The Navigation Tabs: Objects and Tasks that appear at the bottom of the Scoping Pane.
They are used to switch between the Object list, and configuration Tasks.

The Results Tabs: Allows several tasks to be executing in parallel from the single GUI.
Each tab shows the results of a particular task.

The UNIX interface provides several command line options:

• xomni -server <Host> to start the user interface for the complete Data Protector
functionality and connect to a specific Host which is a cell manager
• xomnibackup to start the interface for the backup context (xomni –backup)
• xomnirestore to start the interface for the restore context (xomni –restore)
• xomnimonitor to start the interface for monitoring a single cell (xomni –monitor)
• xomnimm to start the interface for devices and media (xomni –admin)
• xomniadmin to start the interface for users, clients, database and reporting
(xomni –users –clients –db –report)

The Windows interface provides several command line options:

• manager -server <Host> to start the user interface for the complete Data Protector
functionality and connect to a specific host, which is a cell manager
• manager -backup to start the user interface for backup
• manager -restore to start the user interface for restore
• manager -monitor to start the user interface for monitoring a single cell
• manager -admin to start the user interface for devices and media
• manager -db to start the user interface for the Data Protector Database
• manager -users to start the user interface for users
• manager -clients to start the user interface for clients
• manager -report to start the reporting interface
• manager -? to see a list of options

NOTE: Data Protector also provides a “snap-in” for the Microsoft Management
Console (MMC). If you have the MMC loaded, you may add the OB2_Snap as a
standalone Snap-in.

To use the command line interface of Data Protector, enter:


• omnib to start a backup
• omnir to start a restore
• omnistat to monitor the state of the current backup or restore jobs
• omnimm to manage media
• omnicellinfo to report on cell configurations

Most of these components of the GUI and the command interface will be discussed in further
detail throughout the rest of this training course.

You may want to view the man-page or WordPad files for omniintro and omnigui for an
overview of all the commands available to Data Protector.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

Proceed as follows to view the man pages on UNIX:

export MANPATH=$MANPATH:/opt/omni/lib/man

(done by default after installation)

man omniintro

man omnigui

Proceed as follows to view the WordPad documents on Windows:

Open the c:\Program Files\Data Protector\Docs\MAN folder (directory)

Open any of the *.wri files with the WordPad application.

U1610S B.00 4-6 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–3. SLIDE: Authorizing Remote Console Access (1)

Authorizing Remote Console Access (1)

<OMNIHOME>/config/users/UserList (Windows)
<OMNICONFIG>users/UserList (UNIX)

# format "description" "User_Name" "Domain/Group" "FQDN" "DP_Group"

“” * * * "admin“ Å Allows any cell console to connect as admin!


“” “root" “sys” r848c40.dow.edunet.hp.com “admin“
“” “ADMINISTRATOR” “PC1” “pc1.dow.edunet.hp.com” “admin”
“WebReporting” “java” “applet” webreporting “admin”

Student Notes
In many Data Protector installations, more than one Cell Console is distributed during the
installation process. In order to be able to access the Cell Manager remotely via the
distributed Cell Console it must be authorized.

By default, only the Cell Console installed on the Cell Manager system can access the cell
server process. Any attempts to use a remote cell console will be blocked; a permission-
denied message will appear on the system where the console is running.

To authorize another Cell Console, you must add a remote user to the User configuration. If
the user is to be a remote administrator, add them to the Data Protector “admin” user group.
The screen above illustrates the necessary steps:

Select the Users context, select the admin group, then use the right-mouse button to access
the context-sensitive pop-up menu, select “Add Users.”

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–4. SLIDE: Authorizing Remote Console Access (2)

Authorizing Remote Console Access (2)

2
Fields in the
UserList file 3
1
4

Student Notes
You will need the following information to add an additional user of the Cell Console:
• The Platform type (where the console is installed UNIX or Windows)

• The User Name (operating system user ID of the person authorized to use the cell
console)

• The User Group/Domain (operating system group if UNIX, or Domain if Windows)

• The System Name (where the cell console will connect from)

• All of the above entries may contain <Any> instead of a specific name. This is essentially
a wildcard. Use with caution!

NOTE: The Cell Console system does not need to be a client of the cell; this allows an
authorized cell console to connect to many different cell managers.

U1610S B.00 4-8 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

Manually adding a remote user


If you need to have remote cell console access prior to starting your configuration, add the
following line to the <OMNICONFIG>users/UserList file on the cell manager:

“Any” * * * admin

The above entry allows any user from any cell console (user interface) to access the cell
manager; this is not a secure long term solution, but does allow for quick remote access to
the cell manager. Once access is gained remotely, modify the user configuration as necessary
to tighten up the security.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–5. SLIDE: General Backup Concept

General Backup Concept

Backup Objects Logical Device Media from Pool

System-A

Backup Specification
Objects Disk1 DA System-C
SystemA - Disk1 Logical Device

SystemB - Disk2 MA DLT 8000

Logical Device System-B


SystemC - Tape1

Disk2 DA Media Pool

Student Notes
• The Data Protector product performs either local or network backups using the Disk
Agents and Media Agents that are installed onto the various systems in the Data Protector
Cell.

• The Backup Specification is essentially a configuration file that contains a list of the
objects to be backed up along with the devices to use for the backup. Disk Agents are
used to access the object data, and Media Agents are used to write to the backup devices.

• The physical devices attached to a system are configured into Data Protector as a Logical
Device, allowing additional features to be used for backup and restore. One of the
features of the Logical Device is a Media Pool.

• The Media Pool groups tapes together into a logical set, and has policies for how the
tapes in the set may be used and accessed. Media Pools may be assigned to a Logical
Device when the device is configured, and become the default set of tapes to be used
during backup when a logical device is used.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

• Data Protector backups are configured such that tape selection is done automatically
during the running of the backup job. You assign an Object to a Device, which is already
assigned to a Media Pool. Data Protector then chooses an appropriate tape for the
backup. If no tapes are available, Data Protector will issue a Mount Request for the
desired medium.

NOTE: We will explore all of these topics in much detail in the modules following this
introduction.

http://education.hp.com 4-11 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–6. SLIDE: Backup Specification

Backup Specification

The fundamental components of all Data


Protector backups are:
• A list of what is to be backed up (objects)
• A list of devices to be used (logical devices)
• What media is to be used (media pools)
• Options (backup spec, object, device)
These components are grouped together as
a backup specification for repeated use.

Student Notes
Before going through the individual steps of configuring a backup, it is helpful to know how a
backup is defined and processed with Data Protector.

Data Protector requires the following fundamental components for all backups:
• A list of what is to be backed up. Data Protector refers to the data source as an Object.
Data Protector supports specific object types, which will be discussed later in this
module.
• A list of what devices Logical Devices to be used. (Details covered in Module 6)

• A set of media for the backup to be written to. This is in the form of a media pool.
(Details covered in Module 5)

• The options that are to be used for the backup. Data Protector provides many flexible
options that can be used to completely define all characteristics of the backup and the
information relating to it. These options will be discussed in throughout this module.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

These components can be grouped together and saved as a backup specification. Backup
specifications are used to run repeated backups of the same source data, either manually
invoked or scheduled.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–7. SLIDE: Backup Checklist

Backup Checklist

• Install Disk and Media Agents


• Configure Media Pool(s)
• Configure Logical Device
• Initialize Medium
• Create Backup Specification
• Save Backup Specification
• Schedule/Run Backup Job

Student Notes
The slide illustrates some of the main tasks that are necessary to complete an Data Protector
backup. The remainder of the module will guide you through these steps, with a lab at the
end for you to work through them on your own.

Backup Wizard
Data Protector provides a “wizard” to guide you through the main steps in configuring a new
backup specification. The wizard is not covered here, but rather the steps used within the
wizard. To use the Next Step Wizard, select it from the View menu in the Menu Bar:

View -> Next Step Wizard

U1610S B.00 4-14 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–8. SLIDE: Verify Agents

Verify Agents

Client
context

Select
clients

Property list
shows installed
agents

• Install Disk and Media Agents

• Configure Media Pool(s)

• Configure Logical Device

• Initialize Medium

Student Notes
The initial installation of the cell manager installed three key components:
• User Interface — Allows the GUI to be started, also called the Cell Console.
• Disk Agent — Allows data to be backed up from the cell manager
• Media Agent — Allows a backup device to be configured on the cell manager

The Clients context on the Data Protector GUI provides the list of the client hosts, along
with the software that has been successfully configured on each.

TIP! You may see a report from the command line as follows:
omnicellinfo –cell brief

Before configuring devices or backups, be sure that each system in the Cell has the correct
software components (agents) installed.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–9. SLIDE: Check Default Media Pools

Check Default Media Pools

Device/media
context

Select
media

Property list
shows configured
pools
• Install Disk and Media Agents

• Configure Media Pool(s)

• Configure Logical Device

• Initialize Medium

Student Notes
The Devices & Media context in the GUI is used to configure media into the relevant pool (a
media pool is a logical collection of media). It is also used to configure logical devices for
backup and restore (discussed in the next slide).

During the initial configuration of Data Protector, a default media pool was created for each
type of supported medium, you may use or remove these pools as needed.

In this module, you will perform a backup to a tape that will be part of the standard media
pool called Default DDS. To check that this pool is available, click the Devices & Media
context in the GUI, select Media in the Scoping Pane. The Default DDS pool should be listed
in the Results Area. It should have a 0 in the column #Media indicating that there are no
tapes in this pool yet.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–10. SLIDE: Configure a Device

Configure a Device

Select
devices

Properties list
Pop-up menu shows existing
with mouse devices
right-click

• Install Disk and Media Agents

• Configure Media Pool(s)

• Configure Logical Device

• Initialize Medium

Student Notes
As mentioned in the previous slide, the Devices & Media context can be used to configure
logical devices. The logical devices are the entities that represent physical devices on a client
system. They are used to initialize tapes as well as perform backups and restores. You must
create a logical device on the cell manager that can be used to perform the backup at the end
of this module.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–11. SLIDE: Device Specification

Device Specification

Logical device
name and
description

Student Notes

Cookbook to Create a Logical Device


From the Device and Media context, use the following instructions to configure a Logical
Device on the Cell Manager:

1. Select Devices in the Scoping Pane.


2. Right–click on the selected Devices in the Scoping Pane, select Add Device … from
the pop-up menu
3. Select the Device Name field, enter DDS-Practice as the device name.
4. Select the Description field, and enter any textual description for the device.
5. Select your Classroom system from the pull down list for the Client field.
6. Select Standalone for the Device Type.
7. Select Data Protector for the Data Format.
8. Select the Next button (at the bottom of the Results Area).
9. From the pull down list, select the appropriate SCSI device file/name.
10. Select the Add button.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

11. Select the Next button (at the bottom of the Results Area)
12. Verify that the Media Type is DDS, and Default Media Pool is Default DDS, select the
Finish button.

The Results Area should display your configured device.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–12. SLIDE: Add Media to Media Pool

Add Media to Media Pool

Highlight
desired pool

Select
media
Pop-up - context
sensitive menu -
mouse right-click

• Install Disk and Media Agents

• Configure Media Pool(s)


• Configure Logical Device

• Initialize Medium

Student Notes
Before a backup can take place to the logical device that has been created, some media
should be added to the pool.

TIP! Data Protector can use blank media, so you do not have to initialize it. At
backup time, the blank media is simply added to the pool name specified by
the logical device into which the media was inserted. See previous slide for
specifying the pool name for a device.

In this case, we will use the new logical device to initialize a tape and add it to the default
DDS pool.

Procedure to Initialize a Tape


The previous slides introduced the Device & Media context. The following instructions
should be used from that same context.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

Double-click Media in the Scoping Pane; this opens the Media Pool list.

1. Select Default DDS, select Format from the pop-up menu (use the right-mouse button)
2. Select the DDS-Practice device from the pull-down list next to the Device field.
3. Select the Next button.
4. Select the Automatically generate option (selected by default)
5. Select the Location field, and enter “Device Repository”
6. Select the Next button
7. Select the Force Operation button (we assume to have a previously used tape)
8. Select the “Default” for Medium Size.
9. Insert a tape into the tape drive (be sure it’s not write protected).
10. Wait for the device to be ready.
11. Select the Finish button.

Messages should appear in the Results Area window, and the tape should be initialized within
a short period of time, this may take several minutes depending upon previous usage of the
medium.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–13. SLIDE: Format Medium

Format Medium

Media
checked
before format
proceeds

Unique
medium-id
assigned

Session
summary
Session
summary
pop-up window

Student Notes
The graphic above illustrates the messages displayed during a media initialization session.
Note the following:
• Data Protector reads the tape before writing to it.

• Data Protector will not initialize (without the force option) a used tape.

• Data Protector adds a unique MediumID to each tape initialized, and stores this in its
internal media management database.

• The default label for a tape (when auto-label is used) is the pool name and a sequence
number within the pool.

• All tapes must be labeled (formatted) before use. This consists of simply writing a header
to the tape and registering it in the media database.

U1610S B.00 4-22 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–14. SLIDE: Configure a Backup (1)

Configure a Backup (1)

Pop-up
File system menu
selected

• Initialize Medium

• Create Backup Specification

• Save Backup Specification

• Schedule/Run Backup Job

Student Notes
Now that we have a logical device and media in a media pool, we are ready for backup. A
definition must now be created to tell Data Protector which objects to place on the tape. This
definition is called a Backup Specification or Datalist. Datalist is synonymous with
Backup Specification and is more commonly used to refer to the file containing the backup
specification. The directory that contains the backup specification file is called datalists,
and is in the <OMNICONFIG> directory.

The Backup context in the GUI opens the Backup tools. There are many options for creating
the datalist file. In this module, we will address only the ones required for a simple backup.

The Filesystem folder under Backup Specification in the Scoping Pane is the place to
start, select it, and use the menu as shown on the graphic above to add a new Backup
Specification.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–15. SLIDE: Configure a Backup (2)

Configure a Backup (2)

Blank
template

Direct
attached
or remote

Student Notes
With the Create New Backup window open, select the Blank Filesystem Backup,
then select the OK button.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–16. SLIDE: Configure a Backup (3)

Configure a Backup (3)

Select
objects

Select Next>
for
more options

Student Notes
For this first backup, a relatively small object is desirable; locate a directory or filesystem
that is suitable.

1. Select the “plus” in front of your system to open the object list, repeat if necessary to see
the directory to backup. (Double-click to open the list as well.)
2. Select the small check box in front of the desired object or directory, a small blue check
mark will appear in the box, this indicates that it is selected for backup.
3. After you have selected (checked) the items for backup, select the Next button.
4. Select (check) your logical device (it may be selected by default), select Next. Leave
most of the options as their default values, except as indicated below.
5. Change the file system options: Protection to 4 days.
6. Select Next. (You will see the scheduler.)
7. Select Next. (You will see the job summary.)
8. Select Next. (You will see Save, Start, and Preview buttons, go to the next page)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–17. SLIDE: Configure a Backup (4)

Configure a Backup (4)

Save backup
specification to Select finish to
a file complete the
definition

• Initialize Medium

• Create Backup Specification

• Save Backup Specification

• Schedule/Run Backup Job

Student Notes
Data Protector backup specifications are stored as files in the <OMNICONFIG>/datalists
directory. From the Backup Results area, you must perform a save, in order to keep the
specification.
1. Select Save as.

2. Enter a name for the file (for example, exercise-1); leave the group name, default.

3. Click OK.
The new backup (datalist) will appear in the Scoping Pane.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–18. SLIDE: Start the Saved Backup Specification

Start the Saved Backup Specification

Schedule tab
for recurring
backup
Select the
saved backup
specification Start an
interactive
backup
• Initialize Medium

• Create Backup Specification

• Save Backup Specification

• Schedule/Run Backup Job

Student Notes
When Data Protector invokes a backup, it does so using a datalist file. The datalist definition
ensures that Data Protector knows which objects to backup, which to ignore, and which
device(s) to use. To start the backup, perform the following:
1. In the backup context, select a backup specification then:
Start Backup … from the popup menu
2. You will be prompted for the Backup Type (Full) and Network Load (High).

3. Select OK to start the backup.

4. The Backup Results Area window will become a Backup Monitor window, and
will show a session running.

5. The file system object will switch from Pending to Running to Completed

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

6. The logical device part of the window switches from Inactive/Waiting to Running,
and shows that amount of KB of data backed up.

7. The messages part of the window updates the progress as various file system objects are
backed up.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–19. SLIDE: The Scheduler

The Scheduler

The Scheduler can be used to start a


backup at a predefined date and time.

Backups can also be repeatedly scheduled


at regular/irregular intervals.

Holidays can also be predefined so that


no backups will take place on these days,
even if scheduled.

Schedules are created per Backup


Specification.

Student Notes
Once a backup specification has been created, the scheduler can be used to execute the
backup at a predefined date or time. The scheduler can also run the backup on a regular
basis, defined by the administrator.

A schedule is created on a per-backup specification basis; therefore, care needs to be taken


when scheduling multiple backups that no contention arises (for devices or objects).

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–20. SLIDE: Schedule Backup (1)

Scheduled Backup (1)

Select Add…
for recurring
backup

Student Notes
The Data Protector Scheduler offers many possibilities for producing re-occurring backups.
Each backup specification may have a single schedule file, but be executed at many different
times, each time with a different scope (full, incr #, incr).

Notice on the picture above, that you may not schedule backups in the past! Data Protector’s
scheduler only allows for forward scheduling.

Select Add… to create a new schedule, or simply double-click on a particular day to schedule
a backup. You may override the protection for individual backups.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

• Holidays
The scheduler can be configured to skip backups on days that are defined as holidays.
(blackout days) Data Protector can use the standard hp-ux style calendar holiday file as
input. Holidays are seen in the schedule window and are color-coded black.The Holidays
file resides in <OMNICONFIG>/Holidays.

The scheduling information is kept in text files under the <OMNICONFIG>/schedules


directory. The name of the schedule file will be the same name used for the backup
specification file.

The scheduling information is checked every 15 minutes by the Data Protector


omnitrig process, which is automatically scheduled via the system scheduler.
The daylight savings time problem (an hour more or one hour less) is solved; omnitrig
checks if there are any backups that have been scheduled for the previous hour but did
not run, and starts them.
Considering that omnitrig gets started on the cell manager, the schedule is always
relative to the time on the cell manager.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–21. SLIDE: Schedule Backup (2)

Schedule Backup (2)

Selection
determines
options

Student Notes
Backups may be scheduled to be recurring; they may execute daily, weekly, or monthly. Each
schedule (file) may contain multiple time parameters. Backup specifications may also be
setup to start executing at some future date.

The following date forms can be used when scheduling a backup:


• Specific Date and Time.

• Every, Every 1st, Every 2nd ……10th.

• Day, Month, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday.

• Time in 24-hour format, in 15-minute intervals.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

• Backup Type

The scheduler can also specify what type of backup is to be performed:


• Full
• Incr
• Incr 1 – Incr 9
For each scheduled backup, the following options can be specified:
• Protection
Protection set by the scheduler overrides any protection defined within the backup
specification.
• Network Load (Low, Medium, High)
The level to which Data Protector will monopolize the network where a backup is taking
place over a LAN/WAN link. The default is High.Data Protector will reduce its use of the
network when medium and low are selected. The duration of the backup will increase as
the network load is reduced.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–22. SLIDE: Backup Types

Backup Types

Incremental

Incremental
plus level

Student Notes
As is common with many other backup mechanisms, Data Protector provides a method of
performing full, and various levels of incremental backups:

• Full
Everything is backed up.
• Incremental 1 - 9
Data Protector tries to find the latest protected backup session with a lower backup level
on which the incremental backup will be based. With any incremental backup the entire
directory tree is backed up; so even if no files changed, the directory tree is recorded.
For example, if the user starts backup with backup type incr5, Data Protector will search
through the database to find the latest protected version of the object with a lower level
(full or incr 1-4) backup level, and use it as the reference point version on which
incremental will be based. A full backup is equivalent to level 0.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

• Incremental without level


All other backup types are considered to be at a lower level than incremental without
level; so if the user starts a backup with backup type incremental, the latest version (any
level: full, incr 1-9 or incr) will be used as reference point version.

NOTE If Data Protector cannot find a valid reference point version of the object
(hostname, mount point and description identifies an object) on which the
incremental backup is to be based, it will start a full backup. This can then
be seen in the monitor screen (backup type will be Full instead of
incremental). This backup promotion option may be disabled by changing
the UpgradeIncrToFull global option (default is 1, on).

Valid and Invalid Versions of an Object


Data Protector differentiates between two types of object versions - valid and invalid.
Incremental backups can only be based on valid objects. Invalid object versions are always
ignored when Data Protector is searching for a backup object version to use as a reference
point (related object version).

Invalid Backup Object Versions

• The object is not completed (aborted and failed versions of object) during the backup
session.

• Object versions without all media (one or more of the media on which the object was
stored has been overwritten/exported or is not protected any more).

• Full restore chain for object version is broken (full restore chain is broken if the chain
from full to this object version has some missing versions or if one or more object
versions from the chain are invalid)

Which files are actually backed up in incremental backup?


All files that have a modification time newer than the related object versions start time and
WinFS files with the archive attribute set. (time when prior backup was started).

All directories are backed up (irrespective of time).

Which files are NOT backed up in an incremental backup?


Files that have only changed attributes (chmod, chown and chgrp do not change/modify
time of file).

Files that have been moved from one directory to another.

NOTE Use the UNIX command touch -m with options to change the modification
time on a file.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–23. SLIDE: Backup Types Examples

Backup Types Examples

Last Full
Incr Incr Incr Incr

Incr n
Incr n
Incr n
Incr n
Incr Incr Incr Incr Incr

Incr n Incr (n+1) Incr (n+2) Incr (n+3)


Incr Incr Incr Incr Incr

22:00 12:00 22:00 12:00 22:00 12:00 22:00 12:00 22:00 12:00
Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5

Student Notes
There are three different backup models illustrated above, each has certain characteristics
that may be desirable for certain environments.

Full + Daily Incremental


ƒ Full backup at the beginning of the week
ƒ Non-leveled incremental at the end of each day
à Each day’s incremental is assumed to be nearly equivalent in size and duration and
include the changes since the previous nights backup
Ä Recovery may require multiple tape sets and take longer to perform (full plus all
incrementals)

Full + Mid-day Incremental + Daily Leveled Incremental


ƒ Full backup at the beginning of the week
ƒ Mid-day Incremental executed daily
ƒ Leveled incremental using the same level number is executed at the end of each day
à Each mid-day incremental is assumed to be nearly equivalent in size and duration and
include the changes since the previous nights backup

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

Ä Nightly leveled incremental increases in size and duration and includes changes since
the previous nightly leveled incremental backup

Full + Mid-day Incremental + Daily increasing Level Incremental


ƒ Full backup at the beginning of the week
ƒ Mid-day incremental executed daily
ƒ Leveled incremental using an increasing level number is executed at the end of each
day
à Each mid-day incremental is assumed to be nearly equivalent in size and duration and
includes the changes since the previous nights backup
à Nightly leveled incremental is assumed to be nearly equivalent in size and duration
and includes the changes from the previous nights leveled incremental
Ä Recovery may require multiple tape sets and may take longer to perform

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–24. SLIDE: Verify the Backup Session

Verify the Backup Session

Context Tabs to
change data
view
Highlight
session

Object
properties

Student Notes
After your backup finishes, you can review the operation from the database context within
the GUI. Open the Session folder of the Object folder to view the data.

U1610S B.00 4-38 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–25. SLIDE: Perform a Restore

Perform a Restore

Context

Tabs to change
restore options

Highlight
object

Pop-up dialog
Select
items to allows for media
preview
restore Start the
restore

Student Notes
In the final part of this module, a restore will be started to retrieve a file from the tape
following its removal from the Cell Manager.

NOTE: This restore should be performed without the tape in the tape drive to force
Data Protector to generate a Mount Request for the tape.

Start a Restore
As the root/Administrator user on the system where the backup was performed remove
a file or sub-directory (folder) that was included in the previous backup job.
1. Remove the backup tape from the drive. If you have another tape, insert that one instead
(it makes the mount request appear sooner).

2. Select the Restore context in the GUI.

3. Select your object (file system) as shown on the graphic above.

4. Select the Options tab in the Results Area.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

5. Select the “List restored files” and “Display Statistical Information” options.

6. Start the restore by selecting the Restore <object_name> button on the bottom of the
Results area.

7. Select Finish within the “Start Restore Session” pop-up window to proceed with the
restore operation.

8. If you ejected your tape from the device, Data Protector will prompt you (after a short
delay, which could be several minutes) with a mount request for the specific tape to
complete the restore operation.

Proceed to the next page to see how to handle mount requests.

U1610S B.00 4-40 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–26. SLIDE: Mount Request (1)

Mount Request (1)

Device needs a
specific tape to
continue

Student Notes
Data Protector uses a Mount Event to notify you that it needs a particular tape loaded into a
logical device. The Mount Event is used for both backup as well as restore. Having started a
restore and created a situation whereby there is a mount request outstanding, we must satisfy
that request in order for the files to be restored and for the restore session to complete.

Mount requests will remain pending until they are either confirmed or cancelled.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–27. SLIDE: Mount Request (2)

Mount Request (2)

Student Notes
Data Protector will present the above window in the form of a pop-up when you are
performing interactive operations, such as backup and restore. You may use it to confirm the
mount request once you have placed the appropriate tape within the device. If you close this
pop-up window, you may still respond to the mount request, see the next page.

U1610S B.00 4-42 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–28. SLIDE: Mount Request (3)

Mount Request (3)

Monitor
context

Highlight
device

Student Notes
Mount requests may be handled within the monitor context. Select the session that is in the
Mount Request state, then select the device waiting for the tape, and confirm the request
from the Actions menu. You may also use the pop-up menu while selecting the mount request
with the right mouse button.

NOTE: Be sure to place the tape in the required drive before confirming the request,
or you will be back to the same mount request state.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–29. SLIDE: Introduction to Reporting

Introduction to Reporting

Reporting
context

Wizard to
configure report
parameters

Report
to execute
Tasks
scope

Student Notes
Data Protector includes very extensive reporting and notification capabilities. These will be
discussed in much more detail later. You may want to experiment with the reporting tasks
after you have run backup to see the kind of information that is available from the internal
database.

There are several ways to have reports generated. Use the report tasks wizard to execute
reports interactively.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

4–30. SLIDE: Reporting

Reporting

Select report
parameters

Finish to
view
report

Student Notes
Data Protector comes with several categories of reports that may be executed against the
internal database. Each report selected within the reporting wizard will require different sets
of optional parameters in order to execute.

The example above demonstrates the selection of a session for a single session report. Data
Protector provides pull down lists within the reporting wizard to make report parameter
selections very simple. You may Cancel or Finish to abort or complete the report execution.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 4
Data Protector Basics

U1610S B.00 4-46 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5 — Tape Library Configuration and
Implementation
Objectives
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:
• Identify the components of a tape library

• Implement tape libraries on Unix and Windows

• Understand common library operations

• Troubleshoot device operations

http://education.hp.com 5-1 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–1. SLIDE: Objectives

Objectives

• Overview of Library Components


• Library (interface) Connectivity
– SCSI
– Fibre Channel
• Implementation of Tape Libraries
– HP StorageWorks MSL
– Unix
– Windows
• Library Operations (via GUI)
• Troubleshooting Device Operations
– HP StorageWorks Library and Tape Tools (L&TT)
– Data Protector Utility Agent (UMA)

Student Notes
This module focuses on the basic knowledge and skills necessary to successfully implement
tape libraries for use with Data Protector. Today HP manufactures and sells a variety of tape
devices ranging from single drive DDS units to multi-drive ESL libraries.

This section will provide general tape library implementation techniques, yet focus on the HP
StorageWorks MSL product line of midrange tape libraries. Student without this particular
tape library brand will benefit from the implementation and troubleshooting concepts
presented here.

Students pursuing HP Certification in the HPCP program for tape libraries are encouraged to
pursue further studies; including the HP course for library installation as well as the MSL
Library WBT available on the HP ITRC training site (also available on the classroom
systems).

U1610S B.00 5-2 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–2. SLIDE: Library Terminology

Library Terminology
• Tape drive(s)
– Data transfer element
• Repository slots
– Cartridge/magazine slots
– Storage element
• Media exchanger
– Transport element
– Robotics
• Barcode scanner
• Mail-slot(s)
– Import/export slot
– Eject element
• Management interface card
– SCSI (scsi2, scsi3)
– NSR (fibre channel/SCSI bridge)

Student Notes
The tape library is a complex system used for near-line or off-line storage of data. Data is
typically written onto high capacity tape cartridges by utilizing multiple tape drives
simultaneously. The tape library system differs from a standalone tape drive in many ways,
not the least of which is the automated handling (load/unload) of media to/from the
embedded tape drives.

Most tape library systems contain the following components:

• tape drive(s)

• repository slots

• media transport

• mail slot(s)

• barcode scanner

• management interface

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

The SCSI interface within the library presents the various components to all attached host
systems as objects. There are usually four objects, commonly referred to as elements that are
presented:
• transport
o the robotic that moves tape cartridges between slots and drives
o in SCSI terms, “Medium Transport Element”
o the MSL 5000/6000 Series Libraries have a single SCSI transport
• slot
o repository of tape cartridges, stored in magazines in the MSL
o in SCSI terms, “Storage Element”
• drive
o tape drives such as DLT, SDLT, LTO
o in SCSI terms, “Data Transfer Element”
• ports
o commonly referred to as import/export slot or mail slot
o MSL libraries may have one (5U models) or two mail slots (10U models)
o in SCSI terms, “Import/Export Element”
o other tape libraries (non-MSL) may have external access ports or other
numbers of mail-slots (typically 0, 1, or 5)

The management interface card varies depending upon the library. HP MSL libraries may be
equipped with either Ultra-2 SCSI (MSL 5000) or Ultra-3 SCSI (MSL 6000) controllers in
addition to a Fibre Channel interface called the Network Storage Router (NSR E-1200). The
NSR provides Serial, LAN, FC and SCSI ports in a single cPCI card that is installed into the
card cage at the rear of the MSL library.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–3. SLIDE: Library Introduction (hp MSL)

Library Introduction (hp MSL)

• Background
– Designed for backup operations with high-end networks.
– Features high availability and maximum storage density.
– Combines high-end tape drive technology with advanced
robotics.
• HP Midrange Libraries
– MSL#xyz – medium storage library
– MSL5000 series library GUI
touch-screen
– MSL6000 series library
– (xyz indicates slot count)

Student Notes
Background
• Designed for backup operations with high-end networks and high-performance servers.
• Features high availability, maximum storage density, and easy serviceability.
• Combines Digital Linear Tape (DLT), Super DLT (SDLT) or Linear Tape-Open (LTO) drive
technology with advanced robotics.
• Features a GUI-Touch Screen for configuration and management of the library.
History
• The StorageWorks MSL5000 series library models are the first generation.
• Introduced under Compaq brand. Some still sold under this brand.
• The HP brand was introduced with LTO Ultrium 230 (Gen 1) tape drives and
supports high-end SDLT tape drives as well.
• The MSL6000 series library models, announced in April 2003, are the next generation
of MSL libraries that include features such as:
• Auto-power-on
• Ultra3 SCSI interface
• LTO Ultrium 460 (Gen 2) drives

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

• An MSL5000 series library enhancement, announced in September 2003, may be


purchased to upgrade an MSL5000 series library with the auto-power-on feature.
Basic description
• Depending on the model, a library can:
• Support up to 2 drives in a 5U model; up to 4 drives in a 10U model.
• Use DLT, SDLT, or LTO drives.
Note: The MSL5026DLX will go EOL in October 2003. The DLT8000 drive will
be removed from CPL in July 2004.
• Contain up to four removable tape cartridge magazines with either 13
cartridge slots (with DLT or SDLT drives) or 15 cartridge slots (with LTO
Ultrium drives).
• The 10U models is similar to having two stacked 5U models.
• The 10U models have vertical axis assemblies that enable the shuttle (robot) to
access tapes in the upper as well as the lower level of the library.
Basic components
• Each model starts with the basic components and then varies depending on the brand
name, drive type, and features. All models contain:
• Fully functional Graphical User Interface (GUI) touch screen.
• Low Voltage Deferential (LVD) connectivity.
• Robotics (cartridge shuttle, motor hardware, motor drives, and other
supported electronics).
• Bar code reader.
• A card cage with cPCI backplane.
• An electronics controller card.
• Additional cPCI slots for future expandability.
• Hot-Pluggable drives.
• Power supply (5U models have single; 10U models have dual (redundant) hot-
pluggable power supplies.
• Multimodule system capability with redundant robotics through the pass-
through mechanism (PTM).
• All models ship with:
• A single media cartridge.
• A single cleaning cartridge.
• Two or four magazines (left magazines have mail slots).

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Drive Compatibility Table

Native capacity for available MSL drives based upon drive type:

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–4. SLIDE: Magazines – Mail Slots

Magazines – Mail Slots

External Access
enter/eject tapes

Mail Slot(s)

Configured in Repository
0, 1, or 5 slots
3D views available at http://www.smb.compaq.com

Student Notes
One of the most common ways of entering and ejecting individual tapes from a tape library is
via the mail slot. There are various names for this Import/Export Element and different ways
for libraries to provide it.

On the MSL libraries the first slot in the left magazine tray on each of the upper and lower
drawers is the 10U models are the mail slots. (one in the 5U models). Other legacy libraries
have implemented this as an external access port, or as 0, 1, or 5 reserved slots within the
tape magazines.

Once implemented, the contents of the mail-slot may be managed by Data Protector via the
library manager functions of enter and eject. See the Logical Devices module for more
details.

Other slots within the library are numbered beginning with slot 0 (default is zero; may be
changed to start with slot 1 as the first position) which is adjacent to the mail slot. For the
10U models this slot is in the upper left magazine. The remaining slots in this drawer are
number 1-13. Slots 14-28 are in the right (upper) magazine. If so equipped, the lower left
magazine slots are numbered 29 to 42, and 43 to 57 in the right.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

In the MSL6060 there are 58 fixed cartridge slots and two mail slots for a total of 60 slots. The
MSL 6030 has 30 slots, one of which is used for the mail slot.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–5. SLIDE: Rear Panel – 10U Model

Rear Panel – 10U Model

SCSI ports (2)

LAN port

Serial (RJ11)
port

[NSR E1200]

Student Notes
The graphic above illustrates the rear panel components of the MSL libraries. (10U shown; U
is the rack-unit measurement, each U is approximately 1.75 inches; the 5U model is half the
size of the 10U)

The rear panel provides access to the:


ƒ Power supply
ƒ Hot-shoe tape drives
ƒ Card cage
ƒ PCI add-in card slots
ƒ Library controller board (Must be in the far right slot or damage to the library will
occur)
ƒ Cable connections
ƒ Pass-Through Mechanism (PTM) mounting location; used when multiple modules are
configured
ƒ Some models (MSL 6030, 6060) ship with the optional embedded Fibre Channel (NSR)
board in the slot next to the library controller. This is the required configuration.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Library Controller
The library controller board contains a single microprocessor and associated logic
devices to control robotic operations and manage overall library functions. The
microprocessor also manages the SCSI interface between the library and the host system.

Port Descriptions on the Library Controller


ƒ VHDCI Library SCSI connections (68 pin)
ƒ 10-Base-T Ethernet connector
ƒ RS-232 trace connector

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–6. SLIDE: Tape Drives for HP MSL Libraries

Tape Drives for HP MSL Libraries

• Tape drives available


– DLT 40/80 (DLT8000)
– SDLT 110/220
– SDLT 160/320
– LTO Ultrium 230
– LTO Ultrium 460
• Mounted in a hot-pluggable shoe
• Load handle on DLT tape drive
extends from the rear
• LTO-2 media cannot be used LTO Ultrium
in the LTO Ultrium 230 drive

Student Notes
The graphic above shows an LTO Ultrium tape drive and shoe mechanism removed from the
library.
Tape drives are mounted at the rear of the library in a hot-pluggable shoe that permits a tape
drive to be removed and replaced while other tape drives and the library robotics remain
active. The hot-pluggable capability of the tape drives result in uninterrupted SCSI bus
activities during removal or installation.

The Ultrium tape drive shoe assembly has a slightly smaller base than the DLT/SDLT tape
drives. The Ultrium 230 and the Ultrium 460 may be differentiated by the Ultrium logo at the
rear of the drive.

Note: The LTO-2 media cannot be used in the Ultrium 230 tape drive. The Ultrium
460 will accept both LTO-2 as well as LTO-1 media.

The DLT tape drive load handle extends from the rear of the drive shoe.

As of April 2003, media partitioning is supported only on the HP MSL 5026 and MSL 5052
models with DLT 40/80, SDLT 110/220 and SDLT 160/320.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–7. SLIDE: SCSI Interface

SCSI Interface

• With the recommended SCSI interface, the sustained


native transfer rates per drive are:
– 6MB/s for DLT 40/80 drives
– 11MB/s for SDLT 110/220 drives
– 16MB/s for SDLT 160/320 drives
– 15MB/s for LTO Ultrium 230 drives
– 30MB/s for LTO Ultrium 460 drives
• Twice these rates in a two-drive module.

Student Notes
With the recommended standard Ultra/Wide LVD/SE SCSI HBA interface, the data transfer
rate of the module (shown above) is achievable. Actual rates depend upon the type of drive,
number of drives, and the number of drives connected to the SCSI bus.

The library robotics imposes minimal loading on the bus.

Each drive in the MSL 5000/6000 series library has a maximum sustained rate of twice the
data transfer rate with 2:1 compression on the data.

HP recommends the following (for maximum performance):


ƒ maximum of two drives per bus for the MSL 5000 series libraries
ƒ maximum of one drive per bus for the MSL 6000 series libraries

Each of the tape drives and the library controller constitute an independent SCSI target.
When any two or more devices are connected to the same SCSI bus, each must be assigned a
unique SCSI ID. HBA’s are typically assigned SCSI ID 7 by default.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

The library is equipped with a Low Voltage Differential and Single-Ended (LVD/SE) SCSI
interface. The standard configuration is a SCSI LVD/SE using two VHDCI-series (ultra high
desity) 68-pin, Micro-D SCSI connectors.

The MSL 5000 series is equipped with an Ultra2 SCSI interface


The MSL 6000 series is equipped with an Ultra3 SCSI interface

SCSI LVD differs from SCSI-SE in that it overcomes the distance limits imposed upon the
single-ended standard through an enhanced signaling scheme. This signaling scheme has
made the two signaling mediums incompatible on the same bus. The LVD bus must operate
with only LVD devices connected; otherwise the bus will default to single-ended if any SE
devices are connected (including the use of a SE terminator instead of the normal LVD
terminator.

Note: LVD and HVD (High Voltage Differential) will not operate together on the
same bus. The bus itself won’t function with both types of devices connected.

To connect the library to the host system, the host must have at least one Wide SCSI
controller and the appropriate driver software. The controller must support LVD/SE.

SCSI Evolution

SCSI-1
The maximum data transfer speed for this implementation of SCSI is 2 to 4MB/s (actual
average is around 2.5MB/s), using a limited instruction set. Under SCSI-1, all devices use
different commands.

SCSI-2
SCSI-2 (referred to as plain SCSI) is the second-generation SCSI standard. It consists of the
basic SCSI-1 standard with many additions and some deletions.
Two alternative signaling systems are available when implementing SCSI-2:
ƒ Single-ended interface — This is “regular” SCSI and uses the type of conventional
signaling that is used on other buses.
ƒ Differential interface — The differential SCSI bus minimized the
potentialbottleneck created by bus length limitations experienced with single-ended
SCSI.
These two alternatives are incompatible, resulting in two main groups of SCSI devices and
controllers that cannot be mixed on the same bus. It is possible to use special converter
hardware to transform a single-ended bus into a differential one (and vice versa). Single-
ended implementations are the most common. They are suitable for internal cabling.
Differential interfaces are used externally.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Two SCSI bus widths are defined by the SCSI-2 standard:


Narrow — 8-bit data pathway incorporating a 50-pin connector and cable.
Wide —16-bit data pathway incorporating a 68-pin connector and cable.
Wide can indicate 16-bit or 32-bit buses. The 32-bit variant is rarely used, so Wide normally
means 16-bit.

Two bus speeds are defined in SCSI-2 protocols:


ƒ Regular
ƒ Fast

SCSI-3
SCSI-3 defines new physical-level transports, IEEE 1394 and Fibre Channel, as a means of
transporting SCSI data packets. SCSI-3 defines a new low-voltage differential (LVD) SCSI
specification.
LVD SCSI is a technology that combines the advantages of both its predecessors. LVD uses
differential signaling techniques instead of single-ended, making the bus more stable. It will
support up to 15 devices on one cable and enables the use of external SCSI cabling up to 12m
long.

Bus speeds are defined in the SCSI-3 protocols:


Ultra — Transfer rate of 20MHz (also called Fast-20 or F20). Ultra SCSI buses have a
maximum transfer rate of 20MB/s for Narrow SCSI or 40MB/s for Wide SCSI.
Ultra2 — Transfer rate of 40MHz (also called Fast-40 or F40). Ultra2 SCSI buses use LVD
and has a maximum transfer rate of 40MB/s for Narrow SCSI or 80MB/s for Wide SCSI.
Ultra3 — Ultra160 SCSI is the generation of high-performance SCSI technology that offers
data transfer speeds of up to 160MB/s.
Ultra320 — Ultra320 SCSI is the generation of high-performance SCSI technology that offers
data transfer speeds of up to 320MB/s.

Backup and Restore Basics

Backup Speeds and Feeds


The feed speed is the rate at which data is transferred to a tape drive. Feed speed is
dependent on many factors, which are discussed later in this module. The write speed is the
rate at which a tape drive transfers data to a tape.
The HP engineering team in Houston quantified the performance of the entire backup
solution and its components. Basic speeds and feeds of the solution were tested. In order to
achieve optimal backup performance, a 3:1 feed speed to write speed ratio is necessary for
tape drives. If the feed speed to write speed ratio is less than 2:1, the tape drive performance
may be halved (primarily for linear tape and not for HP LTO due to its Adaptive Tape Speed)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–8. SLIDE: Library Performance

Library Performance

Native performance based on drive type

Student Notes
Native performance of the MSL5000/6000 series library indicated above is based upon:
ƒ the native sustained transfer rate
ƒ the number of drives
Note: the HP Ultrium drives support Adaptive Tape Speed (ATS), also referred to as Matching
Data Rate (MDR). ATS reduces performance degradation due to slower data rates as well as
minimizes drive wear due to frequent repositioning (DLT) as a result of lack of streaming.

Multi-module Configuration
The MSL series libraries support a range of two to eight rack-mounted modules configured
into a multi-module mode. This multi-module configuration provides:
ƒ more capacity by adding additional cartridges (52-240 including mail slots)
ƒ more throughput by adding more drives (2-16)

¾ For example, if the maximum of four MSL 6060 Library modules (each with
four LTO Ultrium 460 drives) are placed in a multi-module configuration, the
native capacity would be up to 48 TB and native backup performance would
be up to 1,728 GB/hour.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Storage hardware/software
Support for specific hardware and software depends upon the library model and
environment.

For the most up-to-date information on:


ƒ Operating systems
ƒ Servers
ƒ SCSI HBAs
ƒ Fibre HBAs
ƒ Firmware and drivers

Go to the HP Enterprise Backup Solution (EBS) compatibility matrix at:


http://www.hp.com/go/connect, select the link for “automated backup” then the
“compatibility and tools” link to locate:
ƒ the EBS compatibility matrix
ƒ the HP StorageWorks backup sizing tool

Types of Connection
The type of connection between the servers and clients to be backed up and the secondary
storage system affects the backup performance. This connection is typically one of the
following:
Directly connected SCSI tape device: Devices connected directly to the server through a
SCSI connection are very fast at backing up that server.
Network connection between client and backup server: The LAN bandwidth affects the
speed at which data can be transmitted between the client devices and the backup server.
Fibre Channel connection between backup server and tape device: Data transmitted
over a Fibre Channel connection to the tape device is very fast, 1Gbs(gigabit) or 2Gbs
(approximately 100MB/s or 200MB/s both support full duplex operation).

Typically, a combination of these connections is found in the backup environment.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–9. SLIDE: Fibre Channel – SCSI Router

Fibre Channel – SCSI Router

NSR N1200/E1200-160,E2400, NSR 2402


NSR 2402
N1200

E1200-160

Student Notes
The MSL 5000/6000 Fibre Channel option kit includes:
ƒ Network Storage Router (NSR N1200 or NSR E1200-160)
ƒ Serial Cable
ƒ Two SCSI cables (.5m VHDCI-VHDCI)
ƒ Documentation

The components of the NSR:


Reset switch (push by using paper clip or other sturdy tool)
Power LED
Green – power has been applied
Yellow – POST is in process, or processor problems are present
Serial RJ-11 connector
Ethernet RJ-45 connector
Fibre Channel activity LED – indicating port activity
Fibre Channel link LED – a valid link exists
FC-LC connector
SCSI VHDCI connector (2) – green LED indicates port activity

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

The NSR E1200/E1200-160 is installed in the PCI slot adjacent to (the left of) the library
controller board. The N1200/E1200 support Ultra2 LVD SCSI interfaces. The N1200 is an
external storage router, while the E1200 is an embedded cPCI card.

Caution! The library controller board must always be housed in the correct option slot
(right most position when facing the rear of the library). Insertion of an option
card into the library controller board slot damages the PCI backplane and
renders the library inoperable.

When installing the NSR into the Opal colored (Compaq brand) MSL 5026, there is a
requirement to install a cooling kit. See the MSL user guide for more details. There is a
section in the WBT as well, look for “Installing the Thermal Upgrade Kit” topic.

The HP StorageWorks NSR m2402


The M2402 network storage router is an external 1U rack-mount Fibre Channel-to-SCSI
router with two Fibre Channel ports and four Ultra-3 160 SCSI ports expandable to eight
ports. The M2402 is a modular solution delivering end-to-end throughput in excess of
300MB/s. The router OS supports HTTP (management), FTP, TELNET and SNMP over the
network interface in addition to the serial port access.

The NSR E2400 solution is designed for embedded use in the HP StorageWorks ESL tape
libraries.

Windows 2000 Device Driver

The NSR E1200-160 uses a null device driver (hp_cpq_router.inf) on Windows 2000.

The system requirements are:


ƒ Windows 2000 Server/Advanced Server with SP2
ƒ Minimum KGPSA-CD driver v4-4.53a7 and 5-4.53a7
ƒ Minimum FCA-2101 driver version 4-4.54a7 and 5-4.54a7
ƒ HP recommends using the latest available drivers
The NSR supports SCC Fibre Channel device maps
ƒ not recommended
ƒ recommendation; set the router to user Port 0 or Port 1 map

The NSR supports indexed maps containing a Fibre Channel controller LUN
ƒ not default
ƒ not necessary for Windows OS as long as there are less than 8 devices attached
ƒ use the Port 0 or Port 1 mapping

When controller LUNs are enabled (SCSI array controller device at FC LUN0) the Windows
2000 Device Manager will discover the controller device and prompt for the installation of a
device driver. The hp_cp_router.inf installs a null device driver and creates a device entry
under System Devices in the Device Manager. A true device driver is not required for the
proper operation of the NSR.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Installation of the null device driver


There are three options that may be used to install the null device driver for the NSR onto
Windows 2000. These options will populate the system registry with the necessary device
information.

Windows 2000 hardware discovery wizard


ƒ When the wizard discover the controller device and prompts for installation of driver,
browse to the location of the hp_cpq_router.inf (formerly cpqnsr_e1200.inf).
(diskette, CD, or temporary directory)
Copy the inf file to the C drive
ƒ Copy the hp_cpq_router.inf file to the C:\WINNT\INF directory and restart the system
ƒ During the startup process, the Hardware Discovery Wizard will scan the INF
directory for installation instructions and automatically install the device driver.
Windows 2000 device manager
ƒ From the device manager, under the Unknown Device category; right-click the NSR
and select properties. Select the driver page, click Update Driver, and browse to the
hp_cpq_router.inf file. The file may be found on the HP StorageWorks network
storage router documentation CD in the \pdfs\cpqnsr directory.

Optimizing Performance on the Network Storage Router


In order to optimize performance, a maximum of one tape drive per SCSI port is always the
best configuration. However, network storage routers will support up to two drives per port
for most tape drives except Ultrium 460.
Limitations of the network storage routers include the type of SCSI interface on the router as
well as the router’s bandwidth. The M2402 supports Ultra3 SCSI , but the e2400, e1200, and
N1200 support Ultra2 SCSI. In addition, the M2402 has a maximum bandwidth of 300MB/s.

Supported and optimal configurations

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–10. SLIDE: Library Operations/Configuration

Library Operations/Configuration

Status (main) screen options


• Technical Support Information
• Mail Slot Access
• Magazine Access
• Move Media
• LCD Contrast Controls
• Menu
• Online
• Status
• Power

Student Notes

Navigating the GUI touch screen


The library status screen is the gateway to the operations of the MSL library. Selecting
options from this screen allow for operational control and access to information about the
library.
Options for the MSL 5000/6000s:

ƒ Technical Support Information (HP in the menu)


ƒ Mail Slot Access (not present if disabled)
o may be password protected or disabled
ƒ allows access to a mail slot to remove or insert tape cartridges
ƒ Magazine Access
o allows access to left or right magazines, or both magazines by opening the
doors for tape cartridge removal or replacement
o may be password protected
ƒ Move media
o allows movement of media within the library from one element to another
o may be used to move cleaning cartridge from a reserved slot to a drive

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

ƒ Menu
o allow for viewing, configuring and operating the library, see appendix for
more details.
ƒ Online
o allows the library to be placed online or offline
o default setting is online after power-up initialization
ƒ Status
o view tape drive types
o physical tape drive status including cleaning status
o cleaning cartridge information
Security Levels
ƒ The MSL5000/MSL6000 Series Library features GUI touch screen security to prevent
unauthorized access to the library operation.
ƒ The GUI touch screen offers four levels of security. Only the first three are supported
in the field. (level1, level2, and Service). the fourth security level is Factory and is
reserved for HP.
Password
Each password is represented by four decimal digits that are stored in NVRAM in a range of
0001 to 9999.

Note: 0000 is used to disable password verification for that level.

Enabling a password at a lower level re-enables disabled higher levels to that value. As a
result, prior to accessing any higher level operation, you are prompted first to enter the new
higher level password. You can also use a higher level password to gain access to a lower
level operation.

For example, use the Service password to access the Move Media option.

Using the Service password to access the Menu option also gives full access (without
validating) to the Service operations. To restore passwords if forgotten, use Set User Defaults
using the MSL5000 Utility and diagnostic (serial) cable.

Note: Any configuration that was previously set will be lost.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–11. SLIDE: Menu Screen

Menu Screen
• Use this screen to view,
configure, and operate the
library.
• Screen has three areas:
– View System Data
– Utilities
– Edit Options
• Each option button in these
areas brings you to other
options that further define
the desired task.
• See the WBT or user guide for
detailed information.
• GUI Simulator
(NeoSimHp_414.exe installed
on classroom systems)

Student Notes

Navigating the GUI touch screen


Selecting the Menu option from the library Status screen allows you to view, configure, and
operate the library. The three distinct menu areas are “View System Data”, “Utilities”, and
“Edit Options.”

View System Data - lets you view the library data.


The options available are:
ƒ Library Options
ƒ SCSI Options
ƒ Network Options
ƒ Library Info
ƒ Cartridge Map

Utilities - lets you maintain, diagnose, and secure the library.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

The options available are:


ƒ Maintenance
ƒ Diagnostics
ƒ Factory
ƒ Security Level

Edit Options - lets you set library, SCSI, and network options.
The options available are:
ƒ Library
ƒ SCSI
ƒ Network
ƒ Passwords

Use the GUI simulator, installed on the student systems to practice navigating the menu
option. Choose Lightening for 2-drive 5U models, Thunder for four-drive 10U models.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–12. SLIDE: Configure Network Access

Configure Network Access

• Specify Network Address


• IP Address
• IP Mask (subnet mask)
• IP Gateway (router)
• DNS Server IP

• Enable Remote Management


• Level 1 web login (alpha-numeric)
• Level 2 web login (alpha-numeric)
• Enable Web Secure Login
• Allow Web Level 2 Access
• Library Name

Student Notes
The MSL supports remote management via the network interface once it is configured from
the GUI touch screen. The default network configuration should be changed to allow for this
remote access. There are two screens to configure, both shown above. First configure the
network identity, and then enable the Level 1 and Level 2 web logins. Each web login
provides access to a portion of the library functionality. Level 1 is primarily for operations,
and Level 2 for administration. Library maintenance is not available from the Remote
Management Interface (RMI, web enabled).

Note: the GUI touch screen defaults to a level 1 password of “1” and level 2
password of “2”. The service password defaults to “5566”. Service level access
is not available from the RMI.

The RMI allows for a different password (login) than the GUI touch screen. Enable an alpha-
numeric string for both level-1 and level-2 as desired.

http://education.hp.com 5-25 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–13. SLIDE: Setting SCSI IDs

Setting SCSI IDs


To set SCSI IDs:
1. Navigate as follows: Status Screen → Menu → SCSI →
<the desired SCSI ID>.
2. Touch the box next to the SCSI ID you wish to change.
– A numeric keypad displays.
3. Touch the desired SCSI ID number on the keypad.
– The number displays in the New section.
4. Touch Save to confirm your change.
5. Touch one of the following buttons:
– OK to confirm the new value.
– Cancel to cancel the change
6. Repeat these step for each SCSI ID.
7. Return to Main menu.

Student Notes
The library is designed with many configuration options, each offering multiple settings to
support a variety of applications and platforms.

The setting of each option is stored in NVRAM in the module. For most applications, many of
the factory defaults will be sufficient. The exceptions are host and network specific settings.

Available options (in order of appearance):

Library Options:
ƒ Reserved slots (used for cleaning cartridges)
ƒ Configuring the master module
ƒ Configuring the slave module
SCSI Options:
ƒ Setting SCSI IDs
ƒ Setting element bases
Network Options:
ƒ Setting IP address (must be altered for site network connectivity)

U1610S B.00 5-26 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Setting SCSI IDs


Each tape drive installed within the library requires a unique SCSI ID. After the library is
physically installed and powered on, the SCSI IDs may be modified. For easier manual
configuration (identification) of the tape library drives within Data Protector, configure each
drive with the corresponding SCSI ID (if possible).

For example set the ID for Drive 0 to be SCSI 0; Drive 1, SCSI 1, etc.

To set the SCSI ID:

1. Navigate the GUI touch screen as follows: Status Screen Æ Menu Æ SCSI (in the Edit
Options area) Æ <the desired SCSI ID>

2. Touch the box next to the SCSI ID that is to be changed; a numeric keypad appears.
3. Select the desired ID number using the keypad.
4. Touch the Save button to confirm the change
5. Touch one of the following: OK, or Cancel.
6. Repeat the steps for each SCSI ID that is to be modified
7. Return to the main menu

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–14. SLIDE: Remote Management Interface

Remote Management Interface

Web Level 1 or
Level 2 login

Student Notes
Shown above is the “Login to the Remote Management Interface” for the HP StorageWorks
MSL. The password must be configured via the GUI touch screen. There are two different
access levels (level 1 or level 2) each with a different password. See the previous page
“Configuring Network Access” for web login details.

To access the Login screen, enter the IP Address of the tape library into a web browser (the
IP name will not work!). For example:

http://156.152.82.114

U1610S B.00 5-28 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–15. SLIDE: Web-based Remote Library Management

Web-based Remote Library Management

Student Notes
After a successful login, the tape library automation management console appears, allowing
for selection and access to the tape library.

By selecting the library unit, the logical inventory is displayed.

Along the top of the web interface are the function buttons that allow for remote
management and monitoring.

http://education.hp.com 5-29 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–16. SLIDE: Configuring the NSR

Configuring the NSR

Default Login:
User name: root
Password: password

Student Notes

Default Ethernet settings for the NSR E1200/E1300-160

HP recommends that all of the factory default values for the Ethernet configuration be
changed to site specific values.

The factory defaults are:

IP address: http://1.1.1.1/
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Gateway address: 0.0.0.0
User name: root
Password: password

These settings may be backed up to a configuration file and restored back to the router in
case the settings need to be recovered. Use the FTP method for this backup to a connected
host.

U1610S B.00 5-30 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Common NSR configuration settings

Configuration settings
To provide connectivity between hosts and devices, the router must establish an address on
each connected Fibre Channel network and SCSI bus.
The following slides identify configuration settings that are commonly modified and are
available in the Visual Manager UI and the Serial/Telnet UI.
• For procedural information on accessing and changing these settings, see the NSR
e1200-160 user guide:
• Chapter 3, Visual Manager User Interface.
• Chapter 4, Serial/Telnet User Interface.

Controller LUN commands


The router supports a set of SCSI-3 commands that can be received as FCP commands over
the Fibre Channel port.
These commands provide support for value added features such as Extended Copy (a value
added option).
When using these commands, they must be sent to the Controller LUN.
• For more information, see the NSR e11200-160 user guide:
– Appendix B, Controller LUN Commands.

SCSI bus configuration


The router can appear on a SCSI bus as a pair of initiators.
• The primary Initiator ID can be set to any valid SCSI address (0-15) and is used for
most traffic.
• The alternate Initiator ID can also be set to any valid SCSI address (0-15) and is for
use with high priority traffic.
Recommendation: Leave as NONE. Not supported on most tape drives (July 2003).
• The Initiator IDs (primary and alternate) should not be set to the same SCSI address
and no other devices on the SCSI bus may use either of these SCSI addresses.

The router can appear as one or more Target ID on a SCSI bus. (Not supported as of July
2003.)
• By default, no Target IDs are set up.

Fibre Channel port


By default, the configuration of the Fibre Channel ports is set to N_Port, forcing the router to
negotiate a fabric only mode.

Note: By default, the Fibre Channel port speed is set to 2 GB/s. Changes to the Fibre
Channel port speed must be manually set, such as for 1 GB/s. If set incorrectly
and the router is plugged into a Loop or Fabric, the unit may receive framing
errors, which can be found in the trace logs, and the fiber link light will be off
because of the incorrect Fibre Channel link speed.

Fibre Channel switched fabric


When connected to a Fibre Channel switch, the router is identified to the switch as
a unique device by the factory programmed World Wide Name (WWN).

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Discovery mode
This feature makes it easy to discover attached SCSI target devices and automatically map
them on the INDEXED MAP for the bus/port in question.
• These devices get automatically mapped to the INDEXED map.
• HP recommendation: To map devices to the host, use Port 0 and 1, depending on the
port in question.

Note: This is a type of “mapping protection” so only known hosts will have access to
the maps.

There are two discovery methods available:


• Manual discovery
• Auto discovery
• Auto Discovery can be set to occur after reboot events (when the router
reboots) or link-up events (for instance, when cables are attached or a hub is
rebooted).
• Auto Discovery can be disabled by setting the router to Manual Discovery.

Host device
A host system using a Fibre Channel Host Bus Adapter (HBA) will typically map devices into
the existing device-mapping scheme used by that operating system. Refer to the HBA manual
for the mapping table.

Logical unit management


Because SAN resources can be shared, it is possible for multiple hosts to have access to the
same devices on the SAN.
To prevent conflicts, the router provides LUN management as a means to restrict device
access to certain hosts. LUN management goes beyond simple LUN masking, to prevent gaps
in the list of LUNs presented to a host.

Buffered tape writes


This option is designed to enhance system performance by returning status on consecutive
write commands prior to the tape device receiving data.
If data does not transfer correctly, the router returns a check condition on a subsequent
command. Commands other than Write are not issued until status is received for any pending
Write, and status is not returned until the device completes the command.
This sequence is appropriate for tasks such as file backup or restore.
Some applications require confirmation of individual blocks being written to the medium,
such as for audit trail tapes or log tapes. In these instances, the Buffer Tape Writes option
must be disabled.

U1610S B.00 5-32 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–17. SLIDE: Fibre Channel Mapping (per host client)

Fibre Channel Mapping (per host client)

Switch WWN
Host WWN’s

Host assignment
Map Edit

Student Notes
The Mapping Menu is used to view and modify the host-to-map information for a Fibre
Channel port. Maps and hosts may be added, edited or deleted.

Fibre-Channel to host mapping provides a form of LUN security, similar to that used by most
SAN connected disk arrays. A map defines the devices accessible through a particular Fibre
Channel port (on the NSR). The Administrator then assigns each host a map for each Fibre
Channel port. Multiple maps may be created for a single Fibre Channel port.

The NSR discovers the WWN of the connected FC switch as well as the WWN of the hosts
connected via the FC switch. Shown above are the default configurations obtained without
specific mappings defined. In the default configuration, all hosts have access to all devices.
This default may not be optimum depending upon the desired level of access to the tape
library controller and drives.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–18. SLIDE: HBA Connectivity (topology)

HBA Connectivity (topology)

• Use separate HBAs


– for each Ultrium 460 tape drive.
– for every two Ultrium 230, SDLT, or DLT tape drives.
• Use separate HBA for disk subsystem.
• For optimum performance, the total PCI bandwidth needs
to be more than double the backup rate.
– Example: More than 200MB/s for a single Ultrium 460 tape
drive.

Student Notes
With high-speed tape devices, consider the following:

The HBA must be able to transfer data at maximum tape speeds. The Ultrium 460 has a native
data rate of 30MB/s, double that if 2:1 compression is achieved.

The HBA burst rate must meet the following:

ƒ Ultra2 SCSI supports 80MB/s – limits Ultrium 460


ƒ Ultra3 SCSI supports 160MB/s – needed for the Ultrium 460

ƒ Ultra4 SCSI supports 320MB/s – currently faster than needed

Use separate HBAs


ƒ for each Ultrium 460 tape drive

ƒ for every two Ultrium 230, SDLT, or DLT tape drives

ƒ for the disk and tape devices

U1610S B.00 5-34 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

For optimum performance, the total PCI bandwidth needs to be more than double the backup
rate. For a single Ultrium 460 tape drive the bandwidth must be more than 200MB/s to be able
to achieve maximum drive backup performance.

For high-speed tape devices connected to “Wintel” systems, HP recommends:

ƒ Multiprocessor or single 1+GHz processor with at least 512MB of system memory


ƒ 64-bit/66MHz PCI and HBAs

o PCI-X (133MHz) is better

o 32-bit/33MHZ may degrade the performance on the high-speed tape drives


ƒ Dedicated IRQs for disk and tape HBAs

ƒ No other applications running during backup, such as:

o Virus scans

o Disk defragmenters

o CPU-intensive screen savers

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–19. SLIDE: Server Consideration

Server Consideration

For high-speed tape drives, HP recommends:


• Multiprocessor or single 1+GHz processor with at least
512MB of system memory
• 64-bit/66MHz PCI and HBAs
– PCI-X (133MHz) even better
– 32-bit/33MHz may degrade high-speed tape drive
performance
• Dedicated IRQs for disk and tape HBAs
• No other applications running during the backup, such as:
– Virus scans
– Defragmenters
– CPU-intensive screen savers

Student Notes
For optimum performance, the total PCI bandwidth needs to be more than double the backup
rate. For a single Ultrium 460 tape drive the bandwidth must be more than 200MB/s to be able
to achieve maximum drive backup performance.

For high-speed tape devices connected to “Wintel” systems, HP recommends:


ƒ Multiprocessor or single 1+GHz processor with at least 512MB of system memory

ƒ 64-bit/66MHz PCI and HBAs

o PCI-X (133MHz) is better

o 32-bit/33MHZ may degrade the performance on the high-speed tape drives

ƒ Dedicated IRQs for disk and tape HBAs

ƒ No other applications running during backup, such as:


o Virus scans, Disk defragmenters, CPU-intensive screen savers

U1610S B.00 5-36 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–20. SLIDE: Logical Device Files

Logical Device Files

To set up the library to operate under EBS:


• Identify the HP platforms supported by EBS.
• Install and verify the supported Fibre Channel HBAs.
• Install HBA drivers.
• Update firmware, if necessary.
• Verify that the host sees the library drives and robotics.
• Test with HP Library and Tape Tools
• (Optional, depends on backup software capabilities) Test
with native backup tools (NTbackup, tar)

Student Notes
Prior to use as an Enterprise Backup Solution (EBS) client or server, a number of preliminary
steps must be completed on the host running Windows operating systems (NT and above).

The EBS platform support matrix is available at: http://www.hp.com/go/connect under the
“Automated Backup” link.

Power Up Sequence
After verifying the configuration of the HBA, NSR and MSL, the power up sequence is very
important for host access to the devices connected to the NSR.
Power up sequence:
FC switch (usually takes several minutes to complete the boot up (5-6 minutes for
B-series switches))
MSL Library (allow boot up to complete, green LED on library front glows steady)
NSR (must be powered after MSL, or reboot and discovery will have to be run)
Hosts (may be already powered on depending upon the operating system)

http://education.hp.com 5-37 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Logical Device files on Windows


Configuration at the operating system level is a critical point that is necessary for the
application to see the devices. In some cases, operating system capabilities must be disabled
to allow the backup application (Data Protector) to access the library system.

Detailed configuration of the logical devices is covered in the next module.

Logical Device files on HP Tru-64


Prior to its use as an EBS client or server (device server) a number of preliminary steps must
be completed on an AlphaServer running Tru64.

The server must be installed for Fibre Channel operation with Tru64 UNIX, patched, and
configured so that it can become part of an overall EBS environment

AlphaServers utilize a robust hardware console known as the System Reference Manual
(SRM). Updates to the SRM firmware are regularly released. Firmware version 5.7 or higher
is required to function with EBS.

Logical Device files on HP-UX


The HP9000 is supported running 11.x as an EBS client or server. There are a few patches
necessary for support of EBS; consult the support matrix for details. Once patched, the FC
devices are automatically detected by the OS and device files are created.

HP-UX includes many tools for managing devices files, the most common are:

ƒ mknod – manually creates device files

ƒ insf – automatically creates device files (runs at system startup, or manually invoked)
ƒ lssf – display properties for specific device files

ƒ lsdev – list the available device drivers in the system

ƒ ioscan – scan and display all system devices and associated device files
HP-UX drivers for tape library controllers:

ƒ sctl – requires the manual (mknod) process for creating device files

ƒ schgr – automatically binds to library controller devices at boot time; supports insf
device file creation

U1610S B.00 5-38 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–21. SLIDE: RSM Enabled for Windows 2000

RSM Enabled for Windows 2000

Disable Library RSM for


Data Protector use!

Student Notes
When tape libraries are to be used with Data Protector; the Windows 2000 Removable
Storage Manager must be disabled for the tape library or Data Protector will not be able to
access the library successfully.

Shown above is the result of having the RSM enabled while trying to use Data Protector to
configure the device. The Data Protector device agent (devbra –devices) cannot properly
access the library drive(s). The device agent will not be able to access the library, and may
hang if the RSM is enabled.

http://education.hp.com 5-39 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–22. SLIDE: Disable RSM for Library on Windows 2000

Disable RSM for Library on Windows 2000

Student Notes
Shown above is the simple procedure for disabling the Windows 2000 RSM for a selected
library. Once disabled, Data Protector will be able to function correctly when accessing the
library. See the next slide for details.

U1610S B.00 5-40 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–23. SLIDE: RSM Disabled for Tape Library

RSM Disabled for Tape Library

Student Notes
Shown above is the result of having the RSM disabled for the library to be configured with
Data Protector (covered in more detail in the next module on logical devices). Proper device
detection by the Data Protector device agent is necessary for successful for all Data
Protector media accesses (backup, restore, initialization, etc.).

http://education.hp.com 5-41 U1610S B.00


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–24. SLIDE: Windows SCSI Device Paths

Windows SCSI Device Paths

Changer0:0:5:0
Tape1:0:6:0C (hw compression)

Student Notes
Once installed onto the host operating system a tape library may be tested to determine if it is
operating correctly. This is a recommended step prior to use with Data Protector. The first
step in testing is to determine the device file associated with the tape library.

Shown above are the Windows Device Manger screens showing the SCSI paths for the library
changer and tape device. Windows uses the device name: Bus: Target: Lun as the path to the
devices. For example, the path to the tape device shown is Tape1:0:6:0C, where C indicates
the use of hardware compression. The changer is identified as Changer0:0:5:0, where 0:5:0 is
the Bus: Target: LUN for the device.

The Data Protector Media Agent provides two programs for tape devices (installed in the
C:\Program_Files\Omniback\bin directory by default:

devbra – (device agent) used for device discovery and configuration

uma – (utility media agent) used for tape library management

U1610S B.00 5-42 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Shown above are the results of navigating the Windows (2000) Device Manager to determine
the device paths for the tape library controller as well as the tape drive(s). Once known these
devices may be tested with the Data Protector Utility Media Agent (UMA) to determine
operational status.

Data Protector procedure for device discovery and testing:

1. scan the system for available devices (shows the Windows device paths)
C:\Program Files\Omniback\bin\devbra –devices

2. locate the device path for the tape library robotics (media changer)

3. invoke the utility media agent to interact with the tape library (load/unload tapes,
status inquiry, etc.)
C:\Program Files\Omniback\bin\uma –ioctl <dev> -barcode

example path as reported by devbra:


C:\Program Files\Omniback\bin\uma –ioctl Changer0:0:5:0 -barcode

4. execute some “UMA” commands to test library operations


a. help list available commands

b. inq SCSI inquiry

c. stat SCSI element status (Transport, Export, Drives, Slots)

d. move <from> <to> move media from element to element (return to original
position when testing is completed; use integer value or element name)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–25. SLIDE: HP 9000 Hardware Addressing

HP 9000 Hardware Addressing

Components of Hardware Path


• Bus Adapter Path
• SCSI Target
• Device Unit (SCSI LU)

– Fibre Channel/SCSI
ext_bus 13 1/2/0/0.8.0.255.7 fcpdev CLAIMED INTERFACE FCP Device Interface
target 17 1/2/0/0.8.0.255.7.11 tgt CLAIMED DEVICE
autoch 1 1/2/0/0.8.0.255.7.11.0 schgr CLAIMED DEVICE HP C7200-8000

– SCSI
ext_bus 2 56/52 scsi1 CLAIMED INTERFACE HP 28655A - SE SCSI ID=7
target 4 56/52.4 target CLAIMED DEVICE
spt 0 56/52.4.0 spt CLAIMED DEVICE HP C5177-7000

Student Notes
Mastery of devices and associated files on UNIX requires a bit more knowledge than for
Windows systems. Administrators must be able to build a kernel with the appropriate drivers
and in some cases even create (manually) the necessary devices files.

The HP-UX operating system typically creates device files at system startup for all known
hardware devices that are powered on prior to the system startup. After the system starts,
some additional (manual) steps will be needed to enable missing devices. HP-UX does not
continually scan for new devices; it is up to the system administrator to perform this task
when it is convenient. It is common for administrators to execute these steps when LUNs are
added to disk arrays, as well as when new devices are connected to the SAN while the system
is running. The needed device files will automatically be created after this procedure as long
as the needed device drivers are already loaded into the kernel.

U1610S B.00 5-44 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Host Connections
The tape library systems typically connect to the Host Bus Adapter of the host system or
systems. The most common interface is SCSI, although Fibre Channel connections are
becoming increasingly common. In some cases, the library system will connect to the host via
Fibre Channel and then to the internal drives and library controller with SCSI. When this is
the case, the library includes a protocol converter interface card (NSR in MSL libraries).

Another possibility is the connection of the SCSI library to a SCSI/Fibre bridge device. In this
case the library is SCSI, but is connected to the host through the bridge device.

HP 9000 Hardware Addressing


The hardware addressing for the SCSI library is essentially the same regardless of whether
the library is connected directly to the host or by way of some protocol conversion device
that is internal or external to the library. The three main components of the hardware path
displayed by ioscan include: the controller (host bus adapter), the SCSI target ID, and the
device unit number, or SCSI LUN.
Knowledge of the hardware used to connect the library system is critical to the
understanding of the device file that is used to control the library operations.

In the case of the SCSI connected device, the controller is simply the system path from the
system bus to the SCSI device, and it will be displayed as a class of device called ext_bus by
the ioscan command.

Example FC address components:

HW Path: 0/4/0/0.9.23.198.0.3.1

Host Bus: 0/4/0/0 (HBA path)


FC switch topology: 9.23.198 (Domain.Area.Port)
SCSI emulation: 0.3.1 (Bus.Target.Lun)

In the case of Fibre Channel, the actual hardware path for the controller can represent
several different parameters including the back-plane slot of the interface card and all of the
Fibre Channel values (varies by switch type). The ioscan command, however, still displays
the ext_bus as the class of the device controller. It does not matter from a local perspective,
if the device is on a public or private loop, connected via switch or switched fabric, ioscan
will still show the hardware path to the library controller and SCSI devices as if they were
“local” devices.

The key to the configuration of the library controller device is the location and identification
of the ext_bus interface that connects to the library device. Once this is known we can easily
locate the SCSI target and LU of the controller that needs to be configured.

The three components will be used to construct the minor number (once converted to hex)
used to create the device file for the library controller.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Sample MSL 5030 connected to a B-series switch and HP 9000 server running HP-UX 11i:
Class I H/W Path Driver S/W State H/W Type Description
=============================================================================
ext_bus 7 0/2/0/0.1.3.255.0 fcpdev CLAIMED INTERFACE FCP Device Interface
target 15 0/2/0/0.1.3.255.0.0 tgt CLAIMED DEVICE
autoch 0 0/2/0/0.1.3.255.0.0.0 schgr CLAIMED DEVICE HP MSL5000 Series
/dev/rac/c7t0d0
tape 1 0/2/0/0.1.3.255.0.0.1 stape CLAIMED DEVICE HP Ultrium 1-SCSI
/dev/rmt/1m /dev/rmt/c7t0d1BEST
/dev/rmt/1mb /dev/rmt/c7t0d1BESTb
/dev/rmt/1mn /dev/rmt/c7t0d1BESTn
/dev/rmt/1mnb /dev/rmt/c7t0d1BESTnb
tape 2 0/2/0/0.1.3.255.0.0.2 stape CLAIMED DEVICE HP Ultrium 1-SCSI
/dev/rmt/2m /dev/rmt/c7t0d2BEST
/dev/rmt/2mb /dev/rmt/c7t0d2BESTb
/dev/rmt/2mn /dev/rmt/c7t0d2BESTn
/dev/rmt/2mnb /dev/rmt/c7t0d2BESTnb
ctl 5 0/2/0/0.1.3.255.0.0.3 sctl CLAIMED DEVICE COMPAQ SWMODULAR ROUTER
/dev/rscsi/c7t0d3
Notice: The device instance for the ext_bus class device is 7 (I column), the target device is 0
(last digit of the HW path for the target class device) and the Lun number is 0 (last digit of the
HW path for the autoch class device) producing a device file: /dev/rac/c7t0d0 for the
autochanger device (library controller/robotic). The ext_bus path includes the hardware path
of the HBA as well as the Domain.Area.Port (1.3.255) of the FC device.

The example above shows the LUN mode for the Network Storage Router, where Lun 0 is the
tape contoller, Lun 1 is the first drive and Lun 2 is the second drive. This Lun addressing
mode is used when the NSR is enabled for Active Fabric mode to support the use of the X-
copy serverless backup mode.

HP-UX device discovery


ioscan –fn (use with caution; may have side effects while applications such as
backup are running)
insf new (missing devices) should be created
(use –e for existing devices for which device files are missing)

The Device File (manual creation)


The components of the device file include the mode, major number and minor number as
well as the device name. The mode used for the library device is character, the other choice
of mode is block mode, and this is used for disk type devices. The major number is the
numeric value associated with the device driver. The minor number is the hardware path
converted to hexadecimal.

In order to create a device file for use in controlling the tape library, you will need to gather
all three components. These may be collected by using the ioscan and lsdev commands.
Most HP-UX systems prior to HP-UX 11.11 (11i) do not have the schgr driver configured by
default; it is available and supported but not as widely used as the sctl driver.

The HP-UX command kmsystem may be used to check if the drivers are available on the
system. This command will also display the configured state for the driver. If the drivers are
configured into the system, the lsdev command will display them along with their character
major number. The typical output for lsdev shows the major number 203 for the sctl driver,
231 for schgr.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Converting a hardware path to a (hex) minor number (output from ioscan –f):
Fibre Channel/SCSI (private loop or point to point, domain id=8)
ext_bus 13 1/2/0/0.8.0.255.7 fcpdev CLAIMED INTERFACE
FCP Device Interface
target 17 1/2/0/0.8.0.255.7.11 tgt CLAIMED DEVICE
autoch 1 1/2/0/0.8.0.255.7.11.0 schgr CLAIMED DEVICE
HP C7200-8000

0xnntd00 Æ c#t#d# (c13t11d0)

SCSI
ext_bus 2 56/52 scsi1 CLAIMED INTERFACE HP 28655A
- SE SCSI ID=7
target 4 56/52.4 target CLAIMED DEVICE
spt 0 56/52.4.0 spt CLAIMED DEVICE HP
C5177-7000

0xnntd00 Æ c#t#d# (c2t4d0)

Example creating a device file using mknod with output from ioscan –fn and the sctl driver:
Class I H/W Path Driver S/W State H/W Type Description
=======================================================================
ext_bus 1 8/4 c720 CLAIMED INTERFACE GSC add-on Fast/Wide
SCSI Interface
target 3 8/4.0 tgt CLAIMED DEVICE
unknown -1 8/4.0.0 UNCLAIMED UNKNOWN HP C7200-8000
target 4 8/4.1 tgt CLAIMED DEVICE
tape 1 8/4.1.0 stape CLAIMED DEVICE QUANTUM DLT8000
/dev/rmt/1m /dev/rmt/c1t1d0BEST
/dev/rmt/1mb /dev/rmt/c1t1d0BESTb
/dev/rmt/1mn /dev/rmt/c1t1d0BESTn
/dev/rmt/1mnb /dev/rmt/c1t1d0BESTnb

mknod /dev/lib_cntl c 203 0x010000


8 bit major number
24 bit minor number
8 bit controller, 4 bits SCSI Target, 4 bits LU
8 bit device options, set to 0

The Data Protector Media Agent provides two utilities that may be used for device testing
prior to configuration as a Logical Device. The utilities are located in the /opt/omni/lbin
directory as devbra and uma. Once the devices are known, they may be tested with the Data
Protector Utility Media Agent (UMA) to determine operational status.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Data Protector procedure for device discovery and testing:

1. scan the system for available devices


/opt/omni/lbin/devbra –devices

2. locate the device path for the tape library robotics (media changer)

3. invoke the utility media agent to interact with the tape library (load/unload tapes,
status inquiry, etc.)
/opt/omni/lbin/uma –ioctl <dev> -barcode

example path as reported by devbra:


/opt/omni/lbin/uma –ioctl /dev/rac/c0t7d0 -barcode

4. execute some “UMA” commands to test library operations


e. help list available commands

f. inq SCSI inquiry

g. stat SCSI element status (Transport, Export, Drives, Slots)

h. move <from> <to> move media from element to element (return to original
position when testing is completed; use integer value or element name)

5. HP-UX additionally offers the “mc” utility which operates similarly to the Data
Protector “uma”.

Example:
/usr/sbin/mc –p /dev/rac/c0t7d0 –q (SCSI inquiry)

/usr/sbin/mc –p /dev/rac/c0t7d0 –r DIMS

(SCSI report element status, Drive, Import/Export, Media transport, Storage slots)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–26. SLIDE: Verify Library Robotic Control Using L&TT

Verify Library Robotic Control Using L&TT

L&TT test tool


• Provides the ability to verify robotic operation outside of the
backup application
– Verify that the library is installed and connected correctly
– Quickly identify, diagnose, and troubleshoot library, drive, and
media problems
– Check the library health
• Library test tool provides
– Device Analysis

– Library Exercise
– Firmware Management

For the latest version and information, go to


www.hp.com/support/tapetools

Student Notes
In addition to the utilities provided by Data Protector, HP offers the Library and Tape Tools
for tape library and drive management. Library and Tape Tools is available for no charge
from the HP web site shown above. As of the printing of this manual, L&TT version 3.3 is
available.

HP StorageWorks Library and Tape Tools


HP StorageWorks Library and Tape Tools (L&TT) is a collection of storage
hardware management and diagnostic tools for tape, tape automation, and archival
products. L&TT assembles these tools into a single, convenient program.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Software Features
L&TT offers the following features:
• Installation Check — L&TT guides you through a basic installation check of your
product. The software assists the user in choosing an appropriate HBA and SCSI ID(s),
ensuring that the device is detected by the system, and verifying key device functionality.
The installation check feature is essentially HTML documentation that helps with the
most common generic installation issues while also describing how to use L&TT to verify
the device installation.

• Device Identification — L&TT clearly identifies the storage products connected to the
system, along with key information on product configuration and status.

• Troubleshooting Tests — L&TT provides various tests to verify product functionality


or to isolate product issues. Tests include device self-tests, read/write tests on drives,
exerciser tests for autoloaders and libraries, and specific device utilities.

• Firmware Upgrades — L&TT provides a convenient way of updating product firmware,


enabling users with an Internet connection to take advantage of ongoing enhancements.
The software can be configured to check the Web automatically for firmware updates for
connected devices, or users can manually check the Web for updates if the automatic
update feature is not desired. If updated firmware is available, the program notifies the
user, and the updates can easily be copied to the system. With libraries, users can
upgrade the library and the embedded drive firmware in the same operation. Wherever
possible, the embedded drives are updated in parallel to reduce time.

• Support Ticket Generation — If you experience a problem with a storage product,


L&TT can generate a support ticket that includes essential information for
troubleshooting the problem. As an alternative to phone support, you can e-mail the
support ticket to a support center for assistance. This information streamlines the
support process and enables the support staff to better serve you if a support call is made
later. When a support ticket for a device is generated, L&TT performs a Device Analysis
test on the device. The support ticket contains generic information about a device, as well
as the results of the Device Analysis test. The Device Analysis test can be performed by
itself, but HP recommends generating a support ticket because the resulting data is
presented in a more useful format.

• Automatic Notification of Web Updates—If a connection to the Internet is present


and web updates are enabled in the tool preferences, L&TT automatically informs you of
the following updates, if available, each time the program is started:

− New versions of L&TT


− New firmware files for connected devices
− New device-specific functionality (such as new or updated tests) for connected
devices

U1610S B.00 5-50 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–27. SLIDE: L&TT Connectivity Verification

L&TT Connectivity Verification

Student Notes

Supported Products and Operating Systems


For a complete listing of compatible products, refer to the L&TT Compatibility Matrix found
at http://www.hp.com/support/lttcompatibility. The level of functionality that L&TT offers for
each device varies depending on features of the device, and the degree of device integration
into L&TT. The Windows version of L&TT uses a graphical user interface (GUI), whereas the
NetWare, HP-UX, and Tru64 versions of the program use a command screen interface (CSI).

Shown above is the Windows GUI, illustrating the devices connected to the host. From the
Test area of the GUI, the device to host access may be tested. The host to tape buffer is used
to verify physical connectivity and device availability. Note; no data is written to the tape.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

Note: the L&TT indicates whether the OBDR capable firmware is loaded onto a device;
shown above the DDS drive does not currently have the OBDR firmware loaded. This would
be necessary to support Data Protector Disaster Recovery (OBDR) functionality.

Application Window Layout


The three sections of the L&TT main screen are:
1. Taskbar—This section contains buttons that provide quick access to the main
functions of L&TT and to the online help system.
2. Device List—This is a multi-function window that offers several options on the
following tabs:
ƒ Scan—This option provides either a summary status or detailed information
(depending on whether Show Details or Hide Details is selected) about the bus
scanning process. If a problem is encountered during the scan, this information may
help in determining the cause. When the scan completes successfully, the device list
automatically switches to the By Product tab. The Scan tab also lets you rescan the
bus. If any devices have been hot-swapped or powered on after the OS has booted, in
most cases, the scan feature can discover those devices without requiring a reboot of
the system.

ƒ By Product—This option shows a list of all the products connected to the system.
The list is grouped into the following four categories:
o Libraries and autoloaders
o Drives
o Enclosures and processors
o Other devices
The three number fields listed after the device represent the device address. Each
field in the address is separated by a period: the first field represents the HBA
channel, the second field represents the SCSI ID, and the third field represents the
LUN.

ƒ By Connection—This option shows all products connected to the system, grouped


by the HBA they are connected to. This view makes it easy to see which devices are
connected to the same bus as the device in question, and may help in understanding
system I/O performance issues.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

ƒ Instructions—This window contains brief instructions on how to use the selected


screen. This view can be disabled in the software preferences.

3. Device Information screen—All the main functions of the program are displayed in
this window. The content of this window depends on the device and tool function
selected.

Using the Device Information Screen


When you select a product from the Device List, the Device Information screen displays
information relevant to the device. The Device List also changes to display instructions on
this page (if the instructions preference is enabled). If another tool function is currently
active, then clicking the Identity button on the toolbar opens the Device Information
screen. The Device Information screen provides an overview of the selected hardware
device and its current configuration and status.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–28. SLIDE: Device Analysis Test

Device Analysis Test

Student Notes
Selecting Device Analysis in the Test Group analyzes data in the internal logs on the device
and finds problems if they exist. Advice is given on how to solve the problems.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–29. SLIDE: Library Exercise Test

Library Exercise Test

When test is
in progress,
time
remaining will
display here.

Student Notes
Selecting Library Exercise in the Test Group will perform robotic exercise as well as drive
load and unload exercises. This requires a “scratch” medium to load and unload. Library and
Tape Tools will prompt for a tape to be loaded into the mail-slot for this exercise.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 5
Tape Library Configuration and Implementation

5–30. LAB: MSL Library

Consult with your instructor about availability of the MSL simulator (GUI touch-screen)
and/or remote access to a Network Storage Router and Remote Management Interface for the
MSL library. Due to the nature of this course, students are not expected to configure the tape
library nor the NSR; access may be provided to allow for demonstration purposes. Later in
this course the MSL libraries will be configured as Logical Devices for use with Data
Protector.

Additionally, the MSL Web Based Training may be available on the classroom training
systems or may be accessed via the HP IT Resource Center (http://itrc.hp.com).

U1610S B.00 5-56 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6 — Media Management
Objectives
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:
• Describe the concepts of Media Management in Data Protector.

• Provide protection for backups through media management.

• Plan tape rotations to facilitate off-site media storage.

• Perform automatic and manual media operations

• Implement vaulting using multiple media pools.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–1. SLIDE: Media Management

Media Management

Library Features
• Logical organization of media
• Online catalog
• Location tracking

Protection Features
• Media labeling
• Media duplication
• Media condition monitoring

Student Notes
Today, modern backup utilities must offer more than just a mechanism for backing up
computers data. As the term storage management implies, the management of the data
once it has been backed up is just as important as the act of backing up the data. Data
Protector has powerful features to organize and protect your backups.

Library Features
Logical Organization of Media
Data Protector organizes your media into Media Pools; a Media Pool is simply a logical
collection in which media that belong together are kept.
Online Catalog
Data Protector maintains a record of all the data that been backed up and what media was
used to perform the backup. When it is necessary to restore data, the on-line catalog can be
browsed to locate the file to be restored and to find the candidate backups that could be
used. This catalog is part of the Data Protector Internal Database, more details are in the
Database module.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

Location Tracking
Once a backup has been performed, the media usually is moved physically from one location
to another, for example to offsite storage or a fire-safe.

Data Protector can keep track of the physical location of the media by use of predefined
Vaulting Locations.

In addition to tracking external changes to the media locations, Data Protector stores the
current physical location of media. When a tape is inserted into a Logical Device, and then
accessed by Data Protector, the device repository is stored in the database. This media
tracking provides for quick access to known tapes. This device repository feature is available
for tape library as well as standalone devices.

Protection Features
Media Labeling
When backups or restores are performed, we need to be able to verify that the correct
medium has been selected for the desired action. Without this capability, it would be possible
to restore from the wrong media or erase a media that we want to keep.
Data Protector media contains header information that enables the use of the media to be
tracked and controlled.

Media Duplication
For extra security, it may be necessary to have multiple copies of a particular backup. For
example, if the data were being changed in some way, or removed after the backup has taken
place, the only place that the original data would reside is on the backup media.
In this situation, it is desirable to have multiple copies of the backup available in case there is
a fault with the original copy or it is somehow lost.

There are three methods of creating a second copy of a backup media.

The backup could be performed twice. One disadvantage of this is that the data would be
unavailable to the users for twice the length of time required for a single backup.
Additionally, there is a possibility that some data may change from one backup to another,
thereby not creating exact copies of the original backup.

Data Protector provides a mechanism for copying media. This has the advantage of being
able to be performed while the data is back online following the original backup. Copied
media is also tracked in the Media Management Database.

Data Protector (5.1) provides automated media operations. This has the ability to either
schedule automated media copy or execute automatic media copy after a backup job is
completed. This method combines the flexibility of the manual copy plus the automation
associated with lights out operations.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

Media Condition Monitoring


The key to performing successful backups is to use good quality media. Data Protector
assists with this by tracking the condition of the media, based on three criteria:
• The number of times the media has been used
• The age of media
• I/O errors that have occurred while accessing the media

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–2. SLIDE: The Media Pool

The Media Pool

Purpose
Purpose
•• Logical
Logical grouping
grouping of
of media
media
Database
Backups
•• Media
Media usage
usage policies
policies
•• Device
Deviceproperty
property(default)
(default) Full Daily
Incremental
Backups
•• Assigned
Assigned to
todevice
device by
bybackup
backup Backups

DB Month End
Archive Backups
Logs Backups

Student Notes
Logical Organization
Data Protector organizes media into Media Pools. A Media Pool is simply a logical collection
in which media that belong together are organized into a single structure within the internal
media management database.

The only restriction is that all the media in the same media pool must be of the same physical
type, for example, DDS or DLT.

Media Pools should be used to organize media in a logical fashion; for example, they should
contain only media that is related in some way and has the same usage policy.

The general rule is: "create a media pool with a purpose."

Here are some examples of possible media pool organization:


• Weekly Full Backups (Uses 4 tapes weekly, kept 8 weeks)
• Daily Incremental Backups (Uses 1 tape daily, kept 4 weeks)
• Daily Database Backups (Uses 1 tape daily, kept 6 weeks)
• Local Vault (for tapes that are in the fire safe storage location)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

As you can see from these examples, each backup, while similar, is slightly different, either in
the number of tapes required to complete the backup, or the cycle in which the media will be
used.

It is also possible to have all these backups share the same single media pool. This approach
has certain disadvantages. The quantity of media in the pool may be too large, and managing
the pool may be difficult. It would be difficult to verify that you have sufficient media in the
pool to complete all the backups that utilize it (as each backup has a different requirement).

Media Pool Examples


The use of pools depends entirely on your preferences. For example, pools can be defined
using criteria such as:
• System platform (one pool for UNIX systems, and another one for Windows NT systems)
• Per system (every system has its own pool)
• Organizational structure (all systems in department_A have a pool, and systems in
department_B have another pool)
• Systems categories (running large databases, or business critical applications)
• Backup type (all full backups use one pool, and all incremental backups use another
pool)
• Disaster Recovery pool (must be non-appendable for some DR types)
• Database pool (used exclusively for backup of the Data Protector Internal Database)
• Create a “bad tape pool” for moving tapes into if they become poor in quality. The pool
would be read-only, and the tapes would be exported when a backup has been written to
a good tape in the original media pool to replace the bad one.
• Combinations of the above criteria, and more.

TIP A simplified way to think about media pools: View them as a destination for
your backup, while you look at the devices as a transfer mechanism between
the data and the media pools.

Grouping media used for a similar kind of backup into a Media Pool allows you to apply
common media handling policies on a group level. In this case, you will not have to bother
with each medium individually. All media in a pool are tracked as one set and have the same
media allocation and usage policies.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–3. SLIDE: Creating Media Pools

Creating Media Pools

Using the
command line

omnimm –create_pool <name> <type> <policy> <age> <overwrites> <options> …

Student Notes
The Data Protector administrator can create a media pool via the GUI or by using the
omnimm command. Data Protector provides a set of default media pools, one for each media
type.

Configuration via the GUI is the easier method of creating a new pool, however, the
command line offers several possibilities for automation.

TIP For more information on these commands, refer to the online man pages.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

Example: Create a new media pool using the omnimm command and verify
its attributes:

omnimm -create_pool New_dds DDS App+Loose 36 100 –free_pool –move_free_media


Pool New_dds successfully created.

omnimm -show_pool New_dds -detail

Pool name : New_dds

Pool Description :
Media type : DDS
Policy : App+Loose
Blocks used[MB] : 0
Blocks total [MB] : 0
Altogether media : 0
Poor media : 0
Fair media : 0
Medium age limit : 36 months
Maximum overwrites : 100
Magazine support : No
Free pool support : Uses free pool + Move free media to free pool

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–4. SLIDE: Media Pool Properties

Media Pool Properties

1 Works only Loose policy


with library allows more
devices allocation
options
2

Automatic
32-character name allocation
64-character
description automatic
de-allocation

Age and
overwrites

Student Notes
The Media Pool properties may be set when a media pool is created or modified at a later
time. The name for the pool may contain up to 32 characters, spaces are allowed but not
suggested (complicates scripting, etc).

The description field (64 characters maximum) is optional, and may be used to convey a
purpose or usage characteristics for the pool.

The media type is selected when the pool is created and is not modifiable. To change the
media type of a pool you must first delete the pool and then re-create it.

The Allocation Policy as well as the Usage Policies may be altered for new or existing pools.

The life expectancy and number of overwrites should be set according the media
manufacturer's recommendations. Data Protector simply provides a default value based upon
the media type.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–5. SLIDE: Media Pool Characteristics

Media Pool Characteristics

Properties
Properties Loose
Loose
•• Media
Media allocation
allocationpolicy
policy or
or
Strict
Strict
•• Media usage policy
Media usage policy
•• Media
Mediacondition
conditionfactors
factors
•• Free
Free Pool
Pooluse
use Appendable
Appendable
•• Magazine
Magazine support
support
or
or
Non-appendable
Non-appendable

Age
Age
and
and
Overwrites
Overwrites

Student Notes
In addition to being a logical container for your media, a Media Pool is configured so that the
media within the pool exhibit particular characteristics. These characteristics depend on the
properties and policies that you have set for the Media Pool.

Properties

Name and Description


Media Pool names can consist of up to 32 characters. Use a name that represents the usage of
the pool. For example :
WEEKLY_FULL
ARCHIVE_LOGS

TIP While it is acceptable to use spaces in the name, the recommendation is not to
do so. Use the underscore instead. While using the command line for Data
Protector, you will need to use double quotes around any names that contain
spaces. Notice that the default pools use spaces.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

The description field can be used to give a more detailed explanation of the usage of the pool.
Limit the description to 64 characters.

Media Type
This defines what type of media the pool contains. Remember that a pool can contain only
one type of media. The currently supported media types are:
• DDS
• DLT
• LTO-Ultrium
• SuperDLT
• DTF
• ExaByte
• AIT
• QIC
• T3480/T4890/T9490
• T9840
• T3590
• T9940
• SD-3
• Tape
• Optical
• File

Media Usage Policy

Appendable

This enables Data Protector to append multiple backups to the same piece of media. This can
be very useful when backing up small amounts of data throughout the day, for example
Database Redo Logs.

When using this policy, Data Protector will always request a media that has the most data on
it but is not full (See Media Allocation Policy).

When a backup is performed, it is directed to a specific media pool, via the Logical Device
definition. Data Protector will choose the particular media to be used from the pool, based on
certain factors. If the media pool allocation policy is appendable, the media that is the most
full, but still has spare capacity is used. Ideally, Data Protector wants to fill up existing media
before going on to use empty media. This policy will save generally be less expensive in
terms of media cost, but will not allow for easy tape rotations. Data Protector will continue to
request the medium until it is filled.

Non-Appendable
This specifies that Data Protector will write to a media from the beginning. Data Protector
will request a media that has been used the least amount of times (See Media Allocation
Policy).

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

If the media pool is non-appendable, Data Protector chooses a tape that has been used the
least number of times. In this way, Data Protector ensures even wear across all media, rather
than the same tape being used each time. This may make media more reliable due to less
wear as a result of fewer loadings.

The choice of which tape to use is based on the allocation number associated with the
medium. The allocation number is viewable from the Media Management GUI; select the
Device & Media context, right click on a media pool, select properties, then the allocation
tab.

Appendable Incremental Only


This is the same as appendable except that only incremental backups can be appended to
existing backups. For example, you could perform a full backup to a new media and append
only an incremental backup to it but not another full backup.

Media Condition Factors

Valid For # Months


When media is first initialized for Data Protector usage, the length of time that the media is
considered “good quality” is set. The maximum age of the media is expressed in the number
of months. When the media reaches this age, it is marked in the Media Pool as Poor and will
not be used again for further backups. Tapes reaching 80% of the number of months are
marked as Fair.

CAUTION Media that are marked as Poor should not be reinitialized and registered as a
new medium unless the poor condition was as a result of a tape drive failure,
and the tape is new.

NOTE Media that are marked as Poor may be the result of a failure to write due to a
hardware (drive) failure. In this case the tape quality may be verified by
scanning and/or verifying the tape. (omnimver)

Maximum # of Overwrites
In addition to the number of months that a media is to be considered valid, the number of
overwrites can also be configured. Again, when this threshold is reached the media is marked
Poor. Tapes reaching 80% of this threshold are marked as Fair.

NOTE Both the age and overwrite thresholds may be altered via the MMFairLimit
parameter in the <OMNICONFIG>/options/global file. Eighty percent is
the default for the use of fair quality marking.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

Media Allocation Policy

Loose or Strict
The loose policy defines that even while Data Protector will request a particular medium, it
still accepts an alternative that is available for use.

The strict policy determines that the medium Data Protector requests must be used.
Allocation order is “strictly enforced.”

The most commonly used setting is loose because it is more forgiving. (Loose is also
required when you want the ability to use a new, unformatted medium).

NOTE For more details on the allocation policies, see the next slide.

Allocate Unformatted Media First


Before Data Protector can write a backup to a tape, it must be formatted. Media can be pre-
formatted or Data Protector can initialize it on demand at backup time. This feature is
designed to work with tape libraries, and has no applicability to standalone devices.

The setting of this flag tells Data Protector to initialize and use blank media that may be
loaded in preference to media that is already initialized. If the device being used is a library, it
must be scanned (barcode) prior to using this feature, or Data Protector will not know where
the uninitialized media are located.

Magazine Support
Certain SCSI II Library devices, such as small auto-changers are equipped to manage media
loaded in magazines. Individual media is never removed from a magazine; rather, the whole
magazine is replaced. In addition, the order of the tapes in the magazines should not be
changed. In effect, Data Protector treats the magazine as one large piece of media.

Magazine Pools are very useful when backups consistently require multiple tapes. The
handling of these tapes as one unit eases the process of media loading, unloading and
storage, but may be more expensive if the magazine is not filled before getting removed from
the device.

Data Protector can use media within small auto-changers with a standard media pool, or the
media pool can be configured specifically for magazine support.

When magazine support is enabled for a media pool, the media pool view can be changed so
that magazine’s are shown rather than individual media. When using this view, the following
commands operate on the entire magazine:
• format magazine
• modify
• verify
• move
• recycle
• ungroup media

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Media Management

• import magazine
• export

When a magazine is formatted, Data Protector assigns a name to the whole group of media
and gives every single media in the magazine the same name, suffixed with a sequential
number.
Whenever Data Protector scans a magazine, it reads the label of the first tape to identify the
magazine. It assumes the magazine is completely loaded and does not scan the remaining
slots. Therefore, you should never change the order of the tapes in the magazine or remove
individual media.

Group and Ungroup Media


group media allows you to group together media that has already been formatted as
normal non-magazine-use media, into a group that is suitable for a magazine. The ungroup
media is the reverse, in that it breaks down a magazine grouping so that the media can be
used separately.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–6. SLIDE: Loose or Strict Allocation?

Loose or Strict Allocation?

Loose Strict
•• Even
Evenmedia
mediausage
usage •• Even
Evenmedia
mediausage
usage
•• Auto-initialization
Auto-initialization(optional)
(optional) •• Manual
Manualinitialization
initialization
•• Allocation
Allocation order notenforced
order not enforced •• Allocation
Allocationorder
orderenforced
enforced
•• Works
Works best with smalldevices
best with small devices •• Works
Works best with librarydevices
best with library devices
–– standalone
standalonedrives
drives •• More mount requests
More mount requests with with
–– small autochangers
small autochangers small
smalldevices
devices
•• Fewer
Fewermount
mountrequests
requests •• Override
Overrideduring
duringbackup
backup
•• Auto-allocation/de-allocation
Auto-allocation/de-allocation •• Auto-allocation/de-allocation
Auto-allocation/de-allocation

Student Notes
One of the most important decisions for creating Media Pools is to choose whether you
would like to use loose or strict media allocation. The following will summarize each policy.

Loose Allocation
The loose allocation policy usually works best with standalone devices and small
autochangers. With these smaller devices, it is common to want the ability to use any
unprotected tape to perform a backup (provided that the tape belongs to the pool assigned to
the needed device, or is new). Data Protector will try to use media that exists according to
the allocation order, but this will not be enforced. The operator will be presented with mount
requests for any tape "unprotected or new" if Data Protector finds an invalid tape in the drive.

Blank Media
Data Protector may “format on the fly”, or auto-initialize (format) when it finds blank
medium in either a standalone or a library device. Data Protector may auto-format the
medium when the backup starts. It will give the media a default name and put it in the media
pool associated with the Logical Device used for the backup. The media policy must be set to

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loose to take advantage of this feature. Additionally, a global option, InitOnLoosePolicy must
have the appropriate value to allow for automatic initialization. See the note below.

Note: The auto-initialize feature may be controlled by modifying the global option
InitOnLoosePolicy. The default value of this parameter varies with the
product version. The default value at version 5.1 is 0, which is disabled. To
enable, set the parameter to 1.

With automatic formatting, you will not have initial control over the labels (called description
in the GUI) for the media prior to the backup. After the backup completes, however, you will
be able to modify the media label (description) in addition to producing reports on the media
used for a particular backup session.

Strict Allocation
The strict allocation policy usually works best with library devices. With these larger devices,
it is desirable to have an even usage of media within the library. In the case of the strict
policy, the even usage would be "strictly enforced" by Data Protector. In order for Data
Protector to assign an allocation number to each tape, they must all be manually formatted
prior to the start of a backup session. The order of the initialization (formatting) will
determine the initial allocation sequence.

If a mount request is given to the operator for a tape from a strict allocation media pool, Data
Protector will request a specific medium. At that time only the requested medium will be
acceptable to complete the backup.

The use of strict allocation for standalone devices will require proactive media management,
to be sure that you always have the correct tape in the drive prior to backups starting. The
combination of strict and standalone devices (or small autoloaders) is not usually the best
combination for a lights out operation.

To verify the media allocation order, open the GUI and select a particular media pool in the
“Device and Media” context. In the results area you will see “Order” as one of the column
headings, this is the current Allocation Order for the tape. The tape order has the potential to
change with each backup as a result of tape usage.

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Module 6
Media Management

6-7. Text Page: Media Allocation and Usage


In many cases, Data Protector Administrators are confused when receiving when mount
requests are issued during backup when plenty of media is apparently available. If receiving
unexpected mount requests, or if it is confusing as to the order in which Data Protector is
using tapes in the tape library or media pools, the following information should be helpful.

Data Protector Media Allocation Order

The sequence of media allocation is in the order of the following Data Protector media sets:

• Pre-allocated Media
• Appendable Media
• Uninitialized Media
• Free Media
• Overflow Media

Each of these media sets has its own definition and rules about the sequence of media. These
are explained below:

Preallocated Media
Media named in the datalist device options pre-allocation list. Pre-allocated media in 'Poor'
condition will not be used. The pool policy can be Strict or Loose. This media set is not
sorted.
Order of use:
as specified in the datalist, provided that this won't break any other rules such as those
relating to protection and appendable media.

Appendable Media
Media in 'Good' condition, with some currently protected data objects, but the media is not
full. The pool must be 'appendable'. This media set is sorted according to the time of the last
write. The most recently written medium is listed first.
Order of use:
when one or more media have protected objects, the most recently written media is reused
first.

Uninitialized Media
Uninitialized Media is media without a recognizable header; Data Protector assumes that it
can be auto-initialized as required, during backups. The pool policy must be Loose to allow
auto-initialization and the global file needs InitOnLoosePolicy=1. This media set is only
available in exchanger devices. This media set is sorted with 'Blank' media ahead of media
with an 'Unknown' header.
Order of use:
a. 'Blank' media is used first.
b. 'Unknown' media is only used when there is no 'Blank' media.

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Free Media
Free Media is that which is in 'Good' condition with no currently protected objects contained
on it. This media set is sorted according to the time of the last write. The least recently
written medium is listed first.
Order of use:
• least recently medium is used first.

Overflow Media
Overflow Media is that which is in 'Fair' condition with no currently protected objects. This
media will only be used if no 'Good' condition media are available. This media set is sorted
according to the total number of overwrites. The medium with the least number of overwrites
is listed first.
Order of use:
• least recently medium is used first.

Unclassified Media

Media in the following categories are not classified into any of the sets by Data Protector. As
a result, they are not allocated for use by Data Protector.
• Media in 'Fair' condition which is protected.
• Media in 'Poor' condition.
• Media which is recognized by Data Protector as having a header for another backup
utility such as 'tar' or 'fbackup'.

Other Factors Relating to Media Usage

Strict Policy

The Strict allocation policy is not directly related to the use of a preallocation list. A
preallocation list can be used by both the Loose or Strict policy. The order of media use is
generally the same for Loose and Strict policy. The difference is in Data Protector's response
when the medium in the device is not the one dictated by the allocation rules. Strict policy
means that Data Protector will not use any other medium than the one its own rules indicate
should be used. If the policy is Loose, any unprotected medium can be used, if found in the
device.

Protected and Unprotected Data

The order that media are selected for use depends in part on whether or not the data on the
media is protected. In general, if the data is protected, a medium will be used for appending
more data. If the data is not protected, it will not be used for appending, and will not be
overwritten until no other medium is available.

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Example 1:

A pool is configured as 'Appendable' and 'Loose'. Five newly initialized media are loaded into
an autoloader.

If several backups are made, with protection on the data, they will all be appended to the first
media.

Then several more backups are made, now with NO protection on the data. The unprotected
backups will also be appended to the first medium and they will not overwrite each other.

Once a medium, in an appendable pool, has a protected object on it, it is considered


'appendable.' Data Protector will now append protected and unprotected data to the tape.
However, if the first data object is unprotected, the behavior changes.

Example 2:

Again, five newly initialized media are loaded into an autoloader. If a backup is made with no
protection, it will be written to the first medium. A second unprotected backup will be
written to the second medium. Each subsequent unprotected backup will be written to a new
medium, until all five media are used. The sixth unprotected backup will overwrite the first
medium, which is now the least recently used medium.

Because the data on each medium is unprotected, the media are not considered appendable,
even if the pool configuration is 'Appendable.'

Example 3:

Again, five newly initialized media are loaded into an autoloader. A backup is made with no
protection, and will be written to the first medium. The second backup in this sequence is
protected and it is written to the second medium. The subsequent backups are all
unprotected and they will be appended to the second medium. The presence of a protected
object on the second medium makes it 'appendable.'

While any backup object on a medium is still protected, the whole medium is prevented from
being reused. Sometimes a medium that is expected to have no active protection is rejected
for use by OBII.

It may be that one object on the medium is actually still protected. A typical scenario is that
an ad hoc backup was added to a medium outside the normal schedules. As the default
protection is 'Permanent' this can be what is preventing the medium being used. Check the
medium in question with this command:

omnimm -list_media <medium label> -detail | grep Protection

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Media Management

First Session Medium

The expression 'first session medium' is found in the Data Protector documentation. It refers
to the medium that is used as the first in a sequence of media, if the backup session requires
more than one medium. If the pool policy is appendable, only the medium that is used as first
in the session can be appended.

Subsequent media for that session must begin at the start of a medium so they need to be
empty or unprotected.

If the first session medium becomes full, and there are no empty or unprotected media
available, a mount prompt will occur. This will be true even if some space remains on the
other media in an exchanger. Different parts of backup cannot be appended to the ends of
several different media.

Cleaning Tape Usage

The cleaning status is NOT checked while a medium is in the drive and being written to. The
status of the cleaning request is checked only when a medium is being loaded or changed. So,
if the drive sets the cleaning bit, part way through a backup session, the medium is not
immediately unloaded. It will be used until it is full, assuming that there is enough data to fill
it, in the current backup session.

When medium #1 is unloaded, the cleaning request will be checked; the cleaning tape will be
loaded and used. After that, medium #2 will be loaded to continue the backup. It is possible
that medium #1 is in bad shape and could be the cause of the cleaning request. However,
Data Protector assumes the medium is still 'Good' and does not mark medium #1 as 'Poor'.
The medium will be used again, when it is the 'least recently used'.

If medium #1 is really faulty, this will show up next time it is used, when the write operations
fail. Then it will be marked 'Poor' and not used again.

DDS cleaning tapes are a fixed length, with just enough for '25 times 30 seconds' of cleaning.
When 30 seconds of cleaning has completed successfully, the clean bit on the drive is reset.

The cleaning tape moves forward, over one section of tape, for each 30 seconds of cleaning
and it NEVER rewinds! It just moves along until it gets to the end and then it stops.

Once it is at the end, it is an 'expired' cleaning tape. If you load an 'expired' cleaning tape, the
tape is active for less than 20 seconds, it does not actually do any cleaning and the cleaning
bit is NOT reset. Data Protector can initiate a cleaning operation when the drive sets the
cleaning bit. After the cleaning is done, Data Protector will recheck the cleaning bit. If it is
still set, Data Protector will terminate the session and will report that the cleaning tape was
requested twice for the device.

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Media Management

Initialized Size

The size that a tape media is initialized to will not ultimately affect the amount of data that
can be written to it. Data Protector writes to the tape until the device reports early end of
tape (EOT) warning.

If a tape is formatted to a smaller size than the physical size of the tape, Data Protector will
write to the end of tape, and then update the Media Management (MM) database. The
recorded tape size will be reset to the value of the physical tape size.

The same thing applies to tapes that are initialized to a very large size. Once the tape has
been filled with data, the size will be reset in the MM database.

Statistical Information

The correct settings for the 'Full' flag and for 'Data Protection' are the only tape details
necessary for Data Protector operation.

The Total & Used sizes are statistical information only.

Tape Library Slots

Data Protector does not care about the order of slots inside a random access tape library. It
assumes that the slots it controls are assigned exclusively to Data Protector and performs
media allocation based on the media allocation rules.

The rules do not relate to the order of media in the slots, so Data Protector does not
necessarily start with the lowest slot number and progress towards higher slot numbers. The
media allocation rules are the same for small exchangers and large tape libraries.

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Media Management

6–8. SLIDE: Free Pool Concept

Free Pool Concept

DDS Pool-1
Protected
Expired
Free-DDS Pool
Protected Expired

Protected Allocate Expired

De-allocate Expired

DDS Pool-2 Allocate Expired

Protected
De-allocate
Protected
Expired

Student Notes
Data Protector supports the use of a Free Pool of unprotected media. These “free” tapes may
be newly formatted or have expired backups on them. See the next page for more details.
Each media type supported by Data Protector may have an associated Free Pool; so one for
DDS, DLT, LTO, etc.

To implement the Free Pool for an individual media type, create a new media pool or modify
the properties of an existing pool and select the “Use free pool” feature on the Allocation
properties tab of the GUI. Data Protector will automatically create an additional pool called
“Free <Media_type>”, such as “Free DDS.” There will be only one free pool for each media
type and it may be shared with all of the other pools of the same media type.

Allocation and De-allocation


When additional tapes are needed for backup, Data Protector will move them from the free
pool into the media pool associated with the backup. This tape movement is called
allocation. When the protection of the data on a tape expires, Data Protector will
automatically de-allocate the tape and move it into the free pool. This feature is controlled
by a second media pool property in the GUI called “Move free media to free pool.” If you turn

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Media Management

off de-allocation (by de-selecting the “Move free media to free pool) you may still move
media manually to the free pool as long as the media is not protected.

De-allocation Times
The de-allocation process occurs periodically during the day. The frequency of the de-
allocation is controlled by the “FreePoolDeallocFreq” parameter in the global file. The
default frequency is once per day at 00:00 (midnight). The parameter “FreePoolDeallocFreq”
is set to one by default, but may be set as high as 96 to produce a 15-minute de-allocation
frequency. The first de-allocation occurs at 00:00, and then the day is divided according to the
frequency that you specify. As an example, a frequency of 3 causes de-allocation at 00:00,
08:00 and 16:00.

You have the option of forcing a manual de-allocation at any time by using the command:

omnidbutil –free_pool_update

NOTE The omnidbutil command is available only on the Cell Manager as it is not
part of the command line part of the Cell Console. On the Unix Cell Manager
the command is in the OMNIHOME/sbin directory; on the Windows Cell
Manager the command is in the OMNIHOME/bin directory.

Media Pool Properties


The media pool that uses allocation (uses the free pool) will have condition factors that are
inherited from the free pool. This implies that all pools that share a set of tapes will use the
same condition factors of age and overwrites.

The media pool allocation and usage policies will be established by properties of the regular
media pools, as free pools do not have such policies available. Tapes that exist in the free
pools are not used for backup until allocated and moved to a regular media pool.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
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Media Management

6–9. SLIDE: Media Life

Media Life

Media Pool
properties establish
expected media life

Related commands:
omnimm -list_media ... Medium
omnimm -media_info ... properties track
age and usage
omnimm -catalog ...

Student Notes
Once the media is formatted, it should not be formatted again. Data Protector keeps usage
and quality information regarding the tape in its database. Formatting a medium more than
once resets the quality information stored within the media management database.
If the session information is not required (and it is still protected), use the recycle feature.

NOTE Media can only be exported if the protection of the sessions has expired, or a
recycle has been performed to remove the protection.

Command Examples for Media Information Description


omnimm -show_pools Display a list of media pools
omnimm -list_pool "Default File" Display the contents of a pool
omnimm -list_media "Default File_9" Display summary info for a medium
omnimm -list_media "Default File_9" -detail Display detail info for a medium
omnimm -media_info "Default File_9" Display summary id info for a medium
omnimm -media_info "Default File_9" -detail Display detail time info for a medium

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–10. SLIDE: Media Operations

Media Operations

Medium
Operations

Pool
Operations

Student Notes
Data Protector provides the following Media Management operations for pools:

Format Initialize a medium. Prepare it for Data Protector use by writing a header
to the tape, and register it in the media management database
Import Read the header and detail catalog information from a tape. The tape may
be from a different cell or may have been exported from the current cell.
Delete Removes an empty media pool. Delete media in pool first. This is useful for
removing the Default pools that are not needed.
Select Media Search a Media Pool for specific media.
Useful when a pool contains a large number of media.

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Media Management

Media Operations
Data Protector provides the following Media Management operations for media within pools:

Export Delete an unprotected medium from the media management database. The
contents of the tape are unaffected.
Change Alter the vaulting location string associated with a tape. The tape does not need to
Location be in a device for this operation.
Recycle Remove all of the protection from the data that is backed up on the selected tape.
The tape does not need to in a device for this operation.
Move Change the pool that a particular tape(s) is assigned to. The tape does not need to
be in a device for this operation.
Copy Replicate a tape. Two devices of the same type and a blank tape are required. This
uses the omnimcopy functionality for duplicating a single tape.
Verify Read the tape header and verify that it is written in Data Protector format. The
data may also be verified if the tape contains crc blocks.
Import Recover the detail catalogs from a tape that is still in the database but has had its
Catalog detail catalog expire. The detail catalog is automatically purged from the database
when it expires.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–11. SLIDE: Formatting Media

Formatting Media

Before Media can be used, it


must be formatted. Note: Blank media
may auto-format
on backup when
loose allocation is
Parameters: used
z User label/auto label
z Location
z Logical device
z Media capacity/determine
IMPORTANT: z Force

Format each
tape only
one time
omniminit [-options]

Student Notes
Before any media can be used with Data Protector, it must undergo an initialization process
called Formatting. The Data Protector GUI now presents the format.. option, where
initialize was previously used.

The Data Protector media management system requires a unique medium ID for each tape. A
unique ID is generated when the media is initialized. This ID is written to the media header
and to the Media Management Database (MMDB). Data Protector uses this header to identify
one media from another. Each time a medium is accessed, the header information is read to
ensure that the correct medium is being used. It is also possible to manually read media
header information by using the Scan operation of a Logical Device or with the “omnimlist –
device <logical device> -header” command.

The media format process is performed within the media pool where the formatted medium
is to be added.

Media can be formatted from within the GUI in the Devices and Media context, or from the
command line using the omniminit command.

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Media Management

Media Formatting Parameters

• Medium Description (Label)

Choices for Medium Description are Specify or Automatically Generate. For


standalone devices, “Specify” the description to create the label for the medium. For
library devices with barcode capabilities, the “Automatically Generate” option adds an
additional description for the barcode labeled media.
With the specification of a user-defined, friendly label, such as “Oracle 0001,” the label
can consist of up to 32 characters.
For identification on other systems, an ANSI X3.27 label is also written to the tape.
When “Automatically Generate” is chosen, Data Protector generates a description (label)
based upon the name of the media pool that the media is being added to plus the current
sequence number.

The format of an Auto-labeled medium is POOLNAME_INCREMENT#. For example, if the


pool is called Datalogs, then the first tape to be auto-labeled in this pool will be called
Datalogs_1.
• Location (optional)
The physical location of the medium may be manually entered or selected from a list of
pre-configured vaulting locations from the <OMNICONFIG>vault_locations file. The
location can consist of up to 32 characters. It is suggested that the administrator pre-
configure the possible locations before formatting media to create consistency.
• Logical Device
The logical device used to perform the media initialization. Within the GUI, only logical
devices that match the media type of the media pool are displayed as available during
media formatting.
• Medium Capacity (Determine or Specify)
Determine instructs Data Protector to detect the type of media being formatted and
select the appropriate medium capacity. Data Protector does not take into account any
compression factors when determining this capacity; therefore, this figure will be the
default minimum capacity for this type of media.

Specify allows the user to input a specific capacity in megabytes that the medium is
expected to hold. The capacity is used only for statistical purposes and does not set a
hard limit on the amount of data that any media can hold.
Each time Data Protector writes to a newly formatted media, the media capacity figure is
updated. It reflects the largest amount of data that has ever been written to the tape.

NOTE When using media type File, the specified size will limit the size of the file
medium; the Data Protector default is 100 MB. This may be altered by
modifying the global option: FileMediumCapacity.

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Media Management

• Force
During initialization, Data Protector checks the media to see if it already contains data
that is in a recognizable format. If the format is recognized, then, by default, Data
Protector does not initialize the media. The reason is that this media may contain
valuable data.

If the format is recognized but initialization is still required, the force option must be
specified.

Data Protector recognizes the following media formats:


− tar
− cpio
− fbackup
− HP OmniStorage
− Data Protector (Omniback)
− HP-UX filesystem
− ANSI labeled tapes (some third party backup products )
NOTE Data Protector will not format tapes that are under protection within the
current cell, even if the force option is selected. In order to re-format a tape it
must first be recycled (this is not generally recommended)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–12. SLIDE: Media Duplication

Media Duplication

For additional data security, media


can be copied.

z Copies recorded in MMDB.


• Copies are protected
• Copy and original are marked
non-appendable
• Copy becomes original if original is
exported (deleted)
• Copy process may be scheduled
• Copy process may be automated with backup

omnimcopy –options
omniamo -options

Student Notes
For extra security, it may be necessary to have two copies of a particular backup. For
example, if the data were being changed in some way or removed after the backup has taken
place, the only place that the original data resides is on the backup media. If an individual
medium is lost or damaged the ability to recover data will be lost. In addition, it may be
desirable or required to retain media copies both on-site as well as off-site.

The manual, single copy operation can be initiated through the GUI or the command line
interface with the omnimcopy command. The source and destination devices are logical
devices. The logical devices may be located anywhere in the Data Protector cell, but must be
of the same media class. During the copy, the target media is initialized before all data from
the source media is copied.

After the copy, both media are tracked in the media management database so that the
original media and its copies can be easily identified.

If a mount request is issued during a restore session, all tapes that contain the requested
data are listed; this includes both originals and copies.
If the original media is overwritten or is exported from the MMDB, the first copy becomes an
original.

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Media Management

NOTE: When the copy process is completed, both the original and the copy are
marked as non-appendable. The copy may also be permanently protected. A
copy of a copy is not permitted.

Although it is possible to perform the copy operation from system to system,


for performance reasons this is not the preferred method. Always use logical
devices that are connected to the same system. This avoids unnecessary
network traffic.

Tape Variation
There are slight variations in the overall capacity of individual tapes. This can pose a
significant challenge when attempting to make an exact copy from a tape that is slightly
larger than the destination tape. Planning for this eventual issue must be done before media
is initialized.

There is a local parameter that may be specified per device called OB2BLKPADDING. This
parameter is placed in the omnirc file on each system with connected devices and indicates
the number of blocks to add after the tape header. This additional padding should allow tapes
of the same type to be duplicated, even if they vary slightly in capacity. See the
<OMNIHOME>omnirc.tmpl located on the cell manager for more information.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–13. SLIDE: Automated Media Operations

Automated Media Operations* (AMO)

AMO types:
• Post-backup
– Enables automatic media copy
at the end of a backup session
– Copy all media used in that
particular session
• Scheduled-backup
– Pre-determined start time
– Automatic copy of media used
in time window

*Automated Media Operations – Media Copy abbreviated as AMO

Student Notes
Automated Media Operations (AMO) is a new feature in Data Protector 5.1 that facilitates
automated copying of media containing backups.

There are two types of AMO:

• post-backup: enables automatic media copy at the end of a backup session, which
can copy media used in that particular session

• scheduled: schedules an automatic copy of media used for backups at a specified


point in time. Media used in various backup specifications can be copied in the scope
of a single scheduled AMO session. Appropriate device and media pairs must be
available during scheduled-copying; the copy session aborts if either the device or
medium is not available (such as locked in backup mode).

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
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Media Management

Parameters for AMO (post-backup and scheduled):

• operation type: Media Copy is the only possible value, because currently automated
Media Copy is the only member of Automated Media Operations suite.
• number of copies: N = 1 to 10, where default is 1; each medium will be copied N times
• source drives
• destination drives
• eject = none/copy/original/both
• new location for target media for vaulting purposes
• target media protection: default = same as original, permanent; none, days & weeks

Creation of an Automated Media Operation specification is a precursor to copying media


automatically. An AMO specification triggers the generation of a list of media to be copied,
called source media. The source media is generated based on the parameters specified in the
AMO specification. Each source medium is mapped to a target medium, to which the data
will be copied.

All media management operations, in the realm of AMO classify themselves as sessions, like a
backup or restore session, as opposed to being mere utility tools such as omnimcopy. These
sessions will be tracked in the database and therefore can be monitored and reviewed later.

The source medium defines the destination pool of the target medium. This effectively means
that the copied media will belong to the same pool as the original media.

Each source medium is mapped to a pair of devices from among the devices that were
specified in the AMO specification. Once this device pair is established, a copy session will
copy the data from the source to the target medium.

The AMO functionality provides for its own load balancing. It optimizes the usage of the
available devices by utilizing as many devices as possible and even selecting local devices, if
they are available.

Device locking takes place at the outset of an AMO session. Since the devices that are not
available at the beginning cannot be utilized for the session, device locking after the
beginning of the session is not possible. An available ‘pair of devices’ of a certain device type
is a minimum prerequisite for successful completion of any automated copy session.

The data protection for the copy defaults to the original’s protection. However, you can alter
the protection period either during the creation or modification of the AMC specification.

Automated Media Copy does not handle mount or cleanme requests. Incase a mount request
pops up, the media pair aborts, while the session continues to reach its logical end.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–14. SLIDE: Configuring a Post-Backup AMO

Configuring a Post-Backup AMO

• Select the backup specification


• Select source and target devices
• Select post backup options

Student Notes
Post-backup AMO is automatically initiated after a backup session finishes, and results in the
copying of the media used in that particular session. Session records for AMO post-backup
sessions are stored in the IDB and are also able to be monitored.

The BSM reports the end of a backup session, and thereby supplies information about
session, sessionID, datalist, success etc to omnitrig utility. After a backup finishes, omnitrig
matches the backup (backup specification name) to a corresponding post-backup AMO
configuration file. On a successful match, AMO initiates the copy process and copies all
media used in that particular backup session. There may be only one AMO configuration per
backup specification.

A post-backup Automated Media Copy specification is configured in the following way:

1. Select the Devices & Media context in the GUI

2. In the Scoping pane, right-click Automated Operations and click Add Post-Backup
Media Operation to start the configuration wizard.

3. In the Backup Specification drop-down list, select the desired backup specification.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

4. Map the source drive(s) to their corresponding destination(s) to produce a so-called


‘copy-pair’. Selecting identical drive/s, acting as both the source and destination for
copying is not allowed.

5. Specify:

• the number of copies to be made,


• whether either of the media will be ejected automatically after copy session
• the new location for the target media (if eject is selected)
• the protection of the target media.

6. Select Finish to exit the wizard.

Media Properties

Tracking of the duplicated media is done within the MMDB. While displaying the properties
of the copied media, there appears a button in the upper right corner in the GUI called
“Original..”. Select “Original” and a pop-up window displays the following information about
the source medium:

• Media Pool location of the original


• medium ID and
• medium label

Additionally, when displaying the properties of the original medium, a new tab labeled
“Copies” is available to show a list of all valid copies of the medium as well as a summary of
their properties.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–15. SLIDE: Configuring Scheduled Media Copy (AMO)

Configuring Scheduled Media Copy (AMO)

• poor
Select to • fair
change • good
month • any condition

Select to
change
year

Choose
timeframe
Specify
options

Student Notes
The scheduled Automated Media Operation (Media Copy) is the process of duplicating media
used in one or more backup sessions at a scheduled time. Scheduled Media Copy seeks
backup sessions that started and have completed, within a user-defined timeframe. Once the
sessions are known, AMO copies all of the media that belong to the backup sessions using a
single AMO session.

The AMO session consists of the following processes:

MSM the media session manager


CMA the copy media agent (loads/reads from source media)
BMA the backup media agent (loads/writes to destination media)

The media will be copied simultaneously, if enough devices are available. Otherwise, they
will be copied sequentially. Load balancing in AMO strives to simultaneously use the
maximum number of media during the copy process.

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Module 6
Media Management

The omnitrig module polls every fifteen minutes to see if there are any scheduled tasks
(including backups or reports) to be processed. Under the auspices of AMO, omnitrig will
check for scheduled AMO sessions and triggers omniamo and provides to it the parameters
from the saved AMO configuration file(s).

Schedule Media Copy offers three timeframe choices when defining the schedule, they are
Relative, Absolute, and No Time Limit.

Relative

The relative time option apportions a timeframe based on the two input values, namely
Started Within (hours) and Duration (hours). Started Within establishes the beginning
of the timeframe, while Duration sets the actual duration of the time frame. This defines a
so-called window of opportunity, starting some number of hours before the actual AMO start
time.

For example, an AMO is scheduled at 1200; specifying relative time option, we may choose
Started Within = 14 hours and Duration = 8 hours. Now AMO seeks all media associated
with backup sessions that started between 2200 the night before and 0600 the next morning,
and attempts to copy them.

A conflict can be anticipated in case one or more backup sessions that were started within
the AMO time frame were still running beyond this time frame, and simultaneously AMO was
attempting to copy the media that this particular backup specification would produce.

In such situations, AMO will not be able to copy media that are related to that particular
backup specification because they are still locked by the BSM. The AMO session displays the
following error message:

Source medium <medium ID> could not be locked and will not be copied
in this session.

The different times used in this hypothetical case conform to a typical business enterprises
backup and copy time window.

Absolute
You set the scope in terms of absolute days to search for backup sessions. The drops down
arrows serve to open a calendar. This option would probably be used for one-time vaulting
purposes, or to vault media from a certain time to another!

No Time Limit
This option selected will include all backup sessions, irrespective of when they were
performed. It is expected that this option would be used rarely.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

Parameters only available in scheduled AMO:


• AMO specification as multi-valued parameter
• time frame = absolute, relative, or no time limit
• source media condition = poor, fair, good, & any
• source media protection = any, unprotected & protected

Creating a Scheduled Media Copy


To define a new Schedule Media Copy (AMO) proceed as follows:

1. Select the Devices & Media context in the GUI

2. In the Scoping pane, right-click Automated Operations and select “Add Scheduled
Media Operation” to start the configuration wizard.

3. In the Media Operation Name field, type a user-defined name. This user-defined
name acts as a prefix for that particular configuration file name, and may include or
be the same as the name of a backup specification.

4. In the Media Operation Type drop-down list, select Media Copy; (the only choice in
DP51) and click Next to select the devices for the copy process.

5. Select the source drive(s) and map them to their corresponding destination(s) to
produce a ‘device pair’. On closer observation of the figure above, notice that in
Library 2, lib2_drive1 is disallowed from the Destination list; this is due to the
selection in the Source list. Click Next.

6. Specify the time frame within which you want to search for completed backup
sessions, for scheduling to take place. There are three timeframe choices, namely
Relative, Absolute, and No time limits. Click Next.

7. Select the backup specification(s) of the backups you want to copy. Click Next.

8. Specify the media conditions and protection of the source.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

Media Condition:

• Any: media in any condition is accepted


• Good: only media in good condition is accepted
• Fair: only media in fair condition is accepted
• Poor: even poor media are accepted

Media Protection:

• Any: media with any kind of protection is considered


• Unprotected: only unprotected media will be considered
• Protected: only protected media will be considered for copying; specify the time in
days, as to how long the media that is being considered are to be protected. Click
Next.

9. Specify the number of copies to be made, eject mode stipulating whether either of the
media will be ejected after copying, location for the target media (if ejected) and
protection for target media. Click Next.

10. Right click on a date and select Schedule from the pop-up to open the Schedule
Media Operation dialog box (shown below). Specify the various options
accordingly, and click OK. Click Finish to exit the wizard.

Select Use Starting to delay the first performance of the copy operation and specify the
starting date.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–16. SLIDE: Scheduled Media Copy Example

Scheduled Media Copy Example


backup specs

monday tuesday wednesday week day


AMO spec.

AMO time frame

started within 14h

duration 8h

24:00 1200 24:00 24:00 AMO relative time


AMO session

2200 0600 Scheduled, AMO copies


AMO copies all everyday at 12 noon, all media
pertinent media belonging to backup sessions
started within the AMO time
frame
AMO copies

Student Notes
The sequence on the slide demonstrates the sequence of events for a scheduled media copy.
They are as follows:

1. Omnitrig reads the AMO schedule file and starts the session manager (MSM).
2. The MSM selects media from the database that match the selection criteria
(timeframe).
3. The MSM starts the necessary agents (CMA, BMA) to create the tape copies.
4. The MSM ejects the tapes as configured.(optional)
5. The session ends.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–17. TEXT Page: The omniamo Command and Configuration


Files

Student Notes
Data Protector 5.1 introduces a new CLI utility called omniamo.

omniamo will initiate Automatic Media Operations (AMO), it currently accepts media copy
parameters. The syntax is as follows:

omniamo –help | help


omniamo –amc ConfigurationName <-post_backup | -scheduled>

For example:

omniamo –amc FullBackup


omniamo –amc ScheduleTape

where FullBackup.amc and ScheduleTape.amcs are names of typical post and


scheduled-backup media copy configuration files; leave out the appending suffix .amc
or .amcs to the AMO specification name

In case of post-backup AMO, omniamo requires the session ID of the backup session; the
media of which you want to make a copy of. The session id may be exported as follows:

On Windows: set SESSIONID=SessionID


On UNIX: export SESSIONID=SessionID

NOTE: If the session ID is unknown, use the omnidb –session command to list all
previous session stored in the internal database.

In case of scheduled-backup AMC, omniamo can be used to immediately start an automatic


media copy operation. Furthermore, omniamo can also be used to re-start a failed AMO
session.

Configuration Directories
AMOs configuration files are stored in two directories namely amo and amoschedules. The
directories will contain AMO associated configuration files and schedule files respectively.

The locations of these directories are as follows:

Windows
Configuration: <OMNIHOME>\Config\amo
Schedules: <OMNIHOME>\Config\amoschedules
UNIX
Configuration: /etc/opt/omni/amo
Schedules: /etc/opt/omni/amoschedules

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

The directory amo contains both the post-backup as well as the scheduled AMO
configuration files. On the other hand, amoschedules contains only scheduled AMO
configuration files corresponding to scheduled AMO specifications. A typical CONFIG file in
amoschedules stores detailed AMO schedule information, whereas its corresponding file in
amo stores only AMO specification information.

For example, see below the different contents of the same AMO configuration file
ScheduleTape.amcs, in amo and amoschedules directories:

Configuration File:

NAME " ScheduleTape"


SRC_DRIVES
"drive2"
DEST_DRIVES
"drive1"
EJECT_DEST
DEST_LOCATION ""
DEST_PROTECTION -1
TIMEFRAME 14 8
SRC_PROTECTION 0
SRC_CONDITION 2
DATALISTS
"test1"

Schedule File:

-start
-starting 1 4 2003 -every
-day Sat -month Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar
-at 15:45

The name of a typical AMO configuration file can be broken down into its two constituent
parts, namely a prefix and a suffix.

The prefix may not necessarily be suggestive of the backup specification name, however the
suffix defines whether the AMO operation is post or scheduled. Post-backup AMC
configuration files suffix in .amc, while scheduled AMO suffix in. amcs.
Regarding the prefix part of the configuration files, Data Protector clearly distinguishes the
manner in which the configuration files of the two forms of AMC are labeled. While, it allows
a user-defined name as prefix for scheduled AMCs, it requires that the post-backup AMO
prefix is the same as the backup specification name..

Limitations
• Only entire media can be copied as opposed to copying selected objects or sessions
contained within the media. It is expected that Object Copy (in addition to Media
Copy) shall enable such functionality in future Data Protector versions.

• Media Copy marks both source as well as target media as non appendable.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

• During media copy, the media being copied will be unavailable for restore.

• It is not possible to create copies of media concurrently while the backup is in


progress.

• AMC is not supported on standalone devices; only libraries are!

• Data Protector treats the various sub-types of the same device type (e.g. DLT or LTO
etc.) as homogeneous, for the purpose of copying; however, it forbids forward
compatibility, while allowing backward compatibility within one device type (e.g.
DLT7000 can use DLT4000 media, but DLT4000 cannot use DLT7000 media). i.e., it is
possible to copy a DLT4000 to a DLT7000 media, but not vice-versa Therefore, you are
advised to choose appropriate source and destination devices.

• The time frame options under scheduled AMO can only be specified in hours. (started
within and duration options can only be specified in hours)

• Source media defines destination pools for target media.

• Mount request handling is not implemented. If, indeed a mount request is received
either from BMA or CMA, the device pair is aborted, while the session continues to its
end.

• Device locking in AMO takes place at the outset of a session. It is imperative for AMO
to lock at least the pair of devices (corresponding to source and target media for each
media type) to complete the session successfully. The AMO session will fail
prematurely if the minimum number of devices necessary for the session cannot be
secured at the beginning of the session.

• NDMP media cannot be copied.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–18. SLIDE: Media Vaulting Operations

Media Vaulting Operations

Vaulting:
• Offsite protection
• Stored in safe facility

Student Notes
The process of “vaulting" media is essentially a form of protection. Tapes are typically packed
up and sent to an off-site safe storage facility. Tape rotations typically involve moving the
tapes off site, and then back onsite after some defined period of time.

Data Protector supports the following features to facilitate tape rotations and vaulting:
• Media Protection - inherited from Backup Operations
• Media Pools with Strict Allocation - Media Pool Feature
• Multiple media pools of the same type
• Media Location tracking - Individual Media Feature
• Media Labeling - Individual Media Feature
• Multiple Media Pools - Each with a specific purpose
• Media Duplication (scheduled, automatic, or manual)
• Vaulting Locations - Pre-configured locations

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–19. SLIDE: Vaulting Locations

Vaulting Locations
Device and
allocation order
media
context

List of media
vault [barcode label] description - [Physical Vault
locations label if no location] location
barcode Library slot

<config>/vault_locations

Student Notes
The vaulting locations may be pre-configured into Data Protector using the Device and Media
Management GUI. Vaulting locations are stored in the OMNICONFIG directory as an ASCII
file named vault_locations. You may edit this file using an editor instead of using the GUI.

The vaulting locations are used as media location strings, assigned to individual tapes, and
stored in the Data Protector Media Management Database. When media are moving from one
physical location to another it is a good idea to update the Data Protector Database with the
correct physical location of the media, as this will be displayed whenever a tape is requested
by a running session (backup or restore).

You may change the media location from within the Media Manager, simply select a medium
and then Edit -> Modify…. You may also change the media label at the same time.

NOTE The tape does not have to be in a tape drive to be modified. The label and
location are stored in the Data Protector database along with the Medium-ID
that Data Protector generated for the tape when it was initialized.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–20. SLIDE: Vaulting with Media Pools

Vaulting with Media Pools

Label may
be modified
Medium
selected

Location
Vaulting
may be
locations
modified
Media pool
may change

omnimm -modify_medium
omnimm -move_medium

Student Notes
Data Protector provides another possibility for vaulting operations. Multiple media pools may
serve as media repositories when media are to be taken offsite, or just removed from a device
repository. You may want to create a media pool for each physical location that a tape may
be stored, such as:

Active_pool This is the set of media available within a device repository (library)
the active pool could also be considered a "scratch" pool
On-site_vault Tapes here are out of the device, but not yet offsite
Off-site_vault Tapes are physically at a remote location.
Free Pool May be used as a holding area for expired media, prior to moving to
the active pool.

Data Protector provides both the GUI and command line to allow you to move media from
one pool to another of the same type. The command line could be used in conjunction with
an automation script to make the media management simpler. Consider the following worked
example for providing automated vaulting operations and media management.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

Command Example
The following example demonstrates the command line method of modifying an existing
medium that is moving to a different location (you may change the label at the same time):

<old label> <new label> <new location>

omnimm -modify_medium "Default File_9" Vault_File_9 "Offsite Vault"


Medium information modified.
Medium label : Vault_File_9
Location : offsite vault

omnimm -move_medium "Default File_9" Offsite_vault

<Media Label> <New Media Pool>

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–21. TEXT PAGE: Automated Media Vaulting

(A Worked Example with Custom Sample POSIX Shell Scripts)

Scenario: Tapes are to be taken out of the library each morning and sent offsite for vault
storage. The post-exec feature for the backup specification is used to create a list of media
used during the backup session and store it in a file for further processing. Two scripts will
be used.

1. Media data collection (collection.sh)


2. Media manipulation (manage_media.sh)

The collection.sh script is used as a session post-exec script. It simply starts the
manage_media.sh as a background job, passing to it the session information, then exits.
There may be two ways to pass data from the running session to the manage_media.sh
script; one way would be to create temporary files, the other way would be to pass variables
directly as positional parameters. The sample provided includes both methods, with one
method commented out.

The manage_media.sh processes the session information and collects the media data from
the Data Protector database. The number of media used by the particular session is counted
and stored in a temporary file. The file is read and each medium listed is moved to a different
media pool, and the label and location are updated. A record of the changes is also logged
into another file for verification. (this could be printed or emailed if desired).

Collection.sh (sample only, not provided with the product; create the script in
/opt/omni/lbin on the management server)

#!/usr/bin/sh
# collection.sh
# execute as a session post-exec (from /opt/omni/lbin)
# optionally store the session and key in a file
#print $SESSIONKEY >/tmp/KEY
#print $SESSIONID > /tmp/ID

# pass the session information to the manage_media.sh script


# execute the manage_media.sh as a background job
/opt/omni/lbin/manage_media.sh $SESSIONKEY $SESSIONID > /tmp/manage_media.log &
exit 0

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

Manage_media.sh (sample only, not provided with the product; create the script on
/opt/omni/lbin on the Unix Cell Manager system)

#!/usr/bin/sh
# manage_media.sh
# executed from collection.sh
# Env Vars for session Post_Exec script
# DATALIST name of the datalist
# MODE full or incr backup
# OWNER session owner
# PPID parent process of the session
# PREVIEW 0 or 1 if in the preview mode
# PWD current directory
# RESTARTED 0 or 1 if restarted due to prior failure
# SESSIONID omni session id of the running session
# SESSIONKEY session key of the running session
# SHELL type of unix shell in use
# SMEXIT status of the backup session
#######
# optionally read data from KEY and ID files if created by collection.sh
#SESSIONKEY="$(cat /tmp/KEY)"
#SESSIONID="$(cat /tmp/ID)"
#######
SESSIONKEY="$1"
SESSIONID="$2"
#
VAULT=file_vault # destination pool (considered to be the vault)
MED_PRE=VAULT # prefix added to each medium moved to the vault
LOC="onsite vault" # location for each medium moved to the vault
# Collect the media list from the database
/opt/omni/bin/omnidb -session $SESSIONID -media -detail|\
awk -F ":" '$1 ~ /Medium Label/ {print $2}' > /tmp/media_$SESSIONKEY
sleep 30
#sleep to allow the database record locks to be freed
num_media=$(wc -l /tmp/media_$SESSIONKEY)
print number of media used = $num_media
print
print contents of /tmp/media_$SESSIONKEY
cat /tmp/media_$SESSIONKEY
sleep 5
exec 4< /tmp/media_$SESSIONKEY
COUNT=1
# perform the media operations move and change label/location
while read -u4 CURRENT_TAPE
do
print moving media ${COUNT}, $CURRENT_TAPE to $VAULT
/opt/omni/bin/omnimm -move_medium "${CURRENT_TAPE}" ${VAULT} && \
/opt/omni/bin/omnimm -modify_medium "${CURRENT_TAPE}" \
"${MED_PRE}_${CURRENT_TAPE}" "${LOC}"
((COUNT+=1))
done
exec 4<&-
exit 0

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

6–22. Review Questions

1. What is the purpose of a Media Pool?

2. What protection features does Data Protector provide to safeguard the integrity of your
backups?

3. Data Protector provides two media allocation policies, strict and loose. Briefly,
describe the purpose of these policies.
• strict

• loose

4. When will you want to use Magazine Support?

5. What Media Condition Factors does Data Protector implement?

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Module 6
Media Management

6. How can you change the label on an existing tape? What about the location?
Does the tape need to be loaded into a tape drive in order to change the label or location?

7. What does recycle do to media, and do the media have to be loaded?

8. What happens during a media import? Explain why this would be necessary.

9. To remove bad media from a pool, you export it. TRUE or FALSE?

10. What must be done before Data Protector can use media?

11. When is force required?

12. When initializing media, the size in megabytes set by specify or determine specifies
the hard limit as to how much data it will hold. TRUE or FALSE?

13. By default, Data Protector will automatically initialize blank media. TRUE or FALSE?
Explain.

14. Data Protector supports Vaulting. TRUE or FALSE? Explain.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 6
Media Management

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7 — Logical Devices
Objectives
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:
• Create simple logical devices within Data Protector.

• Configure library devices for use with Data Protector.

• Describe the advanced options for logical devices.

• Troubleshoot and test a library device.

• Scan device repositories to determine their contents.

• Bulk-initialize tapes within the library repository.

• Bulk-enter/eject tapes from a library repository.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–1. SLIDE: The Logical Device

The Logical Device

Usage:
Usage:
•• Backup
Backup
•• Restore
Restore Logical Device Definition
Physical
Device
•• Format
Format Device Options
•• Copy
Copy Physical
•• Scan
Scan Properties
•• Verify
Verify

Media

Student Notes
Data Protector does not reference physical devices directly; rather, it uses a logical
representation of the device known simply as a Logical Device.

The Logical Device concept is used because it allows for easy configuration of device options
and greater flexibility in changing devices after backups have been configured.
A Logical Device consists of a physical part (such as a device file name, SCSI path, or drive
index), and a logical part (parameters that control Data Protector's usage of the device).
The Logical Device definition is stored in the Data Protector media management database,
commonly referred to as the MMDB.
Logical Devices are used for all Data Protector operations that require access to a physical
device, for example backup and restore, media initialization, media scanning, media
verification, media duplication and media listing.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–2. SLIDE: Logical Device Types

Logical Device Types

Device Types Data Formats


• Standalone (tape and file) • Data Protector
• Stacker • EMC Fastrax
• SCSI-II Library • NDMP
• Jukebox (file and optical)
• External Control
• GRAU DAS Library
• StorageTek ACS Library

Student Notes
Data Protector allows you to configure the following predefined Logical Device types.
• Standalone
• Stacker
• SCSI-II Library (used for SCSI and Fiber Channel)
• Jukebox
• External Control
• GRAU DAS Library
• StorageTek ACS Library

Standalone Device Creation


The creation of a standalone device is usually quite simple. In most cases the device file for
the tape drive is already in existence, and we simply associate Data Protector features and
options with that physical device. Be sure to match the device type with physical device; this
controls the Media Pools that will be available to the device.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Standalone File Device


While it is true that most standalone devices are tape drives, it is also possible to create a file
type device. In this case Data Protector will write to a file on the disk, in an existing
filesystem. This may be beneficial if you have a quantity of available space and you would
like to perform a quick backup. This type of backup is useful for quick backup, when a tape
may not be required. The media from the file (disk) backup may additionally be backed up to
tape for further protection from system failure if needed.

The configuration of a file device is very similar to that of a tape drive, except that the
filenames of the Physical Devices are the actual files that the backups will be written to. The
files would be treated just as any other medium, they will be initialized with an Data
Protector tape header. The default size for the Data Protector file medium is 100 MB, this
may be increased by manually initializing the file. (see the module for Media Management for
details)

Standalone and Cascades

Standalone

A single drive device with no repository slots connected to one system.

This is the most common type of device used with Data Protector.

Examples of common standalone devices:

• Internal DDS drive (DDS1, DDS2, DDS3, DDS4)

• External DDS drive

• External DLT drive (DLT4000, DLT7000, DLT8000)

• Ultrium drive (LTO)

Cascades

A cascade is a series of standalone type devices (of the same type) connected to one host
that the user wants to use in sequence. Cascades are useful for backing up more data than
would be able to fit on a single tape, and no operator intervention is desired to manually
change tapes during the backup. A cascade is essentially a standalone device with more than
one physical device.

To configure a device cascade within Data Protector you have to select the device policy
“standalone.” In your standalone device configuration, it is possible to define multiple device
files. For example:
/dev/rmt/c1t0d0BEST

/dev/rmt/c1t1d0BEST

/dev/rmt/c1t2d0BEST

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Data Protector will use the physical devices in the same order as defined in the standalone
device configuration.

Only one backup device license is required per cascade during backup operations.

SCSI-II Library and Jukebox


The SCSI-II Library is a device with multiple repository slots and one or more media drives.
The Library is controlled using the SCSI commands, which can perform random accesses to
media repository using the robotics. Larger library devices are also equipped with barcode
readers for rapid scanning of the media repository. In many cases the barcode scanning will
obtain the labels from a cache at the device; the device scans the barcodes as the tapes are
entered into the device.

The access to a library is split into two paths:

• The Control Path


The control path is responsible for the control of the robotics within an SCSI-II library.
The robotics picks up the media from the slot and inserts it into a data drive or unloads it
and puts it back into a slot.
Data Protector accesses the library robotics through a special device file or SCSI path.
On HP-UX systems the appropriate SCSI driver (spt, sctl, schgr) must be configured
in the kernel and the SCSI-II control device file must be created before you can configure
the device within Data Protector. The default directory path for schgr devices is /dev/rac.
On Windows, the changer#:bus:target:lun identify the device path for the library
controller.

• The Data Path


The data path is used to write data to the medium or read data from it, once the robotics
has loaded the appropriate medium. The data path is the device file associated with the
tape drive. You'll need to have one data path for each drive in the library. In most cases
the data device files are automatically created by the operating system. (Eg; /dev/rmt/0m
(UX) or Tape0:0:3:0C (Windows)).

Using this concept, a SCSI-II Library is configured in two steps:

• Configuring the Library and Control Path

When you add a new SCSI-II Library, you first define the robotic. This includes the
definition of the control device file, the system to which the robotic is connected, the
number of slots used, and the use of such items as cleaning tapes and barcode readers.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

• Configuring the Drives and Data Path

The configuration of the data drives is similar to the configuration of standalone devices.
You define the data device file, the system to which the drive is connected, the drive
index number within the library, and the type of drive and medium pool used by this
device.
The SCSI-II library policy cannot be used to run GRAU devices or large StorageTek silos.
These are managed with StorageTek ACSLS software.

Jukebox Configuration
The Jukebox is very similar to the SCSI-II Library, but only works for Magneto Optical
devices. The major difference to SCSI-II library is that a pair of special MO drivers, which are
available only on HP-UX, operates the Jukebox. (schgr, ssrfc)

Data Protector offers two ways to configure a Magneto Optical Jukebox.


• As an SCSI-II Library (see above)

• As an MO Jukebox (preferred)

The difference with a Jukebox is that the user accesses a side of a platter and the operating
system driver automatically mounts the platter into an available drive. The driver for the
Jukebox understands the concept of media rotation, so as to allow both sides of the MO
medium to be accessed.

The user cannot define into which drive the platter will be loaded.

This is implemented with the use of a special magneto optical driver set, available on HP-UX.

NOTE There are separate device files for side A and side B of the Magneto Optical
platters.
The configuration of an MO Jukebox is similar to an SCSI-II library configuration. Again, it is
split into two steps:
1. Define a library name and the device files for all MO platters.
2. Define the drives.

To use all the drives within a magneto optical jukebox simultaneously, you have to create as
many “logical” drives as there are physical drives available.

In comparison to a SCSII library, you are not required to specify a device file, as the HP-UX
Jukebox device drivers handle the assignment of the drive to the device file. See the
procedure later in this module for configuration of the Jukebox on HP-UX.
NOTE If you configure a jukebox within Data Protector and use it for backups and
restores, this jukebox should not be used by any other application

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Stacker
Stacker devices have a cartridge with multiple media slots. The difference between a Library
Device and a Stacker is that a Stacker has no control over media selection, simply load and
unload. Stackers can only load media sequentially from the cartridge, while libraries can
randomly access the media loaded in their repository slots

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–3. SLIDE: Device Configurations

Device Configurations

Logical device

Logical device Logical devices


Logical device
Logical device
Logical device

Drives
Hardware compression
Library controller
Robotic and barcode reader
Repository slots
Mail slot (import/export)
Cleaning slot

Student Notes
While most of the configuration within Data Protector for a Logical Device contains
parameters added by Data Protector, you must first understand how the operating system
makes the physical device available to you before you can configure it as a Logical Device.

Data Protector supports devices connected to many different Media Agent platforms, and
each one represents devices in a slightly different manner. The two platforms for the Cell
Manager, Unix and Windows usually detect and add their devices automatically.

There are numerous ways to configure Data Protector to make use of the backup devices that
are available. Within Data Protector, from a Logical Device perspective, it is possible to:

• Configure a single physical device multiple times, each with a different name and set of
properties
• Configure a physical device to have multiple device files, and then configure each one a
separate Logical Device (most common on Unix systems)
• Configure multiple single physical devices as a single Logical Device
• Configure a tape library more than once, each with a sub-set of all the available drives
and slots (this is necessary when a library contains drives of different types and where
the repository contains more than one type of media)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

NOTE On Windows 2000 systems it is necessary to disable the RSM (Removable


Storage Manager) driver for the device to be used by Data Protector, as RSM
is not compatible with Data Protector. Use the device manager to facilitate
this change.

Device Locking and Queuing


When a physical device is configured more than one time within Data Protector, it is
necessary to use the “Lock Name” property for the Logical Device. This prevents Data
Protector from trying to access the device from more than one session at the same time.
Device request will be queued for up to 60 minutes until the desired drive is available.

NOTE: There is a global option to control the queuing time (in minutes),
SmWaitForDevice, 60 is the default value.

Device Scanning (devbra)


Data Protector provides a tool to scan Media Agent systems and discover attached devices.
The Data Protector command devbra –devices lists available tape drives and library devices.
You may also use operating system tools as available to discover the connected devices, such
as on HP-UX, the ioscan command, or on Windows the Device Manager.

Sample output from devbra –devices:

Windows Host:

C:\Program Files\Omniback\bin\devbra –devices

Tape: HP:C1533A Path: “Tape0:0:3:0C” SN: “N/A”


Description: CLAIMED:DAT 4mm Tape Drive DDS-2
Device type: 4mm Flags: 0x0011

Unix Host:

# /opt/omni/lbin/devbra –devices

Tape: QUANTUM:DLT7000 Path: “/dev/rmt/0mn” SN: “JF73910796”


Description: Quantum DLT 7000 series drive
Device type: dlt Flags: 0x0081

Tape: QUANTUM:DLT7000 Path: “/dev/rmt/0mn” SN: “JF74020114”


Description: Quantum DLT 7000 series drive
Device type: dlt Flags: 0x0081

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Tape: HP:C1533A Path: “/dev/rmt/0mn” SN: “N/A”


Description: DAT 4mm Tape Drive DDS-2
Device type: 4mm Flags: 0x0001

Exch: HP:C5177-7000 Path: “/dev/rac/c3t4d0” SN: “fq000512”


Description: HP DLT Library 7228w
Flags: 0x0086 Slots: 28 Drives: 2
Drive(s) SN:
“JF74020114”
“JF73910796”

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–4. SLIDE: Configuration Methods

Configuration Methods

Automatic Manual
• Standalone devices • All device types
• Libraries (SAN or SCSI) • All parameters user selected
• Two step approach • Adjust options as needed
• select system/device
• select autoconfigure
• Automatic Lock Names
• Adjust options as needed

Student Notes
Data Protector offers two methods of configuring devices, namely Automatic or Manual.

With Automatic device configuration, Data Protector executes the device agent (devbra) to
scan the Media Agent hosts and assemble a device list. From the list, hosts or devices are
selected by the Administrator and the Logical Device configuration process is then started.
Individual device options are set to the product defaults, but may be altered as needed once
the auto-configuration process completes.

With Manual device configuration, the Administrator specifies all parameters needed to
configure the Logical Device. Using this method, a high degree of control over all of the
parameters is available, but this procedure requires more experience and a thorough
understanding of the hardware and the operating system device to be configured.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–5. SLIDE: Adding a Device (manual method)

Adding a Device (manual method)

Using the
command line

omnidownload, omniupload

Student Notes
The Data Protector Administrator can define a Logical Device via the GUI or by editing a
template. The templates in <OMNICONFIG>/devices may be uploaded into the Data
Protector Media Management Internal Database with the omniupload command.

Logical Device configuration via the GUI is easier than the using the command line, and
therefore the recommended method.

To modify the configuration of an existing device or to just extract the device configuration
from the database use the omnidownload command; this creates a file which then may be
edited and uploaded with omniupload command.

NOTE For more information on these commands,(omniupload/omnidownload)


refer to the following pages or use the online man pages.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Logical Device General Options


When adding a Logical Device, there are many Data Protector options to choose from
including:
Logical Device Name The name within Data Protector that you will use to refer to this
(max 32 chars) Logical Device.
Example: Oasis_DLT_1 (avoid using spaces in the name)

Description A user defined description of the device.


(max 64 chars) Example “Hewlett Packard DLT 7000”.

Client The system to which the physical device is connected.

Device Type Standalone, SCSI Library, etc.

Data Format Choice of Data Protector or NDMP– NetApp, NDMP – Celera

NDMP Server Server name required when NDMP is the interface type, this also
requires the NDMP Media Agent to be installed

Library Options
In addition to the general options available to the standalone device, the library device adds
some configuration parameters for the library components.

Device Type SCSI-II Library

Interface Type Choice of SCSI-II, NDMP – NetApp, NDMP - Celera

NDMP Server Server name required when NDMP is the interface type, this also
requires the NDMP Media Agent to be installed

TIP! Using the omnidownload command to save device configurations in text files
may be beneficial when performing disaster recovery, as device configurations
would need to be created before restore operations would take place.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

omniupload/omnidownload
omnidownload may be used to extract device information from Data Protector
database into a file.

omniupload may be used to upload a new device configuration into the Data
Protector database from a file.

omnicellinfo may be used to display configuration information about the Cell

Examples:

The following table provides some samples using the omniupload/download commands

Description Command Line Examples

List the devices in the cell: omnicellinfo -dev

(use either of the commands) omnidownload -dev_info


List the details of a device: omnicellinfo -dev -detail

(use either of the commands) omnidownload -list_devices -detail

View the device description more /etc/opt/omni/devices/configuration.dev


template file

Copy a template file before cd /etc/opt/omni/devices


editing cp tpstalone.dev dds.dev

Edit the file before uploading vi dds.dev

Upload a new device


definition into the cell omniupload -create_device dds.dev
database
Download a device definition
for modification where omnidownload -device <dev> -file <Filename>
<dev> is the logical device
Upload a modified device
omniupload –modify_device <Logical Name> -
configuration file <Filename>

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–6. SLIDE: Physical Device Selection

Physical Device Selection

Standalone device

Library robotic
device

Student Notes
Robotic Device File The system device file that is used by the operating system to
(SCSI-pass-through communicate with robotic controller.
device file) Example: /dev/rac/c0t5d1 (HP-UX)

Example: scsi2:0:5:1 (Windows)

Example: changer0:0:5:0 (Windows)

Drive Index This number indicates the position of the drive within the library.
This is used to identify to the robot which drive to load tapes
into.

Barcode Reader Informs Data Protector if the library includes a barcode reader
Support mechanism.

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Logical Devices

SCSI-II Reserve, When a library is connected to two or more systems on a shared


Release Robotic bus in a SAN. This feature can be used to ensure that there is no
Control contention between systems.

Busy Drive Handling This tells Data Protector how to react if it unexpectedly finds that
a drive already has media in it. Choices will vary depending upon
the capability of the library.

Example: Abort, Eject, Eject to Mail Slot.

Repository slots The repository slots available in this logical library (This may be
different from the physical settings.)

Drive(s) A library can contain one or more drives. Each drive must be
defined within Data Protector in a similar way as any other
standalone Logical Device. As of version 4.0 of Data Protector,
each drive within the library may be a different type of device,
such as DLT, LTO, etc.

Libraries on HP-UX
Before you configure a SCSI-II Library (Tape or Optical), a SCSI Pass through driver or auto-
changer driver (sctl or schgr) must be installed and configured properly on your system.
When you have a choice of drivers, the schgr driver makes the Logical Device configuration
simpler, as Data Protector is able to detect the device name. If the sctl device file is manually
configured with the mknod command, Data Protector is able to use the device but may be
unable to detect it when performing the system scan. The library controller in this case would
need to be specified by manually entering its name in the “SCSI address or filename of the
library robotic” field when configuring the tape library.

Libraries on Windows 2000


On Windows 2000, the RSM driver is not compatible with Data Protector. On systems that
have the RSM enabled by default, Windows 2000 will attempt to operate the device at boot
time. The Windows 2000 boot process will automatically try to load and scan each tape for its
format. Unfortunately Windows 2000 will report that the tapes are bad for those that have
Data Protector format on them. Disable the RSM for the auto-changer/library devices that you
want to use with Data Protector. Reboot your system as necessary after disabling the device
driver for your tape library within the device manager.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–7. SLIDE: Library Repository Configuration

Library Repository Configuration

Slot range

Used with
Detect dirty
drive

Student Notes

The configuration of the Library Repository allows the Administrator to select all or some of
the available slots within a particular library. The slots may be specified in a range, as shown,
or as individual slot numbers. The slots need not be sequential, although this is most
common. It is possible that a tape library is configured more than once as a logical device,
each time with a different set of physical slots associated with it. This type of configuration is
very useful when the tape library contains more than one type of tape drive (DLT, LTO).

The Cleaning Slot option specifies which (if any) of the library repository slots contains a
cleaning tape(s). Data Protector will use this slot with the logical devices that have enabled
the “dirty drive detection” option. Dirty drive detection is performed only once, and before
the backup process starts. If a drive reports that it is in the clean-me mode, Data Protector
will load the cleaning tape before the backup of data begins.

Uses of the cleaning tapes (loaded automatically by Data Protector) are logged in the
cleaning.log file stored on the cell manager in the /var/opt/omni/log/cleaning.log on Unix and
C:\Program Files\Omniback\log\cleaining.log on Windows.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–8. SLIDE: Library Drive Configuration

Library Drive Configuration

Student Notes
The Data Protector Library configuration controls access to the library only; you must
configure a logical device type "drive" for each tape drive within the library. After the
completion of the Library configuration you will be prompted to create a drive for the library,
select yes to configure the drive now. Later you will be able to add a new drive to the library
configuration by selecting the library from the "Device and Media Management" context and
then Edit -> Add -> Drive… . Be prepared to provide the device file that corresponds with the
library drive index number.

Library Drive Index Numbers


This is likely to be one of the more difficult parts of the SCSI Library configuration. You will
need to know which device file matches to the library drives. One way to make this simpler is
to use the SCSI ID of the drive. You must be able to set the SCSI target ID of the device equal
to the drive index number for that possibility. This setting will allow you to easily identify the
device in the list that Data Protector will present.

The example shown on the slide is for a HP SureStore Library; note the data device path may
be something like: c0t1d0BEST, where t1 represents the SCSI target ID; this is used to
match with the drive 1 (index 1) for the physical drive in the library.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

NOTE On some devices, the drives may be numbered starting with zero (0); this
would correspond to the first drive and the Data Protector index number of
one (1). Data Protector starts index numbers at one.

NOTE If you get the Exchanger Data Device and the Drive Index numbers matched
incorrectly, Data Protector may load a tape into the wrong drive. For example
Drive 2 gets a tape loaded and then the data is sent to Drive 1. This will result
in a backup failure!

Library Operations
Data Protector uses its various agents to access the library devices during backup, restore
and media management sessions. Which agents are used depends upon the session type.

Data Protector uses the following agents to access the data (tape) devices in the library:

BMA Backup Media Agent


RMA Restore Media Agent
MMA Media Management Agent

Data Protector uses the following agent to manage the library activities, such as load and
unload:

UMA Utility Media Agent

The UMA is the only agent that is interactive, and available as a command. The command
executable is in: <OMNIHOME>/lbin on Unix and in the <OMNIHOME>\bin directory on
Windows. There is also a man-page for it. The UMA is useful for troubleshooting and testing
the tape library operations.

NOTE When backup, restore and media operations are in progress, no interaction
with UMA is recommended.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–9. SLIDE: Media Type and Default Pool

Media Type and Default Pool

Standalone and Library Drive

Student Notes
Data protector offers the following choices for device media type and Default Media Pool:

Media Type The type of media that the device supports.


Example: DLT
Pool Name The default media pool that will be used for automatic media
initialization and backup.
Example: Default DDS.
Device File The system device file that is used by the operating system to
communicate with the data device.
Example: /dev/rmt/c2t2d0BEST (HP-UX)
Example: Tape0:0:5:0C (Windows 2000)

Default Media Pool


Data Protector requires a Media Pool to be assigned to each Logical Device. This default
assignment is used for tape initialization as well as backup. Backup Specifications may
override this pool assignment so that a particular Media Pool Is used instead of the default.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–10. SLIDE: Advanced Options

Advanced Options

Student Notes
Library drives as well as standalone devices support additional Advanced options to control
how the devices are to be used during backup. The table below presents these options. All of
the advanced options have default values, and do not require changes in order to use a
particular device. The advanced options allow for more granular control over performance
characteristics of the device.

Concurrency This defines the maximum number of concurrent data streams (from
disk agents) that the device will receive. Setting this to an optimum
value for a particular device type allows the device to stream. This can
have various effects on backup performance. Generally, faster devices
such as DLT 7000 should be configured with higher concurrency values
than slower devices such as DDS.

Values: 1 to 32 (32 as of Data Protector 5.0, previous range 1-5)

Eject Specifies whether the tape should be ejected after the operation that
has accessed it completes. The default is not to eject. This is only
useful for standalone tape drives.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
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Logical Devices

CRC Check Use this button to write CRC checks to the media used with this logical
device. The CRC check allows you to verify the accuracy of the data
written to the media with the verify operation in the GUI or by the
omnimver command.

This option can affect performance negatively.

Rescan This library option instructs Data Protector to rescan the device
repository before a backup starts. This is useful if manual media
changes were performed since the last media scan. This rescan
synchronizes the Data Protector media database with the media that is
currently present within the library repository. For devices that
support barcode readers, this is a barcodes scan; otherwise the scan
requires each tape to be loaded into a drive to scan the header.

For devices, such as LTO (Ultrium) that support cartridge memory,


Data Protector will access the cartridge memory when scanning a tape
as well as when importing the tape.

Dirty Drive This tells Data Protector to detect when a drive is in need of cleaning.
Detection It senses this via the SCSI status bytes received back from the drive. If
this option is enabled, Data Protector will either automatically clean
the drive itself or issue a mount request for a cleaning tape to be
loaded. The cleaning check is only performed once, and before the
backup begins. Drives that set the SCSI status during a backup
execution may cause the backup to fail with IO errors.

Block Size The device hardware processes data it receives using a device type
specific block size. Data Protector allows the adjustment of the size of
blocks it sends to the device. The default is 64 KB on devices
connected to UNIX systems and 56 KB on devices connected to some
Windows systems. For Data Protector to use tapes for backup in
different devices, the block size must be set the same for all devices.
The maximum block size is currently 1024 KB. Your device/interface
adapter may not allow for large block sizes, consult with the vendor for
supported block size for your devices. Larger block sizes (greater than
56K) on some Windows systems require modifications to the registry,
and may not be supported. Disaster recovery requires the default block
size to be used on Windows systems.
See the Administrators Reference Manual for details.
Segment Size Use this field to enter the size of the data segments on the media. The
segment size affects the speed of a restore. A smaller segment size
requires additional space on the media, because each segment has a
fast search mark. The additional fast search marks result in faster
restores, because the Media Agent can more quickly locate the segment
containing the restore data. Optimal segment size depends on the
media type used in the device and the kind of data backed up. By
default, the segment size is in the range of 100 to 2000 MB, depending
on the medium type.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Disk Agent Data Protector Media Agents and Disk Agents use memory buffers to
hold data waiting to be transferred. This memory is divided into a
Buffers number of buffer areas (one for each Disk Agent, depending on device
concurrency).
Each buffer area consists of 8 Disk Agent buffers (of the same size as
the block size configured for the device). You can change this value to
be anything between 1 and 32, although this is rarely necessary. There
are two basic reasons to change this setting:
• Shortage of memory
The shared memory required for a Media Agent can be calculated
as follows:
DAConcurrency*NumberOfBuffers*BlockSize
Reducing the number of buffers from 8 to 4, for instance, results in
a 50% reduction in memory consumption, with performance
implications.
• Streaming
If the available network bandwidth varies significantly during
backup, then it becomes more important that a Media Agent has
enough data ready for writing to keep the device in the streaming
mode. In this case, increase the number of buffers.
Mount Request The script to be executed after a mount prompt request has been
Script outstanding for the number of minutes configured as the Mount
Prompt Delay. The default script simply sends an email notification to
the backup owner containing the relevant details.
Default template: /opt/omni/lbin/Mount.sh (Unix)
C:\Program Files\Omniback\bin\Mounts.sh (Windows)
Mount Request The time in minutes that must of elapsed since a mount prompt was
Delay issued before the Mount Prompt Notification script is executed.
Default: 30 Minutes.
Lock Name Used when a physical device is defined more than once for Data
Protector. The use of the same lock name for each use of the physical
device prevents Data Protector from trying to use (and failing) the
same physical device more than once concurrently. It is common to
configure a tape drive as more than one Logical Device when you
would like to apply more than one set of option to be used for different
operations such as backup. In some cases you may want a different
combination of block size, segment size and concurrency. The lock is
name is usually optional, and just a string of text that you choose;
required for SAN configured libraries.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–11. SLIDE: Device Concurrency

Device Concurrency

Disk Agent Media Agent

Concurrency = 1

Disk Agent Media Agent

Disk Agent

Concurrency = 3

Disk Agent Media Agent

Disk Agent Maximum concurrency: 32

Student Notes
Data Protector supports a Logical Device feature called concurrency; this allows for the
simultaneous (concurrent) backup of multiple objects to a single Logical Device at the same
time. Concurrency is one of the most commonly altered device options. This option controls
the DA to MA ratio for the device. The maximum concurrency per device is 32; however the
device defaults are usually much lower, in the range of 2-5.

The concurrency feature is primarily designed to keep the Media Agent streaming data to the
device to achieve the best device performance. Data Protector will attempt to start the
required number of Disk Agents sending data to the Media Agent simultaneously to satisfy
the concurrency of the logical device during backup operations. Fewer Disk Agents may be
started for backup due to the number of objects included in the backup specification.

Data Protector supports parallel backup as well as concurrency. Parallel backup allows for
multiple tape drives to be used (in parallel) within both a single backup job execution as well
as with multiple backups running within the Data Protector Cell at the same time. The
example at the top of the slide (above) shows parallel backup, both logical devices set to
concurrency one. Any number of logical devices with varying concurrency values may be
used within the cell according to cell’s license limits.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

There are two global variables that have an impact on the concurrency level as well as the
level of parallelism. They are :

MaxMAperSM (32 default, range 1-32) controls the maximum number of load balanced media
agents per session manager.

MaxDAperMA (default 32, range 1-32) controls the maximum concurrency value (DA to MA)
for logical devices.

Concurrency Implications

• Backup Performance
The performance of some linear tape devices, such as DLT, may be negatively impacted
by a lack of streaming. This should be a consideration when configuring the logical device
for backup. Some newer linear tape devices such as HP’s Ultrium allow for speed
variation (adaptive write), and can better accommodate the data flow provided by the
Media Agent to stream the drive.

Higher values for concurrency, however, don't necessarily mean higher backup
performance. Consider performing a full backup on a server with a partitioned disk. In
most cases multiple objects will reside on the same physical disk. Using concurrency to
backup the partitioned disk may lead to disk head contention, and the backup may
actually take longer and not allow the tape device to stream due to the disk bottleneck.

The bottom line is that concurrency values are designed to improve backup performance
in most situations. The organization of the objects within the backup specification will
have an impact as well. You will need to test various solutions in your environment to
find the best possible combination of objects and concurrency to achieve the best
performance.
• Restore Performance
The performance of Data Protector restore may be negatively affected when a device
configured for concurrency was used for backup and you are not using parallel restore to
recover data. Data Protector will have to read more of the tape to restore a single object
that was interleaved onto the tape with other objects during the backup process.
Generally speaking, backups are performed much more than restores, so concurrency
values should be configured to achieve the best backup performance possible.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–12. SLIDE: Data Protector Tape Format

Tape Format

Tape
Image
Data Segments
Header minimum 10 MB
150-1000 MB
defaults
EOD
End of
Segment Data

Data Block Size: Fast Catalog Fast


Blocks 8K -1024K Search Information Search
Mark Mark

Student Notes
The Data Protector tape format supports the following features:

• Fast Tape Positioning


• Multiple Block Sizes
• Data Multiplexing
• Appendable
• Media Label
• Catalog Information
• Verification of Tape Contents

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Tape Sections
The Data Protector tape is comprised of the following sections:
• Tape Header — Data Protector writes a tape header and tape label. There are two Data
Protector labels: one is the user-defined label; the other is the Data Protector medium ID.
This ID is unique and used by Data Protector internally. The tape header uses only one
block on the tape.
• Segments — Data to be backed up is written to a segment. The size of the segment can
be configured in the Logical Device configuration window with advanced options. If
larger segments are used, more memory is required on the system on which the media
agent is running. This memory is used to store catalog information. If device concurrency
is used, the data within the segment will be from more than one disk agent. Larger tape
segments can improve the performance of the backup in many cases; this should be
tested within your environment.
• Dynamic Segment Size --- Segment size is no longer a fixed size (as of 4.0). The
parameter above is used to specify the maximum size of the segment on tape. The
segment size used will now be determined by the segment size parameter, or a system
specific parameter named OMNIMAXCATALOG_<device_name>. By specifying a
catalog size per device on a particular system, you can limit how large the catalog
segment will be on the tape. The default segment size is 12 MB, and can range from 1 to
60 MB. Data Protector may adjust the size of the segment if the catalog reaches the
defined limit. The catalog size takes precedence over the specified segment size. The
parameter to define the catalog limit must be in the omnirc file on the system where the
device is connected.
• Data Blocks ---- Data stored within the segments are written in blocks. The block size for
most Data Protector devices is 64 KB by default (file devices and reel tapes use 16 KB, D3
uses 256 KB.) This default is now used for both Unix as well as Windows NT. In prior
versions of Data Protector the block size for Windows NT was at 56K. You should set the
block size to equal values if you want to exchange tapes between different devices. In
many cases, when backing up a large data set, a larger block size may improve
performance. The required block size for most Disaster Recovery backups is 64KB.
• Catalog Information — Catalog information is stored after each segment is written and
records what data (file names, etc. ...) was backed up in that segment. When the data is
written to tape, the catalog information is kept in memory and then written to the tape at
the end of each segment. The larger the segment, the more memory is required to keep
the backup information. The catalog information is also stored within the Data Protector
database. This information is later used during the restore process. Catalog information
may be read from the tape into the database by performing a media import. (Media
Import is covered in the next module). The size of the catalog per segment by default is
12 MB, but can range from 1 to 60 MB. See the previous description for Dynamic Segment
Size.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Block Size
Although it is possible to change the block size for a device, it is advisable to be mindful of
the following when doing so:

• Each Logical Device has a block size option


• The default block size is set based upon the type of device
• Data Protector adjusts the block size automatically during the restore
• Data Protector backup cannot append to a tape originally written with a different block
size than the one for the current device
• Some versions of Omniback do not support the same block size features as the current
release. This was primarily due to hardware constraints within the operating systems
hardware. Windows devices were previously set to a default of 56 KB, compared to the
current setting of 64 KB. Some Windows devices still support only 56 KB. Consult with
your device/interface documentation to verify support for larger block sizes. Some
disaster recovery procedures used by Data Protector will require the native (default
56KB) block size to be used due to the limited system functionality available at recovery
time.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–13. SLIDE: Mount Notification

Mount Notification

Defaults
Delay: Programs: _____________
30min /opt/omni/lbin/Mount.sh
<product>/bin/mount.bat
Parameters Description
USER User name
GROUP User group name
HOSTNAME Name of host (short)
STARTPID PID of the process that caused the mount prompt
DEVNAME Logical Device Name
DEVHOST Short name of host where device is connected to
DEVFILE File representing the device
DEVCLASS DAT standalone, DAT exchanger, DAT stacker, MO standalone ...
DEVCLASSNAME Currently same as devclass
MEDID Medium ID
MEDLABEL Medium user label
MEDLOC Location of the medium
POOLNAME Name of the pool
POLICY Strict, Loose, App+Loose, App+Strict
MEDCLASS Medium class number
MEDCLASSNAME DAT/DDS, Optical, Double Sided Optical, Exabyte, 3480, Reel Tape, File
SESSIONKEY Session key to be used by omnimnt <config>/options/global:
MountDelay=<DelayInMinutes>
MountScript=<Full Pathname>

Student Notes
Data Protector provides a script template called Mount (Mount.sh on Unix, Mount.bat on
Windows) that may be executed whenever a device needs a tape. Every device may use a
different script, or they all may share a single Mount script. By default, the Mount script will
send an e-mail, or Windows broadcast to owner of the backup at the cell server after 30
minutes of waiting for a tape to be loaded.

The Mount Prompt Script executes in response to an event. The event in this case is a Mount
Request. So in essence, Data Protector is providing an event driven notification mechanism.
The type of notification or notification method is up to you. For example, you may want to
execute some paging software in response to the event.

NOTE The mount script may be customized to perform functions other than
standard email. For example, it can interface with paging software to alert the
operator, or to issue a message to a management application such as
OpenView Operations by issuing the opcmsg command.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

A mount notification is issued when a tape that Data Protector requires is not loaded in the
drive or available within the repository of the library. For example, when a backup is writing
to a standalone device and the tape has been filled, Data Protector will request a further tape
to be loaded to continue the backup. The mount request may also occur when the tape in the
drive is from a different media pool than the one assigned for the backup. When this occurs,
the following events can take place:

• Data Protector puts the session into the Mount Request state.

• Data Protector issues a mount prompt (when interacting with the session) and then waits
until the mount request is satisfied.

• Data Protector waits for the mount delay time (30 minutes) and then executes only once
the notification script.
The Data Protector Operator should satisfy the mount request from the Monitor GUI or
with the omnimnt command.

The Mount Notification Script does not confirm the mount; it simply issues the
notification according to the script instructions.

NOTE In a later section of this course we will discuss in more detail some additional
notification procedures that may be used for Data Protector events including
mount events.

When Data Protector executes the mount notification script, it passes the following
positional parameters to it:

Parameter Value
THIS=${0} or %0 The name of this script
USER=${1} or %1 The UNIX username
GROUP=${2} or %2 The UNIX group name
HOSTNAME=${3} or %3 The expanded hostname
STARTPID=${4} or %4 The UNIX PID of the client process that started backup
session.
DEVNAME=${5} or %5 The name of the logical device
DEVHOST=${6} or %6 The hostname where the logical device is located
DEVFILE=${7} or %7 The physical device file
DEVCLASS=${8} or %8 The device class number
DEVCLASSNAME=${9} or %9 The device class name
MEDID=${10} The medium ID

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

MEDLABEL=${11} The medium label


MEDLOC=${12) The medium location
POOLNAME=${13} The name of the pool medium belongs to
POLICY=${14} The policy name for the pool
MEDCLASS=${15} The medium class number
MEDCLASSNAME=${16} The medium class name
SESSIONKEY=${17} The session key to be used by omnimnt

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–14. SLIDE: Library Sharing

Library Sharing

System A
Data Only MA
inet

MA
TCP/IP SCSI or
Fiber Channel
Control
and
Session Data MA
Manager
inet

UMA
Robotic
System B

Student Notes
Data Protector allows the sharing of library devices between multiple systems. This is can be
achieved because Data Protector separates the definition of a library into two parts, control
and data.

Data Protector controls the robotic of a library via a separate device than that of the drives.
The robotic control will either have a dedicated SCSI interface that is attached to the
controlling system, or will share the same interface as the drives.

The Data Protector Session Manager instructs the UMA (Universal Media Agent) running on
the system, which has the library robotic control attached, to perform all the library functions
(load, unload, eject, scan) etc. This allows other systems that have library drives attached but
no direct robotic control to issue library control requests (load, unload, eject) to the session
manager. The session manager then gets the Universal media agent to carry out the requests
on behalf of the requesting system.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Direct Library Access


Library sharing has one disadvantage; the controlling host is a single point of failure. To work
around this possible failure point, Data Protector allows for all library connected hosts to
access the library directly.

With direct library access, all hosts may send library control commands directly to the
library. The library control host which coordinates access to the library robotics. If this
controlling host if unavailable then the host sends controls directly to the library. This is
typically used within a SAN environment, where many hosts reside within the same SAN, or
SAN zone.

To enable the direct access mode, a configuration file must be created on all hosts called the
“libtab” file. After the libtab file is created, the “direct access” option may be used for the
library configuration.

Manually Configuring the libtab File

The purpose of the libtab file is to map the library robotic access from local host (media
agent client). Create the libtab file on each Windows or Unix system requiring direct access
in the event of a library control host failure. The libtab file is a plain text file with the
following format:

<FQDN of the local client> <Device File or SCSI path> <Library Name>

On HP-UX systems, the Device File must be the same on all hosts that are to access the
library. If the device files are not the same, a symbolic link may be used on the secondary
hosts to create a device name that matches the original name on the controlling host.

The libtab definition file is store in:


Windows: <OMNIHOME>\libtab
UNIX: /opt/omni/.libtab (HP-UX and Solaris)
Other Unix: /usr/omni/.libtab

Note: The libtab file may be copied to each host requiring direct library access or a
client specific file may be created.

Sample /opt/omni/.libtab file on r848c77 for library hosted by r848c76:


Note: quotes are used for library name because the name contains spaces.

r848c77.dow.edunet.hp.com /dev/rac/c7t0d0 “HP:MSL5000 Series_r848c76”

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–15. SLIDE: Autoconfigure a Device (1)

Autoconfigure a Device (1)

three systems and one library (4 drives + robotic control)

Tape Library
smocl4

HP:C7200-800
(DLT 8000)

SAN
smocl3
smohpu04

Student Notes
This example assumes a configuration consisting of three systems and one library consisting
of 4 drives. The library is connected via SAN to three systems, i.e. all three systems can “see”
all four drives and also the robotic of the library.

The goal of the configuration is that one system (smohpu04) gets access to the robotic of the
library, and all systems access all drives. After configuration, the same lock name for all
logical drives should be created, representing the same physical drive.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–16. SLIDE: Autoconfigure a Device (2)

Autoconfigure a Device (2)

Select
Autoconfigure

Select hosts
for library
configuration

Student Notes
Data Protector 5.1 includes the functionality from the “sanconf” tool (from DP 5.0) now as
part of the device GUI. This new capability makes SAN based library configuration very
simple and mostly automatic (with the exception of the previously mention libtab).

Right click Devices and select Autoconfigure Devices to start the auto configuration wizard.

The wizard asks you to select all the systems for which libraries or standalone devices are to
be configured. Click Next. Data Protector scans all selected systems for attached devices.
This scan is done by the tool devbra, and may take several minutes.

The DP 5.1 devbra tool now produces much more user-friendly output, as compared to
previous versions.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–17. SLIDE: Autoconfigure a Device (3)

Autoconfigure a Device (3)

Switch between
Device or Host
grouping

Select system
to control the
robotic

Select systems
which should get
access to the
devices

Student Notes
This slide contains two separate screenshots, which illustrates the step two of the auto
configuration wizard. Two different presentations help to determine the assignments
between the systems and the library. With the grouping by devices (left screenshot) the
presentation is based on libraries. The right screenshot shows a grouping based on systems.
This shows all assignments from the system point of view.

NOTE: Only one system can access the library robotic, indicated by the radio button
(circle). For the drives it is different. Several systems can access the same
device (square button).

The name of the configured drives consist of:

<vendor ID>:<Product>_<Drive Index>_<system name>[(n)]

where n is only used in case the drive is already setup inside Data Protector with the same
name. Since the name must be unique within DP a number is appended. Right-click the drive
name to rename it before the configuration starts.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

The following lock names were automatically created:

drive1: QUANTUM:DLT8000:CKA32P3224
drive2: QUANTUM:DLT8000:JF90908606
drive3: QUANTUM:DLT8000:JF90413627
drive4: QUANTUM:DLT8000:JF90909085

The lock names consist of:

Logical Device Name


Drive type
Model
Serial Number

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–18. SLIDE: Library Scanning

Library Scanning

Student Notes
Data Protector provides a Library Management interface that may be useful verifying library
operations and checking library status.

The slide above shows how to access Library Management to perform scans of the library. If
the library is configured for barcode capability, the barcode scan will report the media label
without having to load the any tapes into the drive. Scan will actually load a tape and read the
tape header. The scan is considered to be a "hard scan" of the tape and is usually avoided
when using libraries, especially if multiple slots are selected due to the amount of time that
the operation may take.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Example: The output of the barcode scan is also available with the uma utility.

NOTE The uma utility may read from the shell standard output on Unix: Also notice
the cleaning tape in slot 15. The CLN prefix for barcode labels is recognized by
Data Protector to indicate a cleaning cartridge.

# print stat | /opt/omni/lbin/uma -tty -barcode -ioctl /dev/dltrobot

*** PROGRAM: UMA VERSION: HP OpenView Data Protector A.03.00

*** Copyright (C) 1996 Hewlett-Packard Company


*** License is restricted for use with licensed
*** HP OpenView Data Protector products.

/dev/dltrobot> stat
Element Status (T=Transport, X=Im/Export, D=Drive, S=Storage):
0 T1 Empty "" ""

20 X1 Empty "" ""

1 D1 Empty "" ""


2 D2 Empty "" ""

31 S1 Full "BE1130" ""


32 S2 Full "BE1121" ""
33 S3 Full "BE1122" ""
34 S4 Full "BE1123" ""
35 S5 Full "BE1124" ""
36 S6 Full "BE1125" ""
37 S7 Full "BE1126" ""
38 S8 Full "BE1127" ""
39 S9 Full "BE1128" ""
40 S10 Full "BE1129" ""
41 S11 Full "BE1120" ""
42 S12 Full "BE1131" ""
43 S13 Full "BE1132" ""
44 S14 Full "BE1133" ""
45 S15 Empty "CLN903" ""
46 S16 Empty "" ""
47 S17 Empty "" ""
48 S18 Empty "" ""
49 S19 Empty "" ""
50 S20 Empty "" ""
51 S21 Empty "" ""
52 S22 Empty "" ""
53 S23 Empty "" ""
54 S24 Empty "" ""
55 S25 Empty "" ""
56 S26 Empty "" ""
57 S27 Empty "" ""
58 S28 Full "BE1134" ""
/dev/dltrobot> <EOD>

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–19. SLIDE: Library Slot Operations

Library Slot Operations

Student Notes
Data Protector is able to perform many functions related to media management by selecting
the Logical Device within the device and media context. Selecting the device (library, slot or
drive) will allow for the following operations:

NOTE Some operations are only available for library devices.

Operation Description

Scan Identify the tape label and format. Data Protector will recognize
several common Unix tape formats. (this is a hard-scan)

Enter Load a tape from the Mail-Slot (supported on libraries that have
such a feature enabled)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

Eject Eject a tape to the Mail-Slot (supported on libraries that have such
a feature). Can be automated for bulk-eject, see the reporting/
notification or media management sections of this course manual.

Format Initialize a tape into a media pool.

Import Read the header and catalog information from a tape to register it
into the media management database.

Export Remove an unprotected tape from the media management


database.

Change Location Update the vaulting location of a specific tape

Recycle Remove all protection from a tape. Use with caution, as this
allows a tape to be overwritten!

List Cartridge Allows access to the data stored in the LTO (Ultrium)
Memory cartridge memory.

Bulk Operations

Data Protector allows for “bulk” media processing tasks to be performed in accordance with
the general capabilities of the individual tape library. The use of the term “bulk” in this
context means multiple slots/tapes simultaneously or sequentially from a single select
operation. Within a single session Data Protector allows for the selection and then
initialization of all (if desired) of the tapes within the library repository. The Media Session
Manager will load and unload tapes as needed to perform the requested task.

Data Protector is also able to eject multiple tapes for library devices that support the mail-
slot feature. Both enter and eject operations are available relative to the available mail-slot.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–20. SLIDE: External Control

External Control

A mechanism for controlling devices that do not


support the SCSI pass-through driver.

OmniBack sends: drive, slot, flip, load, and unload commands


to the external script.

The external script converts the commands to the native


ones required by the device and executes them.

Student Notes
This device type is designed to allow for simple and efficient support of non-standard
autochanger devices that do not work with the standard SCSI pass-through driver.

The idea is to locate the execution of device-specific commands in an external script or


program, which is called each time the media agent needs to load or unload a medium from a
cartridge.

To keep this mechanism as simple as possible, but also powerful and flexible enough to deal
with a large variety of autochanger devices, the Data Protector media agent uses only two
operations: medium load and medium unload.

Both commands are invoked through the same external script, which must be capable of
parsing predefined options and parameters.

At runtime, the Data Protector media agent will call the external script, parsing it for all
necessary information to complete the required action. The script should perform the action
and return an exit code of zero if the operation was successful, or a positive integer in case of
an unsuccessful operation.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

During the execution of the script, any messages read from its stdout will be picked up by
the media agent and passed to the controlling session manager as error messages at level
minor.
The script should be able to handle the commands:
Drive <Drive #>

Slot <Slot #>

flip

load

unload
The media agent assumes that the autochanger is online and reset to an operational state
before it is used. If the autochanger has been used before and left in an inconsistent state, the
load/unload operations will probably fail and abort the media agent.

The external script should catch this situation and reinitialize the autochanger to a default
operational state. The media agent does not issue a special reset or initialize command
for this purpose.

Some autochangers have removable cartridge magazines that can be loaded and unloaded
under software control. The media agent assumes that the magazine is loaded and does not
attempt to preload it at startup or unload it at shutdown. If the specific autochanger supports
magazine loading, the external scripts should detect an unloaded magazine and load it
transparently to the media agent.

The media agent launches the external script; therefore, it runs on the system on which the
Logical Device is configured.

Caution! The external script runs with root permissions, therefore the security of
this script is very important.

Example of an External Control Script


# Usage: script [-load]|[-unload]|....
#
# -load - load cartridge
# -unload - unload cartridge
# -slot - number of the slot (0,1,...)
# -drive - number of the drive (0,1,...)
# -flip - use b side - if device has two sides (for
MO devices)

let num=0
let flip=0
for arg in $*
do
TAB[${num}]=${arg}
let num=${num}+1
done

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

let i=0
while [ ${i} -lt ${num} ]
do
if [ ${TAB[${i}]} = "-slot" ]
then
let slot=TAB[${i}+1]+1
fi
if [ ${TAB[${i}]} = "-drive" ]
then
let drive=TAB[${i}+1]
fi
if [ ${TAB[${i}]} = "-load" ]
then
let load=1
fi
if [ ${TAB[${i}]} = "-unload" ]
then
let load=0
fi
if [ ${TAB[${i}]} = "-flip" ]
then
let flip=1
fi

let i=${i}+1
done

if [ ${load} -eq 1 ]
then
/usr/omni/bin/HTC4 insert $slot
exit $?
else
/usr/omni/bin/HTC4 eject
exit $?
fi

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–21. SLIDE: GRAU and StorageTek Libraries

GRAU and StorageTek Libraries

• Large silos controlled by


DAS/ACSLS software

• Requires unlimited slot


library license.

• Integration modules
installed on client
systems

Student Notes
These large libraries are typically seen in mainframe environments and are controlled by a
dedicated system running either DAS or ACS software.

In order to use these devices with Data Protector, the additional Unlimited Slot Library
License must be purchased. The special integration modules also must be installed on the
client systems that are connected to the library.

GRAU DAS Library


These large silo libraries are made by the GRAU Company and used in mainframe
environments. These libraries are controlled by DAS software running on a separate system.
Data Protector passes commands to this system to perform media requests. Before this type
of library can be configured in Data Protector, the GRAU DAS Integration Module must be
installed on the Data Protector client systems that are attached to the GRAU.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

StorageTek ACS Library


These large silo libraries are made by the StorageTek Company and are used in mainframe
environments. These libraries are controlled by ACS software running on a separate system.
Data Protector passes commands to this system to perform media requests. Before this type
of library can be configured in Data Protector, the StorageTek ACS Integration module must
be installed on the Data Protector client systems that are attached to the StorageTek.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

7–22. Review Questions

1. What Data Protector device type would you use to configure a single DLT drive?

2. What Data Protector utility can be used to check communication with a library device
before you configure it as a Logical Device?

3. What HP-UX driver does Data Protector use to control the robotics of library devices?

HP-UX?

Windows?

4. What is the purpose of the advanced option “Concurrency”?

5. What is the purpose of the “Mount Prompt Script”?

6. Describe the purpose of “Scanning” media?

7. What is the difference between a “scan” and a “barcode scan”?

8. What command can be used to get a listing of all the logical devices in your cell?

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 7
Logical Devices

9. What command can be used to create and modify logical devices?

10. What command can be used to perform a “scan” of the media in a device?

11. The “Drive Index” is related to the SCSI address of the drive. True/False?

12. Is it possible to have more than one logical device that maps onto the same physical
device?

13. If you were able to, why would you create more than one logical device for a single
physical device?

14. What is the purpose of the Lock Name advanced option? Is it ever required by Data
Protector? If so, when?

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8 — Backup
Objectives
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:
• Create and Generate Backup Specifications using the GUI and command line.

• Adjust all of the options that control the execution of a backup job.

• Create an automated environment with pre- and post execution scripts.

• Understand the backup processing flow

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–1. SLIDE: Performing Backups

Performing Backups

Data Protector provides four methods of


performing backups:
• Interactive backup via the GUI
• Predefined backup specification via the GUI
• Predefined backup specification via the scheduler
• Command-line interface via the omnib command

Student Notes
Data Protector provides several methods of performing backups. The method to use depends
on the flexibility required.

• Interactive Backups via the GUI


Using this method, the GUI is used to define exactly what to back up, and the devices,
media, and options to use. The backup is then executed. When the user attempts to exit
the backup screen, a prompt is displayed asking if the backup should be saved. If the
backup is saved, it becomes a backup specification; otherwise, the backup definition is
lost.
• Predefined Backup Specification via the GUI
A backup specification is a complete definition of a backup saved in a file. This definition
may have been created specifically via the GUI for future use, or may be a previously
saved interactive backup. The location for the saved files is <OMNICONFIG>/datalists.

To execute this type of backup, the user simply selects the backup specification required,
and executes it via a menu item. No other information is required, as all the information is
contained in the backup specification.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

• Predefined Backup Specification via the Data Protector Scheduler


Backup specifications can also be scheduled, which allows the user to specify that the
backup is to run at a predefined date, time, and frequency.
• Command Line Interface via the omnib command
The omnib command can be used to start a backup from the command line.

There are two methods:


Use omnib to execute a previously saved backup specification.
Use omnib and pass all required backup options.

Example using omnib with an existing backup specification datalist:


# omnib -datalist mydatalist
[Normal] From: BMA@na168w2 "dds-1" Time: 04/20/02 14:44:35
STARTING Medium Agent "dds-1"

[Normal] From: BMA@na168w2 "dds-1" Time: 04/20/02 14:44:35


/dev/rmt/c1t0d0BEST
Initializing new medium: "Default File_8"

[Normal] From: VBDA@na168w2 "practice-2" Time: 04/20/02 14:44:41


STARTING Disk Agent for na168w2:/stand "practice-2".

[Normal] From: VBDA@na168w2 "practice-2" Time: 04/20/02 14:44:43


COMPLETED Disk Agent for na168w2:/stand "practice-2".

[Normal] From: BMA@na168w2 "dds-1" Time: 04/20/02 14:44:43


COMPLETED Medium Agent "dds-1"

[Normal] From: BSM@na168w2 "mydatalist" Time: 04/20/02 14:44:44


Backup Statistics:

Session Queuing Time (hours) 0.00


----------------------------------------
Completed Disk Agents ........ 1
Failed Disk Agents ........... 0
Aborted Disk Agents .......... 0
----------------------------------------
Disk Agents Total ........... 1
========================================
Completed Media Agents ....... 1
Failed Media Agents .......... 0
Aborted Media Agents ......... 0
----------------------------------------
Media Agents Total .......... 1
========================================
Mbytes Total ................. 10 Mb
Used Media Total ............. 1
Disk Agent Errors Total ...... 0

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

Example: using omnib to backup a filesystem, notice the interrupt takes you into
command mode for the session where interaction is possible, disconnect to keep the session
running without further interaction:
# omnib -filesystem na168w2:/tmp "practice-command" -device dlt_drive1
[Normal] From: BMA@na168w2 "dlt_drive1" Time: 04/20/02 14:43:07
STARTING Medium Agent "dlt_drive1"

[Normal] From: BMA@na168w2 "dlt_drive1" Time: 04/20/02 14:43:08


Loading medium from slot 1 to device /dev/rmt/c1t4d0BEST
^C

Entering command mode....

OMNIB Command Mode


====================
Available are the following commands
Abort - aborts the session and all related actions
Cancel <device> - cancels the device and all Disk Agents working
with the specified device
Mount <device> - informs the Session Manager that a
mount request has been satisfied
Disconnect - disconnects from the Session Manager
Continue - cancels command mode and enters monitor mode
Command:>disconnect Å session stays running to completion

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–2. SLIDE: Backup Specification Types

Backup Specification Types

Datalist:
• DP - General host and file system
Barlist:
• SAP - SAP database and logs
• Oracle 7 - Oracle 7 databases and logs
• Oracle 8 - Oracle 8 databases and logs
• Informix - Informix databases and logs
• Sybase - Sybase databases and logs
• MS SQL - Microsoft SQL databases and logs
• MS Exchange - Microsoft Exchange server

Student Notes
Special types of backup specifications must be used to suit the particular type of source data
being backed up (objects).

Data Protector provides the following predefined backup specification types:

Datalist
This is the most commonly used type of backup specification. It is used to backup:
• General file systems (drives) of UNIX, Windows, and Novell systems
• Windows Registry (configuration)
• Data Protector Internal Database
• Rawdisk sections

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

Barlist

• SAP/R3
An SAP database instance, online or offline, including log files
• Oracle 8/9
An Oracle database instance, online or offline, including log files
• Informix
An Informix database instance, online or offline, including log files
• Sybase
A Sybase database instance, online or offline, including log files
• MS SQL
An MS SQL database instance, online or offline, including log files
• MS Exchange
A Microsoft Exchange mail server.

NOTE The MS backup specifications cannot be configured via the HP-UX GUI. These
must be configured via the NT GUI.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–3. SLIDE: The Backup Specification (datalist)

The Backup Specification (datalist)

A Backup Specification (datalist) may be


used to backup the following object types:

• Filesystem (UNIX/Windows/Netware)
• Hosts (expanded into file systems).
• rawdisk
• the DP internal database

Student Notes
The source data specified within a backup specification is referred to as Objects. When
backed up, the source data is classified according to the specific object type required.
Backup specifications may contain different object types, such as a host backup mixed with
filesystem backups from different systems.
Data Protector provides the following object types:

• file system
This type of object is used for data residing in the operating system file systems. A
backup using this object type backs up the source data, file by file.
Examples: /usr (Unix file system) C: (windows file system)

Data Protector supports most common file system types including:

Vxfs, HFS, NFS, UFS, FAT16, FAT32, VFAT, NTFS, NTFS 5.0, others.
NOTE See the Data Protector Administrator’s Guide for details about each of the file
systems and some specific details or special considerations for each type.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

• host
Also called Disk Discovery; this type of object is used for data residing in file systems. A
backup using this object type backs up the source data, file by file. It is different from the
file system object in that the specific objects to be backed up are determined dynamically
at run time. File systems such as NFS cannot be backed up using this object type, they
must be included as file system objects.
• rawdisk
This type of object is used for data backed up from rawdisk sections (image copy). For
example raw logical volumes on HP-UX systems; /dev/vg01/rlvol1 or
/dev/rdsk/c0t6d0.
• omnidb
Backups of the Data Protector internal database have this special object type. This
ensures that the database is backed up in a consistent state. This backup will be
discussed in more detail in the Database chapter of this manual.
• vbfs
Data originating from HP OpenView OmniStorage MFS (Migrating File Systems).
OmniStorage is HP’s hierarchical storage management solution. Data Protector uses a
special integration to backup OmniStorage data.
• winfs
Data originating from Windows NT/2000, ME, 98 and XP drives. Registry data is also
stored using this object type and is called CONFIGURATION. There are many
considerations for backing up and restoring the CONFIGURATION, see the Data
Protector Administrator’s Guide for more specific details.
• netware
Data originating from Novell NetWare server drives.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–4. SLIDE: Backup Specification Contents

Backup Specification Contents

Backup Spec Options


Backup Specification

Template Options
Defaults

Object Options
Objects

Device Options
Devices

Student Notes
Data Protector provides a rich set of options that can be used to define all the characteristics
that the administrator wants the backup job and stored data to have.

Data Protector provides options at essentially four different levels:

• Template Level
Options associated with a template will set the initial options for the backup. These
“defaults” may be altered for each of the following three additional levels.
• Backup Specification Level
Options available at this level are common to the whole backup session, including the
objects and device specifications that are defined within the backup specification.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

• Object Level
Options at object level are specific to that particular object. A backup specification can
contain one or many separate objects. Each object can have different options. Typically,
objects within a backup specification tend to have the same or similar options. (Defaults
are inherited from templates.)
• Device Level
Options here are specific to the particular logical device. A backup specification can
contain many device definitions. Each one can have different options.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–5. SLIDE: Backup Specification Sequence

Backup Specification Sequence

Choose:
Choose:
•• Load/non-load
Load/non-loadbalance
balance
•• Source
Source
•• Destination
Destination
•• Backup
Backupspecification
specificationadvanced
advancedoptions
options
•• Filesystem advanced options
Filesystem advanced options
•• Schedule
Schedule
•• Backup
Backupobject
object summary
summary(properties/options)
(properties/options)

Student Notes
The list shown above illustrates the typical sequence (as guided by the GUI) used when
defining a backup specification.

The next several pages will first explain and then illustrate each of the choices shown above.

Load balance was previously explained, so next will be the explanation for Source.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–6. SLIDE: Creating Backup Specifications

Creating Backup Specifications

Choose a
template for a set
of default options
Static or
dynamic
devices
Use the
command
to create a
file
••omnicreatedl
omnicreatedl… …
••Edit
EditASCII
ASCIIfile
fileininOMNICONFIG/datalists
OMNICONFIG/datalists

Student Notes
Data Protector is able to generate backup specifications within the GUI, first by selecting an
appropriate template, and then which template options to apply to the new specification.
Once the template is chosen, objects and their options, backup specification options and
devices and their options may all be modified.

All generated specifications are stored in <OMNICONFIG>/datalists directory as text files,


and are able to be edited with editors such as the Unix vi, or the Windows Notepad.

Command Line Example-1: Create a datalist containing all of the file systems for a single
host, the file produced will be host168w2, for the host na168w2, and the logical device
dlt_drive1:

# omnicreatedl -datalist host168w2 -host na168w2 -device dlt_drive1

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

Command Line Example-2: Create a datalist containing all of the file systems from two
hosts, the file produced will be <OMNICONFIG>/datalists/gencombo.

# omnicreatedl -datalist gencombo -host dlthost -host na168w2 \


-device dlt_drive1

NOTE See the man page called omnidatalist for details on the structure and
syntax used within the file.

The datalist file produced by the command line compared to the one produced
by the GUI may be structured differently when more than one host is included.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–7. SLIDE: Load Balancing

Load Balancing

Enables dynamic allocation of devices to objects.

Objects

Devices

Student Notes
One of the first choices you will have to make when creating a backup specification is the use
of load balancing. If you refer back to the previous slide, you will notice the callout indicating
the on/off switch for its use. Load balancing avoids the pitfalls of static device allocation by
enabling dynamic device allocation. With dynamic device allocation, objects are not targeted
at a specific device, rather at a pool of devices. This feature is designed to be used with multi-
drive tape libraries, but will also work with stand-alone devices.

Using this method, the creator of the backup specification does not need to worry about what
objects are sent to each device. Data Protector allocates the objects to a device when the
device finishes backing up the previous object.

Load balancing can also make a backup more robust, as it is possible to define more backup
devices in the backup than are actually required. If a device fails to start, Data Protector will
mark the drive as failed and another device will automatically be used in its place. In some
earlier versions of Data Protector, this was known as Auxiliary Devices.

The creator of the backup specification defines the minimum number of devices that must be
available to successfully complete the backup. In addition, the maximum number of devices
is also defined.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

For example: A load balancing setting of MIN=1, MAX=3 defines that one device is required
to complete the backup successfully, however if three or more devices defined in the backup
specification are available and needed, then three (maximum) will be used.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–8. SLIDE: Static Device Allocation

Static Device Allocation

Objects are pre-assigned to a particular device.

Backup System A Object System A Device


Specification
System A Object System A Device

System B Object System B Device

System C Object System D Device

Student Notes
Static device allocation occurs load balance is disabled, then each object defined in the
backup specification is targeted at a specific logical device. All objects can be targeted to the
same device, or to different ones.

The creator of the backup specification must make a decision as to which objects are sent to
each device. This feature allows for the most control during backups.

The following factors need to be taken into account to get the best performance:
• The number of objects sent to the device
• The size of the objects
• The speed of the device and its concurrency
• How well the object data compresses
• The order in which the objects are backed up

If one device in the list has more or larger objects directed to it, it could still be in use and
have objects pending to it while other devices have finished their objects and are sitting idle.
This is not usually ideal for the best overall backup performance, but may improve
performance by giving more control to someone that is very familiar with the data source,
such as the administrator.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–9. SLIDE: Load Balancing — Object Allocation

Load Balancing — Object Allocation

Backup System A Object


specification Run time Concurrency
2
System A Object
Concurrency
1
Options: System B Object
Load
Balanced System A Object
System C Object System D Device
Min 1
Max 2 System B Object
System A Device
System A Object
System D Device System B Device
System C Object
System A Device

System B Device
Pending Unused
(Max=2)

Student Notes
On the left, we can see a backup specification; the backup specification contains four objects
and three logical devices. The options for the backup specification include: “Load Balanced,
Min 1, Max 2.” Also, note that the backup objects are in a specific order, that is to say they
have an order within the object list.

When a backup specification is configured as load balanced, you will notice that the device
field for each object that normally shows the name of the logical device the object is targeted
at, now shows “Load Balanced.”

At run time, media agents are started for each logical device specified in the backup
specification. However, Data Protector will only start the number of media agents defined in
the MAX parameter, in this case “2.”

The media agents that are started depend on the order defined in the backup specification. In
this example, it is System D and System A Device. The third device, System B Device, is not
used. The backup specification defines “2” as the maximum number of devices that can be
used.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

If one of the devices as not available, for example it is in use by another backup or restore
session, or it failed to start, then Data Protector can use the third device instead.

Once the media agents have started, the disk agents are started. The number of disk agents
started is the combined concurrency values for the running devices; in this case, the total is
three.

Object to Device Assignment


Objects to be backed up are selected in the following manner:
• Objects that reside on the device host have a higher priority for the local device
• Objects are scheduled so that the number of disk agents running per host is minimized
• Objects are grouped together to satisfy the concurrency requirements of the device

Data Protector first sends an object to its local tape drive rather than send it over the
network to a drive on another system.

In our example, the first System-A object has been assigned to the System-A device. The
device concurrency is set to one, so no additional objects are started for the device.

The other System-A object has been allocated to System D device, along with the System B
object, as this device has a concurrency of two.

The reason these two devices are used is that they are the first two devices in the list.
The System C object is in the pending state, as it is waiting for one of the devices to have a
free concurrency slot. The device that finishes backing up one of the objects first will be the
device that receives the System C object.

In this way, devices are constantly fed objects until the backup is complete.

NOTE As the user does not know in advance what objects will be written to each
device, it makes sense to use a common media pool for each device that is to
be a part of a load balanced backup.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–10. SLIDE: Interactive Backup Specifications

Interactive Backup Specificatios

Load
balanced

Non-load
balanced

Check Mark Color:


Blue = primary selection
Cyan = partial
Black = secondary selection
Gray = partial
Manually create a
datalist

Student Notes
When defining objects interactively to be added to a backup specification, you may use a
“task wizard” to create the specification. Within the backup context of the GUI, select
“Tasks” form the bottom of the Scoping Pane. There you will find the wizards. Select either
the load balanced, or non-load balanced wizard. You will not be able to change the load
balance selection later unless you edit the datalist file with a text editor.

As you select objects to be backed up, you may select the check box in front of a host to
include the “host” object, or you may expand the host object and select file systems
individually. The coloring used for the check marks in front of the objects indicate whether
the items were selected directly (blue) or indirectly (black)) because of another selection.
The lightened colors (green and gray) are used to indicate partial selections.

Proceed through the rest of the choices by using the Next Æ button at the bottom of the
Results Area.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–11. SLIDE: Source

Source

primary
Host object
secondary

secondary

Filesystem primary
objects

Student Notes

What to backup?
Multiple object types/selections may be combined together within a single specification for
backup. The choice of host object and file system object may also be mixed with different
agent platforms. The backup is executed as a single session (a single job) comprised of many
objects.

While the flexibility of combining objects together is quite high, you may want to consider
how you will restore data before you define your backups.

How to restore?
Data Protector provides essentially two methods for data restore, object-based, and session-
based.

With session-based restore, Data Protector is able to restore all at once the objects from a
single backup session. The backup session is stored in the Data Protector database and may
be selected for restore. This makes restoration of a complete system very simple, but may

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

change the way that you will define your specifications for backup. With object restore, you
may select to restore an entire object version, or any subset of it, down to the file level.

Warnings during backup


Two very common situations will generate numerous warnings during backup. One is the
backup of the root file system in Unix, the other is the backup attempt of open files in
Windows.

Unix: root file system warnings


The Unix root (/, called “slash”) file system typically holds directories used as mount points
for several other file systems. Unix essentially has one large directory tree that contains
mount point directories for all attached/active disk devices. These disk devices are
commonly logical volumes. When you attempt to backup the root file system, you will only be
backing up the data that resides on the logical volume (disk) mounted to the “/” directory. On
HP-UX systems this is commonly an LVM disk, such as /dev/vg00/lvol3. The warnings
presented during the backup are due to Data Protector’s detection of the mount point
directories. A mount point directory is an empty directory, when the disk is unmounted; that
is how Data Protector will backup the directory, as empty. So a backup of the “root” file
system will only contain the files and sub-directories that are part of the “/ “ mounted
directory. Directories found in “/” that typically serve as mount points are /usr, /var, /tmp,
/home, /opt, /stand. There are likely to be many more in your environment.

Windows: file open warnings


In the Windows file system, applications and users that open files lock these files to prevent
multiple simultaneous access to the same data. This is very common for spreadsheets and
word processor files. While users are logged in the files associated with their profile, as well
as files in the system registry are also opened and locked. These open/locked files are unable
to be backed up by Data Protector. A warning for each one will be given. In the case of the
registry files, you will want to exclude them from the file system that contains them, and
back them up with the CONFIGURATION object. The user files should be backed up while
the users are not logged on to the system. If it is necessary to backup open files on Windows
systems, you may want to add the Data Protector Open File Backup extension for windows.
This product is available starting with Data Protector version 3.5.

NOTE See the Data Protector Administrator’s Guide for a list of files to exclude.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–12. SLIDE: Destination

Destination

Select library to
use all drives

Use drive
default
media pool

Student Notes
The destination for a backup may be a library or individually selected logical devices. Each
device selected may have modifications made to its default properties. You may override the
device default properties for each backup without affecting the device defaults saved within
the Media Management Database.

Device Properties
Properties are modified on a per device basis. Therefore, each device in the backup
specification can have different options. The following options are available:
• CRC Check (default is per device definition, and is usually off)
Set this option to ON to have Data Protector calculate the Cyclical Redundancy Check
(CRC) when a backup is run. The CRC check is an enhanced checksum function that lets
you confirm whether or not data has been written correctly to the medium. This causes
additional processing and tape writes to occur for each backup.

NOTE CRC data can be rechecked using the Data Protector verify function in the
Media Manager, or with the Data Protector command: omnimver

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

• Concurrency (default is as per device definition)

Concurrency allows more than one Disk Agent (up to five) to write to one backup device
concurrently. This helps Data Protector keep the device streaming when it can accept
data faster than a Disk Agent can send it.

• Rescan (Library Repository) (default off)

If this option is ON, Data Protector will updates library repository information before
starting your backup. This is useful when you manually change media order, or enter and
eject media from a library and you want to avoid mount requests during backup.
NOTE If the library has been defined to support barcode reading, then a barcode
scan takes place; otherwise, a physical scan will take place.
• Media Pool (default is as per the logical device definition)

This option selects the media pool from which the device should source media. The
sample above indicates “no media pool selected,” which is interpreted to mean use the
device default pool, no specific pool requested for this backup.

• Pre-Allocation List (default none)


The pre-alloc list requests that a subset of the media in the media pool is to be
selected for this backup. It also specifies the order in which the media will be used. You
must select to override the default media pool if you are to choose specific media.
Choose Add to open a dialog box in which you can add specific media (from the selected
media pool) to the pre-alloc list.

NOTE Pre-allocation should be used only with the strict media allocation policy and
on limited basis. Pre-allocation lists can be inflexible and confusing. If a
backup does not take place, the order of media in the list may not be what is
required for the next backup. Use of this feature will require daily changes to
the datalists. It is possible to request in-appropriate media (full/protected).
Data Protector only checks this list at run-time.

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Module 8
Backup

8–13. SLIDE: Backup Specification Options

Backup Specification Options

Non-modifiable
unless disk
image added
manually

Student Notes
Backup specification options encompass the whole backup session, including the objects and
devices contained within it.

The following options are available for a backup specification:


• Description
Enter a meaningful description of your backup specification.
Example: “Full Backup of Stock, Aitkin and Waterman Systems.”
• Pre-exec
Here you can specify a script file that will be executed before the backup starts. Such a
script can do the necessary application shutdown that must be performed for a backup to
be consistent. This pre-exec may be executed on any system within the Data Protector
cell, but must reside within the agent directory tree. (only the relative path from
OMNIHOME/lbin is necessary for Unix, and OMNIHOME/bin for Windows)

Example: shutdown_application.sh

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• Post-exec
The partner to pre-exec, here you can specify a script file that will be executed after the
backup has completed. Such a script can do the necessary application startups that must
be performed following a backup, so that they are available to the users. This post-exec
may be executed on any system within the Data Protector cell, but must reside within the
same directory tree as the pre-exec scripts.

Example: startup_application.sh
We will discuss exec scripts in more detail later in this module.
• Reconnect Broken Sessions (default is off)
This option can be used to increase the robustness of a backup when it is susceptible to
communication breakdowns due to unstable networks.

We will discuss this option in detail later in this module.


• Ownership (default is the creator of the backup specification)
Ownership defines the particular system user who owns the backup specification and the
objects within it. Data Protector effectively executes the backup as if being run by the
backup owner. Therefore, the user must have the necessary access rights to the data that
the objects describe. Otherwise, the backup will fail. Ownership also has an impact on
who can restore data.

Ownership is specified by three parameters, as follows:


User name, i.e. oracle
Group name / Domain name, i.e. dba
Host name, i.e. kryton.uksr.hp.com

Ownership is not truly a backup specification option. However, it affects the backup
specification and the objects that it contains.

Clustering Options
The options for the backup specification fall into two categories, Data Protector Options and
Clustering.

Features that are designed to work within the MC/ServiceGuard and Microsoft Cluster
environments.
• Automatic Session Restart

− Don't restart backups at failover: (default)


If the Cell Manager is configured within a MC/ServiceGuard package and fails over to
an alternate node during a backup, the backup job will not be automatically restarted.

− Restart backup of failed objects:


Restart only the failed file system objects that are part of a backup job that was
running when the Cell Manager was failed with MC/ServiceGuard. Completed file
system objects are not restarted.

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− Restart backup of all objects:


Restart the entire backup of all objects that are part of a backup job that was running
while a Cell Manager was failed with MC/ServiceGuard. Completed objects are
restarted as well as failed objects.
• Check Elapsed Time

− Abort if less than n minutes: Prevents newly started backups from being restarted.

− Abort if more than n minutes: Prevents long running jobs from being restarted.

• Check Against Abort ID


Check the session against the assigned Abort ID for verification. This logical ID is
assigned to the backup job while it is running. The ID used must be numeric, and
becomes the application ID.

NOTE See the man page for the omniclus command for more details and examples.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–14. SLIDE: Pre- and Post-Execution

Pre- and Post- Execution

Allows commands or scripts to be run before and after


the backup, such as database shutdown and start up. Backup Spec Pre-exec

OmniBack provides two levels of pre and post Object Pre-exec


execution:
System A Object

• Backup Specification Level Object Post-exec


• Object Level
Object Pre-exec

System B Object
Backup Specification Level can be BSM
Object Post-exec
executed on any system in the cell.
Object Pre-exec
Object Level is always executed on System C Object
the system where the object resides. DA
Object Post-exec

Backup Spec Post-exec

Student Notes
Typically, before a system can be backed up, the administrator must secure the system by
shutting down the various applications and databases that the system is running. After the
backup is complete, the administrator restarts the applications and databases, making them
available again to the users.

Data Protector through its Pre- and Post-exec facilities can perform the shutdown and
startup from within the backup itself.

Data Protector provides two levels of pre/post-exec, the first is at the backup specification
level, and the other is at the object level.

Pre/post execution scripts must complete (or send output) within 15 minutes or Data
Protector will abort the backup. This is used to avoid execution hangs. This timeout value is
adjustable by modify the ScriptOutputTimeout parameter in the
<OMNICONFIG>/options/global file.

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Backup Specification Level


At this level, the pre-exec runs before any of the objects within the backup specification are
backed up. The post-exec runs after all the objects have been backed up. The administrator
may designate any client system to execute the pre/post exec scripts for the backup
specification only.

Object Level
The level is available for every object within the backup specification. The pre-exec will run
before the actual object is backed up, and the post-exec will run after the object is backed up.
The scripts are executed on the system where the disk agent retrieves the object data from.

CAUTION When using Host objects, the pre/post execs are run before any objects are
backed up, and once for each object to which the host is expanded.

CAUTION When using combined concurrency levels greater than one (1), you cannot
predict the order in which objects will complete, therefore, do not put commands at the
object level, which rely on particular object completion orders.

NOTE Tasks that never terminate, such as startup of applications or daemons, must be
detached from the scripts in order to avoid time-outs. To achieve this the scripts that contain
such daemon startups may use the UNIX at command to detach the script from the pre-exec
script:
/usr/bin/at -f script_file.sh now
or with some delay
/usr/bin/at -f script_file.sh now + 3 minutes

To check the error output of your pre- and post-exec command and make it
visible in your message window (monitor), always redirect stderr to stdout. To achieve this
on a UNIX system, use output redirection:
unix_command 2>&1 &

Any non-zero return value from the pre-execution command will result in the
backup or backup object being aborted. We suggest that the pre- and post-exec commands be
scripts terminate with exit(0) when executed successfully.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–15. SLIDE: Pre- and Post-Exec Script Failures

Pre- and Post- Exec Script Failures

How Failures Affect the Flow of the Backup

Fail

1 2
Fail 3 Fail 4 Fail 5

Backup Spec Object Object Object Backup Spec


Pre-exec Pre-exec Post-exec Post-exec
Backup

Fail

BDACC SMEXIT
Set Set

Student Notes
The pre/post-exec feature of Data Protector is extremely useful. However, it is very important
that you understand what effect errors and failures of the scripts have on the backup.

The slide shows the effects of failures at different levels:

1. The backup specification level, pre-exec script is run. If the script completes successfully
(exit code 0), it moves on to step 2. If the script fails, then the backup does not take
place, and it jumps straight to step 5.

2. At this stage, the pre-exec script for the first object is run; if it works successfully, it
jumps to step 3.

3. At this stage, the object is backed up. If the backup of the object succeeds or fails, it
jumps to step 4. However, before it goes to step 4, the BDACC environment variable is set
to reflect the status of the object.

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4. At this stage, the object post-exec script is run; if the script succeeds or fails, it jumps to
step 5. However, before it goes to step 5, the SMEXIT environment variable is set to
reflect the status of the entire backup session.

5. At this stage, the backup specification, post-exec script is run; then the backup session
completes.

The following table shows the resulting backup session status that is seen in the monitor
window, following various failures (pre/post with non-zero return values):

Pre Post Backup DA-Status Session Status

0 0 started completed completed

0 0 started failed failed

0 1 started completed completed with errors

1 0 Not started - failed

1 1 Not started - failed

The BDACC variable


Data Protector sets the shell variable, BDACC, for the object post-execution scripts to contain
the completion code for the backup agent. The variable can be used to check the status of the
previous single object backup. The table below shows the various values:

BDACC Status
Value
0 Normal, successful termination
1 Program failed, user error
2 Program failed, environmental
malfunction
3 Program failed, internal malfunction
4 Program failed, reason unknown.

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Module 8
Backup

The SMEXIT variable


Data Protector sets the shell variable, SMEXIT, for the backup specification level post-
execution script. The variable can be used to check the status of the backup session. The
table below shows the various values:

SMEXIT Status
Value
0 Completed.
10 Completed with file errors.
11 One or more disk agents failed.
12 All disk agents failed.
13 Session was aborted.

More Data Protector Environment Variables


Data Protector sets various session variables that can be interrogated in pre or post exec
scripts for conditional processing and reporting of session data.

For example, your post-exec script may read the SESSIONID variable and use it as a
parameter to the omnidb command, to find out what media was used by the session. The list
could then be emailed to the operator:

omnidb –session $SESSIONID –media | mailx –s medialist bkop@hp.com

Backup Specification Pre/Post-exec Variables

Variable Pre Post Meaning


MODE x x Backup mode (Full, Incr, Incr1-0)
OWNER x x Backup Specification Owner,
(owner.group.hostname)
PREVIEW x x Is backup in Preview mode? (0 or 1)
RESTARTED x x Is backup a restarted backup? (0 or 1)
SESSIONID x x The session-id of the backup.
SESSIONKEY x x The session-key (session keys are a sort of temporary
session ID. If the backup fails immediately, it will
have a session-key, but not a session ID).
SMEXIT x The backup exit code status.

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TIP A Pre or Post- exec script may hang because it did not close all file descriptors
before forking the new process. This is the case if the new process runs in the
background and does not exit (for example, database server process
(dbstart), some daemon processes, etc.).

In this case, a user can use the detach command. The source of the
detach command is provided in the detach.c file. This command is
officially unsupported.

For example:
/opt/omni/bin/utilns/detach pre_script
[arguments...]

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Module 8
Backup

8–16. SLIDE: Reconnect Broken Sessions

Reconnect Broken Sessions

Instructs
InstructsData
DataProtector
Protectorto
touse
useaamore
morerobust
robustprotocol.
protocol.
IfIfcommunication
communication between BSM and anagent
between BSM and an agentfails,
fails,the
the
BSM and the agent attempt to re-establish communication.
BSM and the agent attempt to re-establish communication.

Network Backup

Disk Agent TCP/IP

Cell Manager
Scheduler
TCP/IP
Session Session
Manager Manager

Media Agent TCP/IP

Student Notes
The “reconnect broken session” backup specification option can be used to increase the
robustness of the backup. It can be used when backups are taking place over networks that
are susceptible to interruptions, such as WANs. When this option is enabled, a more
advanced protocol is used for agent communication and data transfer. This protocol has a
performance overhead, and therefore, should be used only if the link reliability is a problem.

If the BSM loses communication with the disk or media agents, the BSM and agents will both
try to re-establish communication.

The agent will try for OB2RECONNECT_RETRY seconds to re-establish the TCP/IP connection
and will then wait for another OB2RECONNECT_ACK seconds to get the acknowledgement
from the server. If either one of these time parameters times-out, the object will abort. The
default for the OB2RECONNECT_ACK variable is 10 minutes, and for the
OB2RECONNECT_RETRY the default is 20 minutes. These settings can be changed by placing
the variables in an OMNIHOME/.omnirc file on all systems involved.
If the BSM is unable to contact the host to start the agents for the first time, the object is
rescheduled to the end of the backup specification, where one further attempt is made to
communicate with the host.

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Backup

NOTE A broken connection between agent processes cannot be reconnected (media


agent to disk agent).

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Backup

8–17. SLIDE: File System Options

File System Options

Student Notes
Each object to be backed up within Data Protector may have a unique set of options to
control how the data is backed up and protected within the Data Protector database.

The only general option is the session protection. The default is permanent and may be
changed to:

None
Days <number>
Weeks <number>
Until <yyyy> <mm> <dd> (year, month, day)

Data Protector will protect the session data on tape from overwrite until the protection
expires.

Options at the object level are specific to that particular object. A backup specification may
contain one or many separate objects. Each object can have different options. Typically,
objects within a backup specification tend to have the same or similar options. Rather than
setting these options individually for each object, Data Protector provides a template that can

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Backup

be modified in advance of adding objects to the specification. Newly added objects then
inherit the new default settings provided by the template.

Object options are divided into two categories, options and other:

Advanced Options

• Public (private is the default)


This option defines protection level for the session within the database. Data Protector
will only allow restore to be performed by the session owner unless public is selected.
Users that have restore capability may be able to see and restore sessions that are
marked as public.
• Reporting Level (default is Warning)
This option defines the level of message detail that is reported during the backup session.
Backup session messages are categorized according to the severity of the message.
Messages less than the specified severity are suppressed from the session records in the
database. The following settings are available:
− Warning
− Minor
− Major
− Critical
Set the level according to the minimum severity of messages that is required.

Example: Major – suppresses Warning and Minor messages.


• Pre-exec
Pre-exec is used to specify a script file that will be executed before the backup of the
object starts.
• Post-exec
The partner to pre-exec, where you can specify a script file that will be executed after
the backup of the object has completed.

NOTE Object level pre/post-exec scripts will be run on the system that the object
resides on. They must be located within the OMNIHOME/lbin directory
tree if a relative path is used; they may be located anywhere if an absolute
path is used.
• Catalog Protection (default same as data)
This option enables you to set periods of protection for information about backed up
objects in the Data Protector database. You may want to expire the catalog but keep the
tape protected if the tape is stored off-site for extended periods of time, and you want to
keep your Data Protector database smaller. This concept will be explored further in the
database chapter of this course manual. The default value is the same as for data
protection.

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The following values are available:

− Until
Information in the Data Protector database is retained until a specified date. You
enter the year, month, and day. Protection for the information will cease at noon of
the entered day.

− Days
Information in the Data Protector database is retained for the number of days
specified.

− Weeks
Information in the Data Protector database is retained for the number of weeks
specified.

− Same As Data Protection


Information about the object is protected from being overwritten as long as the data
is protected.

Other Options

• Software compression (default is off)


Use software compression on the object before the object is sent to the media agent.
Typically, this option is not used, as most modern tape devices perform hardware
compression, which is far more efficient than software compression in most cases.

CAUTION Software compression seriously affects the performance of the backup. It


typically consumes large amounts of CPU resources.

TIP Software compression can be useful when backing up data over a WAN.
The data is compressed on the source system before it is sent over the
network, thus reducing network traffic.

• Encode (default is off)


Data Protector lets you encode file system and disk image data so that it becomes
unreadable. Data is encoded before it is transferred over the to the media agent. Data
Protector offers a simple built-in XOR algorithm, implemented in a shared "C" program
library. Since Data Protector provides the API used by the Disk Agent to interface with
the data-encoding module, you can substitute your own internal data encoding algorithms
for greater security. Do this by writing your own data-encoding module. Compile the data-
encoding module into a library, and substitute it for the default Data Protector library.
The specific procedure for this is covered in the Data Protector Administrator’s Guide.

CAUTION Encoding (encryption) may have a performance impact on the backup, as


it typically consumes large amounts of CPU resources.

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• Display statistical info (default is off)


Display backup statistics, such as megabytes per hour for each object. These statistics are
displayed in the message window and stored as session messages in the database.
• Lock files during Backup (default is off)
This option defines how files are handled during a backup session. If set to ON, files are
locked during the backup session, preventing the files from being modified during the
backup.
• Do not preserve access time attributes (default is off)
Whenever a file is opened (read, locked, etc.), the access time of the file is changed.
During backup, each file in the specified fileset is opened, locked, and read. When this
option is set to OFF, the access time attributes remain as they were before backup (they
are reset to their original values). When you set this option to ON, the access time values
are changed to the moment of backup.
• Backup POSIX hard links as files (default is off)
This option will disable the detection of hard links within the file system. This causes
Data Protector to back up hard links as regular files. A hard link is a directory entry that
actually points to a physical file. When you back up hard links as links, Data Protector
traverses the directory trees twice for the backup; once to detect the hard links, and then
to backup the data. This allows Data Protector to estimate the size of the backup as well
as detect the links, but will take longer to execute.

If set to ON, Data Protector will back up the entire file contents for each hard link. This
will prevent hard links from being recreated during the restore process; every filename
that was previously a link is restored as a file. Data Protector traverses the file system
tree only once during the backup, thus speeding up the backup process. When this option
is set to ON, Data Protector cannot estimate the size of the backup or display the
percentage of the backup finished.

NOTE Use this option when there are no hard links in your file system.
• Logging (default is log all)
Data Protector provides four levels of detail on files and directories stored in the Data
Protector database. Data may be restored regardless of the level chosen. The logging
option potentially reduces the amount of data stored in the database. The logging level
also affects the amount of detail available to the restore browser as well as the backup
performance.
− Log All
This is the default option. All detail about backed up files and directories are logged
to the database. This complete information allows you to search for backed up files,
and allows Data Protector to fast position on the tape when restoring a specific file.
However, this information may take a lot of space if there are many files.
− Log File
Details on directories and only file name information are stored in the database. No
file version attributes such as modification time, protection, owner, size, etc are
stored in the database (they are on tape only). This represents a savings of about 70%
over the log all option.

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− Log Directories
Details on directories only are stored in the database. This disables the search feature
during restore, and you will be able only, to browse directories. However, Data
Protector still performs fast positioning because a file is located on the tape near the
directory where it actually resides. This option is suitable for file systems with many
auto-generated files, such as news and mail systems. The data stored with this option
represents a savings of about 90% as compared to log all.
− No Log
No details on files or directories are logged in the database. You will not be able to
search and browse files and directories while restoring. The restore will take longer
because Data Protector cannot use fast positioning on the tape but will read from the
start of the backup. The primary information stored here is at the object level. You
would use this if you expect to restore an entire file system object and not select
individual files and directories by name.

NOTE The following considerations need to be taken into account when


setting the log level:
The level of detail to which you want to be able to browse when
performing restores.
The size of the Data Protector catalog database. A higher level of detail
will result in a larger database.

• Backup Files of Size (default all sizes)


Use this menu button to specify the size of files to be backed up. You can back up files of
All sizes, files Bigger than, Smaller than, or within the specified size Range in KB
• Backup Files of Size (default all sizes)
Use this menu button to specify the size of files to be backed up. You can back up files of
All sizes, files Bigger than, Smaller than, or within the specified size Range

Winfs Options

• Report Open locked files as (Warning is the default)


Files that are opened and locked by an application are not backed up by Data Protector.
The message level chosen as Warning, Minor, or No Report will put messages in the
session with the selected severity when locked files are encountered during the backup.
• Number of retries (default is 0)
Data Protector may make consecutive attempts at backing up opened, locked files.
Caution should be used as this will increase the duration of the backup. The retry attempt
is for each file encountered.
• Time out (default is 0)
Data Protector will pause in between attempts to backup opened, locked files. This
timeout is used for each consecutive retry.

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• Detect NTFS hard links (default is off)


Unlike in Unix operations, Data Protector does not attempt to detect hard links for NTFS
file systems. This significantly speeds up the backup process at the expense of backing up
each hard link as a separate file. The NTFS links are not very common, as compared to
POSIX links on Unix, so this feature is off by default.
• Do not use archive attribute (default is off)
Data Protector will backup all files with the archive attribute set when performing
incremental backup; this is regardless of the modification time of these files. Files that do
not have the archive attribute set, but have their modification time changed since the last
backup will be backed up during incremental backup. Data Protector by default will reset
the archive attribute after a backup.

Netware Options

• Number of retries (default is 0)


Data Protector will make this number of attempts to backup Netware files before issuing
an error message.
• Expand sparse files (default is off)
By default, Data Protector will backup the sparse files in their current, compressed form.
This is more efficient, but prevents the restore of these files to any other platform. When
this option is enabled, Data Protector will expand the sparse file before backup.
• Uncompress NetWare compressed files (default is off)
By default, Data Protector will backup NetWare compressed files in the compressed form
as with the sparse file option, this approach improves the backup performance, but
restricts the restore to only Netware systems.

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Backup

8–18. SLIDE: Object Summary

Object Summary

List sorted
based upon
order

Student Notes
The final step in creating a backup specification is to review, and possibly change the objects
and options selected for the backup. Here you may also change the order of the objects in the
list. The order will affect the execution sequence and pairings for concurrency. The object list
order along with the algorithm for load balancing will determine the backup sequence.

From this object summary screen you may also modify any object options individually.

Notice that you may select the column headings in the summary within the Results Area to
change the sorting preference for the list.

This object summary list is the last configuration screen before you save the specification
and/or start the backup.

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Backup

8–19. SLIDE: Object Properties

Object Properties

Only…
Skip …

Student Notes
The slide illustrates where to find some of the object properties where you may fine-tune the
scope of the backup. From here, you may select the parts of a files tem object to backup,
instead of the entire tree, which is the default. The Trees list is essentially an Include-only list
for the backup. The exclude list allows you to specify the absolute path of the files or
directories to exclude from the backup. When the lists are empty, the entire object (file
system) will be backed up.

Use the Filter … button to specify a wildcard list of names to include or exclude. The “Only”
list is used for include, and the “Skip” list is used for exclude. In both cases, the list
represents a filter for the entire file system. Whenever a match for the filter is found, the item
is either skipped or included in the backup.

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Module 8
Backup

Object Qualifiers
The data that is to be backed up requires qualification that is more detailed for Data
Protector. Configuring Data Protector to backup a file system is not sufficient information. A
complete description of the object, such as where it resides, which parts of it are to be
backed up, etc., must be specified.

Specialized backup specifications, such as Oracle, Informix, MS Exchange, etc., have other
qualifiers, such as the instance or SID name. However, we will not be detailing these options,
but focusing on the backup specification datalist and options instead.

TIP Data Protector uses three key qualifiers to identify file system objects in the
database, they are Hostname, Mountpoint and Description. These are used for
restore and reporting.

The following list details the most commonly used qualifiers used with the backup
specifications:
• Hostname
Specifies the particular system in the cell that the object resides on.
Example: vindaloo.uksr.hp.com is a fully qualified hostname.
• Mountpoint
Specifies the file system mount point on a UNIX type system, or the drive letter on a
Windows or Novell system
Example: /opt - a UNIX file system mount point
/ - a UNIX file system mount point for the root file system
C: - a Windows drive letter
CONFIGURATION - The windows registry and recovery files

• Description (optional-strongly recommended)


A description to distinguish between this particular backup of the object and another.
This description is stored in the Database as the object description.
Although this item is optional, it is very important, and helps to identify this object during
the restore process. Multiple versions of objects may be stored in the database with
different descriptions. Moreover, if the description of an object changes, you will end up
with multiple objects in the Data Protector Database!

The more meaningful your object description, the easier to locate the object for restore!

Example: “Full Backup B4 DB reorg."

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–20. SLIDE: Parallel Data Streams from Object

Parallel Data Streams from Object

Disk Agent Media Agent

Filesystem Disk Agent Media Agent


Disk

Disk Agent

Disk Agent Media Agent

5
Filesystem Disk Agent Don’t forget to
Disk
consider how
you will use
restore!

Student Notes
Data Protector allows for multiple data streams from one file system to be used for a backup.
This is very much different than device concurrency, with is multiple objects being sent to
one device. The purpose for creating the multiple streams is for improved backup
performance.

Great care must be taken in order that you do not overload the disk, (and reduce
performance), and overlap the data streams. This configuration is manual; be aware, it is
possible to be backing up the same data more than once.

Device concurrency is still available, as Data Protector will start a disk agent for each data
stream that you configure.

One disadvantage to this configuration is the possible complexity in performing a restore.


Data Protector, as we will see in the Restore chapter, does permit a session based restore.
Session restores allow for all data that was backed up in a session to be restored in parallel.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–21. SLIDE: Configure Parallel Data Streams

Configure Parallel Data Streams

Student Notes
To configure parallel data streams, use the Manual Add… feature and select the Trees option
for an object. One key to success here is that you will add a file system multiple times; this is
only possible if you change the description for each one. Recall that an object is defined by
three parts, “Hostname, Mountpoint and description.”

As long as the object description is different, you may add another thread (directory) to be
backed up for each file system. Add the data streams (directory to backup) one at a time.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–22. SLIDE: The Backup Process Flow

The Backup Process Flow

Start BSM Parse Global File


Start Agents

Parse Backup MA
DA
Specification

1st Tree Walk

Yes Host Yes


Preview?
Object?
No
No

Convert to Connect to MA Connect to DA


Filesystem Objects
2nd Tree Walk Write Data to
Send Data to MA Device

Student Notes
1. A backup is started either interactively by the user or by the Data Protector scheduler.
The backup request is received by the cell manager, which in turn starts a Backup
Session Manager process (BSM).

2. The BSM parses the backup specification and checks it for errors.

3. If the backup specification contains host objects, these objects are expanded into a list of
the host's currently mounted file systems. The file systems inherit the options defined for
the host object.

4. The <OMNICONFIG>/options/global file is parsed; any modified options are read.

5. The BSM checks that sufficient licenses are available for the logical devices defined in the
backup specification, and whether they can be locked. It will then start the media agents.
For each media agent, it starts the number of disk agents that correspond to the device
concurrency. If load balancing is used, then license checking and locking takes place, just
before the devices start, not at parsing time.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

6. The Disk Agent (DA) does a tree-walk (mount point and tree information are checked).
On the first traversal, it computes the file system statistics and builds a catalog of hard
links. The DA then connects to the MA.

7. If the backup is being run in Preview mode (a dummy run), then stop.

8. The Disk Agent connects to the Media Agent and another tree-walk is performed, during
which it reads the files and sends the information to the Media Agent. When the second
tree walk is finished, the Disk Agent disconnects from the Media Agent, and terminates.
On Windows NT file systems, only one tree walk is performed unless you choose to use
the NTFS hard link option.

The Session Manager (SM) starts a new Disk Agent (if required) for the same Media
Agent. If not, the SM shuts down the Media Agent and terminates. The session is
complete. The restore session runs in a very similar way.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–23. SLIDE: Templates and Groups

Templates and Groups

Templates:
• Often used backup specification and schedule
characteristics can be saved in a template.

• The template can then be used to generate new


backup specifications with ease.

Groups:
• In large environments where many backup
specifications and templates are required, groups can
be created to organize them more effectively.

Student Notes
Data Protector provides the ability to create templates and groups to aid the generation and
organization of backup specifications.

Templates
Many environments can require many separate backup specifications; each backup
specification may have very similar characteristics to previous ones, for example, the same
schedule, the same media pool, etc. Rather than specifying the same options each time a
specification is generated, they can be applied en masse, via a template.

The following elements can be specified in templates:


• Devices and Options
Devices are only applied to a backup specification, if the backup specification uses load
balancing or does not have any configured devices.
• Backup Specification Options
Backup options applied to the whole backup specification.
• Object Level Default Options

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

Backup options applied to objects. Backup options for an object are not applied to the
objects in the backup specification unless the Override object options is selected. You
cannot undo this action.
• Object Qualifiers (Tree Options)
Options skip, exclude and only.
• Schedule
How the backup is to be scheduled.

Groups
Large numbers of backup specifications and templates can be difficult to administer. The
sheer size of a list can make it confusing and difficult to find what you are looking for. Data
Protector allows the creation of Groups that allow you to place related backup specifications
and templates together.

For example, you can create groups based on system usage (production, development, etc).

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–24. SLIDE: Preview

Preview

Performs a “Dummy Run” of the backup.


Should be performed on all new or modified backup specifications.
No data is actually backed up or media written to.

Checks the following:


• Syntax of backup specification
• Licenses
• Agent startup and communication (disk, media agents)
• Sufficient media pool allocation
• File system trees walked, total data calculated
• Object level pre/post-execs run

Student Notes
The Preview function allows the user to perform a “preliminary run” of a backup
specification. The preview will run through all of the backup steps, with the exception of
actually writing any data to the backup device. Therefore, it is a very good test of backup
specification correctness. It is highly recommend that a preview be run on all new or
modified backup specifications, especially when they are to be scheduled.

When you preview a backup, the backup monitor shows exactly the same kind of information
you would see if the backup were actually running. The main difference noticed is the speed
with which the objects are completed. This is because only a tree walk and space calculation
are made, rather than any transfer of data.

CAUTION The pre/post execute scripts may run during the preview mode. This may
cause some interruptions within a production environment. See the options in
the <OMNICONFIG>i/options/global file to turn off pre-exec during
preview. (ExecScriptOnPreview)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

TIP To speed up a preview of a large backup specification, you can temporarily


increase the concurrency of each logical device to the maximum. When the
preview has completed, put the value back to the original setting.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

8–25. Review Questions

1. What command is used to perform a backup from the Data Protector command line
interface?

2. What are the four fundamental components of all Data Protector backups?




3. What is a backup specification?

4. What is an object?

5. Name three types of objects

6. What is the purpose of setting the Ownership of a backup specification?

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

7. In brief terms, describe the advantages of Load Balancing.

8. When is it beneficial to use software compression?

9. What is the meaning of Concurrency?

10. What is the purpose of pre and post execution?

11. What are the differences between object level and backup specification level pre and
post execution?

12. What is the purpose of a Template?

13. What is the purpose of a Group?

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 8
Backup

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9 — Restore
Objectives

Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:


• Use the restore capabilities for Data Protector.

• Perform session and object restores.

• Perform single or parallel restores.

• Use the Data Protector Restore GUI.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–1. SLIDE: Performing Restores

Performing Restores

Data Protector provides two methods of


performing restores:

• Interactive restore via the GUI


• Command line interface via omnir

Student Notes
Data Protector offers two methods of restoring data, interactively through the GUI or via the
command line interface omnir command. All restores are guided interactive sessions, as
opposed to scheduled datalist backups.

In general, restores are occasional events that are performed only once in the same manner.
As such, there is no need to have the equivalent of a backup specification for restores.

Data Protector does not provide a method for predefining a restore session’s requirements,
each restore session must be defined when required. This is not a limitation with Data
Protector, rather a design consideration as restoring data is a destructive process and
incorrect or out of date predefined restores are a potential disaster, waiting to happen. The
Data Protector Administrator may create a script to automate the restore process using the
omnir command, if desired.

Data Protector restore definitions are done on backup session or object level. Within one
restore session, one or more backup objects can be selected. For each object, files and
versions can be selected. Options can be set on the restore session level, as well as on object
level.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

When the restore is started, the restore session manager is executed and a restore session ID
is assigned to the restore session. The restore session is stored in the database in a similar
manner to backup sessions. These sessions may be removed, up to the discretion of the
administrator. While backup data in the Data Protector database is necessary for restore,
restore data is only necessary for auditing and reporting purposes.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–2. SLIDE: Restore Objects

Restore Objects

Depending on the types of backups performed,


the following object types will be available for
restore:

• file system • SAP • winfs


• rawdisk • Oracle • mssql
• omnidb • Oracle8 • msexchange
• vbfs • Sybase • netware
• Informix
• session

Student Notes
Depending on the types of backups performed, many different object types may be available
for restore. Each object has restore options that are specific to the individual object type.
There are also restore options that are common to all object types.

Object Types

• filesystem, vbfs, winfs, netware


From these objects, it is possible to restore a file, directory, or complete file system. In
addition, from the winfs object, it is possible to restore the windows registry (part of
CONFIGURATION).
• rawdisk
From a rawdisk object, it is possible to restore the entire raw disk image copy.
It is also possible to restore a single file from a raw backup, if the raw backup contains an
HFS (single file restore is not supported for JFS). Only the HP-UX HFS file system is
supported for this type of restore. This restore process can be very time consuming,
because Data Protector must read the data multiple times. The maximum number of
passes of the media is five times.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

• omnidb
From the omnidb object, the Data Protector internal database can be recovered,
including the <OMNICONFIG> directories. This topic will be addressed in much more
detail later in this course.
• sap, oracle, oracle8, sybase, informix, mssql, msexchange
From these database objects it is typically possible to restore an entire database, a
portion of the database (dataset) or point in time via the redo logs. Integrated third-party
databases are restored using the databases own tools, for example rman for Oracle or
sapdba for SAP, onbar for Informix.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–3. SLIDE: Restore from a Session

Restore from a Session

Data
Data Protector
Protector Session
Session Restore
Restore
•• Restores
Restores an
an entire
entire client
client
•• Can
Can restore
restore all
all objects
objects from
from aa backup
backup
together
together
•• Operates
Operates like
like aa datalist
datalist for
for restore
restore
•• Can
Can exclude
exclude individual
individual objects
objects
•• Provides
Provides aa high
high degree
degree of of control
control for
for each
each
object
object
•• Makes
Makes extensive
extensive useuse of
of the
the database
database

Student Notes
In some cases, the restore of an entire system is necessary. Normally this would be after a
disaster recovery. Usually, the disaster recovery includes some out of date files or data. Data
Protector in conjunction with your disaster recovery tools allows for easy recovery of your
data from the most current backup session. Disaster recovery within Data Protector is
discussed in more detail later in this course.

The session restore capability within Data Protector is based upon how you perform your
backups. Data backed up within a single session, usually from a backup specification
(datalist), can be restored in parallel.

While selecting a session to restore, Data Protector provides individual object selection, so
you are not limited to an all or nothing restore. Each object that is recorded in the database
may be restored in parallel with any other object. By selecting a backup session for restore
purposes you are able to restore all of the data that was a part of the backup.

The Data Protector internal database plays a key role in making the session and object data
available for restore. Within each session, you will be able to browse the data trees and select
down to the file level if a partial rather than a full restore is necessary.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–4. SLIDE: Parallel Restore

Parallel Restore

Client system
disk agents

DA Disk 1

MA DA Disk 2

Client system
media agent
DA Disk 1
Client system
disk agent

Student Notes
When a backup is performed to a logical device that has a concurrency value greater than one
and/or multiple logical devices, backing up multiple objects in parallel maximizes
performance.

Conversely, when it comes to restore time, the same performance benefits can be realized by
choosing to restore objects in parallel. Parallel restore can be used to restore all of the
objects to a client system from one restore session as well as objects from unrelated
sessions.

A parallel restore requires only one pass of a media in order to extract all the selected objects
from it. A sequential restore only allows the selection of a single object at a time; thus,
multiple passes of the media are required if more than one object from the backup is selected
for the restore.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

Parallel Restore or Sequential Restore


In some cases, objects selected for parallel restore may be restored sequentially. This
depends largely upon how the objects exist on the physical media.
• Objects that were backed up in parallel to the same medium are capable of being restored
in parallel.

• Objects that were backed up to separate devices using different media are capable of
being restored in parallel.

• Objects that exist on the same medium in different tape segments are restored
sequentially, even if configured for parallel restore.

NOTE A parallel restore may execute multiple DA processes for a single MA, just the
reverse compared to concurrent backup. In addition, Data Protector may start
multiple DA processes for a single object if the data was backed up in that
manner using the trees options.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–5. SLIDE: Restore Sequence

Restore Sequence

Choose:
• Object(s) or Session for restore
• Source
• Destination
• Options
• Devices
• Media
• Backup Object Summary (properties/options)

Student Notes
The general sequence for restoring data from Data Protector tapes is listed above. The
process is conceptually similar to backup, but you may start the restore at any point. You do
not have to work through all of the option screens if you want to accept all of the restore
defaults, such as:

• Restore the latest object version


• Restore to the original location
• Restore to the original client system
• Don’t overwrite newer files
• Replace missing files/directories
• Use the same device used for the backup
• Others…

The following pages will illustrate the typical restore sequence; remember you can start a
restore anywhere within the sequence, once you have changed all of the necessary defaults.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–6. SLIDE: Restore Source

Restore Source

Select objects
or a session from
the database

Choose items to
restore and their
properties

Select tasks to
search for files

Student Notes
When a restore is performed, the user is able to browse the catalog database to select
directories, files etc to restore. The graphics shown above illustrate the selection of an object
to be used for restore, and the browse features allowing for file level selection.

NOTE The three parameters that identify an object in the database: Hostname,
Mount Point, Description if these change over the life of an object, you will
end up with multiple object names in the database. Notice how /tmp appears
more than once.

The level to which the user will be able to browse the detail catalog of the database depends
on the following criteria.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

Catalog Log Level


Catalog log level refers to the logging level that was specified when the backup was
performed. It could have been set to “Log All”, “Log File”, “Log Directories” or “No Log”.
• Log All: If "Log All" was specified, you should be able to browse down to file level and
select the file for restore. This will allow the easiest selection, but uses the most database
space. You will also be able to see all of the file attributes.

• Log File: If “Log File” was used, then you may browse the tree as in “Log All”, but you
will not be able to see all of the file attributes, as they are not stored in the database, but
only on the backup tape. The choice would be made to save database space of
approximately 70% over Log All.

• Log Directories: If “Log Directories” was used, the user will only be able to browse to
directory level and must know the name of the file to be restored, as it will not be
possible to browse it. This is a tradeoff between flexibility and database space. This
choice would be made to save database space of approximately 90% over LogAll.

• No Log: If “No Log” was used, no browsing at all is possible, and the user must know
the complete path, filename, etc. This uses the least database space, but makes the
restore more challenging. This option would be used if restores are only performed at the
object level, and browsing the file/directory tree is unnecessary. Minimal disk space is
needed to store the object data as compared to Log All.

Catalog Protection
Catalog protection refers to how long the online catalog information is retained. When the
backup is performed, you can set the catalog information to keep it as long as the media is
valid, or until a particular date. If this date has passed, browsing will not be possible.

Data Protector User Permissions and Public and Private Objects


Depending on the permissions of the user, and the setting of the object protection to public
or private, a user may not be able to see certain objects while browsing the restore catalog.
Typically, Admin level users can see all objects, while ordinary users can see only their own
objects, plus any objects that are made public.

Searching for Files (Tasks Scoping Pane)


When going to restore a file or directory, navigating the restore GUI may become time
consuming if you are not sure where a particular object resides. The Restore by Query task,
located at the bottom of the Scoping Pane may be able to help locate the files in need of
restore. The files must reside within the current Data Protector catalog database to be
located by the search.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

General steps for performing restore by query searches:


1. Select the client system for which the file search will be performed.

2. Fill in as much information as you have about the file name and object that contains the
file. (Case sensitive checking is optional, and wildcards are available)

3. Choose a time frame for which to search, or a range of dates for which the backup was
taken.

4. Select a modification time for the file, if any is known.

5. Data Protector will present a list of all matches based upon your selection criteria. Select
from the list and configure the options for the items that you want to have restored.

6. Select Finish to start the restore session.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–7. SLIDE: Restore Object Properties

Restore Object Properties

Partial
Version and restores
destination
also available
in pop-up
menu

Default
version is
the latest

Student Notes
Data Protector allows each object selected for restore to be “fine tuned” to meet your
requirements. You can select the version of the object, its destination, and desired, only parts
of the object restored.

Restore only allows you to specify wildcard matches to the object contents. For example
maybe you would like all of the Adobe Acrobat documents restored; you would enter *.pdf
in the “Restore Only” option screen. Perhaps you would like to exclude certain files from
the restore, such as anything containing the name core, such as *core, or core.*; enter
these in the “Skip” option screen.

Within the Properties GUI shown above, the Destination tab contains options that allow the
destination of the object to be changed. You may alter the name of the object, or place it into
a new directory. When the Into option is chosen Data Protector will append the original
object path to the selected new location.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

Restore As / Into

• As
Restore the file or directory as the given path, any path specified as non-absolute will be
created relative to the root (/) filesystem.
• Into
Restore the file or directory into a different directory. Directories will be created as
needed and are appended onto the original path.

PC Restore Options
Netware
By default, Data Protector will backup NetWare sparse files in their compressed sparse
format. This choice will speed up the backup process.

Windows 2000
For Windows 2000 there is restore option for restore of Windows 2000 active directories.
• Authoritative:
This is a Windows 2000 specific option dealing with active directory restores. The Active
Directory database is not updated after the restore and the restored data overwrites the
existing data in the target destination.
• Non-authoritative:
The Active Directory database is updated after the restore using standard replication
techniques. The Nonauthoritative replication mode is the default option.
• Primary:
The Primary replication mode allows you to keep the NT directory Service online and is
used when you restore FileReplicationService along with the Active Directory service.
This option has to be used when all replication partners for a replicated share have been
lost.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–8. SLIDE: Destination

Destination

Select or enter
any host with a
disk agent

Student Notes

Filesystem Restore Options (including vbfs, winfs, netware)


Data Protector provides many options when restoring file systems. It is possible to define at
restore time exactly what data is to be restored, what data is to be left out, and to where the
data is to be restored.

Default Destination
The default destination for any restored object is the objects original location. You may
restore data onto any client with a Disk Agent installed (even non-cell clients) as well as
restore the data into any new location within the system. Data Protector will create the
necessary directory trees to accommodate your requested location.

Security Concern
The default behavior with Data Protector, as well as its predecessor Omniback, is to allow
any restore disk agent to respond to any session manager to start the restore process. This
feature is designed to allow for simpler restores in case of a disaster. In this way any cell
manager could be used to restore data to any client, regardless of the cell affiliation.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

The client and therefore the cell may be secured to limit which cell managers have access to
the various clients. The specific details of the security configuration is covered in the security
module, later in this course.

File Conflict Handling


Keep Most Recent: will overwrite files or directories on the disk that are older than the
files from the tape being restored. Newer files will remain untouched during the restore.

Overwrite: replaces any files or directories already on the disk with those from the
restore tapes.

No Overwrite: determines that files and directories are not overwritten, Data Protector
will not restore files from tape even if the version on disk is older. Restored files are only
those that are not currently on the disk, such as files that were deleted.

For example, if the following file and directory structure exists:


Directory_1
File_A

Directory_2

File_B
If File_A and File_B are deleted, and a restore is performed selecting the contents of
Directory_1 for restore, File_A will be restored but File_B will not be restored,
because Directory_2 exists, and the "no overwrite" option will not overwrite an existing
directory to restore its contents. The Warning: “Cannot restore – name conflict. Object
Exists!” will be presented during the restore session to indicate that there are items missing
from a directory that were not restored. To restore the items, choose one of the other two file
conflict handlers.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–9. SLIDE: Restore Options

Restore Options

Student Notes

Omit Deleted Files (default=off)


When performing a point in time restore that requires the restoration of a full backup and
subsequent incremental backups, this option prevents files present on the full backup but
that were removed prior to the incremental backup, from being restored. Data Protector
restores deleted files but then removes them at the end of the restore session. This will
typically require more disk space during the restore operation, than is actually needed for the
restored data. When this option is selected, the only mode available for the restore is
Overwrite mode; "Merge" as well as "No Overwrite" are unavailable.

Move Busy Files


If the target file is in use, it will be renamed to the file name prefixed with a “#”. This allows
the file to be restored with the correct name. The file will remain in use with no impact to the
user. When the file is eventually closed and reopened, the newly restored file will be used.
Some manual cleanup will be required to find and selectively remove all of the previously
busy files.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

List Restored Files (default=off)


Produces a listing in the restore session messages window of the files restored.

Display Statistical Information (default=off)


Display statistical information reports statistical information about the restore size and
performance.

Restore Sparse Files (default=off)


When a sparse file (logical size is greater than the physical size) is backed up, the entire
logical size of the file is written to a tape. When this option is selected, Data Protector will
restore only the blocks containing data and null-data is not restored. The logical size of the
restored file will be the same but it will not consume as much physical space. Data Protector
does not examine the contents of the data blocks by default, so it will not create blocks of
zeros that were previously allocated to the file, unless you enable this option.

NOTE Selecting this can greatly reduce performance because Data Protector must
examine the data to determine if it contains null data blocks; conversely, some
files may not be useable by their applications if they are not restored as
sparse.

Lock Files During Restore (default=off)


Denies access to files during the restore session.

Restore Time Attributes (default=on)


Restore time attributes sets the time attributes of the file to what they were when the file was
backed up.

Restore Protection Attributes (default=on)


Sets the protection attributes of the file to what they were when the files were backed up.

Pre/Post-Exec (no default)


As with backup, you are able to define a command or script that will be executed before and
after restoration. The command/script is executed on the target system.

U1610S B.00 9-18 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–10. SLIDE: Restore Devices

Restore Devices

Device used Restore device


for backup may be changed

Student Notes
When restoring data, Data Protector will choose the same Logical Device that was used
during the backup for the object. In most cases, this is desirable, especially if the needed tape
is still within the repository of the library.

Change Logical Device


The device used for the object backup may no longer be available, or currently busy. If
waiting for the device to become available is not acceptable, or the device no longer exists it
is possible to use a different logical device of the same type for the restore. Select the device
in the GUI, and then select Change .

If the device no longer exists, a permanent change to an alternate device would be in order.
Use the omnidbutil command with the -change_bdev option to permanently change a
device to another within the Data Protector database. The omnidbutil command will be
discussed in more detail within the database module later in this course.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–11. SLIDE: Restore Media

Restore Media

Student Notes
Shows the media that will be required in order to perform the restore.

U1610S B.00 9-20 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–12. SLIDE: Restore Summary

Restore Summary

Student Notes
Last minute changes to the object list. Here Data Protector allows the addition or removal of
objects for the restore session. The properties for each object may be changed by
highlighting the object and using the pop-up menu (right-mouse-button) to select its
properties. The properties include Version, Destination, Restore Only, and Skip choices.

From the pop-up menu, an additional choice of version selection by time, allows a file version
to be chosen from “best available.” You can specify an acceptable time range for an alternate
version, if your preferred version is not available. Your selection may be from a date and time
range from seconds to hours.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–13. SLIDE: Parallel or Single Restore

Parallel or Single Restore

Start restore
from the toolbar
or Actions
menu

Student Notes

Configure Parallel Restore


When you have selected multiple objects for restore, Data Protector will prompt you with a
notification screen, and choice of performing single or parallel restore. In many cases your
choice of multiple objects was deliberate, but just in case sequential restore is needed, you
can choose individual objects for single restore one at a time without losing the configuration
specified up to this point.

Single Restore
When single restore is chosen, you will be prompted for the object to restore. After that
object completes, chose the “start restore” icon from the Tool Bar, and select another of the
configured objects to restore. Repeat this process until all of your objects are restored.

U1610S B.00 9-22 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–14. SLIDE: Point in Time Restore

Point in Time Restore

When
Whenrestoring
restoringto toaa
point
pointinintime,
time,the
thelast
last
full
full backup of thedata
backup of the data
must be restored first,
must be restored first,
followed
followedby bythe
the note
incremental
incremental backupsinin
backups
the
thecorrect
correctorder.
order.

Data
DataProtector
Protectortakes
takes
care
care ofmedia
of mediaselection
selection
and
andrestore
restoreorder,
order,all
allinin
the same restore
the same restore
session.
session.

Student Notes
When using a full backup plus incremental backup scheme, restores are more complex. This
is because to restore to a particular point in time (a date/time of a particular backup) multiple
restores must be performed. For example if a weekly full backup is performed followed by
daily multi-level incrementals (Mon-Fri), the user wants to recover a directory to the state it
was on the Tuesday, then the following restores must be performed:
1. Restore directory from last full backup.

2. Restore directory from Monday’s incremental backup.

3. Restore directory from Tuesday’s incremental backup.


Data Protector takes care of this by building the restore session automatically including the
objects and the order they are to be restored. Data Protector will issue mount requests for
media in the correct order as needed for the restore, if the media is not already in the device.

The slide shows a screen shot from such a restore session, you can see the objects that Data
Protector has decided are necessary to restore and the order.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

With this type of restore, it is also possible to omit files that were deleted between backups.
See file system restore options for more information.

U1610S B.00 9-24 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

9–15. Review Questions


1. Regularly performed backups can be saved as Backup Specifications and scheduled via
the Data Protector scheduler. The same functionality is available with Data Protector
Restores. TRUE/FALSE?

2. Is it possible to restore a single file from a rawdisk backup? If yes, describe the
limitations.

3. The level of detail available in the restore file browser depends on which factors?

4. What does a point in time restore mean?

5. When performing a restore, how would you suppress Warning messages?

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

6. Describe the behavior of the Merge, Overwrite and No Overwrite options:

7. What is the difference between a normal restore and a parallel restore?

8. What is the difference between the Restore As and Restore Into options?

9. Is it possible to restore a file backed up on one system to a different system? Must the
system be a member of the same Data Protector Cell?

10. Give an example of a use for the pre/post-exec facility for restores:

U1610S B.00 9-26 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

11. In order to perform a valid Rawdisk backup of a file system, the file system must first be
unmounted. TRUE/FALSE?

12. What is the difference between Exclude and Skip?

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 9
Restore

U1610S B.00 9-28 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10 — Internal Database
Objectives
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to do the following:
• Describe the Internal Database architecture.

• Maintain the Data Protector internal database.

• Back up the Data Protector internal database.

• Restore/recover the Data Protector internal database.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–1. SLIDE: Internal Database (IDB)

Internal Database (IDB)

Features

• Scalable
• Flexible
Topics
• High performance
• Reliable • Architecture
• Low maintenance • Command summary
• Automated recovery • Maintenance
• Backup
• Recovery

Student Notes
In this module, the following Internal Database topics will be addressed:
Architecture Composition of the database and general overview
Command Summary Details on using the database related commands
Maintenance Required routine maintenance
Backup Backup procedures and recommendations
Restore Restore procedures and recommendations
Recovery Recovery from corruption

U1610S B.00 10-2 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

IDB — Highlights (with contrast to earlier versions)

Scalability
One of the major features is the overall scalability, which allows for:
• Single point control for many more systems

• Storage of catalog data for hundreds of millions of files / many backup session versions
for convenient restore browsing for a long time

Higher Performance
In the Data Protector 5.0 Database, there is:
• Less CPU load, higher insertion rate, less disk IO

• Many more systems / disks backup in parallel while tracking the catalog data for
convenient restore browsing

• Multi-threaded database server for improved scalability on multi-processor systems

Low Maintenance Requirements


The IDB maintenance effort has been significantly reduced:
• Very fast and convenient file version purge (no administrator need to be involved)

• Higher granularity of IDB ensures its higher robustness and reliability

• Improved reports and notifications help to monitor and maintain IDB

Easy IDB Disaster Recovery


With the utility omnidbrestore, IDB recovery is easy:
• With option ‘-autorecover’ it’s a semi-automatic procedure

• Using the IDB archive transaction logs the IDB can be restored to the point in time of
disaster

• In-place restore of IDB is possible

Automated “Online” Migration


With the utility omnidbupgrade, the IDB migration/upgrade is very easy:
• The IDB upgrade utility monitors the upgrade process

• The administrator can decide when to upgrade the IDB detail part

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

• The detail part upgrade is performed while the IDB is online, thus backups can run
(upgrade will be suspended during that time). However, there are several limitations:

− Browsing of objects, residing on tapes not yet upgraded, will not work or will work
partially.
− Tapes with the detail catalogs not yet upgraded will not be allocated for appended
backup.
− Filename purge cannot be run.
− The upgrade will be suspended while backup is running.

The detail upgrade procedure is recoverable. If the system fails in any stage or if Data
Protector shuts down, the upgrade is resumed automatically when services are restarted.

U1610S B.00 10-4 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–2. SLIDE: Configuring the Database

Configuring the Database

• Growth planning
• Disk space allocation
• Transaction logs
• Recovery data
• Event configuration
• Reporting

Student Notes
The Internal Database is configured by default when the cell manager is installed. The default
configuration may be acceptable for smaller sites, but larger sites should consider changing
the default database due to higher expected quantities of data.

Configuring the Internal Database (or changing its configuration) consists of several facets:
• Growth planning
• Disk space allocation
• Transaction log management (archival)
• Recovery data management
• Event configuration
• Reporting

Each of these facets will be explored in more detail in this section.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–3. SLIDE: IDB Information Storage

IDB Information Storage

• Media management data Database Type: Raima Velocis


• Device configuration data
• Backup and restore session data
• File catalog data

Internal Database
• User configuration
• Backup specifications
• Schedules
• Cell environment
• Report groups Flat File
• Report schedules Storage
• Notifications
UX: /etc/opt/omni
Windows: /<product>/config

Student Notes
Data Protector stores its information in two main locations, the first being the Data Protector
internal database, /var/opt/omni/db40 on Unix, <OMNIHOME>/db40 on Windows, and
the other being flat ASCII files located under the /etc/opt/omni on Unix,
<OMNIHOME>/config in the windows directory tree.

Data Protector IDB utilizes an embedded database technology provided by the Raima
Company called Velocis. The following information is stored in this Data Protector IDB:

• Backup Catalog Data


All information relating to data that has been backed up, including the system, directory
and file names of the source data, the various versions of the files that have been backed
up (files that have been backed up more than once), and catalog retention information.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

• Media Management
Records describing media labels, media pools, backup objects, media locations, media
utilization, current device repository, etc.
• Device Management
Records describing logical device configuration, including logical device names, physical
device files, descriptions, lock names, etc.
• Backup and Restore Session Data
The session progress messages and object status as seen through the monitor screen and
also when viewing previous sessions.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–4. SLIDE: IDB Tablespaces

IDB Tablespaces

RDS Controlled Media management DB:


Embedded DB • Devices
Media Management • Libraries
Database • Media pools

Catalog
Database Catalog DB:
• Objects
• Object versions
Filenames • Sessions
(up to 32 GB) • Media positions
• Directory names

Student Notes
The Internal Database resides in the /var/opt/omni/db40 on Unix. and in the
<OMNIHOME>\db40 directory on Windows. It is highly recommended that the database
always have its own filesystem(s) or partition(s), because it can grow to be very large. The
filesystem may be accessed via a mount to the db40 directory, or on Unix, a symbolic link
from the directory /var/opt/omni to the mount point. On Windows 2000, the empty directory,
<OMNIHOME> may be used as a drive letter path to a partition prior to the install of the
product, or the <OMNIHOME>\db40 may be used for a partition containing only the
database. The downside to the partition is that it must be suitable for disaster recovery,
discussed later in this course.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

The embedded Data Protector (Velocis) database is composed of two separate tablespaces
managed by the RDS server:
• The Media Management Database (MMDB) — stores logical device definitions, media
and media pool information.

Location:
− Unix: /var/opt/omni/db40/datafiles/mmdb
− Windows: <OMNIHOME>/db40/datafiles/mmdb

• The Catalog Database (CDB) — stores information about data backed up, such as
files, directories, versions, and so on.

Location:
− Unix /var/opt/omni/db40/datafiles/cdb
− Windows: <OMNIHOME>/db40/datafiles/cdb

NOTE All changes made to the MMDB and CDB are updated using transaction logs.
This is discussed in more detail later in this section.

The CDB (objects and positions) and MMDB parts represent the core part of the IDB.

The CDB tends to be much larger than the MMDB. The largest file in the CDB is:

fnames.dat used for the filenames tables (up to 32 GB)

The initial limit for the fnames.dat is 2 GB, but may be extended in up to 2 GB increments
to 32 GB. The growth of the database depends on the number of backup sessions and the
growth and dynamics of the client environment (number of new files). By frequently
maintaining the database, the size should be kept to a minimum (the minimum amount of
space required to store the information).

The filenames table will initially grow rapidly, but reach somewhat of a plateau after the
catalog retention time expires; at that point the growth will slow dramatically and remain
fairly constant. The size of the database will ultimately be determined by one complete
backup cycle of all of the data.

In an ordinary single-cell environment, both parts of the database are located on the same
cell server.

In a multi-cell environment, with the Manager of Manager licenses, you may configure a
central MMDB database for many cells. In such a configuration, the MMDB is stored on the
Manager of Manager (MoM) system. Multiple Data Protector cells can share it, and therefore,
share devices. (see the module "Manager of Managers" for more details)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–5. SLIDE: External Binary Files

External Binary Files

bsm,msm controlled Session Managed


Binary Files
File version
attributes
One binary file
DCBF
per medium

Session SMBF
messages
One file per SIBF
session

Student Notes
Data Protector (as of Omniback version 4.0) stores a great deal of data associated with
backup session in data-files that are external to the Velocis database (IDB). These binary files
are updated directly by the session managers; transaction logs are not created for them.
There are three data-store directories used by default:

dcbf Detail Catalog Binary Files


smbf Session Messages Binary Files
sibf Server-less Integration Binary Files

Detail Catalog Binary Files (DCBF)


The DCBF directory contains all of the file version attributes for every file that is backed up.
This includes such details as the file size, modification time, permissions, attributes, etc. The
file details are always stored on tape, but also in the DCBF if requested. When the backup
option for filesystem data is set to “Log All” Data Protector will store all the file details in this
DCBF.

The DCBF will contain one file for every backup medium (tape). The names of the files in the
DCBF directory are derived from the medium-id that Data Protector assigned to the tape

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

when it was initialized. Data Protector will automatically remove the file associated with a
medium that becomes obsolete (exported or overwritten.)

The CDB will contain about 20% of backup file data, and the DCBF will contain about 80%,
when the backup option of “Log All” is used.

By default, there is only one DCBF directory enabled; Data Protector supports up to 10 DCBF
directories per cell.

Location:
• Unix: /var/opt/omni/db40/dcbf
• Windows: <OMNIHOME>/db40/dcbf

NOTE All changes made to the DCBF are done directly, without the use of
transaction logs.

Session Message Binary Files (SMBF)


The SMBF stores session messages generated during backup and restore sessions. One
binary file is created per session. The files are grouped by year and month of the session.

The size of the SMBF depends upon the following:


• The number of stored sessions
• The number of messages written per session.
− Unix messages require approximately 130 bytes each
− Windows messages require approximately 200 bytes each
The number of message written per session can be controlled by the message level feature of
the backup session. Data Protector has the default message level at Warning, but it may be
increased to Minor, Major or Critical to reduce the minimum severity of logged messages.
The messages that don’t meet the specified severity level will not be displayed during the
running session, nor recorded in the database.

Location:
• Unix: /var/opt/omni/db40/msg
• Windows: <OMNIHOME>/db40/msg

NOTE All changes made to the SMBF are done directly, without the use of
transaction logs.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

Server-less Integration Binary Files (SIBF)


The SIBF stores raw NDMP restore data and/or EMC Fastrax data. These files are only used
if you have Data Protector integrated with these other third party products.

Location:
• Unix: /var/opt/omni/db40/meta
• Windows: <OMNIHOME>/db40/meta

NOTE All changes made to the SIBF are done directly, without the use of transaction
logs.

Split Mirror/Snapshot Integration Files (ZDB)


The VADB and XPDB stores data related to the Zero Downtime Backup integrations with the
HP disk arrays, VA and XP. These files are only used if you have Data Protector integrated
with these HP disk products.

Location:
• HP-UX: /var/opt/omni/db40/vadb
• HP-UX: /var/opt/omni/db40/xpdb
• Windows: <OMNIHOME>/db40/vadb
• Windows: <OMNIHOME>/db40/xpdb

NOTE All changes made to the vadb and xpdb are done directly, without the use of
transaction logs.

Instant Recovery Integration Files (IR)


The VADB and XPDB stores data related to the Zero Downtime Backup integrations with the
HP disk arrays, VA and XP. These files are only used if you have Data Protector integrated
with these HP disk products. In addition, the split mirrors and snapshots may be used for
Instant Recovery. The sysdb holds information useful for this purpose.

Location:
• HP-UX: /var/opt/omni/db40/sysdb
• Windows: <OMNIHOME>/db40/sysdb

U1610S B.00 10-12 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–6. SLIDE: Directory Structure

Directory Structure

db40

datafiles dcbf logfiles msg

<file
cdb mmdb catalog rlog syslog <year>
versions>

<tables> <tables> velocis.ini obrindex.dat <transaction <month>


logs>

<session id>

*directories for ZDB and


IR not shown

Student Notes
The directory structure for the default Internal Database is shown above. Data Protector
allows many parts of this database to be relocated for optimum performance and
recoverability. Later in this section we will discuss the optimum disk layouts.

The previous pages discussed several of the objects listed above, some not yet mentioned:

velocis.ini: The database configuration file


obrindex.dat: The recovery data file
transaction log: Two files used for the db-replay function
(ex. RAAAAAAI.chg, rdm.chk)

Preparation to Allow for All Recovery Possibilities


• Relocate the IDB directories according to the recommended multi-disk layout.
• Configure the “RecoveryIndexDir” global option
• Transaction logging, with archiving enabled (optional, but limits the scope of recovery)
• Regular checking of the database consistency
• Daily backup of the full database (hot-backup performed)
• Recording of recovery data in case automated full recovery is needed

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

Data Protector stores the recovery data in a file called obrindex.dat. This file is needed
for the automated off-line recovery. There can be two copies of the obrindex.dat created
during the IDB backup. The second copy is created by altering the “RecoveryIndexDir”
parameter in the global options file, and performed by the IDB backup. The copies should be
on different disk locations.

The off line recovery will also replay the transaction logs to bring the database to the state of
the last backup. Transactions that affected the DCBF are not logged, and cannot be
recovered with the transaction log replay. The DCBF data can be imported from the last used
media if it is needed.

It is recommended that the transaction logs are located on the system disk where the IDB
was installed, and the other parts of the IDB are relocated to other disks. In the case of
disaster caused by a disk failure, the logfiles and recovery information would be stored
online, separate from the database.

U1610S B.00 10-14 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–7. TEXT PAGE: Transaction Logs


The transaction logs created by the IDB may be used to recover the core database (MMDB
and CDB in the event of a failure or corruption. By default the transaction log consists of a
single file. The log will grow to a maximum of 2 MB and then be deleted and replaced by a
new log. The transaction logs are stored in the following directories:

Unix: /var/opt/omni/db40/logfiles/syslog
Windows: <OMNIHOME>/db40/logfiles/syslog

The names of the transaction logs will be similar to the following (from an HP-UX host):

/var/opt/omni/db40/logfiles/syslog/rAAAAAAI.chg

NOTE On Windows NT, it is not possible to change the locations of the IDB
directories.

Archive of Transaction Logs


By default, Data Protector does not archive the transaction logs, but rather replaces them
when they reach the 2 MB threshold. Enabling of the Archiving feature for the embedded
database causes the previous logs to remain in place, instead of getting deleted. To enable the
Archiving feature proceed as follows:

1. Stop the Data Protector services

Omnis -stop

2. Edit the …/db40/datafiles/catalog/velocis.ini file, and set the


parameter:

….
Archiving=1

3. Ensure that there is enough disk space on the …/db40/logfiles/syslog directory

(see the section below)

4. Start the Data Protector services

Omnis –start

Disk Space Consideration


Data Protector will save archive logs until a new IDB backup is performed, at which time
they are no longer necessary. The disk space needed to hold the archived transaction logs
may be substantial, depending upon when the Archiving is enabled.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

To minimize the disk space needed for the archived transaction logs, wait until at least one
cycle of full backups has been completed within the cell before enabling Archiving. If the
names of files are already in the CDB, then the transaction logs will be fairly small. If
filenames are not in the CDB, then each new filename added will add approximately 200
bytes to the logs. In a large environment, the size of the transaction logs may be substantial.
The suggested approach is to enable the Archiving after most of the filenames are already
recorded in the CDB.

U1610S B.00 10-16 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–8. SLIDE: Database Size Limits (Review)

Database Size Limits (Review)

• File Versions (10x # of file names)


• 50 directories (containing binary files)
• 4 GB per directory
DCBF
• 10,000 files per directory

• 700 Million File Names Unix (est.)


• 450 Million File Names on Windows (est.)
CDB (32 GB HP-UX & Windows, 30 GB Solaris)

• 40,000 Media per pool


• 500,000 Media
MMDB • 1,000,000 Sessions (max 2,000 per day)
• 100 parallel backup sessions (UX)

Student Notes
The Data Protector Internal Database limits were introduced in the Architecture module.
They are mentioned here as a review for planning purposes.

The IDB has several defined (supported) limits. These limits should not be exceeded under
any circumstances. The limits illustrated on the slide are also available from the product
Release Notes document that ships with the product.

The file-names (fnames.dat) database file is initially limited to 2 GB, but may be extended
in up to 2-GB increments to a maximum of 32 GB. The minimum extension is 1 MB per
extension.

The file-versions stored in the DCBF is initially limited to one directory of 4 GB, but may be
extended in up to 4 GB increments to a default of 10 directories. The maximum number of
DCBF directories is 50, but this requires the modification of the global option “MaxDCDirs”
from the default value of 10. Each extension directory may contain up to 10,000 files; the limit
for the file versions is set to approximately 10 times the number of file-names. The file
versions represents approximately 80% of all the data stored by Data Protector within the
IDB.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

The size of the MMDB will only be approximately 20 MB.

TIP See the Release Notes for last minute changes and further details.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–9. SLIDE: Recommended Distribution

Recommended Distribution

Tablespaces
MMDB
and Binary File
CDB Directories
Logs
Transaction
and
Recovery

Student Notes
For the best performance using Data Protector’s database and for the easier recovery, it is
best to separate the most active parts of the database onto separate disk volumes. Separating
the tablespaces from the external binary files will increase the performance of Data
Protector. It is also wise to move the transaction logs onto a different disk than the
tablespaces, and make a copy of the recovery information.

Depending upon the operating system of the cell manager, it may be possible to allocation
another partition and then simply move the Internal Database onto the new disk space while
the Data Protector servers are not running. (on UNIX systems, this could be done with
symbolic links as well)

It is best to relocation these directories during the installation process, when the database
contains very little data. (Volume mounts can be built before the installation of the database.)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

Relocation Strategy for the Internal Database Components


CDB Store with the MMDB by relocating the datafiles path of the database
(symbolic link or mount)

MMDB Store with the CDB

DCBF Manage the locations with the database maintenance commands (later
in this section)

SMBF Relocation done by editing the global option “SessionMessageDir”

Transaction logs Keep in the default location if CDB, MMDB, and DCBF are relocated

U1610S B.00 10-20 http://education.hp.com


 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–10. SLIDE: Managing Database Growth

Managing Database Growth

Choose Log Level for backup:


• No logging
• Log all, log file, log directory
Marking database records as obsolete:
• Automatically when a tape is overwritten
• Automatically when retention policy is expired
• Manually remove sessions (omnidb or GUI)
Purging Invalid records from the database:
• Automatically by admin daemon (scheduled)
• Manually with "omnidbutil -purge" command
Shrink the database to its minimum size:
• omnidbutil –writedb/-readdb command

Student Notes
The Internal Database will continue to grow, as more sessions are executed within the cell.
Data Protector stores all the details of successful as well as failed sessions for later reporting.
The growth and size of the Internal Database are determined by the following factors:
• Catalog Detail Level
The number of files and directories backed up and the level of detail held in the database
to describe them (Log None, Log All, Log File, Log Directory)
• Catalog Protection Time
How long detail information is to be kept in the database (should be less than the media
protection in most cases)

• Number of Logged Messages


Messages appearing in the session (message level)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

Catalog Detail Level


The most significant influence on the growth of the IDB is the addition of new clients and
new files, as well as the amount of detail logged for each. During the initial configuration of
the Data Protector cell, the growth and dynamics of the data will be very high. Over time,
however the dynamics may average around 3%-5% per client. Clients with higher dynamics
(frequently changing file names) will cause the IDB to experience substantial growth. For
instance, email servers that have a high file turnover.

Clients, and further objects (file systems) that reside on the clients that have very high
dynamics can negatively impact the overall performance and growth of the IDB. These high
dynamic clients are candidates for reduced catalog data logging during backup.

The selection of “Log File” or “Log Directory” will prevent the unnecessary storage of file
version information for dynamic files. The files will be recoverable from tape, but their
details will not need to be stored in the database, as they are unlikely to be requested
individually. Typically restore by object, or restore by directory is used to put back the files
onto the system.

Recall (from the backup chapter) that the “Log File” option reduce about 70%, and the “Log
Directory” option will reduce about 90% of the file information that is stored.

Catalog Protection Time


Data Protector allows you to set protection for data backed up and backup catalog
information independently. This allows the physical data protection of backup objects on
media to be different from the related catalog information for the same objects stored in the
Internal Database.

Setting the catalog retention time to a period lower than the physical protection time can be
useful. For example, if media is required to be kept for a long time span, but realistically, will
not be required for restore (archives, etc), the catalog can be kept for only one month, while
the data on tape is protected for 3 years.

If the catalog protection is set equal to that of the media protection, then the IDB will
continue to grow rapidly. The protection of the catalog for particular sessions may be altered
in the database by using the GUI or the command line.

Changing the Number of Logged Messages


The number of logged messages can be controlled in various ways depending on the source
of the messages.

One source of messages is output from pre/post exec scripts. These messages, by default,
appear on stdout, and thus will appear in the session log. If a pre/post-exec script is
generating large numbers of messages for each backup, it can take up a large amount of
space in the database. Such information can be reduced by either reducing the verboseness
of messages or by redirecting them to a logfile.

Messages generated by Data Protector itself during the backup operation are another source.
Setting the message filter level (Normal, Warning, Minor, Major, and Critical) can control
the number of such messages.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

Data Removal from the IDB


Removal of data from the Internal Database should be automatic. As detail catalogs are
expiring, and as tapes are overwritten (once protection expires) Data Protector will
automatically purge the obsolete data from the database by executing an Admin Session
Manager (ASM) according to a pre-defined schedule.

The global option file contains the parameter “DailyMaintenanceTime” to control when the
ASM executes. The default time is 12:00 (noon). A typical purge session will last for several
seconds while obsolete DCBF and SMBF files are removed for the expired media.

The manual invocation of a purge may still be needed. The omnidbutil command provides
several options to control how this type of data purge will execute.

Data Protector has two features that will help determine if an additional purge is needed.
They include a purge report as well as an automatic notification. The chapter on Reporting
and Notifications will cover both in more detail.

Additional maintenance includes shrinking or extending the database. Shrinking is only


useful if too much disk space has been consumed, and data removal is desirable followed by
a database reduction. Extending the database is necessary if either of the parts of the CDB or
DCBF is nearing the initial limitations.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–11. SLIDE: Internal Database GUI

Internal Database GUI

Disk volume space

Student Notes
Keeping tabs on the disk space consumed by the IDB is very important. Database corruption
could occur if the disk fills up before a transaction is completed. Data Protector provides
sufficient tools to allow advanced monitoring of the space consumption for its database.
Frequent monitoring is highly recommended.

Data Protector has several built in features to aid in the monitoring of the database:
• Built-in size graphs
• Event logging and notification (database full event)
• Scheduled monitoring via reports
• Web Based reporting tools

Shown above is the size-graph available within the database context of the GUI. Each of the
icons within the Scoping Pane within the MMDB and CDB components support the graph
tools.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–12. SLIDE: IDB Size Report

IDB Size Report

Student Notes
In addition to the graphs, Data Protector provides pre-configured reports to show the
physical size and usage of the internal database components. The Reporting context in the
Scoping Pane has several reports available under the Tasks menu tab.

The report shown above should be frequently executed to monitor the growth of the
database. The amount of maintenance needed for the database will largely depend upon the
rate of growth and length of time that the data needs to be kept.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–13. SLIDE: Database Maintenance

Database Maintenance

Reasons:
• Low disk space
• File version purge
• Filenames purge
• DB size management
• DB corruption

Student Notes
There are several maintenance tasks required to keep the IDB running smoothly. They
include:
• Monitoring for devices with low disk space (where the database is stored)
• Ensuring that regular purging of obsolete data is occurring
• Periodically purging the file names tablespace (CDB)
• Monitoring for high client dynamics, and making adjustments to the backup
specifications
• Monitoring and managing the regular growth of the IDB
• Preventing corruption, or detecting it early before major problems occur

The rest of this section will deal with the commands that are provided with the cell manager
to manage, monitor and maintain the IDB. These maintenance commands will allow for
relocation and allocation of additional space for the DCBF.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–14. Text Page: Data Protector Commands

Database Commands
Data Protector provides several commands for access to and control of the database.

The commands are:


omnidbinit Initialize the database and erase all data in it
omnidbcheck Check the physical consistency of the database.
omnidbrestore Automated recovery of the database
omnidbutil Maintain the database.
omnidb Query and modify the database
omnicellinfo Query the database

There is a section at the end of this module containing an overview of the database related
commands and examples for their usage.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–15. SLIDE: Database Cleanup

Database Cleanup

omnidb -purge …
omnidb -strip …

Student Notes
The GUI provides many database maintenance features and actions. Removal of session,
session messages, and session versions are provided. The functionality here behaves the
same as the omnidb command. See the omnidb man-page or the command reference section
lager in this module for details of the selected choices and some examples.

NOTE The GUI allows for the selection of multiple sessions as targets for the
operation.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–16. SLIDE: Adding Filename Extensions

Adding Filename Extensions

Up to 2047 MB
per extension

omnidbutil -extendfnames <path> -maxsize <MB>

Student Notes
When the size of the fnames.dat table is insufficient for the needs of the cell, the
administrator must extend it. This extension is typically done via the GUI as shown above,
but may also be performed from the command line. The omnidbutil command introduced in
the slide, is covered by a reference section near the end of this module.

Each extension to the fnames.dat may range from 1-2047 MB in size. It is generally
recommended to keep all of the extensions within the same directory structure, that is,
within the <OMNIVAR>/db40/datafiles/cdb directory.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–17. SLIDE: Adding DCBF Locations

Adding DCBF Locations

omnidbutil -add_dcbf <path> …

Student Notes
It is desirable in larger cell environments to have more than a single directory used for the
storage of the DCBF. Data Protector allows for a maximum of 50 directories, but has an
initial limit set to 10 by a global option (covered earlier). The new DCBF may be created and
initialized via the Internal Database GUI, or by using the omnidbutil command. When using
the omnidbutil command, there are additional options for relocating the DCBF, as well as
removing the DCBF. Refer to the omnidutil reference near the end of this module for
examples.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–18. SLIDE: Preparing for Database Recovery

Preparing for Database Recovery

Considerations:
Considerations:
•• Distribution
Distribution
•• Transaction
Transaction logging
logging
•• Backup
Backup

Student Notes
Internal Database recovery may be necessary if omnidbcheck reports critical or major
corruption to some parts of the database. Preparation is necessary if you are to recover the
previous non-corrupted database.

Data Protector supports several different recovery possibilities including:


• Removing the parts of the database that report “Minor” corruption

• Restoring the database from backup tape (servers running)

• Restoring the database without the server processes running (crs, rds)
The choice of which type of recovery is needed depends upon preparation and the report
output from the omnidbcheck command. Corruption reported as Major or Critical will
require some form of recovery. Corruption that is Minor allows for removal of the corrupted
data, and then continued operations; recovery of the data is optional and in some cases
unnecessary.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–19. SLIDE: Back Up the Database

Backup the Internal Database

The internal database is a critical component, and


therefore, must be protected!
•• AAspecial
specialobject
objecttype
typeOMNIDB
OMNIDBto
tobackup
backupthe
the
internal database is provided
internal database is provided

•• The
TheOMNIDB
OMNIDBobject
objectmay
maybe
beincluded
includedininaabackup
backup
specification
specification

•• The
Theconfiguration
configurationand
anddatabase
databaseare
areboth
bothincluded
included
ininthe OMNIDB object
the OMNIDB object

•• AA“hot
“hotbackup”
backup”isisperformed
performed

•• Consistency
Consistencycheck
checkperformed
performedbefore
beforebackup
backup
(default=on)
(default=on)

Student Notes
The database is an extremely important part of Data Protector, and must be backed up
regularly. A special object type of OMNIDB is provided, and must be used in order to obtain a
consistent backup. A normal file system backup is not sufficient!

Only one database backup can run at a time. During the Internal Database backup, Data
Protector also performs the following:
• Checks the integrity of the database before backup, thus preventing back up and
restoration of a corrupted database. (-quick enabled by default, this takes about 1.5 hours
for a 10 GB database)

• Online backup while the database is being used. Therefore, other backup or restore
sessions can run while the database is being backed up.

• Backup all Data Protector configuration data that is stored in the database and flat files,
including data on devices, backup specifications, and schedules.

• Backs up all the database extension files if they exist.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

We recommend the following procedure to back up the database:

1. Create a separate backup specification for the database. This simplifies scheduling and
restoring in case of a disk crash.

2. Schedule a database backup every night. This ensures that you always have an up-to-date
backup of the database. You can set the data and catalog protections to only a few days.

3. Make the database backup using a separate media pool on a separate media, on a specific
device. Make sure you know which media you use for a database backup. This greatly
simplifies eventual restore, since you know precisely on which medium your database is
backed up. (use of standalone devices is preferred in case of a disaster; they are easier to
configure for the restore process)

4. Keep at least two copies of the database backup tapes.

Checking the Integrity of the Database


The integrity of the Internal Database is extremely important. To maintain the integrity, Data
Protector provides the following functionality:

• Automatically checks database integrity before each backup.

• Manually checks the database integrity with the omnidbcheck command.

Only one database check at a time can be run on the database.

Checking before Backup


You should always check your database before backing it up. It is important that the database
you back up is consistent, so you can recover it and the backed up data in case of a disaster.

Data Protector by default checks the integrity of the database before the database is backed
up.

Modifying the object properties can disable the automatic database check that is performed
prior to backup of an OMNIDB object. It may be necessary to disable the automatic check if
the database is very large and the check takes too much time. In this case, a manual check
scheduled with the system scheduler may be a better option. The scheduled check should not
be performed while there is any other Data Protector activity.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–20. SLIDE: Manual Restore of the Database

Manual Restore of the Database

rds, crs, mmd

Data
base Internal Database

restore -into CDB MMDB


Temp Directory
te
ca
l- o
e
R te
loca
CDB Re-

MMDB

Student Notes
The restore of the Internal Database must be accomplished in a series of steps, because it is
not possible to do a "hot-restore" of the data with this method. All restore operations in Data
Protector require that Data Protector is operational; that is to say, Data Protector is the only
product that will read the Data Protector tapes.

It is possible that the restore of the Cell Database may be onto a different system than the
original Cell Server (Manager) system; in this case additional steps are needed in order to
proceed with the restore.

Why would you need to restore the Internal Database?

• Corruption
• Recovery due to loss of data
• Restore of failed Cell Server

Database Restore

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

The process below will assume a recovery onto a newly installed Cell Manager System or
after a disaster recovery of the Operating System. This procedure may also be used to restore
the database to a previously non-corrupted state.

Requirements

• Running Cell Server (crs, rds, mmd)

• Operational Database (not corrupted, may be empty)

• Configured Logical Device

• Configured Media Pool

• Sufficient Disk Space

Overview:
Depending upon the condition of the Cell Server and Database, the Database may need to be
re-initialized so that it is operational prior to the restore. Use the omnidbinit command to
initialize the database if necessary; this requires that the Database Server (rds) is running.
If the rds is unable to be started due to database corruption, see the next topic,
"Reconfiguring a Corrupted DB."

Discovering the Medium Containing the IDB Backup


The following procedure requires that the most current IDB backup is known and available.
This information is stored within the IDB, so what can be done if the medium ID is not
known? The <OMNIVAR>/log/media.log file stored on the Call Manager holds the answer.
Each medium access is recorded within this log file and will prove useful in the case of a loss
of the IDB. It is a good practice to print this log file regularly so that it will be available in the
event of a Cell Manager disaster.

Restoring the IDB


The following procedure will restore the Database to the Cell Manager system. The
procedure assumes that you have a Logical Device and Media Pool already configured for
use.

Procedure

1. Import the tape into the existing (new) IDB, into a Media Pool using a Logical Device.
(This is not needed if the database is still operational and contains the session
information from the desired backup session.) This may require the configuration of a
new Logical Device if a new database was created. Consult the media log for the medium
ID if it is not known.

2. Restore the desired backup session data onto the system in an alternate location using
the "into" feature of Restore. (you may be able to restore into the partition or directory
where you have located the “db40”, since you will likely have available disk space there,
just don't overwrite the existing active database, "db40" directory)

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

3. After the "restore - into" has completed, stop the Data Protector servers. Be sure to stop
all GUI's and sessions before proceeding, the database will be moved! On the slide, this is
indicated as the crs, mmd, rds not running. Do not relocate the database with the servers
running!

omnisv -stop

4. Move/rename the current database to a temporary name, then move the restored
database into place.
mv /var/opt/omni/db40 /var/opt/omni/db40.bkup

mv <location>/db40 /var/opt/omni/db40

(where <location> is the full path to the restored database directory (eg. HP-UX))

5. The restore process also restored the configuration files into the same location as the
database files. You may want to move them into place as well if they need to be recovered
(this step may be optional, if the files are intact).

mv /etc/opt/omni /etc/opt/omni.bkup

mv <location>/omni /etc/opt/omni

6. Start the Data Protector Servers using the newly recovered database.

omnisv -start

7. Verify that the database and all of the configurations are operational.

omnidbcheck …

Disk Space Consideration


There will need to be a substantial amount of available disk space for this procedure. It is
advisable to have a disk layout that is conducive to this type of restore. Not considered in the
above procedure is the possibility that some parts of the database reside on separate disk
volumes. Manually relocating the parts of the database, instead of the entire db40 directory is
supported. The disk layout that was present at the time of the backup must be manually
recreated first, before the parts may be distributed. Data Protector does not backup the disk
layout, just the contents of the database and configuration files and directories. In other
words, Data Protector will not re-create mount points and/or symbolic links, which relocate
the database while it is restoring the data.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–21. SLIDE: Manual Restore Using the GUI

Manual Restore Using the GUI

Student Notes
This essentially the same as the previous manual procedure, but only takes into account the
actual restore process, and not the activation of the restored database. After using this task,
follow the manual steps outlined previously.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–22. SLIDE: Automated Restore of the Database

Automated Restore/Recovery

Process Overview
• Stop daemons/services
• Read recovery information
• Restore database session
• Log replay (roll forward)
• Start daemons/services

omnidbrestore
omnidbrestore–autorecover
–autorecover[[ …
… options]
options]

Student Notes
The previous recovery sequence was required if the entire database is replaced, and the cell
server processes are operational.

In the case of the cell server being inoperable, it is still possible to restore the database in
place by using the command omnidbrestore. This is the preferred choice for database
recovery, but some key preparation is required.

CAUTION The existing IDB will be overwritten by this recovery process.

The omnidbrestore command executes several steps necessary to recover from a


damaged IDB.

The general steps performed by omnidbrestore are:


• Stop the daemons/services
• Read recovery information from the existing obrindex.dat
• Restore the database from the latest backup session using the obrindex.dat options
• Prompt for the replay the transaction logs (roll forward)
• Restart the daemons/services

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

Preparations must be made in advance if this type of restore is to be successful. Follow the
preparations mentioned earlier in this section; especially the configuration of a second copy
for the obrindex.dat file.

Requirements for automated recovery


• Data Protector 5.0 software installed
• Copies of the latest IDB backup tapes
• The original device used for the IDB backup, loaded with the tape

The omnidbrestore Utility


The ability of the omindbrestore utility to replay the transaction logs may depend upon
the Archiving parameter being enabled. This is only an issue if the transaction log exceeds 2
MB before the next IDB backup, in which case the transaction log would be overwritten or
archived according to the state of the Archiving parameter.

The omnidbrestore utility supports three modes:

Autorecover mode: -autorecover

In this mode the obrindex.dat file is scanned for the media, RMA, and VRDA options
needed, as well as the name for the transaction log from the last IDB backup which is used
for the restore. When the options are retrieved, the database is automatically retrieved from
the last backup tape using the same physical device that the backup was executed with.

Read mode: -read

The read mode reads from a file created with the –autorecover –save <file> options.
The obrindex.dat file must be available, but requires changes. This is mostly used when
the original device for the backup is not available for the restore, or attached to a different
system. In this case the <file> may be manually updated with the appropriate restore device
information, and then used instead of the obrindex.dat file.

Manual mode:

This manual mode is used when the obrindex.dat file is not available. All of the options
needed for a restore must be specified manually. See the man page for omnidbrestore for
all the details. Good preparation should help to avoid this more difficult type of restore.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

10–23. SLIDE: Recovery from Corruption

Recovery from Corruption

newconfig!

Internal Database

CDB MMDB

The
Thedatabase
databasemust
mustbebeoperational
operationalininorder
order
to
to manually restore the database fromtape
manually restore the database from tape

Student Notes
The corruption of the Internal Database is rare, but it is comprised of files and directories,
and is stored within a filesystem. There may be some circumstances where the Database
Server (RDS) is unable to start due to a corrupted database. When this occurs you are likely
to need to restore the Internal Database using the procedure previously discussed.

Recovery from corruption


There are three classes of error reported by omnidbcheck that need to be addressed:

Critical: Reported when the core IDB is corrupted


Major: Reported when the filenames detail is corrupted
Minor: Reported when there are problems with the DCBF

Each of the three mentioned above is recoverable, with the proper preparations.

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

Critical
To recover from critical level corruption, the IDB will need to be recovered from tape using
either of the previous procedures for recovery.

Major
To recover from major level corruption, the IDB may be recovered from tape (preferred) or
restored by exporting and importing the current database without the details. The
omnidbutil –writedb –no_detail, followed by an omnidbutil –read_db will
recreate the database without the file detail catalogs. The database will appear as to have
been created with backups using the “No Log” option. Once the omnidbutil –read_db
completes, the contents of the DCBF may be removed, as they are no longer referenced. This
recovery operation will take approximately 5-20 minutes.

All new backups may use the “Log All” option to create new DCBF entries.

Minor
To recover from minor corruption, removal of the files in the DCBF may be performed. Then
recreate the DCBF files by importing the media that was deleted. If these files are missing,
then restore will report errors when browsing.

To replace the missing files:


1. Execute the omnidbcheck –bf to get the <medium_id> of the missing files
2. Execute the omnimm –media_info <medium_id> to obtain the tape label and
location information
3. Execute the omnidbutil –fixmpos to repair the corruption
4. Import the media that had the corrupted DCBF file (1 file is used per medium)

To replace the corrupted files:


1. Execute the omnidbcheck –dc to get the <medium_id> of the corrupted files
2. Execute the omnimm –media_info <medium_id> to obtain the tape label and
location information
3. Identify the corrupted files, the names will be <medium_id>_<timestamp>.dat. The
file representing the medium will have “_” characters in place of the “:” character as
reported by the omnidbcheck output.
4. Remove the corrupted DCBF medium files
5. Execute the omnidbutil –fixmpos to establish consistency within the IDB
6. Import the media that had the corrupted DCBF file (1 file is used per medium)

Creating a New Database


There is one major issue that needs to be resolved; if the manual restore is used, you will
need to have an operational database to restore Data Protector. The Database Server also
must be running in order to perform the omnidbinit to initialize the database. You may be
tempted to re-install Data Protector, but this will not succeed, since Data Protector will
assume that you are performing an upgrade, and not recreate the database if it is on the
system already.

During the installation of Data Protector, a copy of the database directory structure was
placed within the <OMNIHOME> directory called “newconfig.” The newconfig/db40

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 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Module 10
Internal Database

directory is a new, uninitialized Internal Database. To use it, copy it into the correct location,
and use the omnidbinit command to initialize it. Then start the manual recovery process as
indicated earlier.

HP-UX Specific Feature


When your Cell Manager is HP-UX, you may use the SD-UX commands to force Data
Protector to recreate the database, without re-installing from the product media. The
swconfig command will allow us to un-configure and then re-configure the Data Protector
product, which will create a new database to allow for the execution of the restore
procedure. This would be necessary in those cases when omnidbinit is unable to
communicate with the database server (RDS).

Procedure to Remove and Recreate an Internal Database

1. Stop the Data Protector Servers (be sure to exit all Data Protector GUI's and sessions):

/opt/omni/sbin/omnisv -stop

2. Check the state of the Data Protector product filesets, they should be configured:

swlist -a state -l fileset DATA-PROTECTOR

3. Un-configure the Data Protector product filesets:

swconfig -u DATA-PROTECTOR

4. Verify the fileset status is installed:

swlist -a state -l fileset DATA-PROTECTOR

5. Remove the corrupted database:

rm -r /var/opt/omni/db

6. Configure the Data Protector filesets to create a "new" database:

swconfig DATA-PROTECTOR

7. Verify the configured state of the filesets:

swlist -a state -l fileset DATA-PROTECTOR

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8. Start the Data Protector servers:

/opt/omni/sbin/omnisv.sh -start

9. Follow the restore procedure discussed earlier to restore the Internal Database from the
latest backup.

NOTE This procedure may be used to create a new, empty database that may quickly
be enabled to allow for a restore of the database from tape.

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10–24. TEXT PAGE: omnidb

The omnidb Command (reference)


The omnidb command provides several important capabilities for database maintenance.
Primarily, omnidb is a general-purpose query tool used to gather information from the
database, however omnidb is also able to make some modifications to the existing session
records.

This section will provide some brief examples so that the basic format of data stored in the
database will be understood. This module is primarily about maintenance, which may be
performed on individual items within the database.

Example 1: Listing sessions from the database

omnidb -session

SessionID Type Status User.Group@Host


====================================================================
2000/04/13-1 Backup Completed root.sys@na159w10
2000/04/13-2 Backup Completed root.sys@na159w10
2000/04/13-3 Backup Completed root.sys@na159w10
2000/04/13-4 Backup Completed root.sys@na159w10
2000/04/13-5 Backup Completed root.sys@na159w10
2000/04/13-6 Backup Completed root.sys@na159w10
2000/04/18-1 Restore Failed root.sys@na168w2
2000/04/18-2 Backup Completed root.sys@na168w2
2000/04/20-1 Backup Completed root.sys@na168w2
2000/04/20-2 Backup Failed root.sys@na168w2
2000/04/20-3 Backup Completed root.sys@na168w2

Example 2: Listing a specific session from the database

omnidb -session 2000/04/20-3

Object Name Object Type Object Status


=======================================================================
na168w2:/tmp 'practice-command' FileSystem Completed

Example 3: Listing details of a specific session from the database

omnidb -session 2000/04/20-3 -detail

Object name : na168w2:/tmp 'practice-command'


Object type : FileSystem
Object status : Completed
Started : Thu Apr 20 14:43:55 2000
Finished : Thu Apr 20 14:44:17 2000
Object size : 6528 [KB]
Backup mode : Full
Protection : Protected permanently
Catalog retention : Protected permanently

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Access : Private
Number of warnings : 0
Number of errors : 0
Device name : dlt_drive1

Example 4: Listing details of a specific object from a session in the database

omnidb -session 2000/04/20-3 -filesystem na168w2:/tmp 'practice-command'

Started : Thu Apr 20 14:43:55 2000


Finished : Thu Apr 20 14:44:17 2000
Status : Completed
Object size : 6528 [KB]
Backup mode : Full
Protection : Protected permanently
Catalog retention : Protected permanently
Access : Private
Number of warnings : 0
Number of errors : 0

Other Options for omnidb


-change_protection Protection

Changes the current protection of the object versions identified by ObjectName


and/or SessionID to the new protection defined as Protection. If it is specified
without any other option, it changes protection for all Failed/Aborted objects.
Protection can be none, permanent, until a specific date, or for a time interval.
When the protection is until a specified date or for a time interval, you must
specify the value. The date form is [YY]YY/MM/DD. In the first case, the value is the
date until which the data is protected. In the second case, the time interval is the
number of days (after today) during which the data cannot be overwritten.

-change_catprotection Protection

Changes the current protection of the catalog retention time. Protection can be
none, same_as_data_protection, until a specific date, or for a time interval.
same_as_data_protection means that the catalog will stay until data is
overwritten or exported. When the protection is until a specified date or for a time
interval, you must specify the value. The date form is [YY]YY/MM/DD. In the first
case, the value is the date until which the data is protected. In the second case, the
time interval is the number of days (after today) during which the data cannot be
overwritten.

Example: Change the protection of a session from permanent to 30 days

omnidb -session 2000/04/20-3 -change_protection days 30

omnidb -session 2000/04/30-3 -change_catprotection days 30

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Database Maintenance Commands


The omnidb command may be used to select (mark) data to be removed from the Internal
Database. There are three aspects to record selection, detail catalogs, sessions and session
messages.

Stripping Catalog Detail

You can mark detailed data for removing using the omnidb -strip command, with various
options; there are four possibilities:

• strip the detail catalogs of all the objects in a session

• strip the detail catalogs for a specific object within a session

• strip the detail catalogs on all unprotected objects

• strip the detail catalogs for an object older than a specific number of days

Examples: using omnidb -strip

• all unprotected objects in the database:


omnidb –strip

• all objects within a session


omnidb -session <session-id> -strip

• a specific object within a session


omnidb -session session-id -filesystem host:/mnt 'description' -strip

• a specific object older than 30 days


omnidb -filesystem host:/mnt 'description' -strip 30

Purging Sessions
The omnidb command may also be used to purge an entire session from the database.
All objects within a session will be marked as unprotected. It will still be possible to restore
from this session until the media used is overwritten; at that time the session data will
become obsolete.

Example:

omnidb -session 2000/05/01-1 -purge

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10–25. TEXT PAGE: omnidbutil

The omnidbutil command (reference)


The omnidbutil command has several different uses, all associated with the database. You
must execute the omnidbutil command with super-user (root/administrator) privileges
from the Cell Manager system only.

The omnidbutil command offers the following general capabilities:

• Removal of Obsolete Data from the Database


• Reporting on Database Usage
• Operations on Detail Catalog Binaries Files and the CDB
• Device and Session Control
• Synchronization of the MMDB and CDB (within the MoM environment)
• Other Miscellaneous Cell Tasks

Removing Obsolete Data from the Database


Data Protector automatically removes obsolete information from the CDB at regular time
intervals (see the Purge Schedule topic below).

Purging removes unneeded information from the database and frees space for new
information. Purging the CDB does not actually shrink the size of the files; it merely makes
space for new information.

The data previously selected (marked) for removal by omnidb will be permanently removed
from the database by this purging process.

Purging data is essentially a two-step process:


First: data must be marked as obsolete This happens as catalogs expire or via the
omnidb command

Next: data must be removed This happens automatically at maintenance


time, or as a result of running omnidbutil as
described next

The following command can purge information relating to restore sessions, as well as
obsolete (overwritten) backup sessions, and sessions without any media, such as failed or
aborted sessions.

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Examples: starting a purge session manually:


omnidbutil -purge Removes:
• obsolete file names, restore and
backup sessions, session messages
and objsolet DCBF files
omnidbutil -purge –days <n> Removes:
• restore sessions and obsolete backup