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PLUS+1™ GUIDE

Software

PLUS+1 GUIDE
User Manual

158.2 mm
6.23

144.5 mm
5.69

2x 25.2 mm
142.0 mm [1.0]
[5.59]

97.0 mm
[3.82]

2x ∅7.0
[.28]
MOUNTING
DIRECTION
#2

LED INDICATOR
PIN #1 LIGHTS
INDICATED

51.6 mm
[2.03]
1 6 1 6

12 7 12 7

47.1 mm
[1.85]

CONNECTOR MATES CONNECTOR MATES


WITH DEUTCH WITH DEUTCH
CONNECTOR #DTM-06-125A CONNECTOR #DTM-06-125A
PLUS+1 GUIDE
User Manual
About this Manual

Organization To help you quickly find information in this manual, the material is divided into sections,
and Headings topics, subtopics, and details, with descriptive headings set in red type. Section titles
appear at the top of every page in large red type. Topic headings appear in the left-hand
column in bold red type. Subtopic headings appear above the body text in bold red
type and detail headings in italic red type.

References (example: See Topic xyz, page XX) are also formatted in red italic type. In
Portable Document Format (PDF) files, these references are hyperlinks that jump to the
corresponding document pages.

Tables, Illustrations, and Tables, illustrations, and graphics in this manual are identified by titles set in blue italic
Complementary type above each item. Complementary information such as notes, captions, and drawing
Information annotations are also set in blue type.

Special Text Formatting Controls and indicators are set in bold black type.

Black italic type is used in the text to emphasize important information, or to set off words
and terms that are used in an unconventional manner or alternative context.

Table of Contents In the PDF version of this document, the table of contents and index entries are
and Index hyperlinked.

Revision history
Revision Date Comment

Rev CA April 2007

©2007 Sauer-Danfoss. All rights reserved.


Sauer-Danfoss accepts no responsibility for possible errors in catalogs, brochures and other printed material.
Sauer-Danfoss reserves the right to alter its products without prior notice. This also applies to products already
ordered provided that such alterations can be made without affecting agreed specifications.
All trademarks in this material are properties of their respective owners.
PLUS+1, GUIDE, and Sauer-Danfoss are trademarks of the Sauer-Danfoss Group. The PLUS+1 GUIDE, PLUS+1
Compliant, and Sauer-Danfoss logotypes are trademarks of the Sauer-Danfoss Group.

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Contents

Risk Reduction .................................................................................................................................................. 9


Design and Test to Reduce Risks......................................................................................................10
Design ...............................................................................................................................................10
Test.....................................................................................................................................................10

Learning About the PLUS+1 GUIDE Program ......................................................................................11


Lesson 1: Create an Application .......................................................................................................12
Lesson 2: Download an Application................................................................................................24

PLUS+1 GUIDE Window ..............................................................................................................................29


PLUS+1 GUIDE Window Elements...................................................................................................30
About the PLUS+1 GUIDE Window .........................................................................................32
About PLUS+1 GUIDE Application Templates.....................................................................34
About Route Names .....................................................................................................................35
Menus........................................................................................................................................................36
Toolbar......................................................................................................................................................43
Plotter Output Setup Window ..........................................................................................................47
Options Window....................................................................................................................................50
View Logical Net Window...................................................................................................................54
Hardware Tab .........................................................................................................................................55
Search Window ..............................................................................................................................57
Project Manager Tab ............................................................................................................................58
About the Project Manager and Hardware Tabs ................................................................60
Page Navigator Tab ..............................................................................................................................62
Component Tab.....................................................................................................................................63
Function Tab ...........................................................................................................................................64
My Blocks Tab .........................................................................................................................................65
Inspector Tab ..........................................................................................................................................66
Compiler Messages Tabs ....................................................................................................................67

Data Types .......................................................................................................................................................69


Data Types ...............................................................................................................................................70
About Overflow Conditions...............................................................................................................71
About the Time Base Data Type .......................................................................................................72
Resolution........................................................................................................................................73
About the Array Data Type ................................................................................................................74

Components ...................................................................................................................................................75
Context-Sensitive Help for Components ......................................................................................76
About Component Descriptions......................................................................................................77
Mathematical..........................................................................................................................................79
Arithmetic ........................................................................................................................................80
Absolute Value ...............................................................................................................................92
Scale...................................................................................................................................................94

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Trigonometric................................................................................................................................. 98
Square Root...................................................................................................................................105
Limit .........................................................................................................................................................106
Max/Min .........................................................................................................................................107
Compare.................................................................................................................................................116
Compare.........................................................................................................................................117
Compare with Hysteresis..........................................................................................................123
Compare in Window ..................................................................................................................129
Constant .................................................................................................................................................131
True/False ......................................................................................................................................132
Digit Autotype..............................................................................................................................134
Typed...............................................................................................................................................137
Logical.....................................................................................................................................................142
AND2–AND5 .................................................................................................................................143
OR2–OR8........................................................................................................................................144
NOT ..................................................................................................................................................145
XOR ..................................................................................................................................................146
Bitwise.............................................................................................................................................147
Shift..................................................................................................................................................150
Position...........................................................................................................................................152
Set/Reset Latch ............................................................................................................................155
Data Flip-Flop ...............................................................................................................................157
Switch, Counter, Memory.................................................................................................................159
Switch Boolean Controlled ......................................................................................................160
Switch..............................................................................................................................................163
Counter...........................................................................................................................................168
Value Connect ..............................................................................................................................175
Memory ..........................................................................................................................................179
Array ........................................................................................................................................................183
Get Array Element.......................................................................................................................184
Set Array Element........................................................................................................................186
Length of Array ............................................................................................................................188
Delete Array Elements ...............................................................................................................189
Insert Array Elements.................................................................................................................191
Copy of Array ................................................................................................................................193
Find Array.......................................................................................................................................194
Array Constant from File...........................................................................................................195
Data Conversion ..................................................................................................................................197
Decode/Encode ...........................................................................................................................198
Split ..................................................................................................................................................204
Combine.........................................................................................................................................205
Swap ................................................................................................................................................206
Retype .............................................................................................................................................207
Transition, Time ...................................................................................................................................208
Transition .......................................................................................................................................209
Delay................................................................................................................................................212
Oscillator ........................................................................................................................................217
Pulse ................................................................................................................................................219
Example—Pulse...........................................................................................................................220

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Time Base ...................................................................................................................................... 221


Measure Period ........................................................................................................................... 223
Connection ........................................................................................................................................... 224
Checkpoint ................................................................................................................................... 225
Set Value........................................................................................................................................ 231
Hardware....................................................................................................................................... 232
CAN ................................................................................................................................................. 242
Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic ............................................................................................. 253
Module................................................................................................................................................... 260
Module Single Wire ................................................................................................................... 261
Module Bus................................................................................................................................... 263
Call Module................................................................................................................................... 264
Manage .................................................................................................................................................. 267
Generate Compiler Error on Range ...................................................................................... 268
Generate Compiler Error on Not Constant ........................................................................ 269
Generate Compiler Error on Type......................................................................................... 270
Predefine Type ............................................................................................................................ 271
Access..................................................................................................................................................... 273
Access App Log Enable ............................................................................................................ 274
Disable Raw Applog Data Readout ...................................................................................... 274
Accessrights App Log Diagnostics ....................................................................................... 275
Accessrights App Log Errors................................................................................................... 276
Accessrights App Log Others ................................................................................................. 277
Accessrights History .................................................................................................................. 278
Accessrights Read ...................................................................................................................... 279
Accessrights Write...................................................................................................................... 280
Read-only Parameter......................................................................................................................... 285
Open Parameter Set .................................................................................................................. 286
Close Parameter Set .................................................................................................................. 287
Connection................................................................................................................................... 288
Example—Read-only Parameter Input with Namespace............................................. 291
Display.................................................................................................................................................... 292
Define Window ........................................................................................................................... 293
Line.................................................................................................................................................. 295
Graphic........................................................................................................................................... 297
Text Label...................................................................................................................................... 299
Graphic Label............................................................................................................................... 300
String .............................................................................................................................................. 301
Text Set .......................................................................................................................................... 309
Define Areas Page ...................................................................................................................... 314
Define Screen Page.................................................................................................................... 314
Application Log................................................................................................................................... 315
Language Definition Input...................................................................................................... 315
Select Language ......................................................................................................................... 315
Define Application Log Areas Page...................................................................................... 315
Define Application Log Page.................................................................................................. 315
Page ........................................................................................................................................................ 316
Basic Page ..................................................................................................................................... 316

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Screen Editor.................................................................................................................................................317
About the Screen Editor....................................................................................................................318
Screen Editor Elements .....................................................................................................................319
Define Areas Page ...............................................................................................................................321
Define Areas Page/Inspector Tab ..........................................................................................323
Define Screen Page.............................................................................................................................330
Define Screen Page/Add Library Items................................................................................332
Define Screen Page/Inspector Tab........................................................................................333
Define Screen Page/Image Register .....................................................................................339
Define Screen Page/Text Register .........................................................................................342

PLUS+1—How To........................................................................................................................................345
Select .......................................................................................................................................................346
Undo Your Mistakes ...........................................................................................................................346
Zoom with the Mouse .......................................................................................................................347
Zoom with Keystrokes.......................................................................................................................347
Delete a Single Item ...........................................................................................................................348
Delete Many Items ..............................................................................................................................349
Delete a Signal-to-Bus Connection ...............................................................................................350
Refresh a View ......................................................................................................................................351
View a Full Page...................................................................................................................................351
Pan a View by Right-Clicking and Dragging ..............................................................................352
Pan a View by Right-Clicking...........................................................................................................352
Navigate an Application with Buttons .........................................................................................353
Navigate an Application with the Page Navigator tab...........................................................353
Show and Hide Panes ........................................................................................................................354
Install a Hardware Description........................................................................................................355
Change Properties with the Inspector Tab.................................................................................357
Change Properties with the Pop-up Edit Window...................................................................358
Create a Page........................................................................................................................................359
Page Creation Overview ...........................................................................................................360
Page Creation Procedure..........................................................................................................361
Page Interface Editor View—Toolbar...................................................................................363
Create a Read-only Parameters File ..............................................................................................373
About the CSV Template File Format ...................................................................................382

Screen Editor—How To.............................................................................................................................383


Start a Screen Editor Project ............................................................................................................384
Define Areas Page/Assign a Hardware Port ...............................................................................387
Define Areas Page/Assign More Screen Areas ..........................................................................388
Define Areas Page/Rename a Screen Area .................................................................................389
Define Areas Page/Delete a Screen Area ....................................................................................390
Define Areas Page/Change Screen Area Properties ................................................................391
Define Areas Page/Initialize Signal-Enabled Screen Areas ...................................................393
Define Screen Page/Assign a Screen Area..................................................................................394
Define Screen Page/Delete a Screen Area..................................................................................395
Define Screen Page/Create Bar Graphs .......................................................................................396
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Define Screen Page/Create a Text Group................................................................................... 397


Define Screen Page/Use the Default Language Setting ....................................................... 399
How to Change the Default Language ............................................................................... 399
Define Screen Page/Switch between Different Languages................................................. 400
Define Screen Page/Display a Data Value.................................................................................. 401
Define Screen Page/Format a Data Value .................................................................................. 402
Define Screen Page/Display an Image List ................................................................................ 404
Define Screen Page/Display a Text List....................................................................................... 409
Define Screen Page/Install Additional Fonts ............................................................................ 414
Define Screen Page/Display a Non-Roman Alphabet............................................................ 420
Define Screen Page/Display Video ............................................................................................... 425
Define Screen Page/Print a Screen............................................................................................... 427

Keyboard Shortcuts and Command Modifiers ................................................................................. 431


Keyboard Shortcuts ........................................................................................................................... 432
Command Modifiers.......................................................................................................................... 434

Page Layout Guidelines............................................................................................................................ 437


Page Guidelines .................................................................................................................................. 438
Port Label Abbreviations ................................................................................................................. 440
Port Label Unit Abbreviations........................................................................................................ 441

Index ............................................................................................................................................................... 443

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Risk Reduction

This chapter explains the importance of designing and testing applications developed
with the PLUS+1™ GUIDE™ program to reduce the risk of personal injury and equipment
damage.

Chapter contents Design and Test to Reduce Risks..............................................................................................................10


Design................................................................................................................................................................10
Test .....................................................................................................................................................................10

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Risk Reduction

Design and Test to Reduce Risks


The applications that you create with the PLUS+1 GUIDE program typically control heavy,
powerful, and mobile off-road equipment such as tractors, cranes, and harvesters.

Under normal operating conditions, using this type of machinery always involves the risk
of personal injury and equipment damage. Abnormal operating conditions greatly
increase the risk of personal injury and equipment damage.

The PLUS+1 GUIDE program has no automatic protections against these risks. The tool
also has no protection against the risks that result from bugs in the tool software, errors in
the tool manual, or incompatibilities between software versions of the tool.

You must design and test your application to reduce these risks.

Design
You have the responsibility when you design a PLUS+1 GUIDE application to include the
fault checking and the error handling needed to reduce risks in normal and abnormal
operating conditions.

The following are some items to consider when developing fault checking and error
handling for your application:

• How the machine is normally used.

• Possible operator errors and their consequences.

• Industry safety standards and legal requirements.

• Input and output failures and their consequences. These failures can include:

− Joystick, sensor, and other inputs suddenly going to 100 % or to 0 %.


− Outputs that control machinery direction, speed, and force suddenly changing
direction or going to 100 % or to 0 %.
Decide how likely each failure is. The more likely a failure, the more you need to
protect against the consequences of the failure.

• The sequence of events and consequences of a fault or error.

• The sequence of events and consequences of an emergency stop.

Test
You have the responsibility once you have created an application to test the application.

You should download your application to hardware and test its operation under both
normal and abnormal operating conditions. You should make sure that:

• Individual inputs produce expected outputs.

• Fault handling and error checking work as designed.

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Learning About the PLUS+1 GUIDE Program

This chapter contains two basic lessons to help you learn about the PLUS+1 GUIDE
program and the PLUS+1 Service Tool program.

These two lessons will help you to understand:

• How to create, open, and save a PLUS+1 GUIDE project.

• Major features of the PLUS+1 GUIDE window.

• How to use a PLUS+1 GUIDE template to create an application.

• Basic PLUS+1 GUIDE keystrokes and program commands.

• How to use the PLUS+1 Service Tool program to download an application to an MC24-
10 Series Controller.

Getting ready • To complete Lesson 1, you need a fully functional version of the PLUS+1 GUIDE
program installed on your PC. (This is a self-contained lesson; you do not have to go
on to Lesson 2.)

• To complete Lesson 2, you need the following hardware:

− One MC024-010 PLUS+1 Controller (part 10100899).


− One PLUS+1 CAN/USB Gateway and cabling (part 1091099).
− One 12–24 VDC 500 mA power supply.

Mouse/keyboard actions Left-click the mouse Right-click the mouse

Left-click and drag the mouse Right-click and the drag mouse

/ Press the Enter key on your Keyboard 4 Press the F4 key on your keyboard

l Press the L key on your Keyboard e Press the E key on your keyboard
The figures in these lessons use symbols that indicate mouse and keyboard actions. The
preceding figure explains these symbols.

Mouse or keyboard You can do most PLUS+1 tasks using either a mouse or a keyboard. To keep things simple,
these lessons typically show only one way to do a task.

More information For more information about some of the basic procedures described here see PLUS+1—
How To on page 345.

T The screen captures shown in this chapter may be slightly different from the
appearances of screens in your version of the PLUS+1 program.

Lesson 1: Create an Application ...............................................................................................................12


Lesson 2: Download an Application........................................................................................................24

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Lesson 1: Create an Application

On: 0.4 s
Off: 0.6 s

In this lesson, you create and compile an application that, when downloaded, blinks the
green LED on a MC024-10 controller on for 0.4 s and off for 0.6 s.

1. Start the PLUS+1 GUIDE program and create a new PLUS+1 project folder.

A. Start the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.

B. In the toolbar of the PLUS+1 GUIDE window, click the New Project button to
display the Create New Project window.

C. In the Create New Project window, name your project Blink LED.

D. Click to display the Browse for Folder window.

E. Use the Browse for Folder window to create a project destination folder named
Blink LED.
Each PLUS+1 project requires its own project folder.

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B E

2. Get the PLUS+1 GUIDE window ready to select the hardware files and the application
template needed to create an application for the MC24-010 Controller.

A. In the View menu, click Default Layout to display the Manager, Selector, and
Compiler panes.

B. Click Project Manager to display this tab.

C. Click to close the Inspector tab.

D. Click to close the Compiler pane.

E. Click to display the Hardware tab.

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3. Click and drag the MC24-10 Hardware Description and Template from the Hardware
tab to the Project Manager tab.

A. In the Hardware tab, fully expand the Programmable Hardware file tree to view
all the Controllers in this tree.

B. Click and drag the Hardware Description for the MC24-10 Controller from the
Hardware tab to the Project Manager tab.

C. Click and drag the Template for the MC 24-10 Controller from the Hardware tab
to the Project tab.

D. In the Replace Main Module window, click OK to rename the module


MC24_10T.SCS.
MC24-10 Controller Template

The Drawing Area now displays a template for creating an application for an
MC24-10 Controllers. This template has predefined inputs, outputs, and memory
locations that match hardware on the MC24-10 Controller. (Different releases of
this template look slightly different.)

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C
A

D
E

E
F

G
...
B

4. Enter the Application page of the template. Select the components needed to
construct an oscillator.

A. In the toolbar, click the Enter Page button.

B. Drag at a port on the Application page to enter this page.

C. Click to display the Component tab.

The Component tab organizes components logically by function.

D. Click to view all the Constant components.

E. Drag these two Constant components into the Application page:

– 3 Digit Auto-type (two)

– True

F. Click to view all the Transition and Time components.

G. Drag these two Transition and Time components into the Application page:

– Oscillator

– Time Base

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B connect

Connection made

C
90º

Step B—Detail

connect
D

Connections made

Step C—Detail

5. Wire the components that you have placed in the Application page together.

You may find it useful to zoom in or out on your work.


A. In the toolbar, click the Route Wire/Bus button.

B. Click to start a wire from the topmost 3 Digit Auto-type constant.


As needed, press n
to force a connection.
The yellow square highlights the connection that you have just made.
The smaller white square on the wire indicates where you will connect this wire to
the P (Period) pin on the Oscillator.
Click to route the wire at a 90º angle.

C. Click to connect the wire to the P pin on the Oscillator.

A small asterisk-like shape (*) appears at each end of the wire to indicate a
successful connection between the two components.
D. Wire the other components to match the connections shown in this picture.
(Straight wires are not necessary in this lesson.)

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T The next step uses the pop-up Edit Value window, which the PLUS+1 Program
enables by default. Use the Options window to enable and disable the pop-up Edit
Value window.
The path to the Options window is Setup menu > Options > Options window >
General > check Pop-up Editor window for components.

A
A
B

D /

6. Use the Edit Value window to apply values to the 3 Digit Auto-type and Time Base
constants.

A. Click the Query/Change button in the toolbar.

B. Click the ? in the topmost constant to display the Edit Value window.

C. In the Edit Value window that displays, type a value of 10.

D. Press / to give this constant a value of 10.


E. Apply the values shown in the above figure to the other constants.

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On
Output
T
Off

0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000
Time (ms)
The values that you enter in this step produce the oscillator output shown in the
preceding figure.

• The T100M value applied to the Unit input on the Oscillator sets a 100 ms time base.

• The 4 value applied to the T (Time) input on the Oscillator sets an on time of 400 ms
(4 x 100 ms time base = 400 ms).

• The 10 value applied to the P (Period) input on the Oscillator sets a period of 1000 ms
(10 x 100 ms time base = 1000 ms).

• The T (true) value enables the Oscillator output.

Outputs bus
A

B C

D
45º

7. Wire the output of the Oscillator to the Outputs bus.


A green wire carries a single signal. A red bus carries multiple signals, typically
between pages in an application.
You get a red multi-signal bus when you start routing (drawing) from a bus. You get a
green single signal wire when you start routing from a single signal source.

A. In the toolbar, click the Route Wire/Bus button.

B. Connect the Oscillator output to the Outputs bus.

Click the Oscillator output pin to start the wire.

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Just before the wire reaches the Outputs bus, click to angle the wire into the
Outputs bus at a 45º angle.
Connecting a wire to a bus at a 45º angle keeps the wire from hiding the wire
name.

The Select/Define Member Name window displays when you make the
connection at the Outputs bus.

C. In the Select/Define Member Name window, name the Oscillator output signal
Green_LED.

D. Click OK to dismiss the Select/Define Member Name window.


Application page
A
Top Level page

B
C

Outputs page

OS page

8. Navigate to the OS page.

The OS page is a sub-page nested within the OUTPUTS page. About PLUS+1 GUIDE
Application Templates on page 34 shows a typical template page structure).
A signal applied to the operating system output of the controller flashes the LED.

A. In the toolbar, click the Leave Page button to leave the APPLICATION page and
return to the Top Level page.
B. In the toolbar, click the Enter page button.

C. Drag at an OUTPUTS page port to enter the OUTPUTS page.

D. Drag at an OS page port to enter the OS page.

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OS page

You can also use the Page Navigator tab to go directly to the OS page.

B D

* = Will be deleted
- = Will not be deleted

E 4

9. Delete the constant True that is applied to the LED_GREEN.

This True keeps the green LED on the controller constantly on.
A. In the toolbar, click the Delete button.

B. Click and drag to select the True component. Releasing the mouse displays the
Select Item Class window.

C. In the Select Item Class window, click Toggle ON<->OFF and put:

– An asterisk (*) next to Component to delete the True component.

– A dash (-) next to WireBusSeg to not delete the wire.

D. Click OK to delete the True component.


E. Press 4 to refresh the Drawing Area view.

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45º

10. Route the Green_LED signal to the LED_GREEN port.

The OUTPUTS bus carries the Green_LED signal. The Oscillator on the APPLICATION
page puts this signal on the bus.
A. In the toolbar, click the Route Wire/Bus button.

B. Connect the LED_GREEN wire segment to the OUTPUTS bus.

– Click the X on the wire end and pull this wire toward the OUTPUTS bus.

– Click to angle the wire into the OUTPUTS bus at a 45º angle.

– Click the OUTPUTS bus. This displays the Select/Define Member Name
window that lists all signals carried by this bus.

C. In the Select/Define Member Name window, click OK to connect this signal to


the LED_GREEN port.

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Compiler messages

11. Compile the application into an LHX format file that you can download.
A. In the toolbar, click the Compile All button to start the compile process.

The Compile pane at the bottom of the PLUS+1 GUIDE window opens to display
the Build Messages tab. This tab displays compiler progress messages.

The Compile Progress window displays during the compile process and indicates
success or failure of the compile process.

B. Click OK to close the Compile Progress window.


12. If you do not have the hardware and cabling needed to download this application,
continue on to step 13 on page 23.
If you have the hardware and cabling needed to download this application, skip ahead
to Lesson 2: Download an Application on page 24.

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13. Exit the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.

A. In the File menu, click Exit.

B. In the Compressed Format window, click OK to compress the project files into a
PLUS+1 Packed (PIP) format file.

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Lesson 2: Download an Application


The PLUS+1 GUIDE program also includes a PLUS+1 Service Tool program. You use this
program to:

− Download an application to PLUS+1 programmable hardware.


− Download parameters (operating values) to PLUS+1 programmable hardware.
− Log PLUS+1 programmable hardware performance.

9-pin connector USB connector


PWR

CAN

CG150 Communicator

Pin 5 Connector 2
Pin 9

Pin 1 Pin 6
Pin 12 Pin 1

Details—Communicator 9-Pin Connector


Single notch
MC024-10 Controller
Pin 6 Connector 1

Details—MC024-10 Connector 1

The following procedure uses a CG150 CAN/USB Gateway Interface Communicator and a
PLUS+1 MC024-10 Controller.

• The USB connector on the CG150 connects to the USB port on your PC.

• Use the following table as a guide when making the remaining connections on the
CG150 Communicator and MC-024-10 Controller.
CG150 Communicator/MC024-10 Controller connections
Function CG150 Communicator 9 Pin Connector MC024-10 Controller Connector 1

CAN+ Pin 7 Pin 3

CAN- Pin 2 Pin 4

CAN shield/ground Pin 3 Pin 5

Controller power supply voltage + —— Pin 2

Controller power supply ground – —— Pin 1

Controller power supply ground – —— Pin 1

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1. Set up and connect the hardware needed to download the application to the
controller.

Successful connection

Connection error

2. Start the PLUS+1 Service Tool program.

A. In the PLUS+1 GUIDE window toolbar, click the PLUS+1 Service Tool button.

You can also start this program through the Start menu on your PC.

B. In the Communications menu, check that the Settings command selects the
CG150 Communicator.

C. If the Confirm window displays, click Yes to scan the hardware.


Scanning reads hardware, application, and history information stored in the
hardware memory.
The Status bar at the bottom of the PLUS+1 Service Tool window indicates that
the CG150 Communicator has successfully connected the PLUS+1 Service Tool
with the controller.

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C
B

3. Prepare to download the Blink LED.lhx file to the controller.

A. In the Service Tool window toolbar, click the File Download button.

Clicking this button displays the File Download window.

B. In the File Download window, click to select the target ECU.

(In a project that uses more than one controller, you will have more than one
choice.)

C. In the File Download window, click OK.

D. In the Open Application File for Download window, browse to and click the
Blink LED.lhx file.

E. In the Open Application File for Download window, click Open to load the Blink
LED .lhx file for downloading.

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Status

4. Download the Blink LED.lhx file to the controller.

In the File Download tab, click the Start Download button to begin the download.

The Status bar at the bottom of the window shows:

− Download during the download.


− Connect before and after the download finishes.
The PLUS+1 Service Tool program automatically rescans the controller when the
download completes.

On: 0.4 s
Off: 0.6 s

Once downloaded, the application starts flashing the green LED on the controller.

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5. Exit the PLUS+1 Service Tool program and the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.

A. In the PLUS+1 Service Tool window’s File menu, click Exit to exit the PLUS+1
Service Tool program.

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This chapter describes the major elements in the PLUS+1 GUIDE window.

Chapter contents PLUS+1 GUIDE Window Elements ...........................................................................................................30


About the PLUS+1 GUIDE Window .........................................................................................................32
About PLUS+1 GUIDE Application Templates.....................................................................................34
About Route Names .....................................................................................................................................35
Menus................................................................................................................................................................36
Toolbar ..............................................................................................................................................................43
Plotter Output Setup Window ..................................................................................................................43
Options Window............................................................................................................................................50
View Logical Net Window...........................................................................................................................54
Hardware Tab..................................................................................................................................................55
Search Window ..............................................................................................................................................57
Project Manager Tab ....................................................................................................................................58
About the Project Manager and Hardware Tabs ................................................................................60
Page Navigator Tab.......................................................................................................................................62
Component Tab .............................................................................................................................................63
Function Tab ...................................................................................................................................................64
My Blocks Tab .................................................................................................................................................65
Inspector Tab ..................................................................................................................................................66
Compiler Messages Tabs.............................................................................................................................67

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PLUS+1 GUIDE Window Elements


Menus
Toolbar
Manager
Selector

Drawing Area

Inspector

Preview

Compiler
Messages

This window displays when you start the PLUS+1 GUIDE program. Use this window to
create applications that you can download to PLUS+1 hardware.

PLUS+1 GUIDE window elements


Item Description

Menus Use the menu bar to access PLUS+1 GUIDE commands and information.

Toolbar Use the toolbar to access common PLUS+1 GUIDE commands and information.

Selector This pane has a Hardware tab, a Component tab with a Preview pane, and a Function tab.
Hardware tab—Shows a tree view of Hardware Descriptions for each PLUS+1 hardware device. These Hardware
Descriptions link to the resources needed by the PLUS+1 GUIDE program to create and compile applications for specific
PLUS+1 hardware models.
Component tab—Shows a tree view of components that you can drag into the Drawing Area when creating your
application.
Preview pane—Displays a preview of the selected component.
Function—Shows a tree view of functions that you can drag into the Drawing Area when building your application
module.

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PLUS+1 GUIDE window elements


Item Description

Manager This pane has a Project Manager tab and a Page Navigator tab.
Project Manager tab—Shows a tree view of the Hardware Description dragged over from the Hardware tab. You must
install a Hardware Description before you can create an application for a PLUS+1 hardware model.
Page Navigator tab—Shows a tree view of all the pages within an application module. Click to display a selected page in
the Drawing Area.

Drawing Area Create your application module here.

Inspector Use this tab to view and change the properties of items that you select with the Query/Change command.

Compiler Messages This pane contains a Build Messages tab, an Error Messages tab, and a Compiler Messages tab.
Build Messages tab—Displays messages from the compiler as it compiles your application into a downloadable LHX
format file.
Error Messages tab—Displays details about errors in the compile process.
Compiler Messages tab—Displays messages sent to the compiler log file.

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About the PLUS+1 GUIDE Window


Displays the Compiler panel Displays the Selector panel
Displays the Inspector panel
Manager panel:
Manage project files, Displays the Navigator panel Selector panel:
navigate project pages Select hardware,
Displays the Manager panel components, functions

Drag to resize panels

Click to lock panels

Click to close panels


Drawing Area: Create
Drag to undock panels your application here

Command selection
Compiler panel:
Crosshair position
View compiler messages
Inspector panel:
View and change values

• The Selector pane (on the right of this window) has Hardware, Component, and
Function tabs.

− Use the Hardware tab to select the files needed to create and compile an
application for different models of PLUS+1 hardware.

− Use the Component tab to select the basic components used within in your
application, such as AND gates.

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− Use the Function tab to select the advanced functions used within your
application, such as a Soft Ramp.

• The Manager pane (on the left of this window) has Project Manager and Page
Navigator tabs.

− The Project Manager tab displays the files dragged from the Hardware tab.
− The Page Navigator navigates you through the pages in the application.
• The Compiler pane (at the bottom of this window) displays compiler messages.

• You can close, resize, and undock these panes.

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About PLUS+1 GUIDE Application Templates

Top Level Pages in an Application Template

An application Template contains a hierarchy of pages that logically organize application


functions. Each PLUS+1 hardware model has its own Template.

A thin blue line (—) indicates the boundary of the page that you are currently viewing.

A thick light blue line ( ) indicates the border of any pages nested within the page that you
are currently viewing.

You can also create your own pages—see Page Creation Procedure on page 361.

Typically, the top-level page of an application Template for a controller has five pages:

• Unit Config page—Defines the Controller Area Network (CAN) Node and Net.

• CAN Config page—Sets the CAN baud.

• Inputs page—Has sub-pages that define input functions such as CAN


communication, controller pin inputs, and operating system inputs.

• Application page—Contains the page where you create the controller application.

• Outputs page—Has sub-pages that define output related functions such as CAN
communication, controller pin outputs, and operating system outputs.

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About Route Names


Every route (either a green single signal wire or a red multi-signal bus) in a PLUS+1 GUIDE
application must have a name.

The Select/Define Member Name window displays when you connect a route. Enter your
signal names in this window.

When naming routes, observe the following rules:

• Always begin a signal name with a capital letter.

Correct: Incorrect:
Green_LED green_LED

• Do not start a signal name with a number.

Correct: Incorrect:
Green_LED_1 1_Green_LED

• Underscore (_) spaces in signal names.

Correct: Incorrect:
Green_LED Green LED

• A–Z, a–z, and 0–9 are valid signal name characters.

• Signal names are case-sensitive: Green_LED and GREEN_LED are the names of two
different signals.

• Signal names can be up to 16 characters long.

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Menus

New Project Undo Enter Page Compile All


Open Project Redo Leave Page Compile Changed
Open Recent Move Refresh Error Check All
Save Project Stretch Set Center Error Check Changed
Save Project As Delete Move View
Close Project Delete All Zoom
Save Drawing Copy/Repeat Manager
In
Save Drawing As Query/Change Page Navigator Out
Close Drawing Symbol in Place Inspector Area
Block Highlight Connections Compiler Messages Fit Page
Page Remove Highlighting Selector 100%
Screen Capture Default Layout
Print Import Block Toolbars
Exit Export Block Help Contents
Import Page User Manual
Export Page Release Notes
Create Troubleshooting File
About PLUS+1 GUIDE

Text
Toggle Display Grid Page PLUS+1 Service Tool
Thin Line
Layers Visible Layers Page Interface Editor Optimize Nets
Active Layers Thin Line Path
Display Port Wire View Logical Net
Thick Line
Backup Folder Port Bus View Net Names
Route Wire/Bus Thick Line Path
Backup Interval License Manager
Repeat Connection Small Arc
Install Hardware
Text/Vector Graphics Large Arc
Install Function Library
Circle
Uninstall Hardware Graphics and Text
Drawing Area Pointer Two-point Circle
Uninstall Function Library
Install Font Color Schemes Filled Circle

Uninstall Font Rectangle

Tools Palette Filled Rectangle

Options Filled Polygon


Filled Polygon Cut

Use the menu bar to access PLUS+1 GUIDE commands.

T Toolbar buttons duplicate commonly used menu commands. See Toolbar on page 43
for more about the toolbar buttons.

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Menu
Item Description

File The commands in this menu manage project files.

New Project Displays the Create New Project window.


Use this window to name a new project and to create a folder for the project files.

Open Project Displays the Open Project window.


Use this window to locate and open P1P and P1X format project files.

Open Recent Displays a list of recently saved projects. Select a project to open from this list.

Save Project Saves the current project files without zipping them into a single PIP format file.

Save Project As Displays the Save Project As window.


Use this window to save the current project under a new name and in a new folder.

Close Project Closes the current project without exiting the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.
Displays a Project Modified window and a Save in PIP window.
Use the Project Modified window to save or discard any changes that you have made in your project.
Use the Save in PIP window to compress project files into single PIP format file.

Save Drawing Saves the application drawing as an SCS format file, using the module name.

Save Drawing As Displays the Select/Define New Job File Name window.
Use this window to save the application drawing as an SCS format file, under a new name.

Close Drawing Closes the current application drawing without closing the project.

Block Import Block—Displays the Load Block Utility Binary window.


Use this window to select an SCS format file and import its contents into the Drawing Area.
This command does not work with Define Areas and Define Screen blocks. Importing blocks into a new
project strips the blocks of their contents.
Export Block—Displays the Symbol Block Export Binary window after you select items for export in the
Drawing Area.
Use this window to export the selected items to an SCS format file.

Page Import Page—Displays the Select Job File Name window after you select a page in the Drawing Area.
Use this window to select an SCS format file and import its contents into the selected page.
Export Page—Displays the Select/Define New Job File Name window after you select a page in the Drawing
Area.
This command does not work with Define Areas and Define Screen blocks. Importing blocks into a new
project strips the blocks of their contents.
Use this window to export the contents of the selected page to an SCS format file.

Screen Capture Displays the Select Screen Dump Format window after you select items in the Drawing Area.
Use this window to save the selected items to a BMP or TIFF format file or as a BMP capture to the clipboard.

Print Displays the Plotter Output Setup window.


Use this window to print out pages from the application.

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Menu
Item Description

Exit Closes the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.


Closing the application displays a Project Modified window and then a Save in PIP window.
Use the Project Modified window to choose to save or discard changes that you have made in your project.
Use the Save in PIP window to compress project files into a single PIP format file.

Edit The commands in this menu change and modify items in the Drawing Area.

Undo Reverses programming actions.


Depending on computer memory, you can undo up to ten actions.

Redo Reverses Undo commands.


Depending on computer memory, you can reverse up to ten Undo commands.
The Options window enables and disables the undo/redo function. To display this window, click Options in
the Setup menu.

Move Moves items that you select.

Stretch Moves items that you select and stretches segments in routes that you select.
Stretch adds a vertex to a selected route segment. You can move this vertex without changing the positions of
the other vertexes on the route.

Delete Deletes items that you select in the Drawing Area. Selected items turn white.
The Attributes window displays when you select an individual item or identical items. Click OK to delete your
selection.
The Select Item Class window displays when you select several different items. Use this window to select the
items that you want to delete. Asterisks (*) identify items that will be deleted; dashes (-) identify items that will
not be deleted.

Delete All Deletes all items in within a page, including template elements.

Copy/Repeat Copies what you select. Items selected for copying in the Drawing Area turn white. Clicking places copied
items.
This command only works within the currently displayed page. Use the Block and Page commands in the File
menu to copy items to other pages.

Query/Change Use to change the properties of items that you select. White text or red text typically indicates a property that
you can change.
Make your changes using either the Inspector tab or the pop-up Edit Value window to make the change.

Symbol in Place Displays a selected page in the Page Interface Editor. Use this Editor to change the pins, text, and graphic
elements that define the appearance of the selected page.

Highlight Connections Use to check wire/bus connections in a page.


Selecting a segment highlights (turns white) all segments that connect to your selected segment.

Remove Highlighting Turns off the highlighting applied to the connected segments.

View The commands in this menu change what you view in the Drawing Area.

Enter Page Enters a selected page.


On pages that have ports, drag on a port to enter the page.
On new pages that do not yet have ports, drag on a page border to enter the page.

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Menu
Item Description

Leave Page Leaves the current page.

Refresh Refreshes the Drawing Area view.

Set Center Centers the Drawing Area view on where you click the pointer.

Move View Homes a zoomed-in page to fit entirely within the Drawing Area. A white-bordered rectangle outlines the area
in which the zoom focused.
Click the pointer on the spot where you want to recenter your zoom.

Zoom In—Zooms in, centering the view where you click the pointer.
Out—Zooms out, centering the view where you click the pointer.
Area—Zooms into a rectangular area whose size you define by clicks of the pointer.
Fit Page—Resizes the page (defined by its blue boundary lines) to fit within the Drawing Area.
100 %—Zooms to a view that is midway between the minimum and maximum zoom views.

Manager Toggles the display of a locked Manager pane that has a Project Manager tab and a Page Navigator tab.
Project Manager tab—Displays a tree view of the Hardware Descriptions that you installed to create and
compile an application.
You select Hardware Descriptions in the Hardware tab and drag them to this tab.

Page Navigator Contains a tree view of the pages in your application module. Click a page name in the view to display the
selected page in the Drawing Area.

Inspector Toggles the display of a locked Inspector tab.


Use this tab to view and change the properties of the items that you select with the Query/Change tool.

Compiler Messages Toggles the display of a locked pane that has a Compiler Messages tab, an Error Messages tab, and a Build
Messages tab. These tabs display compiler messages.
Compiler Messages tab—Displays the compiler messages that log to the Screen.tmp file, located in the
project folder.
Error Messages tab—Displays compiler error messages. Errors stop the compile process.
Build Messages tab—Displays messages from the compiler as it compiles your application into a
downloadable file.

Selector Toggles the display of a locked Selector pane that has a Hardware tab, a Component tab containing a
Preview pane, and a Function tab.
Hardware tab—Displays a tree view of Hardware Descriptions for specific PLUS+1 models.
Each Hardware Description links to the resources needed to create and compile a downloadable file for a
specific PLUS+1 hardware model. Drag Hardware Descriptions from here into the Project Manager tab.
Component tab—Displays a tree view of components that you can use to build your application. Drag
components into the Drawing Area.
The Preview pane shows a preview of the selected component.
Function tab—Displays a tree view of the higher-level functions that you can use in your application. Drag
the functions into the Drawing Area.

Default Layout Toggles the default layout display.


In the default layout, the PLUS+1 GUIDE window locks and displays the Manager and Inspector panes on
the left, the Compiler pane on the bottom, and the Selector pane on the right.

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Menu
Item Description

Toolbars Toggles the display of button sets for the File, Edit, View, Compile, Add, and Help functions.

Compile The commands in this menu control the compile functions.

Compile All Compiles all application modules to produce a downloadable file.

Compile Changed Compiles only the modules that you changed since the last Compile All.
Use this command to save compile time when you have more than one module.

Error Check All Compiles to check for errors in all modules.


The Error Check All and Error Check Changed commands do not produce downloadable files.

Error Check Changed Compiles to check for errors only in the modules that you changed since the last Compile All.

Stop Compile Stops all compile processes.

Setup The commands in this menu set up the PLUS+1 programming environment.

Toggle Display Grid Turns the Drawing Area grid on and off.

Layers Visible Layers—Displays the Define Visible/Define Invisible Objects/Layers window.


Use this window to select classes of objects—such as components or routes—that the PLUS+1 GUIDE
program shows or hides in the Drawing Area.
Active Layers—This PLUS+1 GUIDE release does not support this feature.

Display Graphics and Text—Displays the Define Drawing Mode Filled Area & Text window.
Use this window to change the on-screen display characteristics of text and lines. Changes apply to all
projects.
The PLUS+1 GUIDE default settings are True Size for all lines and Center Line for text.
Drawing Area Pointer—Displays the Graphics Pointer Setup window.
Use this window to change the pointer display, pointer resolution, and set the x-axis and y-axis zero
references.
Color Schemes—Select the Classic scheme to make the Drawing Area background black. Select the White
scheme to make the Drawing Area background off-white.

Backup Folder Displays the Select Folder Backup Job window.


Use this window to set the location for a backup copy of your project.
You must define a backup folder before backups will begin.

Backup Interval Displays the Define Backup Interval in Minutes window.


Use this window to set how often the PLUS+1 GUIDE program automatically backs up your project. Making a
change in the Drawing Area starts the countdown to the next automatic save.
You must define a backup folder before backups will begin.

Install Hardware Displays the Install Hardware window.


Use this window to browse to and add hardware definitions to the Hardware tab.

Install Function Library Displays the Install Function Library window.


Use this window to browse to and add library files to the Library tab.

Uninstall Hardware Displays the Uninstall window.


Use this window to remove hardware definitions from the Hardware tab.

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Menu
Item Description

Uninstall Function Library Displays the Uninstall Function Library window.


Use this window to browse to remove function libraries from the Library tab.

Install Font Displays the Install Font window.


Use this window to make additional fonts available in projects for PLUS+1 graphical terminals.
See Define Screen Page/Install Additional Fonts on page 414 for more information.

Uninstall Font Displays the Uninstall Font window.


Use this window to view all installed fonts and select fonts to uninstall.

Tools Palette Displays the Icon Menu window.


Use this window to modify the button assignments in this pop-up window.

Options Displays the Options window.


Use this window to set PLUS+1 GUIDE options such as enabling the Undo/Redo commands.

Add The commands in this menu add page outlines, buses, ports, text, and other elements to your application.

Page Adds a page where you click in the Drawing Area.


To go to the interface view page you have added, enter the page and then click Page Interface Editor.

Page Interface Editor Displays the page interface view of a page that you have entered.
Use the controls in this view to change the pins, text, and graphic elements that define the appearance of the
page.

Port Wire Displays the Select Signal–Schematics Design window.


Use this window to add a single signal port to where you click in the Drawing Area.

Port Bus Adds a multi-signal port to where you click in the Drawing Area.

Route Wire/Bus Starts drawing either a green single signal wire or a red multi-signal bus from where you click in the Drawing
Area.
You get a bus when you start routing from a bus source. You get a wire when you start routing from a wire
source.
k toggles the route between a wire and a bus.
9 terminates unconnected routes.

Repeat Connection Duplicates a selected route connection.


Repeated connections automatically have a number added to their name—Signal_Name, Signal_Name2,
Signal_Name3, Signal_Name4.

Text/Vector Graphics Displays a menu of text and graphics commands.


Use these command to add text and graphic elements to the Drawing Area.

Tools The commands in this menu open tools to service application that you have downloaded, repair errors in your
module, and manage your PLUS+1 GUIDE license.

PLUS+1 Service Tool Opens the PLUS+1 Service Tool program.


Use this tool to download applications to PLUS+1 hardware and also to monitor and change application
values.
You can open this service program independently of the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.

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Menu
Item Description

Optimize Nets Use to repair routes that are broken when you import a block or page.
Use to remove unneeded data from memory to improve tool performance and produce smaller application
files.

View Logical Net Displays the Logical Net window.


Use this window to trace the connections of a selected logical net throughout a single page or multiple pages.

View Net Names Displays various windows that show floating entries, interface port mismatches, and net errors.
Click items in these lists to see previews of the pages where these problems are located.

License Manager Displays the Select License window.


Use this window to manage your PLUS+1 GUIDE license.
The user ID is a number that is unique to your computer. You must send this number to Sauer-Danfoss to get
a license number to unlock the PLUS+1 programs.

Help The commands in this menu display help for and information about the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.

Help Contents Opens a hyperlinked, online Help version of the user manual.

User Manual Opens a Portable Document Format (PDF) version of the user manual, formatted for printing.

Release Notes Displays Readme Help files for the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.

Create Troubleshooting File Displays a Create Troubleshooting File window.


Use this window to create a zipped folder to e-mail to the Sauer-Danfoss HelpDesk. This folder contains your
project files and other useful troubleshooting information.

About PLUS+1 GUIDE Displays the About PLUS+1 GUIDE window.


Use this window to see PLUS+1 GUIDE version and license information.

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Toolbar
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Toolbar buttons access commonly used PLUS+1 GUIDE commands.

The Screen Editor uses the unavailable (grayed out) buttons shown in the preceding
figure.

T See Menus on page 36 for a complete list of all commands accessed through the menu
bar.

Toolbar
Button Description

New Project Displays the Create New Project window.


Use this window to name a new project and to create a folder for files in your project.

Open Project Displays the Open Project window.


Use this window to locate and open P1P and P1X format project files.

Save Project Saves the current project files without zipping them into a single PIP format file.

Save Project As Displays the Save Project As window.


Use this window to save the current project under a new name and in a new folder.

Print Displays the Plotter Output Setup window.


Use this window to print out pages from the application.

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Toolbar
Button Description

View SCS File Displays the Open SCS File window.


Use this window to browse to an open an SCS file. (This SCS file can be the SCS file for the project that you are
currently working on.)
The selected SCS file displays in the read-only Module Viewer window.
The Module Viewer window only supports navigation and export functions. No programming changes can
be made in this window.
Navigate in the Module Viewer window using View menu keyboard shortcuts, such as E (Enter Block) and
L (Leave Block).
Export items from the Module Viewer window using the File menu keyboard shortcut of Y (Export Block).

Query/Change Use to change the properties of items that you select. White text or red text typically indicates a property that
you can change.
Make your changes using either the Inspector tab or the pop-up Edit Value window to make the change.

Move Moves the items that you select.

Stretch Moves the items that you select and stretches segments in routes that you select.
Stretch adds a vertex to a selected route segment. You can move this vertex without changing the positions
of the other vertexes on the route.

Copy/Repeat Copies what you have selected in the Drawing Area. Items selected for copying turn white. Clicking places
copied items.
This command only works within the current Drawing Area. Use the Block and Page commands in the File
menu to copy items to other pages.

Delete Deletes the items that you have selected in the Drawing Area. Selected items turn white.
The Attributes window displays when you select an individual item or identical items. Click OK to delete
your selection.
The Select Item Class window displays when you select several different items. Use this window to select the
items that you want to delete.
Asterisks (*) identify items that will be deleted.
Dashes (-) identify items that will not be deleted.

Undo/Redo Undo—Reverses programming actions.


Redo—Reverses Undo actions.
Available computer memory determines the number of actions that you can undo.
The Options window enables and disables the undo/redo function. Click the Options button in the toolbar
to display this window.

Page Interface Displays the page interface view of a page that you have entered.
Editor Use the tools in this view to change the pins, text, and graphic elements that define the appearance of the
page.

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Toolbar
Button Description

Route Wire/Bus Starts routing (drawing) either a green single signal wire or a red multi-signal bus.
You get a red bus when you start routing from a bus. You get a green wire when you start routing from a
single signal source.
k toggles your route between a wire and a bus.
9 terminates unconnected routes.

Repeat Connection Duplicates a selected route connection.


Repeated connections automatically have a number added to their name—Signal_Name, Signal_Name2,
Signal_Name3, Signal_Name4.

Port Wire Displays the Select Signal–Schematics Design window.


Use this window to add a single signal port to the Drawing Area.

Port Bus Adds a multi-signal port bus to the Drawing Area.

Text/Vector Displays a drop-down list of text and graphics tools.


Graphics Use these tools to add text and vector graphics elements to the Drawing Area.

Manager The Manager, Page Navigator, Inspector, Compiler Messages, and Selector buttons control the display of
locked tabs when you have selected the default layout. To select the default layout, click Default Layout in
the View menu.
This button toggles the display of a locked Manager pane that has a Project Manager tab and a Page
Navigator tab.
Project Manager tab—Displays a tree view of the Hardware Descriptions that you installed to create and
compile a PLUS+1 application.
You select Hardware Descriptions in the Hardware tab and drag them into this tab.

Page Navigator Displays the Page Navigator tab that contains a tree view of the pages in your application. Click a page
name in the tree view to display the selected page in the Drawing Area.

Inspector Toggles the display of a locked Inspector tab.


Use this tab to view and change the properties of items that you select with the Query/Change button.

Compiler Messages Toggles the display of a locked pane that has a Compiler Messages tab, an Error Messages tab, and a Build
Messages tab. These tabs display compiler messages.
Compiler Messages tab—Displays the compiler messages that log to the Screen.tmp file, located in the
project folder.
Error Messages tab—Displays compiler error messages. Errors stop the compile process.
Build Messages tab—Displays messages from the compiler as it compiles your application into a
downloadable file.

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Toolbar
Button Description

Selector Toggles the display of a locked Selector pane that has a Hardware tab, a Component tab containing a
Preview, and a Function tab.
Hardware tab—Displays a tree view of Hardware Descriptions for specific PLUS+1 models.
Each Hardware Description links to the resources needed to create and compile an application for a specific
PLUS+1 hardware model. Drag Hardware Descriptions from here into the Project Manager tab.
Component tab—Displays a tree view of components that you can use to build your application. Drag
needed components into the Drawing Area.
The Preview pane shows a preview of the selected component.
Function tab—Displays a tree view of the higher-level functions that you can use in your application. Drag
needed functions into the Drawing Area.

Leave Page Leaves the current page.

Enter Page Enters a selected page.


On pages with ports, drag on a port to enter the page.
On new pages that do not yet have ports, drag on a border to enter the page.

Zoom In Zooms in and centers the view where you click.

Zoom Out Zooms out and center the view where you click.

Compile All Compiles all modules to produce a downloadable file.

Compile Changed Compiles only modules that you have changed since the last Compile All.
Use this command to save time when you have more than one module.

Error Check All Checks for errors in all modules.


Clicking the Error Check All or the Error Check Changed button does not compile downloadable files.

Error Check Compiles to check for errors only in the modules that you have changed since the last Compile All.
Changed

PLUS+1 Service Tool Opens the PLUS+1 Service Tool program.


Use this tool to download applications to PLUS+1 hardware and to monitor and change application values.
You can open this service tool independently of the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.

Generate Read-only Displays the Generate Read-only Parameter File window.


Parameter File You use this window when creating a downloadable, read-only parameters lhx file. See Create a Read-only
Parameters File on page 373 for more about this process.

Options Displays the Options window.


Use this window set PLUS+1 GUIDE options.

Help Displays the complete PLUS+1 GUIDE User Manual in Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF).

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Plotter Output Setup Window


Toolbar > or File menu > Print

Use this window to set up your printer output and to print out pages from your
application.

Plotter Output setup window


Item Description

Output to Files Identifies the folder containing the plotter output files.
To change this folder, click to display a Select/Define Base File for Plot Files window. Use this window to
create a new folder or to select another folder.
Selecting a Windows Printer as the Current Plotter makes this selection unavailable.

Current Plotter Displays a Select Current Plotter window.


Use this window to select common plotter outputs.
Select Windows Printer to output to a Windows printer.

Plotter Selection (unlabeled) Shows the plotter or Windows printer that you choose in the Select Current Printer window.
In the preceding figure, an HP LaserJet 8000 prints the selected Output Pages.

Plotter Setup Displays a Plotter Setup window when the Current Plotter output is sent to a plotter output file.
Use this window to set print margins and x-axis and y-axis origin points.
Displays a Print window when the Current Plotter output is sent to a Windows Printer.
Use this window to select a Windows printer and to set printer preferences.

Current Tools Displays a Define New Pen Set window.


Use this window to select an existing pen set or create a new pen set.
Create pen sets when outputting to color printers and plotters.

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Plotter Output setup window


Item Description

Tools Selection (unlabeled) Identifies the pen set that you selected in the Define New Pen Set window.

Edit Displays an Assign Pens window.


Use this window to change the pen assignments of the current pen set.

Manage Tools Displays a Select Pen Set to Delete window.


Use this window to delete pen sets.

Edit Layers/True Size Displays an Edit Plotter Layer Set window.


Use this window to turn on and off the output of objects and layers on pages.
The selections that you make in this window apply to all pages.

Output Pages Lists the pages that can be selected for output.

Toggle Page When checked, selects and deselects Output Pages.


Asterisks (*) identify pages that output when you select Plot Batch & Quit.
Dashes (-) identify pages that do not output when you select Plot Batch & Quit.

Place When checked, displays a Define Transformation window for a page that you have selected in Output Pages.
Use this window to define the Offset, Scale, Rotation, and other properties of the selected page.

All Displays the Define Transformation All Pages window.


Use this window to define the Offset, Scale, Rotation, and other properties for all Output Pages.

View Sheet When checked, displays a View Sheet window for a page that you select in the Output Pages.
Use this window to preview how the selected page fits on the output sheet.

View Tools When checked, displays a Defined Tools window for a page that you select in the Output Pages.
Use this window to review the output settings for the selected page.

All Displays a Defined Tools window.


Use this window to review the output settings for all selected Output Pages.

Plot Page Immediately outputs a page that you select in the Output Pages.

Edit Sort Number When checked, displays a Define Sort Number window for a page that you select in the Output Pages.
Use this window to change the order of Output Pages.

Save Log File Creates a log file that contains the output settings for each page that you select in the Output Pages.

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Plotter Output setup window


Item Description
Sheet Size X Sets the output sheet size in millimeters when the Current Plotter selection outputs pages to files.
Sheet Size Y
Identifies the paper size in millimeters used by a printer when the Current Plotter selection outputs pages to a
Windows printer.

Load Displays a Select Sheet Size window.


Use this window to select different output sizes.

Save Displays a Define Sheet Size window.


Use this window to name and save the current output size.

Delete Displays a Select Sheet Size Object to Delete window.


Use this window to delete output sizes.

Plot Batch & Quit Outputs all selected Output Pages and closes the Plotter Output Setup window.
Asterisks (*) identify pages that output.
Dashes (-) identify pages do not output.

Save & Quit Saves any changes made in the Plotter Output Setup window and then closes this window.

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Options Window
Toolbar > or Setup menu > Options > Options window

> PLUS+1 GUIDE > General or Preview

Click

• General Settings set general PLUS+1 GUIDE options.

• Preview Settings (see page 51) enable the Preview panes in the Component tab
and in other tabs.

• Grid Settings (see page 52) define the grid settings displayed in the Screen Editor.
General settings
Item Description

Undo/Redo Check to enable the Undo and Redo commands.

Pop-up Editor window for Check to enable the pop-up Edit Value window that displays when you click components with the
components Query/Change tool.

Component tab hides When checked, the Component tab hides the components that cannot be used with the selected hardware.
unavailable components

Component tab displays auto When checked, clicking an unexpanded branch in the Component tab displays a pop-up menu that shows all
pop-ups the items within the branch.

Hardware tab displays auto When checked, clicking an unexpanded branch in the Hardware tab displays a pop-up menu that shows all the
pop-ups items within the branch.

Hardware tab hides empty When checked, the Hardware tab hides empty folders in its hardware tree.
folders

My Blocks tab displays auto When checked, clicking an unexpanded branch in the Hardware tab displays a pop-up menu that shows all the
pop-ups items within the branch.

Log keystrokes and mouse Check to create a _Plus1GUIDE.log. This file, located in the project folder, logs mouse actions and keystrokes
actions and can be useful when diagnosing PLUS+1 GUIDE application problems.

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General settings
Item Description

Log file Defines the size of the_Plus1GUIDE.log.

Auto pop-up delay (ms) Sets the delay before a tab displays a pop-up menu for the branch you click.
Range: 10–5000 ms

Text size Normal—Pop-up menus in the tabs display component icons.


Small (No Icons)—Pop-up menus in the tabs do not display icons and also use a smaller text size.

Click

These settings enable the Preview panes in the Component tab and in other tabs.

Preview settings
Item Description

Component tab Check to enable the Preview in the Component tab.


The Preview panel previews the component that you click in this tab.

Function tab Check to enable the Preview in the Function tab.


The Preview panel previews the function that you click in this tab.

Hardware tab Check to enable the Preview in the Hardware tab.


The Preview panel previews the hardware that you click in this tab.

My Blocks tab Check to enable the Preview in the My Blocks tab.


The Preview panel previews the blocks that you click in this tab.

Screen Library tab in Screen Check to enable the Preview in the Screen Library tab.
Editor The Preview panel previews the item that you click in this tab.

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Click

Grid Settings define the two grids used in the Screen Editor:

• Layout pane grid—This grid fills the entire Layout pane. You use this grid in the
Define Areas page when laying out Screen Areas.

• Screen area grid—This grid appears within each Screen Area. You use this grid in the
Define Screen page when laying out Screen Library items.

Grid settings
Item Description

Screen Areas Sets the characteristics of the Screen Area grid that appears within each Screen Area.
You use this grid in the Define Screen page when laying out items from the Screen Library, such as images
and text.

Visible Click to make this grid visible.

Snap to grid Click to snap the Reference point of items to the grid.

File transparency Click to make all items visible through stacked Screen Areas.
You can use this option when aligning items placed on different Screen Areas.

Color Click to select a color for the lines in the grid from a drop-down list.

Cell width Click to set the horizontal distance, in pixels, between gridlines.

Cell height Click to set the vertical distance, in pixels, between gridlines.

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Grid settings
Item Description
Layout pane Sets the characteristics of the Layout pane grid that appears within each Screen Area.
You use this grid in the Define Areas page when laying out Screen Areas.

Visible Click to make lines in the grid visible.

Snap to grid Click to snap the upper-left corners of Screen Areas to the grid.

Color Click to select a color for the lines in the grid from a drop-down list.

Cell width Click to set the horizontal distance, in pixels, between gridlines.

Cell height Click to set the vertical distance, in pixels, between gridlines.

Layout Pane and Screen Area Grids

Sets Screen Area grid

Sets Layout panel grid

Layout panel

Screen Area grid

Layout panel grid

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View Logical Net Window

Page Preview pane—


highlights selected net

Use this window to trace the connections of a selected logical net on a single page or
throughout multiple pages.

View Logical Net window


Item Description

Page(s) Lists all the pages in which the selected net appears.
Click a page name in Page(s) list to display the page in Page Preview pane.

Page Preview pane Previews the page selected in the Page(s) list, highlighting the selected logical net.
Click in this pane to close the View Logical Net window and display the previewed page in the Drawing Area.

List of Nodes this Page Not implemented in this release.

List of Nodes across Pages Not implemented in this release.

List of Tags across Pages Not implemented in this release.

Change Port Names across Click to display the Define New Name for <n> Ports window (<n> is the total number of ports to be renamed).
Pages The name that you enter in this window replaces all the port names that belong to the selected logical net.
The Define New Name for <n> Ports window renames the ports on every page in which the selected net
appears.
This window does not rename the ports that bring signals into and out of pages.

Change Port Names on this Click to display the Define new Port Name window.
Page The name that you enter in this window replaces just the port names in the logical net that is highlighted in the
Page Preview pane.
The Define new Port Name window only renames ports on the page displayed in the Page Preview pane.
This window does not rename the ports that bring signals into and out of the page.

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Hardware Tab
Previous/Next Collapse All

Hardware Category Search


Hardware Type
Hardware Description
Data Sheet
API Specification
Template
Template Overview

Right-click

Preview

This tab contains hardware-related items, organized by Hardware Category, Hardware


Type, hardware model, and Hardware Description. Each PLUS+1 hardware model has a
Hardware Description.

• A Hardware Description has the resources needed by the PLUS+1 GUIDE program to
compile an application for the selected hardware model. You make these resources
available to the PLUS+1 GUIDE program by dragging a Hardware Description from the
Hardware tab to the Project Manager tab.

• Associated with each Hardware Description is a hardware Template and


documentation about the hardware.

To make programming simpler, the hardware Template contains predefined inputs,


outputs, and memory locations that match the selected hardware. You make a hardware
Template available by dragging it from the Hardware tab into the Drawing Area.

Hardware documentation typically has specifications, application interface (API)


information, and a template overview for the hardware model.

Hardware tab
Item Description

Previous/Next Click to expand branches in the Hardware tree.

Collapse All Click to collapse all branches in the Hardware tree.

Search Click to display the Search window.


Use this window to search for items in the Hardware tree. For more information, see Search Window on page
57.

Hardware Category These folders organize hardware by category, such as Programmable Hardware and IO Modules.

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Hardware tab
Item Description

Hardware Type These folders organize hardware by type within hardware categories.

Hardware Description Links to the resources that the PLUS+1 GUIDE program needs to create and compile an application for a
specific PLUS+1 hardware model.
You make these resources available to the program by dragging a Hardware Description from the Hardware
tab into the Project Manager tab.
Right-click a Hardware Description to display a pop-up menu with commands to Install Hardware or Uninstall
Hardware.

Data Sheet Click to view the product specification for the hardware model. This document provides a general description
of the hardware model that typically includes its features, dimensions, power requirements, and pin
assignments.

API Specification Click to view the application interface (API) description for the hardware model.
Refer to this document when configuring hardware inputs and outputs.

Template Click to view programming templates for the hardware model.


To make programming simpler, a Template contains predefined inputs, outputs, and memory locations that
match the selected hardware model.
You make a hardware Template available by dragging it from the Hardware tab into the Drawing Area.

Template Overview Click to view a document that provides basic information about using the template.

Preview Provides a preview of the selected hardware model.


Use the Options window settings (see page 50) to enable this preview.

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Search Window

Use this window to search the Hardware tab for specific Hardware Descriptions.

Search window
Item Description

Search Enter your search term here.

Search in Part numbers—Check to search for part numbers that match your Search entry.
Descriptions—Check to search for descriptions that match your Search entry.
Keywords—Check to search for keywords that match your Search entry.

Options Use these Options to restrict your search.


Case sensitive—Check to search only for items that match the case of your Search entry.
Whole words—Check search only for whole words that match your Search entry.
Exact match—Check to search only for items that exactly match your Search entry.

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Project Manager Tab


Project
Hardware Description Comment*
Kernel
Download Click to download to PLUS+1 hardware

Application Name
Right-click
Application ID*
Main Module*

*Change these values in the Inspector panel.

This tab lists the Hardware Descriptions that you have installed. These Hardware
Descriptions are specific to PLUS+1 hardware models. A Hardware Description has the
resources needed by the PLUS+1 GUIDE program to create and compile an application for
a specific PLUS+1 hardware model.

To make these Hardware Descriptions available to the PLUS+1 GUIDE program, you must
drag them from the Hardware tab to this tab.

Project Manager tab


Item Description

Project The project name.

Hardware Description Displays the Hardware Description that installed when you dragged it from the Hardware tab.
Comment

Kernel The operating system used with the hardware. This kernel is part of the Hardware Description and cannot be
changed.

Download The name of the download file.


After you compile your application, click this file. The PLUS+1 Service Tool program will open, with this file
ready to download.

Application Name The name of the application.


An application can consist of one main module and several subsidiary modules.
Right-click the Application Name to display a pop-up menu with the following commands:
Add New Module—Click to add a new module to the application.
Add Existing Module—Click to display the Select File window. Use this window to select an existing module
to add to the application.
Add Existing Array—Click to display the Select File window. Use this window to select an existing array to
add to the application. For more information, refer to Array Constant from File on page 195.
Add Document—Click to display the Select File window. Use this window to select a file—such as a Microsoft
Word or PDF document—that you want to add to the project folder.

Application ID Replace with a description of the application. The description is optional. Use the Inspector tab to enter the
description.
When you update an application, the old and new descriptions must match before a download can start.

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Project Manager tab


Item Description

Main Module Click to display the module in the Drawing Area.


Typically, you replace this module by dragging a Template over from the Hardware tab.
The Template has predefined inputs, outputs, and memory locations that match the selected PLUS+1
hardware.
Right-clicking the application name displays a pop-up menu with commands to add additional subsidiary
modules.

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About the Project Manager and Hardware Tabs


Hardware
Hardware Category
Description Comment
Kernel Hardware Type
Hardware Descripion
Download
Data Sheet
Application ID API Description
Application Template
Template
Template Overview

The Hardware tab (shown on the right) contains the hardware-related resources needed
by the PLUS+1 GUIDE program to create and compile an application for PLUS+1 hardware.

• Major items in the Hardware tab typically include:


A Hardware Description that has the resources that the PLUS+1 GUIDE program
needs to create and compile and application for a specific PLUS+1 hardware model.

Typically associated with each Hardware Description are:

− A Hardware Data Sheet that describes the hardware.


− An API (Application Interface) Specification that describes how you can configure
the inputs and outputs on the hardware.

− A Template with predefined inputs, outputs, and memory locations that match
the hardware for which you are creating an application.

− A Template Overview that describes how to use the Template.


• Major items in the Project Manager tab include:

− A Hardware Description that contains the resources needed by the PLUS+1 GUIDE
program to create and compile an application for a specific PLUS+1 hardware
model. You drag the Hardware Description from the Hardware tab to the Project
Manager tab.

− A Kernel (operating system) needed by the hardware for which you are
programming. The kernel installs along with the Hardware Description.

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− A Download file in limited hex (*.lhx) format. After the PLUS+1 GUIDE program
compiles your application, you download this file to your hardware.
You can limit downloads to specific hardware models and hide the application
code.

− An optional Application ID that describes the application. When you update an


application, new and old IDs must match before the download starts.

− An Application Template. This is the starting point for you application. You
installed this Application Template by dragging the Template from the
Hardware tab and dropping it into the Drawing Area.

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Page Navigator Tab

Navigation arrows

Navigation pane Drawing Area

Use this tab to go directly to pages in your application.

Navigation tab
Item Description

Navigation arrows Click to display previous navigation selections in the Drawing Area.

Navigation pane Displays a tree view of all the pages within your application.
Click a page name in the tree to display the page in the Drawing Area.

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Component Tab

This tab displays a tree view of components that you can drag to the Drawing Area for use
in your application.

Components are the basic building blocks in an application.

Component tab
Item Description

Components Lists the components, by type, that you can use in your application.
Drag the component that you need from here into the Drawing Area.
When new components libraries become available, use the Install Library command in the Setup menu to
add them to this tab

Preview Shows a preview of the component that you have clicked.


Use the Options window settings (see page 50) to show or hide this preview.

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Function Tab

Function Block manual

This tab displays a tree view of functions that can you drag into the Drawing Area for use
in your application.

A function is a block of components, created by Sauer-Danfoss, and designed to perform


specific tasks such as:

• Ackermann steering.

• Frequency-to-speed conversion.
Function tab
Item Description

Function Block manual Click to view the Basic Function Block Library manual.

Functions Lists the functions, by type, that you can use in your application.
Drag the function that you need from here into the Drawing Area.
When new function libraries become available, use the Install Library command in the Setup menu to add
them to this tab.

Preview Shows a preview of the selected function.


Use the Options window settings (see page 50) to show or hide this preview.

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My Blocks Tab

Right-click

Use this tab to quickly select the blocks and pages that you have created and use
frequently in your projects. These blocks and pages are available for all projects.

A Blocks folder and a Pages folder store the blocks and pages in this tab. The typical path
to these folders is: My Computer\Local Disk (C:)\Program Files\Sauer-Danfoss\PLUS1\
P1ToolData\MyBlocks

My Blocks tab
Item Description

Blocks Lists the blocks that you have exported to the Blocks folder using the File menu’s Block > Export Block command.
Click and drag the block that you want to use into the Drawing Area.

Pages Lists the pages that you have exported to the Pages folder using the File menu’s Page > Export Page command.
Click and drag the page that you want to use into the Drawing Area.

Preview Can provide a preview of the block or page that you click.

To create a Preview pane image and an icon, perform the following procedure:

1. Create a Windows Metafile (*.WMF) image of the block or page. This image displays in
the Preview pane. Keep the image smaller than 150 x 150 pixels.

2. Save the WMF file in the Blocks or the Pages folder using the same name that you
used for the block or page.
3. Create an icon (*.ICO) of the block or page. This icon displays next to the block or page
name in the My Blocks tab’s trees. Keep the icon smaller than 16 x 16 pixels.

4. Save the ICO file in the Blocks or the Pages folder using the same name that you used
for the block or page.
For example, the Memory.WMF and the Memory.ICO files provide the preview and the
icon for the Memory.SCS page.

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Inspector Tab
6 Character Constant Logical AND Set/Reset Latch
Coordinates
Component Name
User Property
Version
Errors
Warnings

Use this tab to view and change the properties of the items that you select with the
Query/Change tool.

You can also use the small, pop-up Edit Value window to change values (see Change
Properties with the Pop-up Edit Window on page 358).

The kind of item that you select determines what properties you can change.

Inspector tab
Item Description

Coordinates The x-axis and y-axis coordinates on the page where you placed the item.

Name The name of the item.

User Property A value that you enter to change item properties.


The properties that you can change depend on the item selected.
The preceding figure shows three examples of properties.
The Inspector tab for the 6-Character constant component displays V1 and X1 values that set the component's value and its
data type.
The Inspector tab for the AND component displays a Modifier value that sets the number of inputs on this component.
The Inspector tab for the Set/Reset Latch component displays no values that you can change.

Version The release version of the item.

Errors The error status of the item.


0 = No error. The PLUS+1 GUIDE program will compile the item without errors.
1 = Error. The PLUS+1 GUIDE program cannot compile the item. The compile process will abort with errors. You need a newer
item.

Warnings The warning status of the item.


0 = No warning. The PLUS+1 GUIDE program will compile the item without warnings.
1 = Warning. The PLUS+1 GUIDE program will compile the item, but with warnings. You should get a newer item as soon as
possible.

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Compiler Messages Tabs

Click to display error


page in Drawing Area

Scroll to view PC memory usage

The Compiler Messages pane has a Build Messages tab, an Error Messages tab, and a
Compiler Messages tab.

Use these tabs to:

• Observe the compile process that produces a download file.

• Find and fix the errors that abort the compile process.

Compiler messages tabs


Item Description

Build Messages tab The compiler displays build messages in this tab as it compiles your application into a downloadable file.

Error Messages tab The compiler displays compile error messages in this tab. Errors stop the compile process.
All errors within an application and most compile process errors produce messages in this tab. If your compile
process aborts, look in this tab first.
A message about an error in an application has lines that describe the type of error and the page and
coordinates where the compiler found the error. Click these lines to display the error source page in the
Drawing Area.
(The page where the compiler found the error and the page that caused the error are not always be the same.
You may have to return to a higher-level page to fix the source of the error.)
The *.err file (* = project name), located in the project folder, logs these error messages.

Compiler Messages tab The compiler displays the messages that it logs to the Screen.tmp file, located in your project folder.

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Data Types

This chapter describes:

• Data types.
Each data type has a range of values or a specific function.

• Overflow conditions that result from using data types whose range of values is too
small.

• How the time base data type is used.

• The basic characteristics of arrays.

Chapter contents Data Types .......................................................................................................................................................70


About Overflow Conditions .......................................................................................................................71
About the Time Base Data Type ...............................................................................................................72
About the Array Data Type.........................................................................................................................74

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Data Types
The following table lists the data types used in the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.

Data types
Data Type Description Range

BOOL True or False T–F

U8 Unsigned 8 bits 0 to +255

S8 Signed 8 bits -128 to +127

U16 Unsigned 16 bits 0 to +65535

S16 Signed 16 bits -32768 to +32767

U32 Unsigned 32 bits 0 to +4294967295

S32 Signed 32 bits -2147483648 to +2147483647

TL Text label; pointer to string in text table

PXO PiXel object; pointer to an external graphic

PORT Hardware port; must match hardware port name

T Time base

FILE Identifies a window in which graphics display

FONT Font used; defined by the operating system

COLOR Color used; defined by the operating system

OBN Object name

NULL No connection

LANG Sets display language

ARRAY Up to 32767 elements allowed

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About Overflow Conditions


An overflow occurs when an output value becomes larger than the data type assigned to
the output allows.
U8 = 255 maximum value
01100100 01100100
100 + 100 = 200 ADD 11001000 100 + 200 = Undefined ADD 1 00101100
U8 U8
01100100 11001000
OK Not OK: Overflow Condition
In the preceding figure:

• The Add component adds two U8 values and outputs a U8 result.

• The U8 data type has 8 bits, with a maximum value of 255.

− OK—100 + 100 = 200; output is less than 255.


− Not OK—100 + 200 = 300; an overflow because the output is greater than 255.
The overflow produces an incorrect output, typically 44.
When assigning data types to integer outputs, keep in mind maximum possible values of
each data type to avoid overflow.

U8 = 255 maximum value U8 = 65535 maximum value


01100100 01100100
100 + 200 = Undefined ADD 1 00101100 100 + 200 = 300 ADD 0000000100101100
U8 U16
11001000 11001000
Not OK: Overflow Condition OK
In the preceding figure:

• Not OK—100 + 200 = 300; an overflow condition because the output is greater than
255.

• OK—100 + 200 = 300; no overflow because the U16 data type can have a maximum
value of 65535.

“Clamped” components, such as Add Clamped and Subtract Clamped handle overflow
conditions by:

• Clamping the output at either maximum or minimum value allowed by the output’s
data type.

• Setting a Boolean output to T during each program loop in which the overflow
condition occurs.

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About the Time Base Data Type


The Time Base data type is used with Time and Transition components.

Three examples of Time and Transition components are:

• On Delay—Delays the return of a Boolean signal from F to T for a specified time.

• Oscillator—Outputs a Boolean signal that oscillates at a specified frequency.

• Pulse—Holds a Boolean output at T for a specified time before returning to F.


Time unit multiplier

t
Time
Trigger Function Output duration = time unit x time unit multiplier

UNIT
Time unit multiplier: 8

Time unit
t
Time
Trigger Function 8 ms output duration

UNIT

Time unit: T1M (1 ms)


The preceding figure shows how time units are:

• Applied as a constant value to a time function component.

• Multiplied by the time unit multiplier to set the output duration.


The following table lists the PLUS+1 GUIDE time units and the values that they represent.
Your hardware selection determines the time units that you can select.

Time base values


Time Base Value Time Base Abbreviation

1 ms T1M

10 ms T10M

100 ms T100M

1s T1S

60 s T60S

1h TIH

Loop time TLOOP*

* Loop time or program loop—the time it takes a change in the input to produce a change in the output.

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Resolution
Processing time, output duration, and time units set the resolution (variation) between the
minimum and maximum output duration times.

Minimum output duration time = output duration − time unit


Maximum output duration time = output duration + processing time
Where :
Output duration = time unit × time unit multiplier
Processing time = time for a change in an input to produce a change in the output

• Example 1:

With a time unit of 100 ms, a time unit multiplier of 5, and a processing time of 15 ms:
Minimum output duration time = 400 ms
Minimum output duration time = output duration − time unit
Minimum output duration time = (100 ms × 5) − 100 ms

Maximum output duration time = 515 ms


Maximum output duration time = output duration + processing time
Maximum output duration time = (100 ms × 5) + 15 ms

• Example 2:
With a time unit of 10 ms, a time unit multiplier of 25, and a processing time of 15 ms:
Minimum output duration time = 240 ms
Minimum output duration time = output duration − time unit
Minimum output duration time = (10 ms × 25) − 10 ms

Maximum output duration time = 265 ms


Maximum output duration time = output duration + processing time
Maximum output duration time = (10 ms × 25) + 15 ms

TLoops always have the same output duration because their time unit value is the
processing time.

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About the Array Data Type


• Arrays can have up to 32,767 elements.

• The first element in an array is in position 0.

• When defining an array input from the Multi-character Constant component:

− Enclose the array within parentheses ( ).


− Use commas to separate each element in the array.
• When defining an array input from a text file, use commas in the text file to separate
each element in the array.

• When defining the data type of an array:

− Put the number of elements in the array within brackets [ ].


− Select the data type of the array, such as S8, U16, or BOOL.
The following figure shows examples of arrays and array-related components.

Array Constant from File component Name of text file containing a


Values comma-delimted array
FILE
ARRAY[11]U16
Number of elements in array Data type of elements

Position 0
Multi-character Constant component
(-6, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6) Array input
ARRAY[7]S8
Number of elements in array Data type of elements

Set Array Element component


(dynamic run-time value) 5
VAL
(0, 0) (5, 0)
ARRAY[2]U8 ARRAY[2]U8
POS
Position of element to be set 0
(dynamic run-time value) 3 VAL
(5, 3)
ARRAY[2]U8
1 POS

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This chapter describes the components in Component tab of the Selector window.

Context-Sensitive Help for Components ......................................................................................76


About Component Descriptions......................................................................................................77
Mathematical..........................................................................................................................................79
Limit ........................................................................................................................................................ 106
Compare................................................................................................................................................ 116
Constant ................................................................................................................................................ 131
Logical.................................................................................................................................................... 142
Switch, Counter, Memory ................................................................................................................ 159
Array........................................................................................................................................................ 183
Data Conversion ................................................................................................................................. 197
Transition, Time................................................................................................................................... 208
Connection ........................................................................................................................................... 224
Module................................................................................................................................................... 260
Manage .................................................................................................................................................. 267
Access..................................................................................................................................................... 273
Read-only Parameter......................................................................................................................... 285
Display.................................................................................................................................................... 292
Application Log................................................................................................................................... 315
Page ........................................................................................................................................................ 316

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Context-Sensitive Help for Components


The PLUS+1GUIDE program has context-sensitive help for all components.

To display context-sensitive help for a component:

1. Click the component for which you need help.

2. Press 1.

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About Component Descriptions


This chapter describes components using pictures, descriptive text, and tables.

Typical component picture


A—Input A3 X—Output

Pins typically numbered up, A2 X2


U8
from bottom to top
A1 X1
? ?—Set value in pop-up
Edit Value window

In a typical component picture:

• A labels, such as A1, A2, and A3, indicate input pins.

• X labels, such as X1 and X2, indicate output pins.

• ? indicates a value that you must select if:

− There is no data type selected.


− You need to change the default data type.
Use either the pop-up Edit Value window or the Inspector tab to change the data
type.
Typical Valid connections table

Valid connections for Valid connections for


A input pins X output pins

Each component has a “Valid connections” table. This table identifies the data types that
you can connect to component pins.

The table lists either single data types, such as BOOL or U16, or a data type group, such as
INT (integer).

If the table lists a data type group, it means that you can connect any one of the data types
in the group to a pin. For example, INT means that you can connect a U8, U16, U32, S8,
S16, or S32 data type to a pin.

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The following table lists the data types in each data type group.

Data type groups


Individual Data Types in Data Type Group

Data Type Group BOOL U8 U16 U32 S8 S16 S32

ARRAY X X X X X X X

INT (Integer) X X X X X X

UINT (Unsigned integer) X X X

ALL All PLUS+1 data types.

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Arithmetic

Click

Add

A2
X1
ADD
?
A1

Use:

• Adds two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = A1 + A2
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT

Example—Add

250 250
ADD 1250 ADD -750
1000 -1000

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Subtract
+
A2
X1
SUB
?
A1 –

Use:

• Subtracts two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = A2 – A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT

Example—Subtract
+ +
2500 2500
SUB 1500 SUB 3500
1000 – -1000 –

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Multiply

A2
X1
MUL
?
A1

Use:

• Multiplies two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = A1 ∗ A2
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT

Example—Multiply

1000 1000

MUL 2000 MUL -2000

2 -2

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Divide

A2
X1
DIV
?
A1

Use:

• Divides two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = A2 ÷ A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT

Example—Divide

10 10
DIV 5 DIV -5
2 -2

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Rounded Divide

A2
X1
RDIV
?
A1

Use:

• Divides two integer signals and outputs the rounded result.

• Function:

− X1 = Rounds the output of A2 ÷ A1:


– Up if the remainder is ≥ 0.5

– Down if the remainder is < 0.5


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 S16

A2 INT

Example—Rounded Divide

10 10
RDIV 3 RDIV 3
S16 S16
3 4
(10 ÷ 3 = 3.33) (10 ÷ 4 = 2.50)

10 10
RDIV 2 RDIV 2
S16 S16
5 6
(10 ÷ 5 = 2.0) (10 ÷ 6 = 1.66)

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Modulo

A2
X1
MOD
?
A1

Use:

• Outputs the modulo (remainder) that results from the division of two integer signals.
Function:

⎛ ⎡ A2 ⎤ ⎞
• X1 = A2 - ⎜ ⎢ ⎥ × A1⎟
⎝⎣ ⎦A1 ⎠

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 U16

A2 INT

Example—Modulo

10 10
MOD 1 MOD 2
U16 U16
3 4

10 10
MOD 0 MOD 4
U16 U16
5 6

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Add Capped

A2
X1
ADD
?
A1
X2
Use:

• Adds two integer signals.

• Clamps the output if it overflows and sets the X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = A1 + A2

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT X2 BOOL

Example—Add Capped

50 50
ADD 150 ADD 255*
U8 U8
100 400
F T
*255—Max value for the U8 data type

50 50
ADD 150 ADD 0*
U8 U8
100 -100
F T
*0—Min value for the U8 data type

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Subtract Capped
+
A2
X1
SUB
?
A1 – X2
Use:

• Subtracts two integer signals.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = A2 – A1

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT X2 BOOL

Example—Subtract Capped

50 50
ADD 150 ADD 255*
U8 U8
100 400
F T
*255—Max value for the U8 data type

50 50
ADD 150 ADD 0*
U8 U8
100 -100
F T
*0—Min value for the U8 data type

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Multiply Capped

A2
X1
MUL
?
A1
X2
Use:

• Multiplies two integer signals.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = A2 ∗ A1

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT X2 BOOL

Example—Multiply Capped

10 100
MUL 100 MUL 255*
U8 U8
10 100
F T
*255—Max value for the U8 data type

10 100
MUL 100 MUL 0*
U8 U8
10 -100
F T
*0—Min value for the U8 data type

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Divide Capped

A2
X1
DIV
?
A1
X2
Use:

• Divides two integer signals.

• Clamps the output if it overflows and sets X2 to T to indicate an overflow condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = A2 ÷ A1

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT X2 BOOL

Example—Divide Capped

500 600
DIV 250 DIV 255*
U8 U8
2 2
F T
*255—Max value for the U8 data type

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Rounded Divide Capped

A2
X1
RDIV
?
A1
X2

• Divides two integer signals and outputs the rounded result.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.

• Function:

− X1 = Rounds the output of A2 ÷ A1:


– Up if the remainder is ≥ 0.5

– Down if the remainder is < 0.5

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 S16

A2 INT X2 BOOL

Example—Rounded Divide Capped


(100000 ÷ 2 = 50000) (65534 ÷ 2 = 32767)
100000 65534
RDIV 32767* RDIV 32767
S16 S16
2 2
T F
*32767 = Max value for S16 data type

(65533 ÷ 2 = 32766.5)
65533
RDIV 32767
S16
2
F

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Modulo Capped

A2
X1
MOD
?
A1
X2
Use:

• Outputs the modulo (remainder) that results from the division of two integer signals.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

⎛ ⎡ A2 ⎤ ⎞
• X1 = A2 - ⎜ ⎢ ⎥ × A1⎟
⎝ ⎣ A1 ⎦ ⎠

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 U16

A2 INT

Example—Modulo Capped
(209999 modulo 70000 = 69999)
210000 2099999
MOD 0 MOD 65535*
U16 U16
70000 700000
F T
*65535 = Max value for the U16 data type

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Absolute Value

Click

Absolute Value

X1
A1 ABS
?

Use:

• Outputs the magnitude of an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = Absolute value of A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

Example—Absolute Value

2500 ABS 2500 -2500 ABS 2500

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Absolute Value Capped

X1
A1 ABS
?
X2
Use:

• Outputs the magnitude of an integer signal.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = Absolute value of A1

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

X2 BOOL

Example—Absolute Value Capped

-250 ABS 250 -500 ABS 255*


U8 U8
F T
*255—Max value for the U8 data type

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Scale

Click

Scale
A2 A3

X1
A1 SCALE
?

A5 A4

Use:

• Scales an integer signal into a new range.

• Apply scaling to a sensor signal.


Function:

⎛ ⎛ A1 − A5 ⎞ ⎞
• X1 = ⎜ ⎜ ⎟ × ( A3 − A4 ) ⎟ + A4
⎝ ⎝ A2 − A5 ⎠ ⎠

T The A2–A5 values set the input-to-output ratio and offset applied to the A1 input signal.
They do not limit the resulting X1 output value.

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1–A5 INT X1 INT

Example—Scale
The following two figures and plots show how different input values applied to this
component produce different input/output ratios. This example applies to both Scale
components.

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25

10 20
100
10 15

10

X1 Pin Output
5

SCALE 0
40 4
-5

-10

-15
-100 -20

-10 -25
--200 -180 -160 -140 -120 -100 -80 -60 -40 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200
A1 Pin Input
This example applies 10 to 1 scaling:
· -100 input = -10 output.
· 40 input = 4 output.
· 100 input = 10 output.

400

350

300
300
10
4500

250
X1 Pin Output

2500 SCALE 150 200

150

500
0 100

This example scales a 0–5000 mV input: 50


· 500 mV input = 0 output.
· 2500 mV input = 150 output.
· 4500 mV input = 300 output. 0

-50
0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 5000
A1 Pin Input

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Scale Capped
A2 A3

X1
A1 SCALE
?
X2

A5 A4

Use:

• Scales an integer signal into a new range.

• Applies scaling to a sensor signal.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

⎛ ⎛ A1 − A5 ⎞ ⎞
• X1 = ⎜ ⎜ ⎟ × ( A3 − A4 ) ⎟ + A4
⎝ ⎝ A2 − A5 ⎠ ⎠
• If X1 does not overflow or overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows or a overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
• X2—Resets to F at the start of each program loop

T The A2–A5 values set the input-to-output ratio and offset applied to the A1 input signal.
They do not limit the resulting X1 output value.

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1–A5 INT X1 INT

X2 BOOL

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Example—Scale Capped
10 100 10 100

10 SCALE 100 100 SCALE 255*


F T

0 0 U8 U8
0 0 *255—Max value for the U8 data type

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Trigonometric

Click

Sin
f(v) = 104 * sin(v/100)
A1 v f(v) X1
?
Use:

• Outputs the sine function of an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = 104 x sin (A1/100)


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 INT

Example—Sin
f(v) = 104 * sin(v/100) f(v) = 104 * sin(v/100) f(v) = 104 * sin(v/100)
4500 v f(v) 7071 9000 v f(v) 10000 13500 v f(v) 7071
S16 S16 S16

f(v) = 104 * sin(v/100) f(v) = 104 * sin(v/100) f(v) = 104 * sin(v/100)


18000 v f(v) 0 22500 v f(v) -7071 27000 v f(v) -10000
S16 S16 S16

f(v) = 104 * sin(v/100)


31500 v f(v) -7071
S16

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13500

9000

4500
X1 Output

-4500

-9000

-13500
0 4500 9000 13500 18000 22500 27000 31500 36000
A1 Input (36000 = 360°)

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Cos
f(v) = 104 * cos(v/100)
A1 v f(v) X1
?
Use:

• Outputs the cosine function of an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = 104 x cos (A1/100)


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

Example—Cos
f(v) = 104 * cos(v/100) f(v) = 104 * cos(v/100) f(v) = 104 * cos(v/100)
4500 v f(v) 7071 9000 v f(v) 0 13500 v f(v) -7071
S16 S16 S16

f(v) = 104 * cos(v/100) f(v) = 104 * cos(v/100) f(v) = 104 * cos(v/100)


18000 v f(v) -10000 22500 v f(v) -7071 27000 v f(v) 0
S16 S16 S16
4
f(v) = 10 * cos(v/100)
31500 v f(v) 7071
S16

13500

9000

4500
X1 Output

-4500

-9000

-13500
0 4500 9000 13500 18000 22500 27000 31500 36000
A1 Input (36000 = 360°)

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Tan
f(v) = 104 * tan(v/100)
A1 v f(v) X1
?
Use:

• Outputs the tangent function of an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = 104 x tan (A1/100)


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

Example—Tan
f(v) = 104 * tan(v/100) f(v) = 104 * tan(v/100)
4500 v f(v) 10000 9000 v f(v) 2147483647
S16 S16

f(v) = 104 * tan(v/100) f(v) = 104 * tan(v/100)


13500 v f(v) -10000 18000 v f(v) 0
S16 S16
35000

30000

25000

20000

15000

10000

5000
X1 Output

-5000

-10000

-15000

-20000

-25000

-30000

-35000
0 4500 9000 13500 18000 22500 27000 31500 36000
A1 Input (36000 = 360°)

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Arc Sin
f(x) = 100 * arcsin(x/104)
A1 x f(x) X1
?
Use:

• Outputs the arcsine function of an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = 100 x arcsin (A1/104)


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

Example—Arc Sin
f(x) = 100 * arcsin(x/104) f(x) = 100 * arcsin(x/104)
3827 v f(v) 2250 7071 v f(v) 4500
S16 S16

f(x) = 100 * arcsin(x/104) f(x) = 100 * arcsin(x/104)


9239 v f(v) 6750 10000 v f(v) 9000
S16 S16
6000

4500

3000
X1 Output (4500 = 45°)

1500

-1500

-3000

-4500

-6000
-15000 -10000 -5000 0 5000 10000 15000
A1 Input

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Components

Arc Cos
f(x) = 100 * arccos(x/104)
A1 x f(x) X1
?
Use:

• Outputs the arccosine function of an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = X1 = 100 x arccos (A1/104)


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 INT

Example—Arc Cos
f(x) = 100 * arccos(x/104) f(x) = 100 * arccos(x/104)
9239 x f(x) 2250 7071 x f(x) 4500
S16 S16

f(x) = 100 * arccos(x/104) f(x) = 100 * arccos(x/104)


3825 x f(x) 6750 0 x f(x) 9000
S16 S16
10500

9000
X1 Output (4500 = 45°)

7500

6000

4500

3000

1500

0
-15000 -10000 -5000 0 5000 10000 15000
A1 Input

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Arc Tan
f(x) = 100 * arctan(x/104)
A1 x f(x) X1
?
Use:

• Outputs the arctangent function of an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = 100 x arctan (A1/104)


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 INT

Example—Arc Tan
f(x) = 100 * arctan(x/104) f(x) = 100 * arctan(x/104)
4142 x f(x) 2250 10000 x f(x) 4500
S16 S16

f(x) = 100 * arctan(x/104) f(x) = 100 * arctan(x/104)


24145 x f(x) 6750 2147483647 x f(x) 9000
S16 S16

5000

4000

3000

2000
X1 Output (4500 = 45°)

1000

-1000

-2000

-3000

-4000

-5000
-15000 -10000 -5000 0 5000 10000 15000
A1 Input

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Square Root
f(x) = 100 * x
A1 x f(x) X1
?
Use:

• Outputs the square root of an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = 100 x A1

• Accuracy: ±4
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

Example—Square Root
f(x) = 100 * x
4 x f(x) 200
U32

f(x) = 100 * x
5 x f(x) 224
U32

f(x) = 100 * x
15 x f(x) 387
U32

f(x) = 100 * x f(x) = 100 * x


16 x f(x) 400 16 x f(x) 144 Error—Overflow condition
U32 U8 Data type too small

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Limit

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Max/Min

Click

Max Value

A2
X1
MAX
?
A1

• Use

• Outputs the larger value of two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = A1 if A1 ≥ A2

• X1 = A2 if A2 > A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT

Example—Max Value

750 1250
MAX 1000 MAX 1250
1000 1000

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Min Value

A2
X1
MIN
?
A1

Use:

• Outputs the smaller value of two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = A1 if A1 =< A2

• X1 = A2 if A2 < A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT

Example—Min Value

750 1250
MIN 750 MIN 1000
1000 1000

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Median Value

A3
X1
A2 MED
?
A1

Use:

• Outputs the median value of three input values.

• Set upper and lower output limits


Function:

• X1 = A1 if:

− A2 =< A1 =< A3
− A3 =< A1 =< A2
• X1 = A2 if:

− A1 =< A2 =< A3
− A3 =< A2 =< A1
• X1 = A3 if:

− A1 =< A3 =< A2
− A2 =< A3 =< A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

A2 UINT

A3 UINT

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Example—Median Value

0 0
ADD -50 MED 0 ADD 125 MED 100
S8 S8
100 100

0
ADD 50 MED 50
S8
100

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Max Value Capped

A2
X1
MAX
?
A1
X2

• Use

• Outputs the larger value of two integer signals.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = A1 if A1 ≥ A2

• X1 = A2 if A2 > A1

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT X2 BOOL

Example—Max Value Capped

200 500
MAX 200 MAX 255*
U8 U8
100 100
F T
*255—Max value for the U8 data type

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Min Value Capped

A2
X1
MIN ?
A1
X2
Use:

• Outputs the smaller value of two integer signals.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = A1 if A1 =< A2

• X1 = A2 if A2 < A1

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT X2 BOOL

Example—Min Value Capped

200 -200
MIN 100 MIN 0*
U8 U8
100 100
F T
*0—Min value for the U8 data type

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Median Value Capped

A3
X1
A2 MED
?
A1
X2

Use:

• Output the median value of three input values.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.

• Set upper and lower output limits


Function:

• X1 = A1 if:

− A2 =< A1 =< A3
− A3 =< A1 =< A2
• X1 = A2 if:

− A1 =< A2 =< A3
− A3 =< A2 =< A1
• X1 = A3 if:

− A1 =< A3 =< A2
− A2 =< A3 =< A1
• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

A2 UINT X2 BOOL

A3 UINT

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Example—Median Value Capped

0 0
ADD -50 MED 0 ADD 125 MED 100
S8 S8
100 100
F F

0
ADD 50 MED 50
S8
100
F

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Limit

X1
A1
?

Use:

• Limits the X1 output to the maximum and minimum values of the data type selected
for X1.
Function:

• X1 = A1 converts into X1 data type

• X1 = Maximum value of the X1 data type if A1 > maximum value of the X1 data type

• X1 = Minimum value of the X1 data type if A1< minimum value of the X1 data type
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

Example—Limit

125 125 1000 127

(S16 in/S8 out) (S16 in/S8 out)

-1000 -128

(S16 in/S8 out)

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Compare

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Compare

Click

Greater

A2 A
> X1
A1
A2 B

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean value based on the comparison of two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = T if A2 > A1

• X1 = F if A2 = A1

• X1 = F if A2 < A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

Example—Greater

999 A 1001 A
> F > T
1000 B 1000 B

1000 A
> F
1000 B

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Less

A2 A
< X1
A1 B

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean value based on the comparison of two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = T if A2 < A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

Example—Less

999 A 1001 A
< T < F
1000 B 1000 B

1000 A
< F
1000 B

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Greater or Equal

A2 A
³ X1
A1 B

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean value based on the comparison of two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = F if A2 < A1

• X1 = T if A2 = A1

• X1 = T if A2 > A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

Example—Greater or Equal

999 A 1001 A
³ F ³ T
1000 B 1000 B

1000 A
³ T
1000 B

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Less or Equal

A2 A
£ X1
A1 B

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean value based on the comparison of two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = T if A2 < A1

• X1 = T if A2 = A1

• X1 = F if A2 > A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

Example—Less or Equal

999 A 1001 A
£ T £ F
1000 B 1000 B

1000 A
£ T
1000 B

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Equal

A2 A
= X1
A1 B

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean value based on the comparison of two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = F if A2 < A1

• X1 = T if A2 = A1

• X1 = F if A2 > A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

Example—Equal

999 A 1001 A
= F
= F
1000 B 1000 B

1000 A
= T
1000 B

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Not Equal

A2 A
¹ X1
A1 B

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean value based on the comparison of two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = F if A2 ≠ A1

• X1 = T if A2 = A1
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

Example—Not Equal

999 A 1001 A
¹ T ¹ T
1000 B 1000 B

1000 A
¹ F
1000 B

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Compare with Hysteresis

Click

Compare with Hysteresis High


A3
+
A2 H
COMPH X1
A1 –

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean value based on a hysteresis comparison between two integer input
signals.
Function:

• X1 = T if A2 ≥ (A1 + A3)

• X1 = F if A2 < A1

• X1 = No change if A1 =< A2 < (A1 + A3)


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

A3 UINT

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Example—Compare with Hysteresis High


1150
3
2
A1 + A3 1100
1 4
1050
5
A1 1000
6

950
A2 Input
X1 = T

X1 Output X1 = F

1 100 2 100

+ +
1050 H 1100 H
COMPH F COMPH F
1000 – 1000 –
A2 < A1 + A3 A2 = A1 + A3

3 100 4 100

+ +
1120 H 1050 H
COMPH T COMPH T
1000 – 1000 –
A2 > A1 + A3 A2 drops, but still > A1

5 100 6 100

+ +
1000 H 970 H
COMPH T COMPH F
1000 – 1000 –
A2 = A1 A2 < A1

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Compare with Hysteresis Middle


A3
+
A2 H
COMPM X1
A1 –

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean value based on a hysteresis comparison between two integer input
signals.
Function:

• X1 = T if A2 ≥ A1 + (A3 ÷ 2)

• X1 = F if A2 < A1 – (A3 ÷ 2)

• X1 = No change if A1 – (A3 ÷ 2) ≤ A2 < A1 + (A3 ÷ 2)


The quotient of A3 ÷ 2 rounds down to the next lowest integer (for example, 7.5
becomes 7).
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

A3 UINT

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Example—Compare with Hysteresis Middle


1100
3
2
A1 + (A3 ÷ 2) 1050
4
A1 1000
1 5
A1 - (A3 ÷ 2) 950
6

900
A2 Input
X1 = T

X1 Output X1 = F

1 100 2 100

+ +
950 H 1050 H
COMPM F COMPM T
1000 – 1000 –
A2 < A1 + (A3 ÷ 2) A2 = A1 + (A3 ÷ 2)

3 100 4 100
+ +
1065 H 1000 H
COMPH T COMPM T
1000 – 1000 –
A2 > A1 - (A3 ÷ 2) A2 drops, but still > A1 - (A3 ÷ 2)

5 100 6 100
+ +
950 H 925 H
COMPH T COMPM F
1000 – 1000 –
A2 = A1 - (A3 ÷ 2) A2 < A1 - (A3 ÷ 2)

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Compare with Hysteresis Low


A3
+
A2 H
COMPL X1
A1 –

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean value based on a hysteresis comparison between two integer input
signals.
Function:

• X1 = T if A2 ≥ A1

• X1 = F if A2 < (A1 – A3)

• X1 = No change if (A1 – A3) ≤ A2 < A1


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

A3 UINT

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Example—Compare with Hysteresis Low


1050
3
2
A1 1000

4
950

1 5
A1 - A3 900
6

850
A2 Input
X1 = T

X1 Output X1 = F

1 100 2 100

+ +
900 H 1000 H
COMPL F COMPL T
1000 – 1000 –
A2 < A1 A2 = A1

3 100 4 100

+ +
1015 H 950 H
COMPL T COMPL T
1000 – 1000 –
A2 > A1 A2 drops,
1000but still > A1 - A3

5 100 6 100

+ +
900 H 870 H
COMPL T COMPL F
1000 – 1000 –
A2 = A1 - A3 A2 < A1 - A3

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Compare in Window
+
A2
COMP X1
W
A1 –
A3
Use:

• Checks if the absolute difference between two signals is within a specified range and
then outputs a Boolean value based on this comparison.
Function:

• X1 = T if A2 ≥ A1 – (A3 ÷ 2) and A2 ≤ A1 + (A3 ÷ 2)

• X1 = F if A2 > A1 + (A3 ÷ 2)

• X1 = F if A2 < A1 – (A3 ÷ 2)
The product of A3 ÷ 2 rounds down to the next lowest integer (for example, 7.5
becomes 7).
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 BOOL

A2 INT

A3 UINT

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Example—Compare in Window
5 1100
4 6
A1 + (A3 ÷ 2) 1050
3 7
A1 1000
2 8
A1 - (A3 ÷ 2) 950
1 9
900
A2 Input
X1 = T

X1 Output X1 = F

3 +
1 + 2 + 1000
925 950
COMP T
COMP F COMP T W
W W 1000 –
1000 – 1000 –
100
100 100
A2 < A1 - (A3 ÷ 2) A2 > A1 - (A3 ÷ 2) but < A1 + (A3 ÷ 2)
A2 = A1 - (A3 ÷ 2)

5 + 6 +
4 + 1075 1050
1050
COMP F COMP T
COMP T
W W
W 1000 – 1000 –
1000 –
100 100
100
A2 > A1 + (A3 ÷ 2) A2 = A1 + (A3 ÷ 2)
A2 = A1 + (A3 ÷ 2)

7 + 8 + 9 +
1000 950 925
COMP T COMP T COMP T
F
W W W
1000 – 1000 – 1000 –
100 100 100
A2 < A1 + (A3 ÷ 2) but > A1 - (A3 ÷ 2) A2 = A1 - (A3 ÷ 2) A2 < A1 - (A3 ÷ 2)

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Constant

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True/False

True
T X1
Use:

• Outputs a Boolean constant true


Function:

• X1 = T
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 BOOL

Example—True
F T

F F
T F
T BOOL T BOOL

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False
F X1

Use:

• Outputs a Boolean constant false.


Function:

• X1 = F
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 BOOL

Example—False
F T

F F
T F
T BOOL T BOOL

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Digit Autotype

Click

3 Digit Autotype
? X1

Use:

• Outputs a constant value.

• Sized for values with up to three digits.

• The value of your entry sets the data type (see the table below).

• Only accepts numbers.

To output Boolean values, use the False component and the True component.

T This component accepts values larger than three digits. Larger values that extend beyond
this component’s boundaries can be hard to read. For larger values, use either the 6 Digit
Autotype component (see page 136) or the Multi-Character component (see page 140).

Function:

• X1 = Auto-typed value of ?
Data types
Value Entered Data Type

0 to +255 U8

–128 to -1 S8

+256 to +65535 U16

–32768 to -129 S16

+65536 to +4294967296 U32

–2147483648 to –32769 S32

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Example—3 Digit Autotype


Output auto-typed as U8 255

Output auto-typed as U16 256

Output auto-typed as S8 -128

Output auto-typed as S16 -129

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6 Digit Autotype
? X1

Use:

• Outputs a constant value.

• Sized for values with up to six digits.

• The value of your entry automatically sets the data type (see the table below).

• Only accepts numbers.

To output Boolean values, use the False component and the True component.

T This component accepts values larger or smaller than six digits. Larger values that extend
beyond this component’s boundaries can be hard to read. For larger values, use the Multi-
Character component (see page 140).

Function:

• X1 = Auto-typed value of?


Data types
Value Entered Data Type

0 to +255 U8

–128 to -1 S8

+256 to +65535 U16

–32768 to -129 S16

+65536 to +4294967296 U32

–2147483648 to –32769 S32

Example—6 Digit Autotype


Output auto-typed as U16 65535

Output auto-typed as U32 65536

Output auto-typed as S16 -32768

Output auto-typed as S32 -32769

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Typed

Click

3 Character
X1
?
?

Use:

• Outputs a constant value.

• You must define the data type of the value.

• Component is sized for values with up to three digits.

T This component accepts values larger than three digits. Larger values that extend beyond
this component’s boundaries can be hard to read. For larger values, use either the 6
Character component (see page 139) or the Multi-Character component (see page 140).

Function:

• X1 = Value of ?
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

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Example—3 Character
Output is T 1 U8 range: 0 to +255 255
BOOL U8

Output is F 0 U16 range: 0 to +65535 255


256
BOOL U16

S8 range: -128 to +127 -128


255
S8

S16 range: -32768 to +32767 -127


-128
255
S8
S16

0x—Prefix for positive hexadecimal values 0xFF


-128
255
U8

-0x—Prefix for negative hexadecimal values -0xFF


-128
255
U8
S16

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6 Character
X1
?
?

Use:

• Outputs a constant value.

• You must define the data type of the value.

• Component is sized for values with up to six digits.

T This component accepts values larger than six digits. Larger values that extend
beyond this component’s boundaries can be hard to read. For larger values, use the
Multi-Character component (see page 140).

Function:

• X1 = Value of ?
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

Example—6 Character
U16 range: 0 to +65535 65535
255
U16

U32 range: 0 to +4294967295 65536


255
U32

S16 range: -32768 to +32767 -32768


255
S16

S32 range: -2147483648 to +2147483647 -32769


-128
255
S8
S32

0x—Prefix for positive hexadecimal values 0x7FFF


-128
255
U8
U32

-0x—Prefix for negative hexadecimal values -0x7FFF


-128
255
U8
S32

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Multi-Character
C?
X1
?

Use:

• Outputs a constant value.

• You must define the data type of the value.

• Use for large, multi-character constants.

• See About the Array Data Type on page 74 for an example of how to use this
component to input an array.
Function:

• X1 = C?
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

Example—Multi-Character
4294967295
U32 range: 0 to +4294967295
U32
-2147483648
S32 range: -2147483648 to +2147483647
S32

0xFFFFFFFF
0x—Prefix for positive hexadecimal values
U32
-0x80000000
-0x—Prefix for negative hexadecimal values
S32
Position 0
(0, -4, 6, 8, -4, 0, 0, 12) Hexadecimal prefix
Array output Red value
ARRAY[8]S8
Green value
Data type of elements within array
Blue value
Number
Number of
of elements
elements in
in array
array Placeholder
Data type 0x 80 80 FF 00
Color signal output
COLOR
Data type

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Zero
0 X1

Use:

• Defines a constant value of 0.


Function:

• X1 = 0
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 U8

Example—Zero
F T

25 25
0 25
0 U8 0 U8

Null
NULL X1
Use:

• Indicates that a connection requires no input.

• Can provide a NULL value for an input that is not being used.
Function:

• X1 = NULL
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 NULL

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Logical

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AND2–AND5

Click

T Except for the number of inputs, the AND2 through AND5 components function alike.
Only the AND2 component is described here.

A2
X1
A1

Use:

• AND function for two to eight Boolean signals.


Function:

• X1 = AND function applied to A1–A8


Truth table
A1 Input A2 Input X1 Output

F F F

T F F

F T F

T T T

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 BOOL

Example—AND
F F T T
F F F T
F T F T

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OR2–OR8

Click

T Except for the number of inputs, the OR2 through OR8 components function alike. Only
the OR2 component is described here.

A2
X1
A1

Use:

• OR function for two to eight Boolean signals.


Function:

• X1 = OR function applied to A1–A8


Truth table
A1 Input A2 Input X1 Output

F F F

T F T

F T T

T T T

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 BOOL

Example—OR

F T F T
F T T T
F F T T

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NOT

A1 X1

Use:

• NOT function for a Boolean signal.


Function:

• X1 = NOT function applied to A1


Truth table
A1 Input X1 Output

F T

T F

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

Example—NOT

F T T F

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XOR
A2
X1
A1

Use:

• Exclusive OR function for two Boolean signals.


Function:

• X1 = XOR function applied to A1 and A2


Truth table
A1 Input A2 Input X1 Output

F F F

T F T

F T T

T T F

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 BOOL

Example—XOR
F T
F T
F F

F T
T F
T T

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Bitwise

Click

Bitwise AND
A2
X1
?
A1

Use:

• Outputs a mask of the bit states in two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = Bitwise AND output of A1 and A2


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

A2 UINT

Example—Bitwise AND
00000010
00000000
00000001

00110011
00000011
00001111

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Bitwise OR
A2
X1
?
A1

Use:

• Outputs a merge of the bit states in two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = Bitwise OR output of A1 and A2


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

A2 UINT

Example—Bitwise OR
00000010
00000011
00000001

00110011
00111111
00001111

00000000
00000000
00000000

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Bitwise XOR
A2
X1
?
A1

Use:

• Outputs a comparison of the bit states in two integer signals.


Function:

• X1 = Bitwise XOR output of A1 and A2


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

A2 UINT

Example—Bitwise XOR
00000010
00000011
00000001

00001111
00111100
00110011

00000000
111111111
00000000

11111111
00000000
11111111

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Shift

Click

Shift Left
A2

X1
A1 SHL
?

Use:

• Shifts bit data in an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = A1 shifted left by the number of positions indicated by the value of A2

T Because the most significant bit in a signed value indicates the value’s sign, only use this
component with unsigned data types.

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

A2 UINT

Example—Shift Left
Shift left 2 places

11100100 SHL 10010000


00
U8 in/U8 out

Shift left 4 places

11001000 SHL 10000000


0000
U8 in/U8 out

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Shift Right
A2

X1
A1 SHR
?

Use:

• Shifts bit data in an integer signal.

• Useful for bit shifting in CAN data.


Function:

• X1 = A1 shifted right by the number of positions indicated by the value of A2

T Because the most significant bit in a signed value indicates the value’s sign, only use this
component with unsigned data types.

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

A2 UINT

Example—Shift Right
Shift right 2 places

11001000 SHR 00
00110010
U8 in/U8 out

Shift right 4 places

11001000 SHR 0000


00001100
U8 in/U8 out

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Position

Click

LSB Position
X1
A1 LSB #
?

Use:

• Outputs the position of the least significant bit (LSB) set to 1 in an integer signal.

• Can indicate the highest priority alarm if alarm states are coded into the byte.
Function:

• X1 = Position (from the right) of the least significant bit with a value of 1

• X1 = 0 if no bits are set to 1.


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

Example—LSB Position
00000000 LSB # 0
U8 in/U8 out

11111110 LSB # 2
U8 in/U8 out

11111000 LSB # 4
U8 in/U8 out

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MSB Position
X1
A1 MSB #
?

Use:

• Outputs the position of the most significant bit (MSB) set to 1 in an integer signal.

• Can indicate the highest priority alarm if alarm states are coded into the byte.
Function:

• X1 = Position (from the right) of the most significant bit with a value of 1

• X1 = 0 if no bits are set to 1.


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

Example—MSB Position
00000000 MSB # 0
U8 in/U8 out

00000100 MSB # 3
U8 in/U8 out

00001000 MSB # 4
U8 in/U8 out

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Bit Count
X1
A1 BITCNT
?

Use:

• Outputs the number of bits set to true (1) in an integer signal.

• Can count the number of active alarms if alarm states are coded into the byte.
Function:

• X1 = Number of bits with a value of 1


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 UINT X1 UINT

Example—Bit Count
00000001 BITCNT 1
U8 in/U8 out

00000011 BITCNT 2
U8 in/U8 out

00000111 BITCNT 3
U8 in/U8 out

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Set/Reset Latch
A1

Set
Q X1

Reset

A2

Use:

• Holds a Boolean signal output.

• Reset has priority.


Function:

• X1 = No change if A1 = F and A2 = F

• X1 = Set to T if A1 = T and A2 = F

• X1 = Reset to F if:

− A1 = F and A2 = T
− A1 = T and A2 = T
Truth table
A1 Input A2 Input X1 Output

F F No change

T F T

F T F

T T F

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 BOOL

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Example—Set/Reset Latch
F T F T

Set Set Set Set


Q No change Q T Q F Q F

Reset Reset Reset Reset

F F T T

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Data Flip-Flop
A3

Set
A2 Data X1

A1 Clock X2
Reset

A4

Use:

• Holds a Boolean signal output.

• Toggles a Boolean signal output on the transition of a Boolean signal input.

• Can be used to implement a toggling push button by connecting the X2 output to the
A2 input.

• Reset input always has priority.


Function:

• X1 and X2 = No change if A1, A2, A3, and A4 = F

• X1 = T and X2 = F if A3 = T and A4 = F

• X1 = F and X2 = T if:

− A3 = F and A4 = T
− A3 = T and A4 = T
• X1 = F and X2 = T if A1 = Transition from F to T, A2 = F, A3 = F,
and A4 = F

• X1 = T and X2 = F if A1 = Transition from F to T, A2 = T, A3 = F,


and A4 = F
Truth table
A1 Input A2 Input A3 Input A4 Input X1 Output X2 Output

F F F F No change No change

Do not care Do not care T F T F

Do not care Do not care F T F T

Do not care Do not care T T F T

F–T transition F F F F T

T–F transition T F F T F

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Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 BOOL X2 BOOL

A3 BOOL

A4 BOOL

Example 1—Data Flip-Flop


1 T 2 F

Set Set
0 Data T 0 Data T

F Clock F F Clock F
Reset Reset
F F

3 F

Set
0 Data F

F to T Clock T
Reset
0
F

Example 2—Data Flip-Flop


1 2
F F

Set Set
Data T Data F

F to T Clock F to T Clock
Reset Reset
F F

A1—Push-button input. Each button push toggles the X1 state.

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Switch, Counter, Memory

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Switch Boolean Controlled

Click

Switch 2
A3

A2 X1
A1 ?

Use:

• Switches the output between one of two inputs.


Function:

• X1 = A1 if A3 = F

• X1 = A2 if A3 = T
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1, A2 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, X1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, PORT, COL, LANG
FONT, PORT, COL, LANG

A3 BOOL

Example—Switch 2
F T

1000 1000
100 1000
100 100

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Switch 2 Capped
A3

A2 X1
A1 ?
X2
Use:

• Switches the output between one of two inputs.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = A1 if A3 = F

• X1 = A2 if A3 = T

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = Clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1, A2 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, X1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, PORT, COL,
FONT, PORT, COL, LANG LANG

A3 BOOL X2 BOOL

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Example—Switch 2 Capped
F T

250 250
100 250
100 U8 100 U8
F F

500 255*
100 U8
T
*255—Max value of the U8 data type

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Switch

Click

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Switch 2–16

T Except for the number of outputs, the Switch 2 through Switch 16 components function
alike. Only the Switch 16 component is described here.

A17

A16 0
A15 1

A10 6
A9 7 X1
A8 8 ?

A2 14
A1 15

Use:

• Switches the output between 1 of 16 inputs.


Function:

• X1 = A(16 – A17 input value)

• No inputs on this component can float. All inputs must connect to a value.
A17 input—X1 output
A17 Input X1 Output A17 Input X1 Output A17 Input X1 Output

<0 A16 5 A11 11 A5

0 A16 6 A10 12 A4

1 A15 7 A9 13 A3

2 A14 8 A8 14 A2

3 A13 9 A7 15 A1

4 A12 10 A6 >15 A1

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1–A16 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, X1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, PORT,
PORT, COL, LANG COL, LANG

A17 INT

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Example—Switch 2–16
0 1 6

2 0 2 0 2 0
4 1 4 1 4 1

14 6 14 6 14 6
7 7 7
2 4 14
8 8 8
U8 U8 U8

14 14 14
31 15 31 15 31 15

-6 18

2 0 2 0
4 1 4 1

14 6 14 6
7 7
2 31
8 8
U8 U8

14 14
31 15 31 15

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Switch 2–16 Capped

T Except for the number of outputs, Switch 2 Capped through Switch 16 Capped
components function alike. Only the Switch 16 Capped component is described here.

A17

A16 0
A15 1

A10 6
A9 7 X1
A8 8 ?

A2 14
X2
A1 15
Use:

• Switches the output between 1 of 16 inputs.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = A(16 – A17 input value)

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop

• No inputs on this component can float. All inputs must connect to a value.

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A17 input—X1 output


A17 Input X1 Output A17 Input X1 Output A17 Input X1 Output

<0 A16 5 A11 11 A5

0 A16 6 A10 12 A4

1 A15 7 A9 13 A3

2 A14 8 A8 14 A2

3 A13 9 A7 15 A1

4 A12 10 A6 >15 A1

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1–A16 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, X1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, PORT,
PORT, COL, IMG COL, IMG

A17 INT X2 BOOL

Example—Switch 2–16 Capped


0 1 6

2 0 2 0 2 0
4 1 4 1 4 1

500 6 500 6 500 6


7 7 7
2 4 255*
8 U8 8 U8 8 U8

14 14 14
F F T
31 15 31 15 31 15

-6 18

2 0 2 0
4 1 4 1

500 6 500 6
7 7
2 31
8 U8 8 U8

14 14
F F
31 15 31 15
*255—Max value for the U8 data type

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Counter

Click

Loop Counter with Carry


LOOP COUNT
A4 PRESET VALUE
X2
A3 PRESET OUT ?
A2 MAX
A1 CLU CARRY X1

Use:

• Daisy-chain together for large counts

• Use to total seconds, minutes, hours, and days of operating time


Function:

• A1 = F–T transition increments X2 by 1

• A2 = Maximum loop value

• A3—If:

− A3 = T, then X2 = A4
(A1 transitions do not increment X2 until A3 becomes F)

− A3 = F, then A1 transitions increment X2

• A4 = Preset value

• X1:

− Becomes T for one count after X2 = A2 and A1 transitions from F–T


− Stays F as long as X2 ≠ A4 + 1
• X2:

− Count out
− Resets to 0 when X1 = A2 and A1 transitions from F to T

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Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT X2 UINT

A3 BOOL

A4 UINT

Example—Loop Counter with Carry


LOOP COUNT Counts seconds
0 PRESET VALUE
T on startup PRESET OUT
59 MAX To memory component

1 s clock pulses CLU CARRY LOOP COUNT Counts minutes

Minutes (reads from memory on startup) PRESET VALUE To memory


PRESET OUT Minutes
To display
0
59 MAX
CLU CARRY LOOP COUNT
Counts hours

Hours (reads from memory on startup) PRESET VALUE To memory


PRESET OUT Hours
To display
1000 MAX
CLU CARRY
This example shows a timer that totals seconds, minutes, and hours.

• Every 60 seconds, the LOOP COUNT seconds component outputs a true CARRY that:

− Increments the LOOP COUNT minutes component by one.


− Writes OUT values from the LOOP COUNT minute and hour components to
memory.

• Every 60 minutes, the LOOP COUNT minutes component outputs a true CARRY. This
output increments the LOOP COUNT hours component by one.

• On start up, a true PRESET:

− Applies a PRESET VALUE of 0 to the LOOP COUNT seconds component.


− Applies a PRESET VALUE read from memory to the LOOP COUNT minutes and
hours components. (When this example is first downloaded, all PRESET inputs
need to be manually initialized to F. This example does not show this logic.)

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Loop Counter
A2 MAX X1

LOOP ?
A1 CLU
R

A3

Use:

• Loop an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 is a value between 0 and the A2 maximum value

• X1 increments each time A1 transitions from F to T

• X1 resets to 0 when X1 = A2 and A1 transitions from F to T

• X1 = 0 if A3 = T

• X1 = No change if A1 = F and A3 = F

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 UINT

A2 UINT

A3 BOOL

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Example—Loop Counter
Sets maximum X1 value MAX Outputs from 0 to A2 value;
LOOP at maximum value,
F–T increments X1 CLU next CLU input resets to 0
R

When T, resets X1 to 0

Count function
1 10 MAX 9
2 10 MAX 10
3 10 MAX 0
LOOP LOOP LOOP
F to T CLU F to T CLU F to T CLU
R R R
F F F

Reset function
1 10 MAX 9
2 10 MAX 0
LOOP LOOP
0 CLU 0 CLU
R R
F T

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Up/Down Counter
A5 A6

A4
A3 X1
A2 ?
A1

A7

Use:

• Counts the transitions of a Boolean signal.


Function:

• X1 is a value that goes from the A1 minimum value to the A4 maximum value

• X1 = A1 if A7 = T

• X1 = A6 if A5 = T and A7 = F

• X1 increments each time A3 transitions from F to T until X1 = A4 maximum value

• X1 decrements each time A2 transitions from F to T until X1 = A1 minimum value

• If the A6 preset enable value is greater than the A4 maximum value, then X1 = A4

• If the A6 preset enable value is less than the A1 minimum value, then X1 = A1

• A7 (Set minimum) = T has priority over A5 (Preset enable) = T

Pin functions
Pin Function Pin Function

A1 Minimum count value A5 Preset count enable

A2 Decrement count A6 Preset count value

A3 Increment count A7 Set minimum count value

A4 Maximum count value X1 Count output

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Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 BOOL

A3 BOOL

A4 INT

A5 BOOL

A6 INT

A7 BOOL

Example—Up/Down Counter
When T, sets X1 to A6 preset value* Preset value
A5 A6

Sets max X1 value A4


F–T increments X1 A3
X1 Increments/decrements
F–T decrements X1 A2 to A1 min/A4 max value
Sets min X1 value A1

A7
When T, resets X1 to A1 minimum value

*If A5 is T:
· Sets X1 to A1 min value when A6 value is less than A1 value.
· Sets X1 to A4 max value when A6 value is greater than A4 value.

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Set minimum 5 Count up 5 Count up 5


F F F

10 10 10
F F to T F to T
0 1 2
F F F
0 0 0

T F F

Count down 5 Count down 5 Preset enable 5


F F T

10 10 10
F F F
1 0 5
F to T F to T F
0 0 0

F F F

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Value Connect

Click

Value
A2

X1
A1 CON
?

Use:

• Switches between signals when used in a group (see example).

• Samples and holds a value.

• Wire the X1 outputs of these components together to create a wire OR function.


Function:

• When using multiple components, whichever one has its A2 input active (A2 = T) will
have its input connected to the output

• If more than one A2 input is active (A2 = T), the value of the last one in the execution
order is valid.
Truth table
A2 Input X1 Output

F No change

T A1

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, X1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, PORT, COL,
PORT, COL, IMG IMG

A2 BOOL

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Example—Value
1 T 2 F

1000 CON 1000 1000 CON 1000

F F

2500 CON 2500 CON

3 F

1000 CON 2500

2500 CON

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Value Capped
A2

X1
A1 CON
?
X2
Use:

• Switches between signals when used in a group (see the Example—Value on page
176).

• Samples and holds a value.

• Wire the X1 outputs of these components together to create a wire OR function.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• When using multiple components, whichever one has its A2 input active (A2 = T) will
have its input connected to the output

• If more than one A2 input is active (A2 = T), the value of the last one in the execution
order is valid.
Truth table
A2 Input X1 Output

F No change

T A1

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, X1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, PORT, COL,
PORT, COL, IMG IMG

A2 BOOL X2 BOOL

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Value Initialization
INIT
X1
A1 CON
?

Use:

• Initialize values at the start of each program loop.


Function:

• A1 = X1 at the start of each program loop

• Always executes first, regardless of its position in the application


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 All X1 All

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Memory

Click

Memory
A2

A1 X1
?
MEM
Use:

• Samples a signal value and keeps this value after the signal changes.
Function:

• X1 = A1 if A2 = T

• X1 = X1 if A2 = F

• You cannot wire together multiple outputs from this component

• Use the Value component (see the Value component on page 175) when you need
to wire multiple outputs together.
Truth table
A2 Input X1 Output

F No change

T A1

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, X1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, PORT, COL, IMG
FONT, PORT, COL, IMG

A2 BOOL

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Example—Memory
1 2
T F

1000 2500
1000 1000

MEM MEM

3
T

2500
2500

MEM

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Memory Capped
A2

A1 X1
?
MEM X2
Use:

• Samples a signal value and keeps this value after the signal changes.

• Clamps its X1 output if it overflows and sets its X2 output to T to indicate an overflow
condition.

• Boolean outputs on capped components can be wired together; an overflow


condition outputs a T on the net.
Function:

• X1 = A1 if A2 = T

• X1 = X1 if A2 = F

• If X1 does not overflow, then X2 = F

• If X1 overflows, then:

− X2 = T
− X1 = clamps at the minimum or maximum value of its data type
− X2 resets to F at the start of each program loop
• You cannot wire together multiple X1 outputs from this component

• Use the Value component (see the Value component on page 175) when you need
to wire multiple X1 outputs together.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, X1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, PORT, COL, IMG
FONT, PORT, COL, IMG

A2 BOOL X2 BOOL

Truth table
A2 Input X1 Output

F No change

T A1

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Example—Memory Capped
1 2
T F

100 250
100 100
U8 U8
MEM F MEM F

3 4
T T

250 500
250 255*
U8 U8
MEM F MEM T
*255—Max value for the U8 data type

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Array

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Get Array Element


A2
A1
X1
?
Use:

• Output the value of an element in an array.


Function:

• A1 = Array

• A2 = Position of element to be output


The first element in an array is in position 0

• X1 = Copied element

• An array can have a maximum of 32,767 elements

• Different ARRAY data types on input and output pins can produce overflow on the X1
output

• For more about defining arrays, see About the Array Data Type on page 74.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY X1 BOOL, INT

A2 U8, S8, S16

Example 1—Get Array Element


Postion 0 0
(-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3)
ARRAY[7]S8 -3

5
(-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3)
ARRAY[7]S8 2

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Example 2—Get Array Element


The following example shows how to use the Get Array Element component to extract
individual elements from an array.

(5, 3, 4, 6)
ARRAY[4]U8
0

2
1

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Set Array Element


A3 VAL
X1
A2
?
A1 POS
Use:

• Set an element in an array to a defined value.


Function:

• A1 = Position of the element to be defined


The first element in an array is in position 0

• A2 = Array with element to be set

• A3 = Value of element to be set

• X1 = Array with changed element

• An array can have a maximum of 32,767 elements

• Different ARRAY data types on input and output pins can produce overflow on the X1
output

• For more about array data types, see About the Array Data Type on page 74.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 U8, S8, S16 X1 ARRAY

A2 ARRAY

A3 INT, BOOL

Example 1—Set Array Element


Position 0
-4 VAL
(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1) (-4, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1)
ARRAY[8]S8 ARRAY[8]S8
0 POS

-4 VAL
(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1) (1, 1, 1, -4, 1, 1, 1, 1)
ARRAY[8]S8 ARRAY[8]S8
3 POS

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Example 2—Set Array Element


The following example shows how to use the Set Array Element component to construct
an array that contains variables.

(Variable) 5
VAL
(0, 0, 0, 0) (5, 0, 0, 0)
ARRAY[4]U8 ARRAY[4]U8
POS
0
(Variable) 3 VAL
(5, 3, 0, 0)
ARRAY[4]U8
1 POS

(Variable) 4 VAL
(5, 3, 4, 0)
ARRAY[4]U8
2 POS

(Variable) 6 VAL
(5, 3, 4, 6)
ARRAY[4]U8
3 POS

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Length of Array
A1
X1
?

Use:

• Outputs the number of elements in an array.


Function:

• A1 = Array

• X1 = Number of elements in array

• An array can have a maximum of 32,767 elements

• Different ARRAY data types on input and output pins can produce can produce
overflow on the X1 output

• For more about array data types, see About the Array Data Type on page 74.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY X1 UINT

Example—Length of Array
(-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3)
ARRAY[7]S8
7

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Delete Array Elements


A3
A2
A1
X1
?
Use:

• Delete elements from an array.


Function:

• A1 = Array from which elements are deleted

• A2 = Starting position of first element deleted


The first element in an array is in position 0

• A3 = Number of elements deleted from array

• X1 = Array after elements are deleted

• An array can have a maximum of 32,767 elements

• Different ARRAY data types on input and output pins can produce overflow on the X1
output

• Input and output arrays must be the same data type

• For more about array data types, see About the Array Data Type on page 74.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY X1 ARRAY

A2 U8, S8, S16

A3 UINT

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Example—Delete Array Elements


3
Position 0
0
(-6, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6)
ARRAY[7]S8 (0, 2, 4, 6)
ARRAY[4]S8

3
3
(-6, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6)
ARRAY[7]S8 (-6,-4, -2, 6)
ARRAY[4]S8

3
2
(-6, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6)
ARRAY[7]S8 (-6 -4, 4, 6, 0, 0, 0)
ARRAY[7]S8

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Insert Array Elements


A4
A3
A2
X1
A1
?
Use:

• Insert additional elements into an array.


Function:

• A1 = Array into which new elements are to be inserted

• A2 = Starting position from which new elements are inserted


The first element in an array is in position 0

• A3 = Array with elements to be inserted

• A4 = Number of elements to be inserted

• X1 = Array after elements are inserted

• An array can have a maximum of 32,767 elements

• Different ARRAY data types on input and output pins can produce can produce
overflow on the X1 output

• Input and output arrays must be the same data type

• For more about array data types, see About the Array Data Type on page 74
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY X1 ARRAY

A2 U8, S8 S16

A3 ARRAY

A4 UINT

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Example—Insert Array Elements


3
(2, 4, 6)
ARRAY[3]S8 Position 0
4
(-6, -4, -2, 0) (-6, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6 )
ARRAY[4]S8 ARRAY[7]S8

3
(2, 4, 6)
ARRAY[3]S8
3
(-6, -4, -2, 0) (-6,-4, -2, 2, 4, 6, 0)
ARRAY[4]S8 ARRAY[7]S8

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Copy of Array
A3
A2 X1
A1 ?

Use:

• Copy and output elements from an array.


Function:

• A1 = Array with elements to be copied

• A2 = Position of first element to be copied


The first element in an array is in position 0

• A3 = Number of elements to be copied

• X1 = Copied elements

• An array can have a maximum of 32,767 elements

• Different ARRAY data types on input and output can produce overflow on the X1
output

• For more about array data types, see About the Array Data Type on page 74.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY X1 ARRAY

A2 U8, S8, S16

A3 UINT

Example—Copy of Array
3
Position 0
0 -6 -4 -2
(-6, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6)
ARRAY[3]S8
ARRAY[7]S8

3
4 2 4 6
(-6, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6)
ARRAY[3]S8
ARRAY[7]S8

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Find Array

A2
? X1
A1
?

Use:

• Finds the position of a matching element or the starting position of elements that
match
Function:

• A1 = Array with elements to be matched

• A2 = Array elements to be matched

• X1 = Position of matching element or the starting position of elements that match

• If no match, then X1 = -1

• For more about array data types, see About the Array Data Type on page 74.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY X1 S16

A2 ARRAY

Example—Find Array
Position 0
(3)
(1)
(1, 2, 3, 4) ARRAY[1]U8 ? 2
0
ARRAY[4]U8

(3)
(1, 2, 3, 4) ARRAY[1]U8 ? 2
ARRAY[4]U8

(2 3)
(1, 2, 3, 4) ARRAY[1]U8 ? 1
ARRAY[4]U8

(6)
(1, 2, 3, 4) ARRAY[1]U8 ? -1 (No match)
ARRAY[4]U8

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Array Constant from File


? (File name)
FILE X1
? (Data type)

Use:

• Input data from text (***.txt) file.

• Data must be comma delimited; only one array per text file.
Function:

• X1 = Array with elements set to comma delimited values from file

• ? = Text file name

− The file name must start with a capital letter:


OK: Array1.txt
Not OK: array1.txt

− The file name must not contain a period (.):


OK: Array1.txt
Not OK: Array.1.txt

For more about array data types, see About the Array Data Type on page 74.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ARRAY

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Example—Array Constant from File


Array file name—No periods in name; must start with a capital letter)
Array source—comma delimited text file.
Save to a location outside of your PLUS+1 project folder.

Right-click

Browse to file with array


The PLUS+1 application registers
and copies the array file into your project folder.
Make any future changes to your array using this file.

Click array file name

Name of array

Name of array
VALUES (start with a capital letter)
Input in application for array values FILE
ARRAY[11]S8
Number of elements in array;
data type of elements

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Data Conversion

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Decode/Encode

Click

Encode 4 BOOL
A4 Lsb
ENCODE

A3 X1
A2 ?
A1 Msb
Use:

• Encodes Boolean signals into an integer signal.

• Can merge Boolean data into a CAN message.


Function:

• In the X1 output:

− The A1 input state sets bit 3


− The A4 input state sets bit 0
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1–A4 BOOL X1 INT

Example—Encode 4 BOOL
T Lsb T Lsb
ENCODE
ENCODE

F T
9 15
F T
T Msb T Msb

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Decode 4 BOOL
Lsb X4

DECODE
X3
A1
X2

Msb X1

Use:

• Decodes an integer signal into four Boolean signals.


Function:

• X1 = Output of bit 3

• X4 = Output of bit 0

• A negative value on A1 sets all outputs to zero


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1–X4 BOOL

Example—Decode 4 BOOL
Lsb T Lsb T
DECODE

DECODE

T F
3 9
F F
Msb F Msb T

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Encode 8
A8 0
A7
A6

ENCODE
A5 A1
A4 ?
A3
A2
A1 7
Use:

• Encodes a Boolean signal into an integer, ARRAY[INT], or ARRAY[BOOL] signal.

• Can merge data into CAN data.


Function:

• For an INT output on X1, the:

− A1 input sets bit 7


− The A8 input sets bit 0
• For an ARRAY output on X1, the:

− A1 input sets the value of the element in position 7


− A1 input sets the value of the element in position 0
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1–A8 BOOL, INT X1 ARRAY[BOOL], ARRAY [INT], INT

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Example—Encode 8
BOOL input BOOL input
T 0 T 0
F T
F T

ENCODE
ENCODE
F T
129 255
F T
U8 U8
F T
F T
T 7 T 7
U8 input
45 0
16
24 Position 0
ENCODE

14 (45, 16, 24, 1 4 , 55, 12, 84, 35)


55 ARRAY[8]U8
12
84
35 7

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Decode 8 BOOL
0 X8
X7
X6
DECODE X5
A1
X4
X3
X2
7 X1

Use:

• Decodes an integer signal into eight Boolean signals.

• Can extract data from a CAN data byte.


Function:

• X1 = Output of bit 7

• X8 = Output of bit 0

• A negative value on A1 sets all outputs to zero


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 U8 X1–X8 BOOL

Example—Decode 8 BOOL
0 T 0 T
F T
F T
DECODE

DECODE

F T
129 255
F T
F T
F T
7 T 7 T

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Decode 8 U8
0 X8
X7

DECODE U8
X6
X5
A1
X4
X3
X2
7 X1

Use:

• Decodes an eight element array that contains integers into eight U8 signals.

• Can extract data bytes from a CAN data field.


Function:

• X1 = Outputs the value of the element in position 7

• X2–X7 = Outputs the values of the elements in positions 6 through 1

• X8 = Outputs the value of the element in position 0


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY[8]U8 X1–X8 U8

Example—Decode 8 U8
0 112
631
DECODE U8

Position 0 175
(112, 631, 175, 233, 118, 462, 715, 611) 233
ARRAY[8]U8 118
462
715
7 611

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Split
X1
T1
A1 MS LS
X2
T2

Use:

• Separates an integer signal into two signals each having an equal number of bits.

• Can separate a combined CAN message into two parts.


Function:

• X1 = Half of the A1 input, with the most significant A1 bits

• X2 = Half of the A1 input, with the least significant A1 bits

− A 16-bit A1 input produces an 8-bit X1 output and an 8-bit X2 output.


− An 8-bit A1 input produces a 4-bit X1 output and a 4-bit X2 output, both with four
leading zeroes.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

X2 INT

Example—Split
00000010
00000010 00000001 MS LS
00000001

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Combine
A2
X1
MS LS
?
A1

Use:

• Combines two integer signals of the same size into a new signal with double the
number of bits.

• Can combine two separate received U8 CAN messages into a single U16 signal.
Function:

• X1 = A2 shifted to the left of A1

• Always combine inputs of the same bit size

− An 8-bit A1 input and an 8-bit A2 input combine to produce a 16-bit X1 output


− A 16-bit A1 input and a 16-bit A2 input combine to produce a 32-bit X1 output.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

A2 INT

Example—Combine
00000010
MS LS 00000010 00000001
00000001

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Swap

X1
A1 MS LS
?

Use:

• Swaps the bits in an integer signal.


Function:

• X1 = Least significant half of the bits in the A1 input swap places with the most
significant half of the bits in the A1 input

• After a swap:

− The 8 most significant bits in a 16-bit A1 input become the 8 least significant bits
in the X1 output.

− The 8 least significant bits in a 16-bit A1 input become the 8 most significant bits
in an X1 output.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

Example—Swap

00000010 00000001 MS LS 00000001 00000010

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Retype
X1
A1 RETYPE
?

Use:

• Changes the data type of a signal.


Function:

• X1 = A1

• Changing data types, such as going from S8 to U8 or from U16 to U8, can cause the X1
output to overflow
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT X1 INT

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Transition, Time

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Transition

Click

Positive Transition

A1 X1

Use:

• Detects the positive transition (F to T) of a Boolean signal.


Function:

• X1 = T for one program loop after A1 transitions from F to T


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

X1 output

Program Loop A1 X1

n1 F F

n2 T T

n3 T F

Example—Positive Transition
n1 n2
F F F to T T

n3
T F

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Negative Transition

A1 X1

Use:

• Detects the negative transition (T to F) of a Boolean signal.


Function:

• X1 = T for one program loop after A1 transitions from T to F


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

X1 output

Program Loop A1 X1

n1 T F

n2 F T

n3 F F

Example—Negative Transition
n1 n2
T F T to F T

n3
F F

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Transition

A1 X1

Use:

• Detects a F to T or a T to F transition of a Boolean signal.


Function:

• X1 = T for one program loop after A1 transitions from F to T


or from T to F
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

X1 output

Example 1 Program Loop A1 X1 Example 2 Program Loop A1 X1

n1 T F n1 F F

n2 F T n2 T T

n3 F F n3 T F

Example1—Transition
n1 n2
T F T to F T

n3
F F

Example2—Transition
n1 n2
F F F to T T

n3
T F

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Delay

Click

On Delay
A2

A1 X1
UNIT

A3

Use:

• Delays the return of a Boolean signal from F to T for a specified amount of time.
Function:

• X1 = F if A1 = F

• When A1 goes from F to T, the hold time (A3 x A2) begins

• X1 = F during the hold time

• X1 = T when the hold time ends


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3 TIME

Time units
Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value

T1M 1 ms T1S 1s TLOOP Program loop

T10M 10 ms T60S 60 s

T100M 100 ms TIH 1h

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Example—On Delay
1 2
10 10

F F T F for 1000 ms, then T


UNIT UNIT (A2 ´A3 = 1000)

T100M T100M

T
Delay time starts A1 input
State

X1 output
F
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000
Time (ms)

T
Delay time starts Delay time restarts
State

F
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000
Time (ms)

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Off Delay
A2

A1 X1
UNIT

A3

Use:

• Delays the return of a Boolean signal from T to F for a set time.


Function:

• X1 = T if A1 = T

• When A1 goes from T to F, the hold time (A3 x A2) begins

• X1 = T during the hold time

• X1 = F when the hold time ends


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3 TIME

Time units
Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value

T1M 1 ms T1S 1s TLOOP Program loop

T10M 10 ms T60S 60 s

T100M 100 ms TIH 1h

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Example—Off Delay
1 2
10 10

T T F T for 1000 ms, then F


UNIT UNIT
(A2 ´A3 = 1000)
T100M T100M

Hold time starts


T
A1 input
State

X1 output
F
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000
Time (ms)
Hold time starts Hold time restarts
T
State

F
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000
Time (ms)

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Loop Delay
X1
A1 t
?

Use:

• Passes the A1 input to X1 after a delay of one program loop.


Function:

• X1 = A1 after a delay of one program loop


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, X1 BOOL, INT, TIME, TEXT, FILE, FONT, PORT, COL, OBJ
FONT, PORT, COL, OBJ

Loop Delay component input/output


Program Loop A1 Input X1 Output

n1 5 5

n2 7 5

n3 7 7

n4 7 7

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Oscillator
A2 A3

A1 X1

A4

Use:

• Generates Boolean signals that toggle.

• Combine with a counter to make a timer.


Function:

• A2 is the on time (T in the component)

• A3 is the period (P in the component)

• X1 = T if A2 ≥ A3 (Note: this is not normal usage.)

• When A1 goes from F to T, the A2 and A3 values get sampled and:

− X1 = T during the first (A2) hold time


− X1 = F during the second (A3 – A2) hold time
As long as A1 = T, this function repeats. During repeats, the A2 and A3 values are
sampled and the hold times recalculated each time X1 goes from F to T

• X =T for at least one program loop if A2 > 0


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3 UINT

A4 TIME

Time units
Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value

T1M 1 ms T1S 1s TLOOP Program loop

T10M 10 ms T60S 60 s

T100M 100 ms TIH 1h

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Example—Oscillator
10
4

T T for 400 ms/F for 600 ms

T100M

P P = A4 x A3 X1 output
T
State

T T = A2 x A4
F
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000
Time (ms)

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Pulse
A2

A1 X1

A3

Use:

• Holds a Boolean signal at T for the time you specify before returning the signal to F.
Function:

• If A1 = F, then X1= F

• The hold time (A3 × A2) begins when A1 goes from F to T

• X1 = T during the hold time

• X1 = F when the hold time ends


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3 TIME

Time units
Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value

T1M 1 ms T1S 1s TLOOP Program loop

T10M 10 ms T60S 60 s

T100M 100 ms TIH 1h

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Example—Pulse
10 10

F F T T for 1000 ms or
until A1 goes from T to F

T100M T100M

A1 input X1 output
1
0
State

1
1000 ms (A2 x A3)
0
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000
Time (ms)
1
0
State

1
0
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000
Time (ms)

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Time Base
X1

Use:

• Outputs a constant time base.


Function:

• X1 = Time base value that replaces ?


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 TIME

Time units
Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value

T1M 1 ms T1S 1s TLOOP Program loop

T10M 10 ms T60S 60 s

T100M 100 ms TIH 1h

T A smaller value time base produces a more accurate output resolution. See
Resolution on page 73 for a detailed explanation of resolution.

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Example—Time Base
Pulse component with a 100 ms Time Base
10 10
A2

F F T T for 1000 ms

A3
T100M T100M

1
A1 input
0
State

1
X1 output 1000 ms (A2 x A3)
Time (ms) 0
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000

Pulse component with a 1 s Time Base


10 10
A2

F F T T for 10 s

A3
T1S T1S

1
A1 input
0
State

1
X1 output 10 s (A2 x A3)
Time (s) 0
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 30

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Measure Period
X1
A1
T1

A2

Use:

• Measures the period of a toggling signal.


Function:

• X1 = Time between the two last transitions from F to T on A1

• X1 = A1 ÷ A2
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 INT

A2 TIME

Time units
Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value Unit Unit Value

T1M 1 ms T1S 1s TLOOP Program loop

T10M 10 ms T60S 60 s

T100M 100 ms TIH 1h

Example—Measure Period

F to T (two transitions) 10

T100M

1000 ms (A1)

T
A 1 input
State

F
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 3000
Time (ms)

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Connection

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Checkpoint

Click

Simple Checkpoint
A1 CHECK ?
POINT
Use:

• Creates a checkpoint signal that you can check with the PLUS+1 Service Tool program.

• Route the signal that you want to check to A1; your ? entry is the signal name.

• Click the underscore (_) with the Query/Change tool to set a 0–9 PLUS+1 Service Tool
program access level to the value (0 is the highest access level).

T The ? names used in checkpoint and non-volatile dynamic memory components


must be different. Identical ? names produce a MULTI DEFINED SYMBOL compile
error.

Function:

• ? = User-defined name for the A1 signal


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY, BOOL, INT — —

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Example—Simple Checkpoint
Log Functions in Service Tool
Engine_Hours
Reset Minute
Enable Hours
Enable_Reset Seconds
Reset Reset In Reset Out Enable Carry Out
Enable Enable In Enable Out

Minutes CHECK CP_Minutes


POINT
Carry In Carry Out
Reset
Enable Minutes Minutes

Hours CHECK CP_Hours


POINT
Carry In
Reset
Enable Hours Hours

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Advanced Checkpoint
A3 ACTIVE ?
A2 PREFIX
A1 CHECK
POINT
Use:

• Creates a checkpoint signal that you can check with the PLUS+1 Service Tool program.

• Route the signal that you want to check to A1; your ? entry is the signal name.

• Adds the A2 PREFIX to the ? signal name.


When copying a page, you only have to change the A2 PREFIX. You do not have to
change ? names to use the copied page.

• Click the underscore (_) with the Query/Change tool to set a 0–9 PLUS+1 Service Tool
program access level to the value. (0 is the highest access level.)

T The ? names used in checkpoint and non-volatile dynamic memory components must be
different. Identical ? names produce a MULTI DEFINED SYMBOL compile error.

Function:

• ? = User-defined name for the A1 signal

• If:

− A3 = T, then the ? signal is available through the PLUS+1 Service Tool program
In the PLUS+1 Service Tool program, the ? signal name becomes the A2 PREFIX +
underscore + ? signal name

− A3 = F, then the ? signal is not available


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY, BOOL, INT — —

A2 TL — —

A3 BOOL — —

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Example—Advanced Checkpoint
Log Functions in Service Tool
Engine_Hours
Reset Minute
Enable Hours Engine_CP
TL

Enable_Reset Seconds
Reset Reset In Reset Out Enable Carry Out
Enable Enable In Enable Out T ACTIVE Minutes
PREFIX
Minutes
CHECK
Carry In Carry Out POINT
Reset
Enable Minutes Minutes
Contents of Engine_Hours
T ACTIVE CP_Hours and Auger_Hours pages
Hours PREFIX are the same
Carry In CHECK
Reset POINT
Enable Hours Hours

Auger_Hours
Reset Minute
Enable Hours Auger_CP
TL

Enable_Reset Seconds
Reset Reset In Reset Out Enable Carry Out
Enable Enable In Enable Out T ACTIVE Minutes
PREFIX
Minutes
CHECK
Carry In Carry Out POINT
Reset Contents of Auger_Hours
Enable Minutes Minutes and Engine_Hours pages
T ACTIVE CP_Hours
are the same
Hours PREFIX
Carry In CHECK
Reset POINT
Enable Hours Hours

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Advanced Checkpoint with Namespace


NAMESPACE ?
A2 ACTIVE
A1 CHECK
POINT
Use:

• Creates a checkpoint signal that you can check with the PLUS+1 Service Tool program.

• Route the signal that you want to check to A1; your ? entry is the signal name.

• Prefixes the page’s Name Space to the ? signal name.


When copying a page, you only have to change the page’s Name Space. You do not
have to change ? names to be able to use the copied page.

• Click the underscore (_) with the Query/Change tool to set a 0–9 PLUS+1 Service Tool
program access level to the value (0 is the highest access level).

T The ? names used in checkpoint and non-volatile dynamic memory components must be
different. Identical ? names produce a MULTI DEFINED SYMBOL compile error.

Function:

• ? = User-defined name for the A1 signal

• If:

− A2 = T, then the ? signal is available through the PLUS+1 Service Tool program
In the PLUS+1 Service Tool program, the ? signal name becomes the page’s Name
Space + underscore + ? signal name

− A2 = F, then the ? signal is not available


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ARRAY, BOOL, INT — —

A2 BOOL — —

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Example—Advanced Checkpoint with Namespace


Log Functions in Service Tool

Engine name space prefix


Engine_Hours
Reset Minute
Enable Hours
Enable_Reset Seconds
Reset Reset In Reset Out Enable Carry Out
Enable Enable In Enable Out
NAMESPACE CP_Minutes
T ACTIVE
Minutes CHECK
Carry In Carry Out POINT
Reset
Enable Minutes Minutes
Contents of Engine_Hours
NAMESPACE CP_Hours and Auger_Hours pages
Hours T ACTIVE are the same
Carry In CHECK
Reset POINT
Enable Hours Hours

Auger name space prefix


Auger_Hours
Reset Minute
Enable Hours
Enable_Reset Seconds
Reset Reset In Reset Out Enable Carry Out
Enable Enable In Enable Out
NAMESPACE CP_Minutes
T ACTIVE
Minutes CHECK
Carry In Carry Out POINT
Reset
Enable Minutes Minutes
NAMESPACE CP_Hours
Hours
Contents of Auger_Hours
T ACTIVE
and Engine_Hours pages
Carry In CHECK
Reset POINT are the same
Enable Hours Hours

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Set Value
? (User name for value)
X1
? (Data type of value)

Use:

• When experimenting with values.

• Inputs values directly from the PLUS+1 Service Tool program to the controller without
having to use memory components to read and write values.

• Turning off the controller returns all values to 0.

• Click the underscore (_) with the Query/Change tool to set a 0–9 PLUS+1 Service Tool
program access level to the value. (0 is the highest access level.)
Function:

• ? = User name for the value; use this name to access the value in the PLUS+1 Service
Tool program
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

Example—Set Value
Parameter Functions in Service Tool

Sensor_2Pt
0 Fault% Status
Hi_DBnd
Hi DBnd% Fault
Lo_DBnd U16
Lo DBnd%
U16
9000 Hi Cal%
1000
0 Lo Cal%
Snsr Pwr
Input Output

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Hardware

Click

Initialize Hardware Output


?
X1

Use:

• Writes a value to the kernel before the first program loop.


Function:

• ? = Hardware signal name (must be an exact match)—see the Application Interface


(API) specification for a list of signals
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — A1 ALL

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Hardware Input Typed


? (User name for value)
X1
? (Data type of value)

Use:

• Reads a value from the kernel into the application.


Function:

• ? = Hardware signal name (must be an exact match)—see the Application Interface


(API) specification for a list of signals
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

Hardware Input
?
X1

Use:

• Reads a value from the kernel into the application.


Function:

• Autotyped

• ? = Hardware signal name (must be an exact match)—see the Application Interface


(API) specification for a list of signals
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

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Hardware Output
?
A1

Use:

• Writes a value from the application to the kernel at the end of every program loop.

• To set an output just one time, before the start of the first program loop, use the
Initialize Hardware Output component (see Initialize Hardware Output on page
232).
Function:

• ? = Hardware signal name (must be an exact match)—see the Application Interface


(API) specification for a list of signals
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ALL — —

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Hardware Input/Output Typed


A2

? (Hardware signal name)


A1 X1
? (Data type)

T If you are creating a new application using templates developed for use with PLUS+1
GUIDE 2.1(and later), use the new CAN components (see CAN on page 242). If you are
updating an application that uses this component (typically for CAN communication), see
Using Old CAN and Memory Components on page 240.

Use:

• Switches between reading from or writing to the kernel.


Function:

• ? = Hardware signal name (must be an exact match)—see the Application Interface


(API) specification for a list of signals

• X1 = Writing to kernel if A1 =F (A1 not connected to X1)

• X1 = Reading from if A2 =T (A1 = X1)


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ALL X1 ALL

A2 BOOL

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Hardware Input/Output
A2

?
A1 X1

T If you are creating a new application using templates developed for use with PLUS+1
GUIDE 2.1(and later), use the new CAN components (see CAN on page 242). If you are
updating an application that uses this component (typically for CAN communication), see
Using Old CAN and Memory Components on page 240.

Use:

• Switches between reading from or writing to the kernel.


Function:

• Autotyped

• ? = Hardware signal name (must be an exact match)—see the Application Interface


(API) specification for a list of signals

• X1 = BIOS input if A1 = F (A1 not connected to X1)

• X1 = BIOS output if A2 = T (A1 = X1)


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ALL X1 ALL

A2 BOOL

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Read Output from Hardware Typed


? (Hardware signal name)
X1
? (Data type)

Use:

• Reads a BIOS output signal.


Function:

• ? = Hardware signal name (must be an exact match)—see the Application Interface


(API) specification for a list of signals
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

Read Output from Hardware


?
X1

Use:

• Reads a BIOS output signal.

• X1 output is autotyped.
Function:

• ? = Hardware signal name (must be an exact match)—see the Application Interface


(API) specification for a list of signals
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

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Non-Volatile Memory Input Typed

X1
?

T If you are updating an older application that uses this component, see Using Old CAN and
Memory Components on page 240.
If you are creating a new application using templates developed for use with PLUS+1
GUIDE 2.1(and later), use the new Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic components listed on
page 253.

Use:

• Connection point for a BIOS input from non-volatile memory.


Function:

• ? = BIOS hardware signal name (must be an exact match)


BIOS hardware signal name must be typed

• Replace the ALIAS with a name that you want the PLUS+1 Service Tool program to
display
The PLUS+1 Service Tool program uses the BIOS hardware name if ALIAS is not
changed
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 INT

Example—Non-Volatile Memory Input Typed


X1 ouputs the S16 value stored in memory locationEE.s16[0].
EE.s16[0]

U8
EE_CmpVal
In the Service Tool, select the EE_CmpVal signal to view and
change the value stored in memory location EE.s16[0].

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Non-Volatile Memory Input/Output


?
A1
ALIAS

T If you are updating an older application that uses this component, see Using Old CAN and
Memory Components on page 240.
If you are creating a new application using templates developed for use with PLUS+1
GUIDE 2.1(and later), use the new Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic components listed on
page 253.

Use:

• Connection point for a BIOS output to non-volatile memory.


Function:

• A1 = BIOS hardware signal name (must be an exact match)

• ? = Software location of data

• Replace ALIAS with a name that you want the PLUS+1 Service Tool program to display
The PLUS+1 Service Tool program uses the BIOS (EE.s nn[n]) hardware name if ALIAS is
not changed.
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ALL — —

Example—Non-Volatile Memory Input/Output

ECU_EEPROM F
SET_EE

WR_EE0 EEWR
ALL
SET_DEF
F

DEF_VALUE
0
EE_NeutVal
EE.s16[0]

EE_NeutVal

In the Service Tool, select the EE_NeutVal signal to view and


change the value stored in memory location EE.s16[0].

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Using Old CAN and Memory Components


This table lists old and new CAN and memory (EEprom) components. PLUS+1 GUIDE 2.1
software replaced the Old components with the New components.

Old and New CAN and Memory components


Old New

Non-Volatile Memory Input Transmit CAN

Non-Volatile Memory Input Typed Receive CAN with Filter

Hardware Input/Output Typed Receive CAN with ID Mask

Hardware Input/Output Typed Receive CAN Basic

Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic with Default

Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic

Non-Volatile Memory Input

• Applications created using templates developed for use with PLUS+1 GUIDE 2.1 (and
later) software must use the New components.

• You must change System file parameters from NEW to OLD to enable PLUS+1 GUIDE
2.1 (and later) software to compile applications with the Old components listed in this
table. See Change from New to Old CAN and Memory Components on page 241.

• PLUS+1 GUIDE 2.1(and later) software with System file parameters set to OLD cannot
compile applications with the New components listed in this table.

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Change from New to Old CAN and Memory Components

1 2

To change the System file parameters from NEW to OLD:

1. In the View menu, click Default Layout to display the Project Manager and
Inspector tabs.

2. In the Project Manager tab, click the System file.

3. In the Inspector tab, click to display the Edit System Parameters window.

4. In the Edit System Parameters window, click OLD.

5. In the Edit System Parameters window, click OK.

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CAN

Click

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Transmit CAN
A7 CAN-PORT
A6 EXT
A5 RTR
A4 ID
TX
A3 LENGTH
A2 DATA[ ] OVERRUN X2
A1 SEND PENDING X1

T If you are updating an application that was created before the release of PLUS+1 GUIDE
2.1 software, see Using Old CAN and Memory Components on page 240 before using this
component.

Use:

• Transmits CAN messages.


Function:

• A1 = Message on A2 transmits when T

• A2 = Array of message data field, read from data byte 0

• A3 = Data length code, number of bytes (0–8) in the data field

• A4 = Message ID (identifier field)

• A5—If:

− A5 = T, RTR (Remote Transmission Request flag set (not supported in J1939)


− A5 = F, RTR flag not set
• A6—If:

− A6 = F, standard 11-bit message ID field (CAN 2.0A)


− A6 = T, extended 29-bit message ID field (CAN 2.0B)
• A7—Connect to the CAN port defined by the hardware file (Refer to your hardware’s
API document)

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• X1—If:

− X1 = T, message pending
− X1 = F, no message pending
• X2—If:

− X2 = F, no overrun
− X2 = T, new message (A1 = T), with pending message not sent (X1 is T); messages
not sent are lost
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 ARRAY[]U8 X2 BOOL

A3 INT

A4 UINT

A5 BOOL

A6 BOOL

A7 PORT

T The Example—Receive CAN Basic on page 251 uses this component.

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Receive CAN with Filter


A9 CAN-PORT
A8 EXT
A7 RTR
A6 ID
RX
A5 ID-MASK OVERRUN X5
A4 DATA[ ] ID X4
A3 DATA[ ]-MASK LENGTH X3
A2 LEN-MASK DATA[ ] X2
A1 PROTECTED UPDATED X1

T If you are updating an application that was created before the release of PLUS+1 GUIDE
2.1 software, see Using Old CAN and Memory Components on page 240 before using this
component.

Use:

• Receive CAN messages.

• Apply masking to ID input.

• Apply masking to DATA input.


Function:

• A1—If:

− A1 = T, saves the first message received in the program loop; following messages
do not overwrite the first message

− A1 = F, saves the last message received in the program loop; the last message
overwrites any preceding message

• A2 = Number of bytes in DATA[ ]-MASK to use

• A3 = Mask applied to A4 data

• A4 = Data

• A5 = Mask applied to message ID (identifier field)

• A6 = Message ID (identifier field)

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• A7—If:

− A7 = T, receives only transmission request (RTR) messages


− A7 = F, does not receive RTR messages
• A8—If:

− A8 = F, standard 11-bit message ID field (CAN 2.0A)


− A8 = T, extended 29-bit message ID field (CAN 2.0B)
• A9—Connect to the port signal on the CAN bus as defined by the hardware file:

• X1—If:

− X1 = T, new message received since last program loop


− X1 = F, no new messages received since last program loop
• X2 = Array of message data field, read from data byte 0

• X3 = Data length code, number of bytes (0–8) in the data field

• X4 = Message ID

• X5—If:

− X5 = T, more than one message received during program loop


− X5 = F, no overrun
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT X2 ARRAY [8] U8

A3 ARRAY [ ] U8 X3 U8

A4 ARRAY [ ] U8 X4 U32

A5 UINT X5 BOOL

A6 UINT

A7 BOOL

A8 BOOL

A9 PORT

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Receive CAN with ID Mask


A5 CAN-PORT OVERRUN X5
A4 EXT ID X4
RX
A3 ID LENGTH X3
A2 MASK DATA[ ] X2
A1 PROTECTED UPDATED X1

T If you are updating an application that was created before the release of PLUS+1 GUIDE
2.1 software, see Using Old CAN and Memory Components on page 240 before using
this component.

Use:

• Receive CAN messages.

• Apply masking to message ID input.


Function:

• A1—If:

− A1 = T, saves the first message received in the program loop; following messages
do not overwrite the first message

− A1 = F, saves the last message received in the program loop; the last message
overwrites any preceding message

• A2 = Defines mask applied to message ID (identifier field); if a mask bit is 0, then it is a


“do not care”

• A3 = Message ID (identifier field)

• A4—If:

− A4 = F, standard 11-bit message ID field (CAN 2.0A)


− A4 = T, extended 29-bit message ID field (CAN 2.0B)
• A5—Connect to the port signal on the CAN bus as defined by the hardware file (Refer
to your hardware’s API document)

• X1—If:

− X1 = T, new message received since last program loop


− X1 = F, no new messages received since last program loop

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• X2 = Array of message data field, read from data byte 0

• X3 = Data length code, the number of bytes (0–8) in the data field

• X4 = Actual message ID

• X5—If:

− X5 = T, more than one message received during program loop


− X5 = F, no overrun
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT X2 ARRAY [8] U8

A3 UINT X3 U8

A4 BOOL X4 UINT

A5 PORT X5 BOOL

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Receive CAN Basic


A4 CAN-PORT OVERRUN X4
A3 EXT LENGTH X3
RX
A2 ID DATA[ ] X2
A1 PROTECTED UPDATED X1

T If you are updating an application that was created before the release of PLUS+1 GUIDE
2.1 software, see Using Old CAN and Memory Components on page 240 before using
this component.

Use:

• Receives CAN messages.


Function:

• A1—If:

− A1 = T, saves the first message received in the program loop; following messages
do not overwrite the first message

− A1 = F, saves the last message received in the program loop; the last message
overwrites any preceding message

• A2 = Message ID (identifier field)

• A3—If:

− A3 = F, standard 11-bit message ID field (CAN 2.0A)


− A3 = T, extended 29-bit message ID field (CAN 2.0B)
• A4—Connect to the port signal on the CAN bus as defined by the hardware file:

− CAN_0 bus for MC024 Microcontroller


− CAN_0 bus or CAN_1 bus for MC050 Microcontroller
• X1—If:

− X1 = T, new message received since last program loop


− X1 = F, no new messages received since last program loop
• X2 = Array of message data field, read from data byte 0

• X3 = Data length code, number of bytes (0–8) in the data field

• X4—If:

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− X4 = T, more than one message received during program loop


− X 4 = F, no overrun
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT X2 ARRAY[8]U8

A3 BOOL X3 U8

A4 PORT X4 BOOL

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Example—Receive CAN Basic


In Unit 1, the:

• Transmit CAN component (TX) broadcasts messages with an ID of 0x001.

• Receive CAN Basic component (RX) receives messages with an ID of 0x002.


In Unit 2, the:

• Transmit CAN component (TX) broadcasts messages with an ID of 0x002.

• Receive CAN Basic component (RX) receives messages with an ID of 0x001.

Unit 1 Inputs CAN_0


Node: 0
Broadcasts messages with an ID of 0x001
Net: 0 Port
CAN-PORT
F EXT
RTR
Message ID
0x001
ID TX
U16
Number of bytes in message data field 4 LENGTH
Message data field: array with 4 bytes DATA[ ] OVERRUN
Use a rising edge to transmit message SEND PENDING Wired to AND and NOT components so that
a pending message must transmit before
you can send a new message

Port Receives messages with an ID of 0x002


Selects the CAN port CAN-PORT OVERRUN
F EXT LENGTH
0x002 RX
Message ID ID DATA[ ] Message data field: array with 3 bytes
U16
F PROTECTED UPDATED

Unit 2 Inputs
CAN_0
Node: 1
Net: 0 Port Broadcasts messages with an ID of 0x002
CAN-PORT
F EXT CAN bus
RTR
Message ID 0x002
ID TX
U16
Number of bytes in message data field 3 LENGTH
Message data field: array with 3 bytes DATA[ ] OVERRUN
SEND PENDING

Port Receives messages with an ID of 0x001


CAN-PORT OVERRUN
F EXT LENGTH
0x001 RX
Message ID ID DATA[ ] Message data field: array with 4 bytes
U16
F PROTECTED UPDATED

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For information about using:

• Set Array Element components to construct a message data field that contains
dynamic run-time values see Example 2—Set Array Element on page 187.

• Get Array Element components to output individual elements within a message data
field; see Example 2 on page Example 2—Get Array Element on page 185.

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Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic

Click

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Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic with Default


A6 DEFAULT ? (User name for memory value)

A5 DEF ENABLE
A4 IN
A3 IN_ENABLE
A2 READ_ PEND X2
A1 WRITE_ VAL X1
? (Data type of X1 output)

T If you are updating an application that was created before the release of PLUS+1 GUIDE
2.1 software, see Using Old CAN and Memory Components on page 240 before using
this component.

Use:

• Read and write non-volatile memory values.

• Write default values to memory.

• On hardware power-up, the value in memory copies to X1.


Function:

• ? = Your name for the memory value; in the PLUS+1 Service Tool program, use this
name to access the memory value

• A1 = When T, the X1 value writes to memory

• A2 = When T, the value in memory copies to X1

• A3 = When T, the A4 value copies to X1

• A4 = New value

• A5 = When T, the A6 value copies to X1

• A6 = Default value

• X1 = Value read from memory/value to be written to memory

• X2 = When T, pending completion of writing X1 value to memory

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Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 INT, BOOL

A2 BOOL X2 BOOL

A3 BOOL

A4 INT, BOOL

A5 BOOL

A6 INT, BOOL

Example 1—Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic with Default


Parameter Functions in Service Tool

EE_Example
DEFAULT
DEF ENABLE
Read and write values to memory
IN
IN_ENABLE
READ_ PEND
WRITE_ VAL 3500

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Example 2—Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic with Default


1 Power-up—Value in memory copies to VAL 2 IN copies to VAL 3 VAL writes to memory; PEND goes T

3500 DEFAULT EE_Example 3500 DEFAULT EE_Example 3500 DEFAULT EE_Example

F DEF ENABLE F DEF ENABLE F DEF ENABLE


3222 IN 3222 IN 3222 IN
F IN_ENABLE T/F IN_ENABLE F IN_ENABLE
F READ_ PEND F F READ_ PEND F F READ_ PEND T
F WRITE_ VAL 3645 F WRITE_ VAL 3222 T/F WRITE_ VAL 3222

4 Write ends; PEND goes F

3500 DEFAULT EE_Example

F DEF ENABLE
3222 IN
F IN_ENABLE
F READ_ PEND F
F WRITE_ VAL 3222

1 IN copies to VAL 2 Value in memory copies back to VAL

3500 DEFAULT EE_Example 3500 DEFAULT EE_Example

F DEF ENABLE F DEF ENABLE


3444 IN 3444 IN
T/F IN_ENABLE F IN_ENABLE
F READ_ PEND F T/F READ_ PEND F
F WRITE_ VAL 3444 F WRITE_ VAL 3222

1 DEFAULT copies to VAL 2 VAL writes to memory; PEND goes T 3 Write ends; PEND goes F

3500 DEFAULT EE_Example 3500 DEFAULT EE_Example 3500 DEFAULT EE_Example


T/F DEF ENABLE F DEF ENABLE F DEF ENABLE
3444 IN 3444 IN 3444 IN
F IN_ENABLE F IN_ENABLE F IN_ENABLE
F READ_ PEND F F READ_ PEND T F READ_ PEND F
F WRITE_ VAL 3500 T/F WRITE_ VAL 3500 F WRITE_ VAL 3500

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Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic


A4 IN ? (User name for memory value)
A3 IN_ENABLE
A2 READ_ PEND X2
A1 WRITE_ VAL X1
? (Data type of X1 output)

T If you are updating an application that was created before the release of PLUS+1 GUIDE
2.1 software, see Using Old CAN and Memory Components on page 240 before using
this component.

Use:

• Read and write non-volatile memory values.

• On hardware power-up, the value in memory copies to X1.


Function:

• ? = Your name for the memory value; in the PLUS+1 Service Tool program, use this
name to access the memory value

• A1 = When T, the X1 value writes to memory

• A2 = When T, the value in memory copies to X1

• A3 = When T, the A4 value copies to X1

• A4 = New value

• X1 = Value read from memory/value to be written to memory

• X2 = When T, pending completion of writing X1 value to memory


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 BOOL X1 INT, BOOL

A2 BOOL X2 BOOL

A3 BOOL

A4 INT, BOOL

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Example 1—Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic


Parameter Functions in Service Tool

IN EE_Example
Read and write values to memory
IN_ENABLE
READ_ PEND
WRITE_ VAL 3500

Example 2—Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic


1 Power-up—Value in memory copies to VAL 2 IN copies to VAL
3500 IN EE_Example 3500 IN EE_Example
F IN_ENABLE T/F IN_ENABLE
F READ_ PEND F F READ_ PEND F
F WRITE_ VAL 2250 F WRITE_ VAL 3500

3 VAL writes to memory; PEND goes T 4 Write ends, PEND goes F


3500 IN EE_Example 3500 IN EE_Example
F IN_ENABLE F IN_ENABLE
F READ_ PEND T F READ_ PEND F
T/F WRITE_ VAL 3500 F WRITE_ VAL 3500

1 IN copies to VAL 2 Value in memory copies to VAL

4500 IN EE_Example 4500 IN EE_Example


T/F IN_ENABLE F IN_ENABLE
F READ_ PEND F T/F READ_ PEND F
F WRITE_ VAL 4500 F WRITE_ VAL 3500

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Non-Volatile Memory Dynamic Input


NV ? (User-defined name for memory value)
X1
? (Data type for X1 output)

T If you are updating an application that was created before the release of PLUS+1 GUIDE
2.1 software, see Using Old CAN and Memory Components on page 240 before using
this component.

Use:

• Read a value from a memory location.


Function:

• ? = Your name for the memory value; use this name to access the memory value in the
PLUS+1 Service Tool program

• X1 = Value from memory location


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

X1 INT, BOOL

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Module

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Module Single Wire

Click

Module Input
? (User-defined signal name)
X1

Use:

• Input point for a module signal.

• Click the underscore (_) with the Query/Change tool to set a 0–9 PLUS+1 Service Tool
program access level to the value (0 is the highest access level).
Function:

• ? = User-defined signal name

• X1 = Input signal
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

Module Output
? (User-defined signal name)
X1

Use:

• Output for a module signal.


Function:

• ? = User-defined signal name

• X1 = Output signal
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

T See Example 1—Call Module on page 264 for an example of how to use this
component.

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Configurable Module Connection


A2 OUTPUT ? (User-defined signal name)
A1 PREFIX X1
? (Data type for X1 output)

Use:

• Makes a connection between two modules:

− Outputs a signal from a module.


− Inputs the same signal to another module.
Use the Export Block and Import Block commands to export and import
connections.
Function:

• ? = User-defined signal name

• If:

− A2 = T, then X1 = Output signal to another module


− A2 = F, then X1 = Input signal from another module
− X1 signal name is the value of A1 + underscore (_) + name of X1. The signal name
becomes global
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 TL X1 ALL

A2 BOOL

Example—Configurable Module Connection


Module 1 Module 2

T OUTPUT
A_ADD
A PREFIX F OUTPUT
S16 A_ADD
A PREFIX A
S16
=
B
ADD

A_ADD signal outputs from Module 1 A_ADD signal inputs to Module 2

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Module Bus

Click

Module Bus Input


?
X1

Use:

• Input for a module bus.


Function:

• ? = User-defined bus name

• X1 = Bus output
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

T See Example 2—Call Module on page 266 for an example that uses this component.

Module Bus Output


?
X1

Use:

• Output for a module bus.


Function:

• ? = User-defined bus name

• X1= Bus input


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

T See Example 2—Call Module on page 266 for an example that uses this component.

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Call Module

A1

Use:

• Executes a module, without parameters in the call, contained in another file.


Function:

• Replace NAME ? with a user-defined module name

The name that you enter must match the Module name for the Module.scs file.

(The Module name is a property of the Module.scs file. The Inspector tab displays
this Module name when you click the Module.scs file in the Project Manager tab.)

• Replace COMMENT with a user comment string

• If:

− A1 = T components in the module identified by NAME ? execute


− A1 = F no components in the module identified by NAME ? execute
• Do not call the same function more than once in the main loop

• If the module is not called, module output values remain set

• Whatever output values apply when A1 goes from T to F, also apply when A1 goes
from F to T

• Each call overwrites existing values in the memory

T See Example 1—Call Module below and Example 2—Call Module on page 266 for
examples of how to use this component.

Example 1—Call Module


The following figure shows how to use the Module Input Typed, Module Output, and
Call Module components to create a module.

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How to Add a Module

Inspector tab properties for Module.scs file


Right-click

Click

Click to return to Main module


Must match NAME entry in
Click to go to Module Call Module component

Main Module to Module Signal Flow

Main Module (in Application Page) PRE


U16
Steer L_Fwd
T Module1 PRE
U16
Dual Path Module L_Rvs
Speed
PRE
U16
R_Fwd

Sig PRE
na U16
ls b R_Rvs
ack
to
Ma
in m
od
e

ule
ul
od
M

CHECK CP_Steer Module1


o

L_Fwd
tt

POINT
ou

PRE
s

U16
al
gn

Dual_Path Valve_Driver
L_Rvs
Si

Steer
Steer L Valve L Valve L_Fwd
L_Rvs
R_Fwd
R_Fwd
Speed
Speed R Valve R Valve R_Rvs
R_Rvs
PRE
U16 CHECK CP_Speed
POINT

Components Used in Creating a Module

PRE Predefine Type—Defines the data type of Module Input


Module Input—Brings a signal into a module
signals connected to hardware; Defines the data type of
Module Ouput signals connected to checkpoints
Module Output—Outputs a signal from a module

True calls
module in compile T Module1 NAME entry—Must match Module name in Inspector tab for Module.scs file
Enter a comment (optional)
Call Module—Directs signals to and from the external module

Compile Buttons in the Toolbar


Compiles all modules Compiles only modules that you have changed

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Example 2—Call Module


The following figure shows how to use the Module Bus Input, Module Bus Output, and
Call Module components to create a module.
How to Add a Module

Inspector tab properties for Module.scs file


Right-click

Click

Click to return to Main module


Must match NAME entry in
Click to go to Module Call Module component

Main Module to Module1 Signal Flow

Main Module (in Application Page)


Inputs Steer_Speed Steer_Speed Fwd_Rvs Fwd_Rvs
T Module1
Dual Path Module Sig
na
le ls b
u ack Outputs
od to
M Ma
o
tt in m
ou od
als ule
Sign

Module

L_Fwd
DUAL_PATH VALVE_DRIVER
Steer
Steer L Valve L Valve L_Fwd L_Rvs
L_Rvs R_Fwd
R_Fwd
Speed R_Rvs
Speed R Valve R Valve R_Rvs

Components Used in Creating a Module

Module Bus Input—Brings a bus into a module

Module Bus Output—Outputs a bus from a module


True calls
module in compile T Module1 NAME entry—Must match Module name in Inspector tab for Module.scs file
Enter a comment (optional)
Call Module—Directs buses to and from the external module

Compile Buttons in Toolbar

Compiles all modules Compiles only modules that you have changed

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Manage

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Generate Compiler Error on Range


CREATE COMPILER ERROR OUTSIDE
A1 RANGE LOW? HIGH?
MSG:?

Use:

• Aborts the compile process when the compiler finds an out-of-range constant value.

• Displays a user-defined error message in the Error Messages tab.

• Prevents a user from entering a value that compiles but causes erratic operation when
downloaded.
(For example, a joystick calibration value that is too high would compile successfully
but might cause erratic machine operation when downloaded.
Function:

• A1 = Constant value

• Low? = Click with Query/Change to enter the low value for the range

• High? = Click with Query/Change to enter the high value for the range

• MSG? = Click with Query/Change to enter the error message that displays if A1 is out
of range
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT — —

Example—Generate Compiler Error on Range


CREATE COMPILER ERROR OUTSIDE
RANGE LOW 1000 HIGH 1200
MSG: Joystick Cal Val Out of Range

Cal value (too high) 1500

Custom error message

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Generate Compiler Error on Not Constant


CREATE COMPILER ERROR ON
A1 TYPE NOT CONSTANT
MSG:?

Use:

• Aborts the compile process when the compiler finds variable value instead of a
constant value.

• Displays a user-defined error message in the Error Messages tab.

• Prevents a user from entering a value that compiles but causes erratic operation when
downloaded.
Function:

• A1 = Constant data type (any other data type aborts the compile)

• MSG? = Click with Query/Change to enter the error message that displays if A1 is a
variable value instead of a constant value
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ALL — —

Example—Generate Compiler Error on Not Constant

CREATE COMPILER ERROR ON


TYPE NOT CONSTANT
MSG: Must be a constant value.
C2P02_Voltage

(This value should originate from constant)

Custom error message

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Generate Compiler Error on Type


CREATE COMPILER ERROR ON
A1 TYPE DIFFERS FROM?
MSG:?

Use:

• Aborts the compile process when the compiler finds an incorrect data type.

• Displays a user-defined, custom error message in the Error Messages tab.

• Prevents a user from entering a value that compiles but causes erratic operation when
downloaded.
Function:

• A1 = Data type

• TYPE DIFFERS FROM? = Click with Query/Change to enter the allowed data type (any
other data type aborts compile)

• MSG? = Click with Query/Change to enter the error message that displays if A1 is an
incorrect data type
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 ALL — —

Example—Generate Compiler Error on Type

CREATE COMPILER ERROR ON


TYPE NOT CONSTANT S16
MSG: Data type must be S16.

2500
U16

Custom error message

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Predefine Type
PRE X1
?
Use:

• Defines the data type of a signal that does not have a data type.

− Needed to define the data type of a Module Input signal routed to a hardware
output.

− Needed to define the data type of a Module Output signal routed to a


Checkpoint component.

• Force connecting the correct signal to an input or output.

− A signal that you route to a predefined signal must either have no data type or a
matching data type; otherwise you get a compiler error.
Function:

• X1 = Outputs the ?data type


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 ALL

T Also see Example 1—Call Module on page 264 for another example of how to use this
component.

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Example—Predefine Type
Define the data type of Module Input signals routed to hardware

PRE
U16
L_Fwd
Module Input signals
PRE
U16
L_Rvs

PRE
U16
R_Fwd

PRE
U16
R_Rvs To hardware
Outputs

Define the data type of Module Output signals routed to Checkpoints


PRE CHECK CP_Steer
U16 POINT
Module Output signals Steer

Speed

PRE CHECK CP_Speed


U16 POINT

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Access

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Access App Log Enable


A1 APP–LOG ENABLE

T Contact Sauer-Danfoss for more information about using this component.

Disable Raw Applog Data Readout


DISABLE APPLOG RAW DATA READOUT

T Contact Sauer-Danfoss for more information about using this component.

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Accessrights App Log Diagnostics


A1 APP–LOG DIAG ACCESS

Use:

• Sets the PLUS+1 Service Tool program’s access to diagnostic data in an application
data log.

The Application Log components create application data logs. These logs contain
access history data, diagnostic data, error data, and “other” data. Each type of data has
a separate access level that you can set from 0 to 9.

The A1 value of the APP-LOG DIAG ACCESS component works with the diagnostic
data’s access level to limit the Service Tool program’s access to diagnostic data.
Function:

• A1 can range from 0–9

• The PLUS+1 Service Tool:

− Can view diagnostic data that has an access level ≥ A1


− Cannot view diagnostic data that has an access level < A1
• Sets access rights for all application data logs in an application

• Can be placed anywhere in an application


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT — —

Diagnostic data viewing rights

A1 Access Value Service Tool Can View Diagnostic Data with These Access Levels

0 APP-LOG DIAG ACCESS 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


3 APP-LOG DIAG ACCESS — — — 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
6 APP-LOG DIAG ACCESS — — — — — — 6 7 8 9

9 APP-LOG DIAG ACCESS — — — — — — — — — 9

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Accessrights App Log Errors


A1 APP–LOG ERROR ACCESS

Use:

• Sets the PLUS+1 Service Tool program’s rights to access error data in an application
data log.

The Application Log components create application data logs. These logs contain
access history data, diagnostic data, error data, and “other” data. Each type of data has
a separate access level that you can set from 0 to 9.

The A1 value of the APP-LOG ERROR ACCESS component works with the error data’s
access level to limit the Service Tool program’s access to error data.
Function:

• A1 can range from 0–9

• The PLUS+1 Service Tool:

− Can view error data that has an access level ≥ A1


− Cannot view error data that has an access level < A1
• Sets access rights for all application data logs in an application

• Can be placed anywhere in an application


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT — —

Error data viewing rights

A1 Access Value Service Tool Can View Error Data with These Access Levels

0 APP-LOG ERROR ACCESS 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


3 APP-LOG ERROR ACCESS — — — 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

6 APP-LOG ERROR ACCESS — — — — — — 6 7 8 9

9 APP-LOG ERROR ACCESS — — — — — — — — — 9

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Accessrights App Log Others


A1 APP–LOG OTHERS ACCESS

Use:

• Sets the PLUS+1 Service Tool program’s rights to access “other” (miscellaneous) data
in an application data log.

The Application Log components create application data logs. These logs contain
access history data, diagnostic data, error data, and “other” data. Each type of data has
a separate access level that you can set from 0 to 9.

The A1 value of the APP-LOG OTHERS ACCESS component works with the “other”
data’s access level to limit the Service Tool program’s access to “other” data.
Function:

• A1 can range from 0–9

• The PLUS+1 Service Tool:

− Can view “other” data that has an access level ≥ A1


− Cannot view “other” data that has an access level < A1
• Sets access rights for all application data logs in an application

• Can be placed anywhere in an application


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT — —

“Other” data viewing rights

A1 Access Value Service Tool Can View “Other” Data with These Access Levels

0 APP-LOG OTHERS ACCESS 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


3 APP-LOG OTHERS ACCESS — — — 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
6 APP-LOG OTHERS ACCESS — — — — — — 6 7 8 9
9 APP-LOG OTHERS ACCESS — — — — — — — — — 9

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Accessrights History
A1 HISTORY ACCESS

Use:

• Sets the PLUS+1 Service Tool program’s rights to view access history data in an
application data log.

The Application Log components create application data logs. These logs contain
access history data, diagnostic data, error data, and “other” data. Each type of data has
a separate access level that you can set from 0 to 9.

The A1 value of the HISTORY ACCESS component works with the access history
data’s access level to limit the Service Tool program’s ability to view access history
data.
Function:

• A1 can range from 0–9

• The PLUS+1 Service Tool:

− Can view access history data that has an access level ≥ A1


− Cannot view access history data that has an access level < A1
• Sets access rights for all application data logs in an application

• Can be placed anywhere in an application

• Overrides all access rights set within the PLUS+1 GUIDE Service Tool
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT — —

History data viewing rights

A1 Access Value Service Tool Can View History Data with These Access Levels

0 HISTORY ACCESS 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
3 HISTORY ACCESS — — — 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
6 HISTORY ACCESS — — — — — — 6 7 8 9
9 HISTORY ACCESS — — — — — — — — — 9

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Accessrights Read
A1 READ ACCESS

Use:

• Works with password logic to limit a user’s ability to read component values with the
PLUS+1 Service Tool program.

Some PLUS+1 components—such as the Checkpoint and Memory components—


have a read rights feature. Their read rights can range from 0 to 9.

The A1 value applied the Read Access component works with the read rights set on
individual components to limit the values that a user can read with the Service Tool.
Function:

• A1 can range from 0–9

• Using the PLUS+1 Service Tool, a user:

− Can read the value of any component whose read right ≥ A1


− Cannot read the value of any component whose read right < A1
• Sets read rights for all components in an application

• Can be placed anywhere in an application

• Overrides all read rights set within the PLUS+1 GUIDE Service Tool
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT — —

Read rights

With an A1 Value* Service Tool Can Read Values from Components with these Read Rights

0 READ ACCESS 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
3 READ ACCESS — — — 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
6 READ ACCESS — — — — — — 6 7 8 9
9 READ ACCESS — — — — — — — — — 9
*Typically set with password logic.

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Accessrights Write
A1 WRITE ACCESS

Use:

• Works with password logic to limit a user’s ability to write values to components with
the PLUS+1 Service Tool program.

Some PLUS+1 components—such as Memory components—have a write rights


feature. Their write rights can range from 0 to 9.

The A1 value applied the Write Access component works with individual component
write right to limit the values that a user can write to (change) using the Service Tool.
Function:

• A1 can range from 0–9

• With the PLUS+1 Service Tool, a user:

− Can write a value to any component whose write right ≥ A1


− Cannot write a value to any component whose write right < A1
• Sets write rights for all components in an application

• Can be placed anywhere in an application

• Overrides all right rights set within the PLUS+1 GUIDE Service Tool
Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 INT — —

Write rights

With an A1 Value* Service Tool Can Write Values to Components with these Write Rights

0 WRITE ACCESS 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
3 WRITE ACCESS — — — 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
6 WRITE ACCESS — — — — — — 6 7 8 9
9 WRITE ACCESS — — — — — — — — — 9
*Typically set with password logic.

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Example—Read Access and Write Access


The examples on this and on the following pages show how the Read Access and Write
Access components used with password logic can limit a user’s ability to read and write
application values with the PLUS+1 GUIDE Service Tool program.

The example below shows what happens when a user enters either a wrong password or
no password at all with the Service Tool.

The password logic in this example applies a value of 9 to the Write Access and Read
Access components. The Service Tool can only read and write to Memory components
with read and write values of 9. (No components here have a read or write value of 9).

A user with either no password or the wrong password:

• Cannot view or change any application values.


Passwords
111 = Application engineer
No password/wrong password:
555 = Service technician
• No read or write rights to any values
888 = Rental dealer

Password logic

No password/wrong password A

111 B
=
A

555 B
=
A

888 B
= 1
WRITE ACCESS
5 9
8
READ ACCESS
9

IN EE_Limit_Lo IN EE_Limit_Hi
Memory components
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 1 PEND READ 1 PEND
WRITE 1 VAL WRITE 1 VAL

IN EE_Cal_Lo IN EE_Cal_Hi
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 5 PEND READ 5 PEND
WRITE 5 VAL WRITE 5 VAL

IN EE_Total_Hrs IN EE_Rental_Hrs
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 8 PEND READ 8 PEND
WRITE 5 VAL WRITE 8 VAL

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The example below shows what happens when an application engineer enters a password
of 111 with the PLUS+1 GUIDE Service Tool.

The password logic in this example applies a value of 1 to the Write Access and Read
Access components. A value of 1 lets the Service Tool read and write to all Memory
components with read and write values of 1 or greater.

The application engineer:

• Can view and change all application values.

Passwords
111 = Application engineer Application engineer password:
555 = Service technician • Read and write rights to EE_Limit_Lo
888 = Rental dealer and EE_Limit_Hi values
• Read and write rights to EE_Cal_Lo and
EE_Cal_Hi values
• Read and write rights to EE_Total_Hrs
and EE_Rental_Hrs values

Password logic

Application engineer password

111 A

111 B
=
A

555 B
= T
A

888 B
= 1
WRITE ACCESS
5 1
8
READ ACCESS
9

IN EE_Limit_Lo IN EE_Limit_Hi
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 1 PEND READ 1 PEND
WRITE 1 VAL WRITE 1 VAL
Memory components
IN EE_Cal_Lo IN EE_Cal_Hi
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 5 PEND READ 5 PEND
WRITE 5 VAL WRITE 5 VAL

IN EE_Total_Hrs IN EE_Rental_Hrs
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 8 PEND READ 8 PEND
WRITE 5 VAL WRITE 8 VAL

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The example below shows what happens when a service technician enters a password of
555 with the PLUS+1 GUIDE Service Tool.

The password logic in this example applies a value of 5 to the Write Access and Read
Access components. A value of 5 lets the Service Tool read and write to all Memory
components with read and write values of 5 or greater.

The service technician:

• Cannot view or change limits.

• Can view and change calibration values.

• Can view and change (reset) total run hours.

• Can view and change (reset) rental hours.

Passwords
111 = Application engineer Service technician password:
555 = Service technician • No read or write rights to
EE_Limit_Lo and
888 = Rental dealer EE_Limit_Hi values
• Read and write rights to
Password logic EE_Cal_Lo and EE_Cal_Hi
values
Service technician password • Read and write rights to
EE_Total_Hrs and
A EE_Rental_Hrs values

111 B
=
555 A

555 B
=
T
A

888 B
= 1
WRITE ACCESS
5 5
8
READ ACCESS
9

IN EE_Limit_Lo IN EE_Limit_Hi
Memory components IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 1 PEND READ 1 PEND
WRITE 1 VAL WRITE 1 VAL

IN EE_Cal_Lo IN EE_Cal_Hi
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 5 PEND READ 5 PEND
WRITE 5 VAL WRITE 5 VAL

IN EE_Total_Hrs IN EE_Rental_Hrs
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 8 PEND READ 8 PEND
WRITE 5 VAL WRITE 8 VAL

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The example below shows what happens when a rental dealer enters a password of 888
with the PLUS+1 GUIDE Service Tool.

The password logic in this example applies a value of 8 to the Write Access and Read
Access components. A value of 8 lets the Service Tool read and write to all Memory
components with read and write values of 8 or greater.

The rental dealer:

• Cannot view or change limits.

• Cannot view or change calibration values.

• Can view but not change (reset) total run hours.

• Can view and change (reset) rental hours.

Passwords
111 = Application engineer Rental dealer password:
555 = Service technician • No read or write rights to EE_Limit_Lo and
EE_Limit_Hi values
888 = Rental dealer
• No read or write rights to EE_Cal_Lo and
EE_Cal_Hi values
Password logic
• No read or write rights to EE_Cal_Lo and
Rental dealer password EE_Cal_Hi values
• Read-only rights to EE_Total_Hrs value
A

111 B
= • Read and write rights to EE_Total_Hrs value

555 B
=
888
A

888 B
= T
1
WRITE ACCESS
5 8
8
READ ACCESS
9

IN EE_Limit_Lo IN EE_Limit_Hi
Memory components
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 1 PEND READ 1 PEND
WRITE 1 VAL WRITE 1 VAL

IN EE_Cal_Lo IN EE_Cal_Hi
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 5 PEND READ 5 PEND
WRITE 5 VAL WRITE 5 VAL

IN EE_Total_Hrs IN EE_Rental_Hrs
IN_ENABLE IN_ENABLE
READ 8 PEND READ 8 PEND
WRITE 5 VAL WRITE 8 VAL

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Read-only Parameter

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Open Parameter Set

X1

Use:

• Marks the start of a set of read-only parameter inputs.


Function:

• X1 = T if the parameters in a read-only parameters lhx file matches the parameters in


the application

− TYPE name, parameter names, parameter order, and data types must match
− Program the application so that a T output from this component writes values in
the read-only parameters lhx file to the controller

• X1 = F if the parameters in a read-only parameters lhx file do not match the


parameters in the application

− Program the application to deal with an F output from this component


• TYPE = Replace with a user-friendly name for the parameter set

T See Example—Read-only Parameter Input on page 290 for an example of how to use
this component. Also see Create a Read-only Parameters File on page 373 for a
detailed, step-by-step procedure that describes how to use this component.

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— INT X1 BOOL

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Close Parameter Set

Use:

• Marks the end of a set of read-only parameters.


Function:

• COMMENT = Replace with a useful comment.

T See Example—Read-only Parameter Input on page 290 for an example of how to use
this component. Also see Create a Read-only Parameters File on page 373 for a
detailed, step-by-step procedure that describes how to use this component.

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — — —

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Connection

Read-only Parameter Input with Namespace

X1

Use:

• Inputs a read-only parameter to an application.

• When copying a parameter set, you only have to change the block’s Name Space.
You do not have to change individual? parameter names
Function:

• Prefixes the block’s Name Space to the ? parameter name

• ? = Name of the parameter

• X1 = Parameter value input from a read-only parameters lhx file

T See Example—Read-only Parameter Input with Namespace on page 291 for an


example of how to use this component

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 INT, BOOL

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Read-only Parameter Input

X1

Use:

• Inputs a read-only parameter to an application.


Function:

? = Name of the parameter

X1 = Parameter value input from a read-only parameters lhx file

T See Example—Read-only Parameter Input on page 290 for an example of how to use
this component. Also see Create a Read-only Parameters File on page 373 for a
detailed, step-by-step procedure that describes how to use this component.

Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 INT, BOOL

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Example—Read-only Parameter Input


The following example shows:

• The source files for read-only parameters lhx files as they appear in Microsoft Excel.

• That the PARAMETER OPEN component outputs a T for a valid read-only parameters
lhx file and an F for an invalid read-only parameters lhx file.

• How T inputs to the Switch 2 components cause these components to apply the
read-only parameter values of 4500, 7500, and T.

• How F inputs to the Switch 2 components cause these components to apply the
internal values of 0, 0, and F.
Valid Read-only Parameter lhx File—PARAMETER OPEN X1 = T

Comma-separated
surce file for the T
read-only Setup_Values
parameters lhx file
Cal_Low
4500
0
U16

Cal_Hi
7500
0
Names—OK U16
Data types—OK
Order—OK Fault_Detect
T
F
BOOL

Invalid Read-only Parameter lhx File—PARAMETER OPEN X1 = F

F
Setup_Values

Cal_Low
0
0
U16

Cal_Hi
0
0
Names—OK U16
Data types—OK
Fault_Detect
Order—Not OK
F
F
BOOL

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Example—Read-only Parameter Input with Namespace


The following example shows:

• The source file for the read-only parameters lhx file as it appears in Microsoft Excel.

• That each parameter name in the source file has a Name Space prefix.

Sensor_1
Values

T Values
Setup_Values
Comma-separated surce fil
for theread-only parameters lhx file Cal_Low Cal_Low1
1500
0
U16

Cal_Hi Cal_Hi1
3500
0
U16

Snsr1 Name Space prefix


Except for output signal names,
Sensor_1 and Sensor_2 blocks are the same.

Snsr2 Name Space prefix


Sensor_2
Values

T Values
Setup_Values

Cal_Low Cal_Low2
4500
0
U16

Cal_Hi Cal_Hi2
7500
0
U16

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Display

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Define Window
A8 FILE
A7 PORT
A6 COLOR
A5 XMAX
A4 XMIN
A3 YMIN
A2 YMAX
A1 OPEN

Use:

• Defines a window in which graphic elements appear.

T This component supports graphical terminal applications that were created before the
Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this component.

Function:

• Assigns a file to a hardware port.

• If:

− A1 = 0 window displays
− A1 = 1 window does not display
• A2–A5 define the minimum and maximum window size in pixels:

− A2 = Maximum window size on the y-axis


− A3 = Minimum window size on the y-axis
− A4 = Maximum window size on the x-axis
− A5 = Minimum window size on the x-axis
• A6 = Window color

• A7 = Hardware port that outputs the window

• A8 = Assigned file name

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Valid connections
Pin Type Pin Type

A1 BOOL — —

A2 UINT

A3–A5 INT

A6 COL

A7 PORT

A8 FILE

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Line
A9 FILE
A8 COLOR
A7 WIDTH
A6 X0
A5 Y0
A4 X1
A3 Y1
A2 PRIORITY
A1 ENABLE X1

Use:

• Displays a line in a window defined by IF_ASSIGN.

T This component supports graphical terminal applications that were created before the
Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this component.

Function:

• If:

− A1 = 0, then X1 = 0 the line does not display


− A1 = 1, then X1 = 1 enables the display of the line
• A2 = Display priority of the line

• A3–A6 position the line in the window defined by IF_ASSIGN:

− A3 = Y-axis starting position of the line in pixels


− A4 = X-axis starting position of the line in pixels
− A5 = Y-axis ending position of the line in pixels
− A6 = X-axis position ending position of the line in pixels
• A7 = Line width in pixels; line centers between the points defined by A3–A6

• A8 = Line color

• A9 = FILE name assigned to IF_ASSIGN

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Valid connections
Pin Type Pin Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3–A6 INT

A7 UINT

A8 FILE

A9 BOOL

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Graphic

A8 IMAGE
A7 FILE
A6 COLOR
A5 X
A4 Y
A3 ROTATION
A2 PRIORITY
A1 ENABLE X1

Use:

• Displays an image file (such as ***.bmp) in a window defined by IF_ASSIGN.

T This component supports graphical terminal applications that were created before the
Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this component.

Function:

• If:

− A1 = 0, then X1 = 0 the image file does not display


− A1 = 1, then X1 = 1 display of the image file enabled
• A2 = Display priority of the image file

• A3 = Degrees ccw that the image file rotates

• A4–A5 position the image file in the window defined by IF_ASSIGN:

− A4 = Y-axis position of the image file in pixels


− A5 = X-axis position of the image file in pixels
• A6 = Background color of the image file; use with a monochrome image file displayed
on a color display

• A7 = FILE name assigned to IF_ASSIGN

• A8 = File name given to the image file in the Image Register Editor

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Valid connections
Pin Type Pin Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3–A5 INT

A6 COL

A7 FILE

A8 IMG

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Text Label
? X1

Use:

• References an external TL data type signal.

T This component supports graphical terminal applications that were created before the
Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this component.

Function:

• X1 = Where ? is a user-defined name


Valid connections
Pin Type Pin Type

— — X1 TEXT

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Graphic Label
? X1

Use:

• References an external PXO data type signal.

T This component supports graphical terminal applications that were created before the
Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this component.

Function:

• X1 = Where ? is a user-defined name


Valid connections
Pin Type Pin Type

— — X1 PXO

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String

Click

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String
A8 STRING
A7 FILE
A6 FONT
A5 COLOR
A4 Y
A3 X
A2 PRIORITY
A1 ENABLE X1

Use:

• Displays simple string with no data variables in a window defined by IF_ASSIGN.

T This is a legacy component that supports graphical terminal applications that were
created before the Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this
component.

Function:

• If:

− A1 = 0, then X = 0 display of the string not enabled


− A1 = 1, then X = 1 display of the string enabled
• A2 = Display priority of the string

• A3–A4 position the string in the window defined by IF_ASSIGN:

− A3 = Y-axis starting position, in pixels, of the string


− A4 = X-axis starting position, in pixels, of the string
• A5 = color of string font

• A6 = Type of string font

• A7 = FILE name assigned to IF_ASSIGN

• A8 = String pointer for the text string, assigned using the Text Editor

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Valid connections
Pin Type Pin Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3 FILE

A4 TEXT

A5–A8 ALL

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String with 4 Variables

A12 VAR1
A11 VAR2
A10 VAR3
A9 VAR4
A8 STRING
A7 FILE
A6 FONT
A5 COLOR
A4 X
A3 Y
A2 PRIORITY
A1 ENABLE X1

Use:

• Displays a string with four variable data values in a window defined by IF_ASSIGN.

• You can use IF_STRING-OUT if you do not need to specify string position, color, and
font.

T This is a legacy component provided to support graphical terminal applications that were
created before the Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this
component.

Function:

• If:

− A1 = 0, then X = 0 display of the string not enabled


− A1 = 1, then X = 1 display of the string enabled
• A2 = Display priority of the string

• A3–A4 position the string in the window defined by IF_ASSIGN:

− A3 = Y-axis starting position, in pixels, of the string


− A4 = X-axis starting position, in pixels, of the string

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• A5 = color of string font

• A6 = Type of string font

• A7 = FILE name assigned to IF_ASSIGN

• A8 = String pointer for the text string, assigned using the Text Editor

• A9–A12 = String variables, assigned using the Text Editor


Valid connections
Pin Type Pin Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3–A4 INT

A5 COL

A6 FONT

A7 FILE

A8 TEXT

A9–A12 ALL

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Basic String with 4 Variables


A8 VAR1
A7 VAR2
A6 VAR3
A5 VAR4
A4 STRING
A3 FILE
A2 PRIORITY
A1 ENABLE X1

Use:

• Displays a string with four variable data values in a window defined by IF_ASSIGN.

• Use IF_STRING-OUT when you need to specify string position, color, and font.

T This is a legacy component provided to support graphical terminal applications that were
created before the Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this
component.

Function:

• If:

− A1 = 0, then X = 0 display of the string not enabled


− A1 = 1, then X = 1 display of the string enabled
• A2 = Display priority of the string

• A3 = FILE name assigned to IF_ASSIGN

• A4 = String pointer for the text string, assigned using the Text Editor

• A5–A8 = String variables, assigned using the Text Editor


Valid connections
Pin Type Pin Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3 FILE

A4 TEXT

A5–A8 ALL

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Basic String with 8 Variables

A12 VAR1
A11 VAR2
A10 VAR3
A9 VAR4
A8 VAR5
A7 VAR6
A6 VAR7
A5 VAR8
A4 STRING
A3 FILE
A2 PRIORITY
A1 ENABLE X1

Use:

• Displays a string with eight variable data values in a window defined by IF_ASSIGN.

T This is a legacy component provided to support graphical terminal applications that were
created before the Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this
component.

Function:

• If:

− A1 = 0, then X = 0 display of the string not enabled


− A1 = 1, then X = 1 display of the string enabled
• A2 = Display priority of the string

• A3 = FILE name assigned to IF_ASSIGN

• A4 = String pointer for the text string, assigned using the Text Editor

• A5–A12 = String variables, assigned using the Text Editor

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Valid connections
Pin Type Pin Type

A1 BOOL X1 BOOL

A2 UINT

A3 FILE

A4 TEXT

A5–A8 ALL

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Text Set

Click

Open Text Set

A1

Use:

• Attaches an external file containing multiple language format definitions to the


application.

T This is a legacy component provided to support graphical terminal applications that


were created before the Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not
use this component.

Function:

• A1 = Defines the language to be used in the user’s application

• S1 = Alias name of the text definition file

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Close Text Set

Use:

• Ends text definition function.

T This is a legacy component provided to support graphical terminal applications that were
created before the Screen Editor became available. The Screen Editor does not use this
component.

Function:

• Use with the Open Text Set component

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Language Definition Input


?
X1
LANG

Use:

• Combine with the Select Language component to enable switching between the
languages displayed in a PLUS+1 graphical terminal.

− Example—Select Language on page 313 shows how to use this component with
the Select Language component.

− See Define Screen Page/Switch between Different Languages on page 400 for
detailed information on using this component with the Screen Editor.
Function:

• ? = Language as defined in the Text Groups tab of the Screen Editor


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

— — X1 LANG

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Select Language
A1 SELECT LANGUAGE

Use:

• Combine with the Language Definition Input component to enable switching


between the languages displayed in a PLUS+1 graphical terminal.

− The following example shows how to use this component with the Language
Definition Input component.

− See Define Screen Page/Switch between Different Languages on page 400 for
detailed information on using this component with the Screen Editor.
Function:

• A1 = Language as defined in the Text Groups tab of the Screen Editor


Valid connections
Pin Data Type Pin Data Type

A1 LANG — —

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Example—Select Language
Inputs
Soft_Buttons

Sw_Soft1 Match language names with language names in Screen Editor tab

German Place to the left of Define Screen page


LANG English SELECT LANGUAGE
LANG
LANG

Define Areas
Area_Page1
Data

Soft_Buttons
Scrn_Cntrl1 Define Screen
Sft Btns Screen_Page1
CAN_0
CAN Out Data

Screen Library tab in Screen Editor

Match language names


with Select Language names

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Define Areas Page


Define Areas
Area_Page1
Data

T Installing the hardware files for a PLUS+1 graphical display (such as the DP600) in the
Project Manager tab makes this component available.

T The File menu’s Import Page and Import Block commands do not work with this
component. Importing a Define Areas block into a new project strips the block of its
contents.

Use:

• Define the areas that appear in a PLUS+1 graphical terminal.

For more information about using this page, see Screen Editor on page 317.

Define Screen Page


Define Screen
Screen_Page1
Data

T Installing the hardware files for a PLUS+1 graphical display (such as the DP600) in the
Project Manager tab makes this component available.

T The File menu’s Import Page and Import Block commands do not work with this
component. Importing a Define Screen block into a new project strips the block of its
contents.

Use:

• Define the contents that appear in a PLUS+1 graphical terminal screen areas.

For more information about using this page, see Screen Editor on page 317.

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Application Log

Language Definition Input


?
X1
LANG

T Contact Sauer-Danfoss for more information about using this component.

Select Language
A1 SELECT LANGUAGE

T Contact Sauer-Danfoss for more information about using this component.

Define Application Log Areas Page


D e f i n e APPAreas
AppLog_Page1
Data

T Contact Sauer-Danfoss for more information about using this component.

Define Application Log Page


D e f i n e APPLog
AppLog_Page1
Data

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Page

Basic Page
Basic_Page
In1 Out1
In2 Out2

Use:

• A generic block—use as a starting point when creating your own blocks.

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This chapter documents the PLUS+1 Screen Editor. The PLUS+1 GUIDE release 2.0.3 (and
later) includes the Screen Editor.

The Screen Editor creates applications for Sauer-Danfoss PLUS+1 graphical terminals such
as the DP600.

For more information about using the elements described here to create an application
for a PLUS+1 GUIDE graphical terminal, see Screen Editor—How To on page 379.

Chapter contents About the Screen Editor........................................................................................................................... 318


Screen Editor Elements............................................................................................................................. 319
Define Areas Page ...................................................................................................................................... 321
Define Areas Page/Inspector Tab.......................................................................................................... 323
Define Screen Page/Assign Screen Areas........................................................................................... 330
Define Screen Page/Add Library Items ............................................................................................... 332
Define Screen Page/Inspector Tab ....................................................................................................... 333
Define Screen Page/Image Register..................................................................................................... 339
Define Screen Page/Text Register......................................................................................................... 342

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About the Screen Editor


The Screen Editor consists of a:

• Define Areas page.

• Define Screens page.

• Basic Page.
You use these pages to define the:

• Screen areas that appear in the graphical terminal.

• Contents—such as 256-color bitmap images and text—of each Screen Area.

• Signals (after you have ported signals to these pages) that control the display of
individual screen elements.

The Define Areas page, Define Screen page, and Basic Page are available in the
Components tab of PLUS+1 GUIDE release 2.0.3 (and later). You drag these pages into the
Application page of the graphical terminal template when creating a graphical
application.

Typical Graphical Terminal

1 5

15
2 mp/h 6

3 7
10
rpm x 1000
4 8

ESC OK

The preceding figure shows a typical graphical terminal.

The Screen Editor defined the:

• Tan and aqua Screen Areas.

• 256-color bitmap images and text that appears in each Screen Area.

• Signals—from buttons and external sources—that control the display of each Screen
Area and its contents.

T The Screen Editor can manipulate (rotate, turn on and off) 256-color bitmap images but
it cannot create them. To create bitmap images, you need a pixel-editing program such
as Paint Shop™ Pro® or Adobe Photoshop® Elements.

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Screen Editor Elements


Screen Areas—Define
in Screen Areas page
Screen Area contents—Define
in Define Screens page
1 5

15
2 mp/h 6 Buttons—Put control
logic in Basic pages
3 7
10
rpm x 1000
4 8

ESC OK
Application page

Define Areas page


Basic page

Define Areas Page


Define Screen Page
Basic page
Define Screen page Basic Page

Callouts in this figure identify:

• The basic elements in a typical graphical terminal screen display.

• The Define Areas page, Define Screen page, and Basic Page that define and control
these elements. You place these three pages in the Application page of the graphical
terminal template.

Start a Screen Editor Project on page 380 describes how to install a graphical terminal
template and add these pages to the template’s Application page.

Screen Editor elements


Item Description

Application page You create most of an application for a graphical terminal in this page.
The template that you use must match the graphical terminal for which you are creating an application.
You create a graphical terminal application using a Define Screen page, a Define Areas page, and Basic
pages. You select these pages in the Components tab and drag them into the Application page.
The Inputs bus brings signals from graphical terminal buttons and other sources to these pages.

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Screen Editor elements


Item Description

Define Areas Page Use the tools that display when you enter this page to create the Screen Areas that appear on the screen of
your graphical terminal.
A Screen Area is the background against which images, lines, and text appear.
Use the tools in the Define Areas page to define the position of each Screen Area, as well as the Screen Area’s
size and color.
A Screen Area can fill all or part of the graphical terminal’s screen.
After you bring signals to the Define Areas page, use the editing tools within this page to select the signals
that enable the display of Screen Areas.
The Define Areas page does not support sub-buses. Always use a main bus to bring signals to this page.
The File menu’s Import commands do not work with this component. Importing this component into a new
project strips the component of its contents.

Define Screen Page Use the tools that display when you enter this page to define the contents of each Screen Area.
The contents of each Screen Area include bitmap images, lines, and text.
(Before you can define the contents of a Screen Area, you must first use the Define Areas page to create the
Screen Area.)
Use the tools in the Define Screen page to define the appearance and position of each item that appears in a
Screen Area.
After you bring signals to the Define Screen page, use the editing tools on this page to select the signals that
control the behavior of items in Screen Areas.
Use signals to show and hide items, move and rotate items, and display changing numeric values.
The Define Screen page does not support sub-buses. Always use a main bus to bring signals to this page.
The File menu’s Import commands do not work with this component. Importing this component into a new
project strips the component of its contents.

Basic Page Use this page as a container for the logic that controls the display of Screen Areas and the items in the Screen
Areas.
This page is available for your programming convenience. It is an empty page except for input and output
ports.

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Define Areas Page

Enter
Click to display tools

Click Editor buttons


Layout panel

Click

Assign

Screen area
Screen Area properties

The preceding figure shows the tools—tabs, panes, and buttons—within the Define
Areas page that you use to create Screen Areas. These tools display when you first enter
the Define Areas page.

(The Screen Library tab also displays but is not used when creating Screen Areas. The
figure here does not show this tab.)

The Define Areas page does not support sub-buses. Always use a main bus to bring
signals to this page.

T You must assign an HWPortName in the Inspector tab before you can create a Screen
Area.

T The File menu’s Import Page and Import Block commands do not work with the
Define Areas block. Importing a Define Areas block into a new project strips the block
of its contents.

Define Areas page


Item Description

Port Manager tab Use this tab to manage Screen Areas.


Areas—Click for a tree view of all the Screen Areas assigned to a hardware port. The HWPortName in the Inspector tab
shows the port assignment of all the Screen Areas in the tree.
Click a Screen Area name to see its properties in the Inspector tab and to move the area to the front of the Layout pane.
SingleWireEntry—Not used here.
BusEntries—Click for a tree view of all the signals available on the Define Areas page’s Data bus port.

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Define Areas page


Item Description

Inspector tab Use this tab to manage the properties of Screen Areas.

Layout pane Use to layout Screen Areas. Drag as needed to resize and reposition Screen Areas placed in this pane.
When you click a Screen Area in this pane, the Area moves to the front, the Port Manager tab highlights its name, and the
Inspector tab shows its properties.
Right-click a Screen Area to open a pop-up menu with Delete, Move Backward, and Move Forward commands.
Use the Move Backward and Move Forward commands to change the Inspector tab’s Order property.

Editor buttons The size of your monitor determines the row in which these buttons appear.

Close Click to return to the Application page.

Options Click to open the Options window.


Use this window to control the Layout pane’s grids and the transparency of items placed on Screen Areas.

Zoom Zooms the Layout pane.


In/Out

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Define Areas Page/Inspector Tab

Use this tab to manage the properties of Screen Areas.

To view the properties of a Screen Area, click the Screen Area name listed in the Port
Manager tab or click the Screen Area in the Layout pane.

Define Areas page/Inspector tab


Item Description

HWPortName Becomes available after you click Areas1 in the Port Manager tab.
The HWPortName selection that you click in the pull-down list sets the port type and maximum pixel size of all
Screen Areas in the Areas1 tree.
Selecting an HWPort Name makes other properties in the Inspector tab available.

File name The name of the Screen Area.

Order Indicates the display order of a Screen Area when several Screen Areas simultaneously have an Enable
property that has a true Entry signal or a Value that is True.
The order in which you assign Screen Areas in the Port Manager tab initially sets the front-to-back Order
property.
A Screen Area with an Order property of 1 displays in front of a Screen Area with an Order property of 2; a
Screen Area with an Order property of 2 displays in front of a Screen Area with an Order property of 3.
To change the Order property, right-click a Screen Area. In the pop-up menu that opens, click the Move
Forward or Move Backward command.
A signal-enabled Screen Area always displays in front of a true-enabled Screen Area.

Color Signal—Click to select a signal to control the Screen Area color.


Constant—Click to see a list of standard colors. Double-click to open a standard Windows palette from which
you can select a color.

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Define Areas page/Inspector tab


Item Description

Enable Enables the display of a Screen Area.


Signal—Click to select a signal from the pull-down list.
A true signal brings this screen to the front of the display pane.
A true signal makes the results of changed Color, Upper left corner, and Lower right corner properties visible.
Constant—Click True or False.
A True Screen Area displays in front until a signal-enabled Screen Area receives a true signal.
A False selection disables the display of the Screen Area. You cannot select this screen.

Upper left corner Defines the upper left corner position of a Screen Area.
Upper left corner—Sets the upper left corner X (horizontal) and Y (vertical) pixel positions of a Screen Area.
Signal—Click to select a signal to control the position of the upper-left corner.
Because disabled pixels remain visible until overwritten by the pixels in another Screen Area, you need a
background Screen Area to see the effects of shrinking a Screen Area.
Constant—Click to set fixed values the position of the upper-left corner.
Dragging a Screen Area in the Layout pane also changes these corner values.

Lower right corner Defines the lower right corner position of a Screen Area.
Lower right corner—Sets the lower right corner X (horizontal) and Y (vertical) pixel positions of a Screen Area.
Signal—Click to select signals to control the position of the lower-right corner.
Constant—Click to set fixed values for the position of the lower-right corner.

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Define Areas Page/About the Enable Property


The Inspector tab’s Enable property selections set the display properties of Screen Areas.

• A signal-enabled Screen Area:

− Stays invisible after you power on the graphical terminal and becomes visible
when its enabling signal becomes true.

− Moves to the front whenever its enabling signal becomes true.


• A true-enabled Screen Area is always in front until a Screen Area that is signal-enabled
gets a true signal.

Press Press

1
File2
5 1
File2 5 1
File2 5

2 6 2 6 2 6

File3 File3 File3


3 7 3 7 3 7

File1 File1 File1


4 8 4 8 4 8

ESC OK ESC OK ESC OK

1. Data.SW_SOFT1 = True. 2. Data.SW_SOFT1 = False. 3. Data.SW_SOFT1 = False.


Data.SW_SOFT2 = False. Data.SW_SOFT2 = True. Data.SW_SOFT2 = False.
(File3 = Value of True.)

The preceding figure shows how a single true-enabled Screen Area works with two signal-
enabled Screen Areas.

Note the Enable settings in the Inspector tab for each Screen Area.

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Press Press Press

1
File2 5 1
File2
5 1
File2
5

2 6 2 6 2 6

File3 File3 File3


3 7 3 7 3 7
File1 File1 File1
4 8 4 8 4 8

ESC OK ESC OK ESC OK

1. Data.SW_SOFT1 = True. 2. Data.SW_SOFT1 = False. 3. Data.SW_SOFT1 = False.


Data.SW_SOFT2 = False. Data.SW_SOFT2 = True. Data.SW_SOFT2 = False.
Data.SW_SOFT3 = False. Data.SW_SOFT3 = False. Data.SW_SOFT3 = True.

The preceding figure shows how three signal-enabled Screen Areas work together.

Note the Enable settings in the Inspector tab for each Screen Area.

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Define Areas Page/About the Order Property


The Inspector tab’s Order property sets the front-to-back display order of Screen Areas
when two or more areas simultaneously have an Enable:

• Signal that is true.

• Value that is True.

(See Define Areas Page/About the Enable Property on page 325 for more about
Enable properties.)

The order in which you assign Screen Areas in the Port Manager tab initially sets the
front-to-back Order.

Sets Screen Area order

1
File2 5

2
File1 File3
6

3 7

4 8

ESC OK

File1, File2, and File3 = Value of True.

The preceding figure shows the display order of three true-enabled Screen Areas.

To change the Order property, right-click a Screen Area in the Layout pane. In the pop-up
menu that opens, click the Move Forward or Move Backward command.

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True-enabled Screen Area


Signal-enabled Screen Areas

1
File2 5

2 File1 6
File3
3 7

4 8

ESC OK

File1 = Value of True.


Data.SW_SOFT1 = True.
Data.SW_SOFT2 = True.

The preceding figure shows the display order of three Screen Areas where:

• The File1 Screen Area is true-enabled.

• The File2 and File3 Screen Areas are signal-enabled and both have true signals.
Signal-enabled Screen Areas that have true signals display:

• In front of true-enabled Screen Areas.

• In a front-to-back order set by their Order property.

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Define Areas Page/About the Corner Property


0 400
X-axis

Y-axis

240

The preceding figure shows the effect of the Inspector tab’s Upper left corner and Lower
right corner properties on the size and position of a Screen Area.

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Define Screen Page

Enter

Click to display tools

Click Editor buttons

Right-click Select

Layout panel

When you enter the Define Screen page for the first time, this page displays the tools that
you need to assign the Screen Areas that you created in the Define Areas page described
on page 321.

Once you assign your first Screen Area, the tools that enable you to drag items from the
Screen Library tab (not shown here) into Screen Areas become available. Define Screen
Page/Add Library Items on page 332 describes these tools.

The Define Screen page does not support sub-buses. Always use a main bus to bring
signals to this page.

T The File menu’s Import Page and Import Block commands do not work with the
Define Screens block. Importing a Define Screens block into a new project strips the
block of its contents.

Define Screen page/Assign Screen areas


Item Description

Screen Manager tab Use this tab to assign the Screen Areas that you created in the Define Areas page to a hardware port.
Screen_Page1—Click for a tree view of the Screen Areas assigned to the PortName selected in the Inspector tab.
Click a Screen Area name in the tree to bring the area to the front of the Layout pane.
SingleWireEntry—Not used here.
BusEntries—Click for a tree view of all the signals available at the Define Screen page’s Data port.

Inspector tab This tab assigns the Screen Areas in the Screen1 tree to a hardware port.

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Define Screen page/Assign Screen areas


Item Description

Layout pane Displays the Screen Areas added to the Screen1 tree.
(You must return to the Define Areas page if you need to change the property of a Screen Area, such its Color,
Enable, or Corner properties.)
Click a Screen Area to bring the area to the front and highlight its name in the Screen Manager tab.

Editor buttons The size of your monitor determines the row in which these buttons appear.

Close Click to return to the Application page.

Preview Click for a preview of the layout as it will look in the graphical terminal.
The preview temporarily overrides Options window settings.

Options Click to open the Options window.


Use this window to control the Layout pane’s grid and transparency settings.

Zoom In/ Zooms the Layout pane.


Zoom Out

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Define Screen Page/Add Library Items


Screen Area name
Screen Area item

Layout panel

Properties Preview

Once you assign a Screen Area to a port, the Define Screen page displays more tools.

You use these tools to drag items from the Screen Library tab—such as Shapes, Images,
and Texts—into Screen Areas and to then manage the properties of these items.

Define Screen page/add Library items


Item Description

Screen Manager Use this tab to manage the contents of each Screen Area.
tab Click a Screen Area name for a tree view of all the library items that you assign to the selected area.
Click Screen Area items in this tab to see their properties in the Inspector tab.
Right-click items in this tree to open pop-up menus that have Cut, Copy, Delete, and Paste commands.

Inspector tab Use this tab to manage the properties of items placed in Screen Areas.

Layout pane Drag library items from the Screen Library tab into Screen Areas placed here.
Click a Screen Area to bring the area to the front and highlight its name in the Screen Manager tab.
Click a library item to see its properties in the Inspector tab. The Screen Manager tab highlights the name of the selected
item.

Screen Library tab Displays a tree view of a library of Shapes, Images, Texts, and HWComponents that you can add to Screen Areas.
Use the Image Register pane to add to the library of available Images.

Preview Displays a preview of bitmap Images.

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Define Screen Page/Inspector Tab

Use this tab to manage the properties of the library items that you add to Screen Areas.

To view the properties of a library item, click the item name in the Screen Manager tab or
click the item itself in the Layout pane.

Different types of library items have different properties, so that the type of item you
select determines the properties displayed by the Inspector tab.

See Define Screen Page/About Screen Item Properties on page 335 for a list of the
properties of Shapes, Images, Texts, and HWComponents.

Define Screen page/Inspector tab


Item Description

ID Used for internal identification purposes. You cannot change this value.

Order Indicates the front-to-back display order of overlapping library items when library items simultaneously have an Enable with
a true Signal or a Constant that is True.
An item with an Order of 1 displays in front of a library item with an Order of 2.
The sequence in which you drag a library item into the Layout pane sets its initial Order.
To change a library item’s Order, right-click the item. In the pop-up menu that displays, click the Move Forward or Move
Backward command.

Begin point X—Sets the starting y-axis (horizontal) position, in pixels, of a Line.
Y—Sets the starting y-axis (vertical) position, in pixels, of a Line.
(You select Line from the Shapes tree in the Screen Library tab.)

End point X—Sets the ending x-axis (horizontal) position, in pixels, of a Line.
Y—Sets the ending y-axis (vertical) position, in pixels, of a Line.

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Item Description

Width Sets the top-to-bottom thickness, in pixels, of a Line drawn on the horizontal x-axis.
Sets the side-to-side thickness, in pixels, of a Line drawn on the vertical y-axis.

Color Sets the color property of the library item.


Click Signal to select a signal from a list of signals to set the color.
Click Constant to select a color from a list of colors. Double-click Constant to select a color from a standard Windows color
palette.

Font Sets the font property of Texts taken from the Screen Library.

Enable Enables the display of library items.

Reference Sets the X-axis and Y-axis coordinates of the small blue cross displayed on Images and HWComponents library items.
position All vertical, horizontal, and rotational movements of the library item take place with reference to this point.
Reference point in the Image Register pane sets the position of this cross.

Priority Determines which library item displays when two or more items simultaneously have an Enable with a true Signal.
When you enable two or more items, the graphic terminal only displays the item (or items) with the highest Priority.
Lower Priority numbers give library items higher display priorities, with 0 giving an item the highest display priority.

Rotation Rotates Images and HWComponents library items.


All rotational movements take place with reference to the small blue cross that displays on these library items.
Reference point in the Image Register pane sets the position of this cross.
Apply rotational values between 0 and 359°.

Visible Outputs a true Boolean signal when a library item becomes visible.
To be visible, a library item must have a true Screen Area, a true Enable property, and a Priority that is higher than or equal to
the Priority of any other library item in the same Screen Area.
(You must connect a wire to the Data bus to be able to output this signal.)

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Define Screen Page/About Screen Item Properties


Different types of library items have different properties. This table lists of the properties of
Shapes, Images, Texts, and HWComponents.

Properties of Screen Library tab items


Library Items

Property Shapes Images Text HW Components

Begin point √ — — —

Color √ √ √ √

Enable √ √ √ √

End point √ — — —

Font — — √ —

ID — √ √ √

Reference position — √ — √

Order √ √ √ √

Priority √ — √ √

Rotation — √ — √

Starting point — — √ —

Visible √ √ √ √

Width √ — — —

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Define Screen Page/About the Order Property


The Inspector tab has Order and Enable properties that work together to produce
different display results.

In the following example the:

• Low Oil Pressure! text has an Order of 1, with Enable properties that change.

• Red background has an Order of 2, with Enable properties that change.

1 5

2 6
Low Oil Pressure! (text) Low Oil Pressure! Red background
3 7

4 8

ESC OK

Order and Enable properties


Item Order Enable Result

Low Oil Pressure! 1 Constant


Constant display, with alert text in front of background bar.
Red background 2 Constant

Low Oil Pressure! 1 Signal Constant display of background bar.


Red background 2 Constant Alert text only displays in front of background bar when its signal becomes true.

Low Oil Pressure! 1 Signal Alert text and background bar only display when their signals become true.

Red background 2 Signal Alert text displays in front of background bar when both signals are true.

Low Oil Pressure! 1 Constant Constant display of alert text.

Red background 2 Signal Background bar displays behind alert text when its signal becomes true.

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Define Screen Page/About the Color Property


The Inspector tab has a Color property that allows you to set the color through a
Constant or through a Signal.

When setting the color through a Signal, use a Multi-character Constant component to
output red, green, and blue (RGB) color values.

Use the ten-character scheme shown below when setting individual RGB values.
Place holder
Blue value
Green value
Red value
Hexadecimal prefix

0x FF FF 00 00
COLOR
Two-character hexadecimal values set the red, green, and blue values of the color where:

• A hexadecimal value of FF equals a decimal value of 255.

• A hexadecimal value of 00 equals a decimal value of 0.

Color examples
Red Value Green Value Blue Value

Constant Hex Decimal Hex Decimal Hex Decimal Color

FF 255 00 00 00 00 Red

00 00 FF 255 00 00 Green

00 00 00 00 FF 255 Blue

FF 255 FF 255 00 00 Aqua

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Define Screen Page/About the Priority Property


The Inspector tab has a Priority property that determines which library item displays
when two or more items simultaneously have an Enable with a true Signal.

When you enable two or more items, the display terminal only shows the item (or items)
with the higher Priority.

• An item with a Priority of 0 displays before an item with a Priority of 1.

• An item with a Priority of 1 displays before an item with a Priority of 2.


In the following example:

• The Low Oil Pressure, Dirty Air Filter, and Low Washer Fluid alerts all appear within
the same Screen Area.

• The alerts in order of importance are:

− Low Oil Pressure.


− Dirty Air Filter.
− Low Washer Fluid.
• Only the three alerts appear in this Screen Area.

• Each alert is a bitmap, composed of yellow text against a red background.

Priority example
Alert Enable Signal Status Priority Display

Low Oil Pressure True 0

Dirty Air Filter True 1 Low Oil Pressure

Low Washer Fluid True 2

Low Oil Pressure False 0

Dirty Air Filter True 1 Dirty Air Filter

Low Washer Fluid True 2

Low Oil Pressure False 0

Dirty Air Filter False 1 Low Washer Fluid

Low Washer Fluid True 2

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Define Screen Page/Image Register

Right-click

Preview

Pixel color

Use the Image Register pane to add 8-bit bitmaps (BMP) to the Image tree in the Screen
Library tab.

Registering a bitmap image:

• Copies the selected bitmap to a file in the folder that contains the graphic project files.
This copied bitmap becomes the source of the registered image.

• Registers (defines) the display characteristics of the bitmap.

The Images tree in the Screen Library tab displays the name of the registered image.
The source bitmap itself remains unchanged.

Define Screen page/Image Register


Item Description

ID Used for identification purposes. You cannot change this value.

Path Displays the location of the registered image in the Screen Library tab’s Images tree.

Description Enter the reference name for the bitmap that you are registering.
This name displays in the Images tree when you click Save.

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Define Screen page/Image Register


Item Description

Image Displays the name of the source file, its image type, and its size in pixels.

Browse Click to display an Open window.


Locate and select the source bitmap file in this window. The Screen Editor copies the file that you select into the graphic project
folder.

Reference Sets an X-axis and Y-axis reference point on bitmap images.


point All vertical, horizontal, and rotational movements of the bitmap image take place with reference to this point.

Pixel origin Becomes available if your image has a single pixel with a unique color. Check to set the Reference point on this pixel.

Color depth Sets the color depth that the bitmap image displays.
Select Monochrome (1 bit) or 256 Colors (8 bit).
The 256 Colors (8 bit) selection is only available for 256-color source images.

Format Displays the compression technique used on the bitmap image.

Preview Displays a preview of the bitmap image.

Transparency Click to set what areas of the bitmap image are transparent.
Opaque—All pixels in the bitmap image are visible.
Lower left corner—All pixels with the same color as the pixel in the lower left corner of the bitmap image become transparent.
Click image—All pixels in the bitmap image that have the same color as the pixel that you click become transparent.
Pixel color—Displays the color of the selected pixel.

Palette Sets the color palette that the bitmap image uses.
Active in application—Uses a color palette previously defined in the application.
From OS—Uses the color palette defined in the hardware operating system.
From BMP—Uses the color palette from the BMP source file.

Save Registers the bitmap image.


The bitmap source file copies to the project folder. The Image tree in the Screen Library tab displays the name of the registered
image.

Close Closes the Image Register pane.

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Define Screen Page/About the Reference Point

Sets reference point on image

Reference point

The Reference point sets an X-axis and Y-axis reference point on an image.

The default Reference point is the upper left corner of the image.

All movement in reference to this point

When you click an image in the Layout pane, a small blue cross identifies the Reference
point.

All vertical, horizontal, and rotational movements of the image take place with reference
to this point.

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Define Screen Page/Text Register

Languages in
each Text Group
Text Group

Languages Text Groups


in Text Group

Use the Text Register pane to add a Text Group to the Texts tree in the Screen Library
tab.

Registering a Text Group:

• Copies the strings in the Text Group to a file in the graphic project folder.

• Defines (registers) the display characteristics of the text string.

• Displays the Description name of the Text Group in the Screen Library tab’s Texts
tree.

Define Screen page/Text Register


Item Description

ID Used for identification purposes. You cannot change this value.

Preview font Sets the font and size of the string that displays in the Preview pane.
(This control does not set the font displayed by the graphical terminal. The Inspector tab’s Font property sets the font displayed
by the graphical terminal.)

Path Displays the location of Text Group within the Texts tree in the Screen Library tab.

Description Enter the name for the Text Group. This name appears in the Screen Library tab’s Texts tree when you click Save.
Click a Text Group name in the Texts tree to open the Text Register pane and view the strings in the group.

Languages Lists the different languages in which you can display the Text Group string.

Strings Enter the text that you want to display here.


Use c+‘ for line breaks.
Use the % print character to display data values in the string.

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Define Screen page/Text Register


Item Description

Preview pane Provides a preview of your String entry.


(The Inspector tab’s Font property determines the font used by the graphical terminal when displaying the string.)

Save Registers the Text Group.


The strings in the group copy to a text file in the graphic project folder.
The Texts tree in the Screen Library tab displays the Description of the Text Group.

Close Closes the Text Register pane.

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PLUS+1—How To

This chapter contains some basic “how-to” procedures for the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.

Chapter contents Select ...................................................................................................................................................... 346


Undo Your Mistakes........................................................................................................................... 346
Zoom with the Mouse....................................................................................................................... 347
Zoom with Keystrokes ...................................................................................................................... 347
Delete a Single Item .......................................................................................................................... 348
Delete Many Items ............................................................................................................................. 349
Delete a Signal-to-Bus Connection .............................................................................................. 350
Refresh a View ..................................................................................................................................... 351
View a Full Page .................................................................................................................................. 351
Pan a View by Right-Clicking and Dragging.............................................................................. 352
Pan a View by Right-Clicking.......................................................................................................... 352
Navigate an Application with Buttons ........................................................................................ 353
Navigate an Application with the Page Navigator tab .......................................................... 353
Show and Hide Panes ....................................................................................................................... 354
Install a Hardware Description....................................................................................................... 355
Change Properties with the Inspector Tab................................................................................ 357
Change Properties with the Pop-up Edit Window.................................................................. 358
Create a Page ....................................................................................................................................... 359
Page Creation Overview .......................................................................................................... 360
Page Creation Procedure......................................................................................................... 361
Page Interface Editor View—Toolbar .................................................................................. 363
Create a Read-only Parameters File ............................................................................................. 373
About the CSV Template File Format .................................................................................. 382

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Select
Windows programs use an object-action paradigm: you first select an object and then you
select the action to apply to the object.

The PLUS+1 GUIDE program uses an action-object paradigm: you first select an action and
then you select the object of the action.

When working with the PLUS+1 GUIDE program, you:

1. Click to select an action.

2. Do the action.
3. Stop the action by either clicking another action or by pressing `.

Example: To add 3 Digit Autotype constants components to the Drawing Area:

1. In the Constant section of the Component tab, click 3 Digit Auto-type.

2. Each click in the Drawing Area adds another 3 Digit Auto-type component.

3. Stop adding these components by either clicking another action or with `.

Undo Your Mistakes

Undo Redo

Toolbar

Use the Undo and Redo buttons in the toolbar or the Setup menu’s Undo and Redo
commands to correct your mistakes.

T By default, the PLUS+1 GUIDE program enables the Undo and Redo functions. The
Options window enables and disables these functions.
The path to this window is Setup menu > Options > Options window > General.

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Zoom with the Mouse


...
2 1
...
1 2

Zoom in Zoom out

Zoom level

To zoom using the mouse:


1. Right-click to locate the zoom center.

2. Right-click and drag to zoom in or out:

− Drag diagonally to the upper right to zoom in.


− Drag diagonally to the lower left to zoom out.
The Status bar shows the zoom level.

Zoom with Keystrokes


To zoom using keystrokes:
1. Right-click to locate the zoom center.
2. Zoom in or zoom out:

− M zooms in.
− W zooms out.

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Delete a Single Item

Displays for a single selection or multiple identical selections

4 4

Selected
action

1. In the toolbar, click the Delete button.

The Status bar shows that you have selected the delete action.
2. In the Drawing Area, click and drag to select the item that you want to delete.

The Attributes window displays when you select a single item or make multiple
selections of identical items (such as selecting three components).

3. Click OK to delete the selected item.

4. Press 4 to refresh your view of the Drawing Area.

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Delete Many Items

* = Will be deleted
- = Will not be deleted
2

4
Selected
action
5 4
1. In the toolbar, click the Delete button.

The Status bar shows that you have selected the delete action.
2. In the Drawing Area, click and drag to select multiple items.

The Select Item Class window displays when select multiple items that belong to
more than one class (such as a component and a wire).

3. Use the Select Item Class to select the items that you want to delete.

− An asterisk (*) identifies a class of items that will be deleted.


− A dash (–) identifies a class of items that will not be deleted.
4. Click OK to delete items.
5. Press 4 to refresh your view of the Drawing Area.

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Delete a Signal-to-Bus Connection


Bus

Port Annotated text

Signal wire

A signal-to-bus connection consists of:

• A green signal wire.

• Annotated text that identifies the signal carried by the wire.

• A port where the signal wire enters the bus.

• A red signal bus.

Typically, when you delete a signal-to-bus connection, you want to keep the bus but
delete the wire, annotated text, and port.

* = Will be deleted
A - = Will not be deleted
C

D
B

E 4
Selected action

1. Delete the signal-to-bus connection at the bus without deleting the bus.
A. Click the Delete button in the toolbar.
The Status bar shows that you have selected the delete action.

B. Click and drag to select the signal connection items as shown.

Releasing the mouse displays a Select Item Class window that identifies, by class,
the items that you have selected.

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C. In the Select Item Class window, click Toggle ON<-> OFF and click:

– An asterisk (*) next to Annotate Text.

– An asterisk (*) next to Port.

– A dash (-) next to WireBusSeg.

D. Click OK to delete the selected items.


E. Press 4 to refresh the Drawing Area view.

... B
A

C 4

2. Delete the remaining wire segment.

A. Click and drag to select the wire segment as shown.

Releasing the mouse displays an Attributes window that shows the attributes of
the wire that you selected.

B. Click OK to delete the selected wire.

C. Press 4 to refresh the Drawing Area view.


Repeat this step to delete any remaining wire segments.

Refresh a View
Press 4 to refresh your view of the Drawing Area.

View a Full Page


Press h to fit the entire page in the Drawing Area. A thin blue line (—) indicates the
boundaries of a page.

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Pan a View by Right-Clicking and Dragging

1
2

1. Right-click and drag the pointer straight in the direction that you want the page to
move.
A square appears where you right-click.
2. Release the mouse.

The area that was under the square now centers on your pointer.

Pan a View by Right-Clicking


Right-click your mouse in the direction that is opposite from the direction that you want
the page to move.

The farther you right-click from the center of the page, the more the page moves.

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Navigate an Application with Buttons


Top Level page
1 or e
Inputs page
...
2

To leave a page: or L

• To enter a page:
1. Click the Enter Page button in the toolbar or press E.

2. Drag at a page port.

• To leave a page, click the Leave Page button in the toolbar or press l.

Navigate an Application with the Page Navigator tab


Top Level page

Inputs page

• To go directly to a page, click the page in the Page Navigator tab.

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Show and Hide Panes


This figure identifies the controls that show and hide panes in the PLUS+1 GUIDE
window. (Not all panes have the same controls that are shown in this figure.)

Panel Control buttons

Drag to undock
Click to close

Drag to dock

Default Down—lock
Layout Up—unlock

Drag to resize

• Click the Default Layout command in the View menu to display locked Manager,
Inspector, Compiler, and Selector panes in their default positions.

• Once you have clicked the Default Layout command, you can use the Pane Control
buttons or the Manager, Page Navigator, Inspector, Compiler Messages, and
Selector commands in the View menu to show and hide panes.

• To undock a pane from the PLUS+1 GUIDE window, drag the pane by its undocking
bar to separate it from the window.

• To dock a pane to the PLUS+1 GUIDE window, drag the pane by its title bar over the
window edge until it docks.

• To autohide a pane (show and hide with mouse movements), unlock the Pane Control
button. The pane will only display when you move the mouse to the edge of the pane.

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Install a Hardware Description

1. Install the Hardware Description in the Project Manager tab.

A. Locate the Hardware Description for your PLUS+1 hardware model and drag it
from the Hardware tab into the Project Manager tab.

B. In the Project Manager tab, fully expand the Hardware Description tree.

C. In the Hardware tab, also fully expand the Hardware Description tree.

A
B

2. As needed, change the comment that describes the hardware to a comment that is
meaningful to you.

A. In the Project Manager tab, click the Hardware Description comment.

B. In the toolbar, click the Inspector button to display the Inspector pane.

C. In the Inspector pane Comment field, change the default Hardware Description
comment.

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3. Install and rename the Template.

A. Drag the Template from the Hardware tab to the Project Manager tab.

(You can also drag the Template and drop it into the Drawing Area.)

B. Use the Rename Main Module window to give the Default template a name that
is useful for you.

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Change Properties with the Inspector Tab


A B

1. Display the properties of the item in the Inspector tab.

A. In the toolbar, click the Inspector button.

The Inspector tab displays.

B. Click the Query/Change button in the toolbar.

C. In the Drawing Area, click an item.

The Inspector tab displays the properties of the item.

A
A
B

2. Change the property of the item.

A. In the Inspector tab, click the property that you want to change.
B. Select or enter a new property value.

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Change Properties with the Pop-up Edit Window


1

Change the property of an item.

1. In the toolbar, click the Query/Change button.


2. In the Drawing Area, click the property that you want to change.

The pop-up Edit Value window displays.

3. Change the property value.

T By default, the PLUS+1 GUIDE program enables the Undo and Redo functions. The
Options window enables and disables these functions.
The path to this window is Setup menu > Options > Options window > General.

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Create a Page
An application template contains pages. Pages in the template logically organize
functions such as inputs, parameters, outputs, as well as the application itself.

User-defined pages

You can add your own pages when you need to:

• Create more space in which to layout components.

• Reduce confusion and clutter.

• Logically organize functions.

• Create blocks of components that you can export and then import for reuse in other
applications.

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Page Creation Overview


Page Top View
Click to enter Page Interface Editor View
Click to enter Page View

Page View

Page Interface
Editor View

Import Block (*.SCS format file)

The preceding figure shows a Top View, Page View, and Page Interface Editor View of the
same page. You use these three page views—typically along with the Import Block
command—to create a page.

Page Creation overview


Item Description

Page Top View In this view, you connect wires and buses to the entries that you defined in the Page Interface Editor View.

Page View In this view, you add wire and bus ports. These ports connect to the entries that you defined in the Page Interface
Editor View.
You connect the components that you place in this page to these ports.
You can import blocks of components into this page and also drag individual items into this page from the
Component and Library tabs.

Import Block Use the File menu’s Import Block command to select an *.SCS file containing a block of components and import it
into the Page View.
(Use the File menu’s Export Block command to export selected items to an *.SCS format file.)

Page Interface Editor View Design the appearance of the page’s Top View here. Use the Page Interface Editor tools to draw page borders, add
wire and bus entries, and add text labels.

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Page Creation Procedure

The following procedure creates the page shown in the preceding figure. This page has a
wire and a bus input and a wire and a bus output.

The contents of your page determine the number of inputs and outputs required on the
page that you create.

This procedure focuses on creating a page but not on adding contents to the page. Your
programming style determines when and how you add contents to the page.

Also see Page Guidelines on page 438 for suggestions about the layout of page elements
and port labeling.

1. Prepare to add a new page.


A. In the toolbar, click the Enter page button.
B. Drag at an entry port of the page in which you want to place a new page.

Typically, the Application page is the first place where you need to add a page.

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Stop

Start

2. Add a page.

A. In the Add menu, click Page.


B. Click and drag from the lower left to the upper right to add the page.

A Page Interface Editor toolbar

3. Go to the Page Interface Editor View.


You design the top view appearance of a page in the Page Interface Editor View.
A. In the toolbar, click the Enter page button.

B. Click and drag on a page border to enter the page.


C. In the toolbar, click the Top View button to enter the Page Interface Editor View.
The Page Interface Editor View displays a new toolbar. Use the buttons in this
toolbar to create the Top View of the page.

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Page Interface Editor View—Toolbar

The Page Interface Editor View displays the preceding toolbar. The following table
describes the tools in this toolbar that you commonly use to create a page view.

Page Interface Editor toolbar—commonly used tools


Tool Use To

Move Move items.

Change Size Resize lines and move entries, @PAGENAMEs, and text.

Copy Copy items.

Query/Change Change entry names and the text in text entries.

Delete Delete items.

Entry Bring a wire carrying a single signal to a page.

Bus Entry Bring a bus carrying many signals to a page.

Line Draw a line between an entry and a page border.

Wide Line Draw the borders of a page.

Text Label entries.

Close Window Leave the Page Interface Editor.

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4. In the Page Interface Editor View, delete the page border.

A. In the toolbar, click the Delete button.


B. Drag on the page border. Dragging turns the page’s lines white and opens an
Attributes window.

C. In the <Rectangle> Attributes window, click OK.

A
C
B
Insertion point
D

Two grid offset

5. In the Page Interface Editor View, draw new, thick blue page borders and reposition
the @PAGENAME.

Do not delete @PAGENAME. @PAGENAME is a placeholder for a meaningful page


name that you will add in a future step.

A. In the toolbar, click the Wide Line button.


B. Click and drag to draw boundary lines.
Position the left vertical boundary two gridlines (5.0 mm) to the right and two
gridlines down from the entry point.

Always start and end page boundary lines on grid intersections.


C. In the toolbar, click the Move button.

D. Click @PAGENAME and move it to just below the top border of the page.

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A
B

C
E `
D

6. In the Page Interface Editor View, add wire entries as needed.

A wire entry brings a signal to the border of a page.


To add bus entries, go the next step.
A. In the toolbar, click the Entry button.

(Note the button shown in the preceding figure. Do not confuse the Entry Bus
button and the Entry button.)

The <Entry> Change Attributes (Single Mode) window opens.

B. In the <Entry> Change Attributes (Single Mode) window’s EntryName, type the
name for the wire entry.

C. In the <Entry> Change Attributes (Single Mode) window, click OK.


D. Click to place the wire entry.
Place entries two grids from the page border.

E. Press `.
Repeat these substeps to add additional wires.

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A B

C
E `

7. In the Page Interface Editor View, add bus entries as needed.


A bus entry brings a bus to the border of a page.

A. In the toolbar, click the Entry Bus button.


(Note the button shown in the preceding figure. You can easily confuse the Entry
button and the Entry Bus button.)

The <Entry>Change Attributes (Single Mode) window opens.

B. In the <Entry> Change Attributes (Single Mode) window’s EntryName, type the
name that you want to give the bus entry.

C. In the <Entry> Change Attributes (Single Mode) window, click OK.


D. Click to place the bus entry.
Place entries two grids from the page border.

E. Press `.

Repeat these substeps to add additional bus entries.

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A
B

8. In the Page Interface Editor View, draw lines between the entries and the page
borders.
These non-functional lines improve the top level appearance of a page.

A. In the toolbar, click the Line button.

B. Draw a line between each entry and the borders of the page.

A
B

D E

9. In the Page Interface Editor View, add a text label to each entry.
A. In the toolbar, click the Text button.
B. Click anywhere on the page.

The Text Attributes window opens.

C. In the Text Attributes window, type a text label name in the String field.

D. Click OK.

E. Click where you want to place the label.


Repeat these substeps to add text labels to all other entries.

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Click
Standard toolbar

10. Click the Stop button to leave the Page Interface Editor and return to the Page View.

11. In the Page View, add wire ports as needed.


A wire port brings a wire entry into the page.
To add a bus port, go to step 13.
A. In the toolbar, click the Port Wire button.

(Note the button shown in the preceding figure. You can easily confuse this
button with the Port Bus button.)

The Select Symbol – Schematics Design window opens.

B. In the Select Symbol – Schematics Design window, click


wp.Interface ->·· local.

C. In the Select Symbol-Schematics Design window, click Load.

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E `

12. Place the wire port and select the wire entry that you want to port into the page.
A. Click to place the wire port.

The Select/Define Port Name window opens. This window lists the names of wire
entries that you created in the Page Interface Editor.

B. In the Select/Define Port Name window, click the wire entry that you want to
port into the page.

C. In the Select/Define Port Name window, click OK.

D. Draw a wire from the wire port and then press 9 to terminate the wire.

Repeat these substeps to add additional wire ports.


E. Press ` to stop adding wire ports.

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13. In the Page View, add bus ports as needed to the page.

A bus port brings an entry bus into the page.


A. In the toolbar, click the Port Bus button.
(Note the button shown in the preceding figure. You can easily confuse this
button with the Port Wire button.)

The Select Symbol – Schematics Design window opens.

B. In the Select Symbol – Schematics Design window, click


bp.Interface ->·· local.

C. In the Select Symbol-Schematics Design window, click Load.

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B
C

E `
14. Place the bus port and select the bus entry that you want to bring into the page.
A. Click to place the bus port.

The Select/Define Port Name window opens. This box lists the bus entries that
you created in the Page Interface Editor.

B. In the Select/Define Port Name window, click the bus entry that you want to port
into the page.

C. In the Select/Define Port Name window, click OK.

D. Draw a bus from the bus port and then press 9 to terminate the bus.

Repeat these substeps to add additional bus ports.


E. Press ` to stop adding bus ports.

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Click

15. In the toolbar, click the Leave Page button to leave the Page View and go to the Top
View of the page.

D ‘

16. In the Top View, give the page a name that is meaningful to you.
A. In the toolbar, click the Query/Change button.

B. Click Page1.

The Edit Page Name window displays.

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Create a Read-only Parameters File


This procedure describes how to create a read-only parameters file.

A read-only parameters file is a downloadable lhx file with constant values that configure
an application.

A read-only parameter files is useful where, except for different configuration values, the
same logic controls a series of devices, such as a family of hydraulic motors.

Instead of creating a separate application for each device, you can create different read-
only parameters files to configure the same application for use with each device in the
series.
This procedure creates a read-only parameters file with the following values.

Read-only parameters
Name Signal Type Value

CalThldMin (Calibration Threshold Minimum) U16 5400

CalThldMax (Calibration Threshold Maximum) U16 8100

ThldMult (Threshold Multiplier) U16 1000

DfltThld (Default Threshold) U16 7500

FltDet (Fault Detect) BOOL 1 (1 =T; 0 =F)

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1. Start the PLUS+1 GUIDE program.


2. Open the GUIDE project for which you want to create a read-only parameter lhx file.

T See Read-only Parameter on page 285 for more information about the components
used to create a read-only parameters file.

Changed from
TYPE to Setup_Values

Changed from
COMMENT to Mtr_Values
(Motor Values)

3. Create the logic needed to add read-only parameters to an application.

In this example:

− The PARAMETER OPEN component outputs a Boolean F until you download a


read-only parameters lhx file with a matching TYPE, parameter names, parameter
order, and data types.

F inputs to the Switch components cause these components to output 0 and F


values to the application.

− The PARAMETER OPEN component outputs a Boolean T when you download a


matching read-only parameters lhx file.

T inputs to the Switch components cause these components to apply the values
in the read-only parameters lhx file to the application.

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4. Enable the read-only parameters feature.

A. In the Project Manager tab, click the *.SYS (kernel) file.

B. In the Inspector tab, click the button that appears in the Parameters property to
display the Edit System Parameters window.

C. In the Edit System Parameters window, click to ENABLE the Read-only


Parameters feature.

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Type names must match

C
D ‘
5. Set the properties needed to create a read-only parameters lhx file.

A. In the Project Manager tab, right-click the Application Name (Motor Control in
this example) to display a pop-up menu.

B. In the pop-up menu, click Add New Read-only Parameter.

The Inspector tab shows the File Name of the *.exr conversion file.

C. In the Inspector tab, enter a TYPE name that matches the TYPE name used in the
PARAMETER OPEN component (Setup_Values in this example).

D. Press ‘.

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6. Generate a CSV (Comma-Separated Value) template file.

A. Click the Compile All button.


The compile process generates a CSV template file and then aborts, displaying
ERROR 77 messages in the Error Messages tab. One error message displays for
each read-only parameter in the application.

The CSV template file has fields for each parameter, but no data types or values in
the fields.
In the next steps, you turn the CSV template file into a CSV source file by adding
values and saving the file under a new name. You then run a PLUS+1 process that
outputs the values in the CSV source file to a downloadable read-only parameters
lhx file.

These steps resolve the causes of ERROR 77 messages.

B. Click Close to close the Compile Progress window.

Warning
Do not compress (zip) your project files until you have resolved the causes of all ERROR 77
messages.
Zipping the project files with unresolved errors will corrupt the P1P format file. You will not be
able to reopen your project.
If you close a project with unresolved ERROR 77 messages, do not zip the project files.

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A
CSV template file—no data types or values

7. Browse to and open the CSV template file.

A. Browse to the project folder and locate the CSV template file.

The name of the CSV template file is DataTemplate_+TYPE.csv.

In this example, the TYPE of the PARAMETER OPEN component is Setup_Values.


The name of the CSV template file is DataTemplate_Setup_Values.csv.

B. Right-click the CSV template file and, using the pop-up menus, open the template
file with Microsoft Excel or Notepad.

See About the CSV Template File Format on page 382 for more information
about the format of the CSV template file.

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CSV template file—no data types or values

Data type
Value
CSV source file—data types and values

Value (1 = T; 0 = F)
Data type
8. Create the CSV source file.
A. In the CSV template file, enter a data type and a value for each parameter.

Data types and values are required. Comments are optional.


B. Save the changes made to the CSV template under a different file name. This file
becomes the CSV source file.

In this example, changes made in the DataTemplate_Setup_Values.csv file get


saved to the DataTemplate_Setup_Values_1.csv file.

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A
B

Select CSV source file

9. Generate a downloadable read-only parameters lhx file.

A. In the toolbar, click the Generate Parameter button to display the Generate Read-
only Parameter File window.

B. In the Generate Read-only Parameter File window, click Generate Type.

C. In the Generate Read-only Parameter File window, click Browse to display the
Open window.

Use the Open window to select the CSV source file for the Data Values used in
the read-only parameters lhx file.

D. In the Generate Read-only Parameter File window, click Run.

An Information window with a NO ERRORS FOUND message displays if the


PLUS+1 GUIDE program successfully outputs the values in the CSV source file to
the read-only parameters lhx file.
By default, the name of the read-only parameters lhx file is
DataTemplate_+TYPE.lhx.

(To change the default file name, see OutputFileName on page 382.)

In this example, the TYPE of the PARAMETER OPEN component is Setup_Values.


The read-only parameters lhx file name is DataTemplate_Setup_Values.lhx.

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Compile

Read-only parameters file


Application file

10. Compile the application.


The project now has two downloadable lhx files:

− An application file—Motor Control.lhx in this example.


The application file reserves controller memory locations for the read-only
parameters, with references to their TYPE, order, data types, and names.
Download this file first.

− A read-only parameters file—DataTemplate_SETUP_VALUES.lhx in this


example.

Download this file second.


To successfully download this file, references in this file to the order, data types,
and names of the parameters must match similar references in the controller’s
memory.

For more information about downloading lhx files, see the PLUS+1 Service Tool User
Manual.

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About the CSV Template File Format

The CSV template file has fields for each read-only parameter but no values in the fields.

You add values to the fields and save the file under a new name to create a CSV source file.

The CSV source file is the source for the downloadable, read-only parameters lhx file.

CSV template file format


Row Label Field Description
1 Format* Identifies the format of the read-only parameters file.

2 Type* Identifies the read-only parameter set, using the PARAMETER OPEN component’s TYPE value.

3 TypeFileName* Identifies the *EXR file used to generate the read-only parameters file.

4 OutputFileName Defines the name of downloadable read-only parameters lhx file that you generate with the Generate Read-
only Parameter File window.
As needed, enter a new output file name (in this example, replace DataTemplate_SETUP_VALUES.lhx).

5 VERSION Defines a version field that appears in PLUS+1 Service Tool program.
As needed, enter a version (in this example, replace Heavy Duty Motor).

6 ADDRESSMODE* The address mode as defined by the hardware.

7 DEFAULTTYPEDATA* The default data type as defined by the hardware.

8 MIN_DATASIZE* The value of the minimum data size as defined by the hardware.

9 – – – – –* Divides the file header from the data.

10 NAME*; SIGNALTYPE; Data header.


VALUE; COMMENT

11– Read-only parameters, generated from the parameter set in your application.
For each read-only parameter, enter a SIGNALTYPE (Data Type) and a VALUE.
As needed, enter an optional COMMENT. Comments do not become part of the read-only parameters lhx file.

*Do not change.

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This chapter contains some “how-to” procedures for the PLUS+1 GUIDE Screen Editor.

Chapter contents Start a Screen Editor Project ........................................................................................................... 384


Define Areas Page/Assign a Hardware Port .............................................................................. 387
Define Areas Page/Assign More Screen Areas.......................................................................... 388
Define Areas Page/Rename a Screen Area ................................................................................ 389
Define Areas Page/Delete a Screen Area.................................................................................... 390
Define Areas Page/Change Screen Area Properties ............................................................... 391
Define Areas Page/Initialize Signal-Enabled Screen Areas................................................... 393
Define Screen Page/Assign a Screen Area ................................................................................. 394
Define Screen Page/Delete a Screen Area ................................................................................. 395
Define Screen Page/Create Bar Graphs....................................................................................... 396
Define Screen Page/Create a Text Group................................................................................... 397
Define Screen Page/Use the Default Language Setting ....................................................... 399
How to Change the Default Language ............................................................................... 399
Define Screen Page/Switch between Different Languages................................................. 400
Define Screen Page/Display a Data Value.................................................................................. 401
Define Screen Page/Format a Data Value .................................................................................. 402
Define Screen Page/Display an Image List ................................................................................ 404
Define Screen Page/Display a Text List....................................................................................... 409
Define Screen Page/Install Additional Fonts ............................................................................ 414
Define Screen Page/Display a Non-Roman Alphabet............................................................ 420
Define Screen Page/Display Video ............................................................................................... 425
Define Screen Page/Print a Screen............................................................................................... 427

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Start a Screen Editor Project


The following procedure describes how to start a Screen Editor project. This project will
create an application for a PLUS+1 graphical terminal.

1. Install the most recent version (2.2.4 or later) of the PLUS+1 GUIDE program on your
PC.
2. Start the PLUS+1 program.
3. If you have already installed the hardware files for the graphical terminal, skip ahead
to step 6.

4. Install the hardware file for the graphical terminal for which you are creating an
application.

A. In the Setup menu, click Install Hardware.

B. In the Install Hardware window that opens, click Browse.

C. In the Select Hardware window that opens, locate and click the hardware file for
the graphical terminal.

D. In the Select Hardware window, click Open.

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A Hardware file

5. Install the hardware file for the graphical terminal.

A. In the Install Hardware window, click Install. The selected hardware file installs
and the Hardware tab now displays the selected hardware file.

B. Click OK to close the Information window.

Optional: change name

6. Click and drag the hardware file and the template for the graphical terminal from the
Hardware tab to the Project Manager tab.

A. In the Hardware tab, click to view all the items in the graphical terminal tree.

B. Drag the hardware file for the graphical terminal from the Hardware tab into the
Project Manager tab.

C. Drag the template file for the graphical terminal from the Hardware tab into the
Project tab. As needed, use the Replace Main Module window to rename the
module.

D. In the Replace Main Module window, click OK.

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The Drawing Area now displays the template in which you will create an
application for a graphical terminal. (Your template may look different.)

F
D

B E
F

7. Enter the Application page of the template and add Screen Editor pages.

This step adds the Define Areas page and the Define Screen page. All graphical
terminal applications that use the Screen Editor must have these two pages.

The Basic Page is provided for your convenience to contain the logic that controls
what the graphic terminal displays. You can add this page later.

Typically, you also add buses to bring Inputs signals to these pages. (See Screen
Editor Elements on page 319 for a fully “wired” example.)
A. In the toolbar, click the Enter Page button.

B. Drag at an Application page port to enter this page.

C. Click to view the Component tab.

D. In the Components tab, click to view all Display components.

E. Drag the Define Areas page into the Application page.

F. Drag the Define Screen page into the Application page.


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Define Areas Page/Assign a Hardware Port

Enter

1. Enter the Define Areas page.

Port pixel dimensions

Screen Area properties

Screen Area

2. Assign a hardware port.

A. In the Port Manager tab, click Area_Page1.

B. In the Inspector tab, click to select an HWPortName.

The Screen Editor adds a Screen Area to the Layout pane.

It resizes Layout pane to match the pixel dimensions of the HWPortName.

The Inspector tab displays the properties of the Screen Area, including its File
name.

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Define Areas Page/Assign More Screen Areas


Assigning a hardware port (see Define Areas Page/Assign a Hardware Port on page 387)
automatically assigns the first Screen Area. Follow this procedure to assign more Screen
Areas.

Enter

1. Enter the Define Areas page.

B
A

New Screen Area

Screen Area properties

2. Add a Screen Area.

A. In the Port Manager tab, right-click Area_Page1.

B. In the pop-up menu that opens, click New Screen Area.


The Layout pane displays a new Screen Area.

The Inspector tab displays the properties of the new Screen Area, including its
File name.

Repeat this step to add more Screen Areas.

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Define Areas Page/Rename a Screen Area

Enter

1. Enter the Define Areas page.

A
New file name

C /
2. Change the name of a Screen Area.

A. In the Port Manager tab, click the Screen Area name that you want to change.

B. In the Inspector tab, type the new File name.

C. Press '.

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Define Areas Page/Delete a Screen Area

Enter

1. Enter the Define Areas page.

2. Delete a Screen Area.

A. In the Port Manager tab, right-click the Screen Area that you want to delete.

B. In the pop-up menu that opens, click Delete.

C. In the Confirm window that opens, click Yes.

The Screen Area disappears from the Layout pane.


Repeat this step to delete other Screen Areas.
You cannot delete the last screen. One Screen Area always remains assigned to
the hardware port.

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Define Areas Page/Change Screen Area Properties


Route bus to page to make signals available

1. If you want to control properties with signals, you must route the bus containing the
desired signals to the Define Areas page to make these signals available.

Enter

2. Enter the Define Areas page.

3. To change a Screen Area property that is Constant, perform continue on to the next
step.

To control a Screen Area property through a Signal, perform step 5.

4. Change a screen property that is Constant.

A. In the Port Manager tab, click the Screen Area that has the property that you
want to change.
The Layout pane displays the selected Screen Area.

B. In the Inspector tab, click the Constant property that you want to change. Select
a new property from the list that displays.

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5. Control a screen property through a Signal.

A. In the Port Manager tab, click the Screen Area that has the property that you
want to control with a signal.
The Layout pane displays the selected Screen Area.

B. In the Inspector tab, click the Signal for the property that you want to control.
Select a signal from the list that displays.

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Define Areas Page/Initialize Signal-Enabled Screen Areas


You may want your graphical terminal to automatically display signal-enabled Screen
Areas on power up. On power-up, signal-enabled files (Screen Areas) stay invisible until
their enabling signals become true.

Multiple Screen Areas Display on Power Up

Off Delay: Holds all signal outputs


true for 150 ms after OS start.

Two Input Switch: Disables


inputs for 150 ms after OS start.

When you power up the graphical terminal, the logic in the preceding figure:

• Displays the Screen Areas enabled by the SW_SOFT1, SW_SOFT2, and SW_SOFT3
signals.

• Disables the SW_SOFT1, SW_SOFT2, and SW_SOFT3 inputs for 150 ms.

Screen Area with Company Logo Displays on Power Up

Off Delay:
Holds Logo_Scrn
signal true for 5 s after OS start
Negative Transition:
Two Input Switch: Makes SW_SOFT1 true
Disables inputs when 5 s off delay ends
for 5 s after OS start

When you power up the graphical terminal, the logic in the preceding figure:

• Displays the Screen Area enabled by the Logo_Scrn signal for five seconds.

• Disables the SW_SOFT1, SW_SOFT2, and SW_SOFT3 inputs for five seconds.

• Displays the Screen Area enabled by the SW_SOFT1 signal after five seconds.
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Define Screen Page/Assign a Screen Area


Enter

1. Enter the Define Screen Page.

C
B

A
D

2. Assign a Screen Area.

A. In the Screen Manager tab, right-click Screen_Page1.

B. In the pop-up menu that opens, click Assign Screen Area.

C. In the Select Screen Area window that opens, click the Screen Area that you want
to assign.

This window lists all the Screen Areas that you created in the Screen Areas page.

D. In the Select Screen Area window, click OK.


The Layout pane displays the Screen Area that you just assigned.

The Layout pane also resizes to the pixel dimensions of the HWPortName that
you assigned in the Define Areas page.

Grayed-out items in the Screen Library tab become available as soon as you
assign the first Screen Area.

Repeat this step to assign more Screen Areas.

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Define Screen Page/Delete a Screen Area


Enter

1. Enter the Define Screen page.

2. Delete a Screen Area.

A. In the Screen Manager tab, right-click the Screen Area that you want to delete.

B. In the pop-up menu that opens, click Delete.

C. In the Confirm window that opens, click Yes.


The Screen Area disappears from the Layout pane.
Repeat this step to delete more Screen Areas.

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Define Screen Page/Create Bar Graphs


The following figure and table lists the typical Inspector tab settings that you need to
create dynamic horizontal and vertical bar graphs using a Line.

You select a Line from the Shapes tree in the Screen Library tab.

• A horizontal bar graph changes size along its x-axis.

• A vertical bar graph changes size along its y-axis.

0 X-axis 400
0 Layout panel
Width—Constant

Y-axis

End point:
240 X—Constant,
same as Begin point X value
Y—Signal

Begin point: End point:


X—Constant X—Signal
Y—Constant Y—Constant,
same as Begin point Y value

Begin point:
Width—Constant X—Constant
Y—Constant

Horizontal Bar Graph Vertical Bar Graph

Basic inspector settings for bar graphs


Begin Point End Point

Bar Graph Type X Y X Y Width

Horizontal Constant Constant Signal Constant—same as y-axis Begin point Constant

Vertical Constant Constant Constant—same as x-axis Begin point Signal Constant

The horizontal bar graph shown in the preceding figure:

• Increases in length when the pixel value of its x-axis End point signal increases.

• Decreases in length when the pixel value of its x-axis End point signal decreases.
The vertical bar graph shown in the preceding figure:

• Increases in height when the pixel value of its y-axis End point signal decreases.

• Decreases in height when the pixel value of its y-axis End point signal increases.

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Define Screen Page/Create a Text Group

Parentheses () = default language

1. Define English as the default language for the Text Group.

(You can change the default language later. See Define Screen Page/Use the Default
Language Setting on page 399 for more information.)

A. In the Screen Library tab, right-click Texts.

B. In the pop-up menu that displays, click New Group.

2. If you do not need additional languages, skip ahead to step 4.

B Enter language name


Language list Text Group languages

Adds to Languages list


C
Deletes from Languages list
D

3. As needed, add additional languages to the Text Group.

A. Right-click Languages (English).

B. In the pop-up menu that displays, click Add.

C. Use the Languages window to add additional languages to the Text Group.

– Click the + button to display the Screen Editor window. Type the name of the
new language in this window and click OK.

– In the Languages window, click the languages that you want to add.

D. Click OK to add the selected languages to the Text Group.

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4. Open the Text Register pane.

A. In the Screen Library tab, right-click New Text Group.

B. In the pop-up menu that displays, click Text to open the Text Register pane.

Text Group
name

C D

5. Define the strings in the Text Group.

A. In Description, enter the reference name for the Text Group.

B. Enter the string in each of the Languages.

C. Click Save.
The Screen Library tab displays the Description name in the New Text Group
tree. (As needed, repeat these steps to add an additional Text Group.)

D. Click Close to close the Text Register pane.

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Define Screen Page/Use the Default Language Setting


Use the default language setting under the following conditions:

• Your application has Text Groups with multiple language strings.

• You want to create a separate download for each language.

• You do not want the end user to be able to switch between languages.

If you want the end user to be able to switch between languages, see Define Screen
Page/Switch between Different Languages on page 400.

How to Change the Default Language


To change the default language, perform the following steps:

2
New default language

1. In the Screen Library tab’s Languages tree, right-click the language that you want to
make the default language.

2. In the pop-up menu that opens, click Set as Default.

A download file created with a Swedish default language setting (as shown in the
preceding figure) only displays Swedish text strings.

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Define Screen Page/Switch between Different Languages


Language Definition Input* Select Language*

Input switches languages

Place to right of
Select Language component

*Available in Display components

Languages names and Definition inputs must match

Use this figure as a guide when creating logic that switches languages if:

• Your application has Text Groups with multiple language strings;

• And you want the end user to be able to switch between different languages.

If you do not want the end user to be able to switch between languages, see Define
Screen Page/Use the Default Language Setting on page 399.

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Define Screen Page/Display a Data Value


Route bus to page to make data signals available

1. Route the bus containing the desired data signal or signals to the Define Screen page.

Enter

2. Enter the Define Screen page.

3. Use the Text Register pane to create and register a text string with a % print character.
(See Define Screen Page/Create a Text Group on page 397.)

4. Select the data value that you want to display.

A. Drag the registered text from the Screen Library tab into the Layout pane.

B. In the Screen Manager tab, click to expand the new T (ext) entry.

C. In the Screen Manager tab, click the dv DataValue.

D. In the Inspector tab, click the signal with the value that you want to display.

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Define Screen Page/Format a Data Value


The following figure shows the elements used when displaying data values.

Print character Print character Print character

%d %+5d %05d
Conversion character Conversion character Conversion character
Formatting characters Formatting characters

• All data values require a:

− % print character.
− A conversion character that is appropriate for the data values that you want to
display.

• Use the formatting characters as needed to refine the appearance of the data.

Conversion character properties


Conversion
Character Display Data Type Positive Values Negative Values

d Decimal U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 Yes Yes

Ld Decimal U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 Yes Yes

li Decimal U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 Yes Yes

0 Octal U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 U32 Yes No

Lo Octal U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 U32 Yes No

x Hexadecimal, lower case U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 U32 Yes No

X Hexadecimal, upper case U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 U32 Yes No

Lx Hexadecimal, lower case U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 U32 Yes No

lX Hexadecimal, upper case U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 U32 Yes No

U Decimal U8 S8 U16 S16 S32 U32 Yes No

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Special formatting characters


Formatting
Character Description Examples

Space Puts a blank space before a positive displayed value and a - sign before a negative displayed value. Item 2

+ Puts a + sign before a positive displayed value and a – sign before a negative displayed value. Item 3

n Right justifies the displayed value, where n = maximum number of spaces that precede the value. Spaces Item 4
decrease as the value increases.

-n Left-justifies the displayed value, where n = maximum number of spaces that can follow the value. Spaces Item 5
decrease as the displayed value increases.

0n Sets the maximum number padding zeros that appear to the left of the displayed value, where n = number Item 6
of zeros.

# Alternate displayed value: ——


#o—octal output, with value preceded by an “0”
#X—uppercase hexadecimal output, with the value preceded by an 0X.

Formatting examples (S16 input)


Item Formatting Input Value Displayed Value Input Value Displayed Value Input Value Displayed Value

1 %d 0 0 111 111 -111 -111

2 %+d 0 +0 111 +111 -111 -111

3 %5d 0 0 111 111 -111 -111

4 %-5d 0 0 111 111 -111 -111

5 %05d 0 00000 111 00111 -111 -0111

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Define Screen Page/Display an Image List

This “how-to” assumes that you have assigned:

• A hardware port to your Define Areas block.

For more information, see Define Areas Page/Assign a Hardware Port on page 387.

• A Screen Area to your Define Screen block.

For more information, see Define Screen Page/Assign a Screen Area on page 394.

ImgLst_Enbl (BOOL)—Enables the Image List component


Img_Slct (U8)—Selects which image displays

1. Create the logic needed to control an Image List component.

Typically, this logic has:

− A Boolean signal that controls the Image List component’s Enable property.
In this example, the Image List component displays when the Boolean
ImgLst_Enbl (Image List Enable) signal is T.

− An integer signal that controls the Image List component’s ActiveIndex


property.

In this example, the value of the U8 Img_Slct (Image Select) signal controls which
image the Image List component displays.

Enter

2. Enter the Define Screen block.

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Image Register pane

Add images

3. Use the Image Register pane to add images to the Screen Library tab’s Image tree.

See Define Screen Page/Text Register on page 342 for more information about the
Image Register pane.

Image List entry

4. Drag an Image List component from the Screen Library tab into the Layout pane.

− Position the Image List component where you want the images to appear.
− The Screen Manager tab displays an Image List entry.

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Display order

5. Drag images from the Screen Library tab on to the Image List component.

− Each image that you successfully add to the Image List component acquires the
layered border of the Image List component.

− The name of each image added to the Image List component appears in the
Image List tree in the Screen Manager tab.

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6. Select an ActiveIndex signal to control which image the Image List component
displays.

A. In the Screen Manager tab, click the Image List entry.

B. In the Inspector tab, select a signal to control the Image List component’s
ActiveIndex property.

The order in which you added images to the Image List component sets the initial
Order value of each image.

(You can move an image in the Image List tree to change its Order.)

An image displays when its Order value equals the ActiveIndex value.

In this example, the Data.Img_Slct signal sets the ActiveIndex property.

– The Low Washer Fluid image has an Order value of 0. A Data.Img_Slct


signal value of 0 displays this image.

– The Check Taillight image has an Order value of 1. A Data.Img_Slct signal


value of 1 displays this image.

– The Dirty Oil Filter image has an Order value of 2. A Data.Img_Slct signal
value of 2 displays this image.

– The Dirty Air Filter image has an Order value of 3. A Data.Img_Slct signal
value of 3 displays this image.

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7. Select an Enable signal to enable the display of the Image List component.

A. In the Screen Manager tab, click the Image List entry.

B. In the Inspector tab, select a signal to set the Enable property.

An Image List component displays when its Enable property is T.

In this example:

– The Data.ImgList_Enbl signal sets the Enable property.

– No images in the Image List component display unless the


Data.ImgList_Enbl signal is T.

To enable a constant display of the Image List component, set its Enable
property to a Constant value of T.
8. Compile the application and download it to the display terminal.

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