Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 6

Name

Date

Criterion:

A,B,C,D

2 MYP

GREEN
GREEN

-

BLUE
BLUE

States of Matter Lab

Objective: To determine how water behaves when its temperature is increased

Hypothesis: Write an “If….then” statement about how temperature will affect an object’s state of matter.

Background Information:

Substances can exist in three different statessolid, liquid, or gas. Regardless of whether the substance is a solid, liquid,

or gas, the atoms, ions, or molecules that make up the substance are attracted to each other. The attractions between

these particles is what holds the substance together ( Inquiry Action, 2015).

In a solid, the atoms, ions, or molecules of the substance are held very close together. They vibrate but do not move past

each other. This is what gives solids their definite size and shape. When heat energy is added to a solid, the motion of

the particles increases. The particles are still attracted to each other but their extra movement starts to compete with

their attraction. If enough heat is added, the motion of the particles begins to overcome the attraction and the particles

move more freely. They begin to slide past each other as the substance begins to change its state from a solid to a liquid.

This process is called melting. The particles in a liquid are only slightly further apart than in a solid. Their attractions hold

them together enough so they don’t just fly apart and become a gas ( Inquiry Action, 2015).

Water exists in three states: solid, liquid, and gas. Solid water is ice. The water molecules in ice vibrate but cannot

change position relative to other water molecules. In liquid water, molecules are free to move around each other.

However, the molecules remain close together. Gaseous water is called water vapor. Water molecules in vapor have so

much energy that they escape the attractions of the other water molecules. Water vapor spreads out into the available

space. In this activity, you will investigate the three states of water (Science Today, 2017).

Materials:

Exeriment 1

500-mL beaker

crushed ice

hot plate

Celsius thermometer

Stop watch

Safety:

EXPERIMENT 2

Ice

Salt

Clean empty metal can

Metal spoon

Paper towel

The hot plate and beaker will be very hot. Do not touch them until after they have cooled.

Procedure:

EXPERIMENT 1

1. Place the ice directly into the beaker.

2. Place the thermometer in ice and record the temperature in degrees Celsius in the data table.

3. Turn the hot plate on.

4. Carefully place the beaker on the hot plate and start the stop watch.

5. Record the temperature of the ice every minute.

6. Record the state of matter of the water at each minute.

7. Make a graph showing how the water temperature changed over time.

a. Label the x-axis of your graph Time (min)

b. Label the y-axis of your graph Temperature (Celsius)

Time Temperature (C) State of Matter/Observations
Time
Temperature (C)
State of Matter/Observations
Experiment 2 1. Dry the outside of a can with a paper towel. 2. Place

Experiment 2

1. Dry the outside of a can with a paper towel.

2. Place 3 heaping teaspoons of salt in the bottom of the can. Fill the can about halfway with crushed ice.

3. Add another 3 heaping teaspoons of salt

4. Add more ice until the can is almost filled and add another 3 teaspoons of salt.

5. Hold the can securely and mix the icesalt mixture with a sturdy metal spoon for about 1 minute. Remove the spoon, and observe the outside of the can. Do not touch it yet.

6. Wait 35 minutes. While you wait, answer the questions on the activity sheet.

7. 7. Look at and touch the outside of the can. Then record your observations.

Analysis:

EXPERIMENT 1

1. Examine the graph you created. Describe how the temperature changed throughout the experiment in relation to the state of matter of the water.

2. Heat energy is being continually added to the system by the hot plate. This causes the water molecules to change their motion. Explain how the addition of energy changes the movement of the molecules during each state of matter.

3. In this lab, you saw how water changes state. Give 2 other examples of matter changing state.

EXPERIMENT 2

Give 2 other examples of matter changing state. EXPERIMENT 2 2. Why do you think there

2. Why do you think there is frost on one part of the can and water on another part?

3. Use the terms condense and freeze to answer the question: How does water vapor

become frost?

4. In the upper atmosphere, where its colder, water vapor in the air can change. This

activity can be a model of what happens to water vapor in the atmosphere. Models help us to understand objects or processes that cannot easily be seen. In this model,

the can represents the cold temperature in the upper atmosphere and the water vapor in your classroom represents the water vapor in the atmosphere. Using this model, what do the liquid and frost on the outside of the can represent?

5. Use the terms evaporation, condensation, freezing, and melting to label the processes where matter changes from one state to another in the picture below.

changes from one state to another in the picture below. Conclusion The conclusion section needs to

Conclusion

The conclusion section needs to have five sentences:

1 st sentence: Repeat the objective

2 nd sentence: Describe what you did specifically in the lab to achieve the objective.

3rd sentence: State your hypothesis and use your data to explain if it correct or not and why. 4th sentence: Share what you learned. 5th sentence: This is a general summary of the lab. It ties into the first sentence of the purpose.

REFERENCES: (at least 3 Resources)