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S H I C H A N

portfolio vol. 4.2


C U R R I C U L U M V I T A E

CONTACT ABOUT ME

Singapore 23 years old, Singaporean

Born in Shanghai, Raised in Singapore


shichan_shen@hotmail.com
Proficient in English, Chinese, and Shanghainese

(+65) 8189 5922 I am fascinated by the magnitude of the universe


and what it has to offer, which is why I love pursuing
linkedin.com/in/shichan-shen the truths behind it. When I am not doing architec-
SHEN SHICHAN ture, I like to travel, listen to music, and read about
(ALLIE) philosophy and science.

ACADEMIC BACKGROUND SOFTWARE SKILLS

Master of Architecture, NUS (aug’18 - present)

Bachelor of Arts in Architecture (Hons), NUS (aug’14-may’18)


Relevant Coursework: Design for Fire Safety, Ageing and The
Enviroment, Architectural Practice, Architectural Construction AutoCAD Rhino SketchUp v-ray Enscape

Exchange Semester, Tsinghua University, Beijing (aug’17-jan’18)


Relevant Coursework: Interior Design, History and Theory of Chinese
Architecture, Ecological Design

Adobe Adobe Adobe ArchiCAD Microsoft


Anglo-Chinese Junior College (feb’12-dec’13)
Illustrator Photoshop InDesign Office
Nan Hua High School (jan’08-dec’11)

LEADERSHIP ROLES WORK EXPERIENCE

Paperspace (Architectural Publication) Editor (’17) Architectural Intern @ DP Architects (may’18-aug’18)


Developed a monthly publication which enabled students to Conceptualised and conducted modelling and drafting works of
discover and learn from the happenings around school interior spaces for a large-scale hospital project
Vice-Head of Costume Design for NUSSU Rag & Flag (’15) Partnered with consultants to solve design issues during technical
Designed and managed costumes for perfomers in an annual consultations
charity project organised by NUSSU to raise funds Prepared authority submissions and consulted FSSD on fire safety
Camp Leader for AKIID 2015 (’15) compliance matters
Coordinated and conducted activties for freshmen to assimilate Gained an enhanced understanding of designing for healthcare
them into the school through talks and meetings
Head of Publicity and Welfare in Chinese Orchestra (’12-13)
Architectural Intern @ FDAT Architects (may’17-aug’17)
Planned and organised an annual concert where the earnings
Conceptualised design elements for various projects in line with their
contributed to the maintenance of the orchestra
design briefs
Partnered with consultants and contractors to solve on-site issues
ACHIEVEMENTS + AWARDS during consultations
Prepared authority submissions and consulted URA and BCA on
Young Talent Programme – Market Immersion Award (’18)
compliance matters
BCA-Industry Undergraduate Sponsorship (’17-18)
Managed and negotiated with clients to meet stakeholders’ require-
Chinese University Study Award (’17-18)
ments
Project featured in Tsinghua Yearbook (’17-18) Conducted modelling and drafting works for a local small-scale
Project featured in NUS Yearbook (‘15-16) residential, shophouse renovation, and an overseas hotel project
THE HEART OF TSINGHUA
清华之心

The site of interest is located right in front of the main building of Tsinghua Unviersity. This space is fre-
quently visited by visitors and students of Tsinghua. Important events also take place at the main building,
which is one of the most prominent landmarks of Tsinghua University.

At first glance, what appears to be a beautifully manicured landscape is not as pleasant as it seems.

There is a disconnect between the different schools on site even though they exist in close proximity to
one another. The pavements leading up to the main building are used primarily as a transit zone. As the
main mode of transport in the campus is cycling, the pace of movement is very fast. This results in making
the space in front of the main building unsafe for pedestrians. The most pleasant space, which is the
beautifully manicured lawn cannot be used. All the unused spaces lead to congestion on the pavements.
The schools in the area are also located some distance away from residential/eating areas. Travelling to
these places between breaks take up time.

The site has potential to be homogeneous instead of dissociated. By slowing down the pace of life, there
can be increased chances of interaction. The site can be converted into a more pedestrian instead of bicy-
cles friendly zone. In order to cater to the students, programmes such as sleeping pods, cafeteria and
collaborative learning spaces can be introduced.
As the main building space is a place of im-
portance and great significance to the
campus, minimal intervention has been made
to the existing vistas, axes and symmetry on
site.

Functional spaces are created from


carved-out volumes underground. A continu-
ous underground axis connects the site from
the main gate to the main building. It also
functions as a promenade space, separating
the pedestrians from the cyclists who will
remain on ground level.

The central space of the site is defined by a


sphere that is carved out from the ground. In
the centre of this atrium space, there is a spi-
ralling series of steps that connects to differ-
ent programmes underground.

The sphere and steps are made from glass,


which makes the space transparent. Vertical
circulation cores expressed as glass blocks
punctures the different floors. These allows
natural daylight to penetrate the underground
spaces. Being transparent also allows the ex-
perience of going down the series of spiral- CONVERSATIONS BETWEEN DIFFERENT
ling steps to double as a journey of discovery. PUBLIC SPACES ALONG THE AXIS

DERIVATION OF FORM
EXPLODED AXONOMETRY
While inside the sphere, a person does not feel the boundaries in the confines of the underground space.

There is only air. The sphere is completely transparent and weightless.

The columns supporting the central square space is made of glass, whereas the others are made of con-
crete. This emphasies the difference between the central circulatory space and the programme spaces.

The configuration of the plan also resonates with the idea of freedom and weightlessness. Secondary
spaces are seen as individual, stand-alone entities, detached from walls and columns.

The programmes cater to the needs and wants of the students (ie. gym, cafeteria, supermarket, sleeping
pods, study areas).

These programmes are organised according the the amount of light they receive.

The lower the spaces are, the lesser natural daylight they receive, and vice versa. For instance, the sleep
sleep-
ing pods are located on the lowest floor and the study areas are located on the highest floor. The degree of
privacy the different programmes require are determined by their floors as well. The higher the spaces, the
more accessible they are to the public (ie. cafeteria, gym, study areas) , compared to spaces that are on the
lower floors.
THE OTHER PLACE

The thing that struck me the most when I was at Raffles Place was that everything was very regimented.
The spaces are demarcated and the boundaries on site were clear. There was a decorum to be abided by
on site – no walking across the lawn, unless you’re walking to the tables or swing sets that are placed on
the lawn. The amenities on site define the usage of the space. If there are no swing sets or tables on a
lawn, nobody walks on it.

What if, there exists another space? A space that gives the user autonomy over it. A space where the user gets to
observe how it morphs and changes in response to their movements?

The Other Place is an organism situated in the heart of the city. It hooks on to existing buildings and struc-
tures, appearing as a cloud-like web that invades the urbanscape. The Other Place responds to its envi-
ronment, shifting and morphing as it is being used. The user observes its physical mutation through the
appropriation of space at different scales.
Like many areas in Singapore, this site faces the problem of being a ghost town at night. A preliminary
analysis of the site and its surroundings, including Star Vista, Rochester Suites & Mall and the Ghim Moh
residential district, showed activity taking place mostly in the day, with programs largely localised and tar-
geted to specific users: the Holland Drive Food Center is the central node for residents in that area, while
Star Vista is a destination node for users from elsewhere due to its mixed-use nature.

However, further site studies showed potentials of activiating the site at night, such as the dominance of
Multi-National Companies in the Metropolis building (hence the possibility of syncing their working hours
with their foreign counterparts when needed), the phenomena of elderly exercising in the residential area
at 4am, the presence of food delivery serves (such as Foodpanda and Deliveroo) to both residential and
commercial areas in the middle of the night; all of which led to a study of sleep cycles and the likelihood
of a 24-hour town that caters to users who do not adhere to the conventional sleep cycle and daily routine
(i.e. sleeping from 12am to 6am, then working from 8am to 5pm).

Hence, the masterplan is designed on the basis of a 24-hour continuum, that is programmatically rooted
in round-the-clock hotdesking spaces and a cafe, together with work-live apartment units that provide
flexibility in terms of hours for working, sleeping and taking breaks.
A

B’

A’

raffles place
0 10 20 30 40m
1:1000
1st floor plan 2nd floor plan

3rd floor plan 4th floor plan


entry points

transformability of connector module through hydraulic pistons


The structure consists of multiple layers of certain places. These places are where the around the body. It can also stretch to accom-
nets stretched across the site. The top layer is bottom layer are stretched higher and the modate larger groups. At a larger scale, the
opaque, acting as a sun-shade for the main upper layer is stretched lower so they meet. connector nodes is a system that appropri-
spaces. Interspersed on the layers of nets are This creates a platform space. This platform ates space to its function. When the hydraulic
fixed slabs. Eating spaces such as kitchens space is adjustable in height. It can serve as a pistons are raised, the platform becomes a
and dining tables are situated on these slabs. connector between the different layers, stage for the display of exhibits or perfor-
Connecting these slabs across the layers of where one gets to crawl from the outside of mances. When the hydraulic pistons are low
nets are lifts and dumbwaiters. The lifts trans- one membrane into the inside of another. It ered, the platform becomes a transit between
ports humans from floor to floor, whereas the can also function as a performance or exhibi- the different layers of membrane, where one
dumbwaiters transport food from floor to tion space by raising the height of it. This can crawl from one layer to another.
floor. For instance, when someone is on the system is controlled by hydraulic pistons. The
ground floor, they can order food through the system of net changes spatially as this con- There are various types of entry points onto
dumbwaiter, and the food gets delivered to nector module changes to different functions. this structure. Firstly, at parts where the net
them from the higher levels after they have connects to the ground, users can climb onto
been prepared. No matter which level you are In this net, there is appropriation of space it to access the spaces above. The net also
on, you can order food that can be found on across different scales. Firstly, there is appro- extends into existing buildings on site, where
any level, because of the dumbwaiter system. priation of space to the human body. The net users can enter from the inside of buildings.
The different layers of nets are connected in itself is a flexible surface that warps itself Lastly, they can enter through the lifts.
CONTINUITY

It is the year 2047. Land is getting increasingly scarce. Resting places of the deceased in Singapore that
used to be shunned to the peripherals of the island to make up for housing development can no longer be
done so. There is a pressing need to integrate housing and resting places together. Research has also
shown that people recognise the importance of having conversations about death, showing their open-
ness towards the topic.

Continuity is about valuing every aspect of your life – whether you are alive, dying or dead. It is also about how
these aspects can coexist together in a community.
MASTERPLAN

The masterplan addresses the change in climate in the future, which according to projections, will entail
heavier rains and higher temperatures. The water body running through the site is a detention tank that
discharges into the rochor canal. The detention tank will not be underground as we project that there
would be technology to allow it to be above ground in the future. The masterplan also addresses the
main connection between Ophir Road and Rocher Road.
CLUSTERS
2ND STOREY PLAN 3RD STOREY PLAN

4TH, 11TH STOREY PLAN 5TH, 12TH STOREY PLAN

6TH, 10TH, 13TH STOREY PLAN 7TH STOREY PLAN

8TH STOREY PLAN 9TH STOREY PLAN


14TH STOREY PLAN 15TH STOREY PLAN

ROOF PLAN

The form is derived from the golden spiral - a symbol of continuity. The circulation is also such that the
spaces throughout the building are continuously linked by moving through corridors and garden spaces.

In a standard cohousing cluster, there are two stories of living spaces coupled with a double volume
kitchen and dining space. The second storey accesses the first storey through stairs. So it’s likely that
the disabled or the elderly stay on the lower floors whereas the more mobile occupants stay on the
upper floor. There is also a set back on the upper floor, which creates a balcony space that allows for a
another type of interaction with the communal space.
GARDENS OF REMEMBRANCE

The three different unit types are arranged in an upward spiral, emphasising the concept of continuity. Due
to this upward stagger, voids are formed. These voids are the gardens of remembrance. There are three
different types of gardens with different hierarchies - from a mediative and insular space to a more open
concept. The roof garden is the main garden space. Due to the nature of the golden spiral, the garden
space also expands progressively into a main garden space. Each garden is a communal space for one
group of clusters, where the roof garden is shared among the entire community.
SECTION A-A’ SECTION B-B’

SECTION C-C’ SECTION D-D’


H YPERCITY

A 24-hour city concept is proposed to encourage a more flexible work-life cycle. The design strategy is
to ensure a constant pulse of activity that runs throughout the day by giving the users opportunities to
easily toggle between different programmes. It challenges the existing social notion of what work-life
cycles should be like, by allowing users to adjust to their own unique lifestyle.

“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created
by everybody.” - Jane Jacobs,
MASTERPLAN

Like many areas in Singapore, this site faces the problem of being a ghost town at night. A preliminary
analysis of the site and its surroundings, including Star Vista, Rochester Suites & Mall and the Ghim Moh
residential district, showed activity taking place mostly in the day, with programs largely localised and tar-
geted to specific users: the Holland Drive Food Center is the central node for residents in that area, while
Star Vista is a destination node for users from elsewhere due to its mixed-use nature.

However, further site studies showed potentials of activiating the site at night, such as the dominance of
Multi-National Companies in the Metropolis building (hence the possibility of syncing their working hours
with their foreign counterparts when needed), the phenomena of elderly exercising in the residential area
at 4am, the presence of food delivery serves (such as Foodpanda and Deliveroo) to both residential and
commercial areas in the middle of the night; all of which led to a study of sleep cycles and the likelihood
of a 24-hour town that caters to users who do not adhere to the conventional sleep cycle and daily routine
(i.e. sleeping from 12am to 6am, then working from 8am to 5pm).

Hence, the masterplan is designed on the basis of a 24-hour continuum, that is programmatically rooted
in round-the-clock hotdesking spaces and a cafe, together with work-live apartment units that provide
flexibility in terms of hours for working, sleeping and taking breaks.
HOLLAND DRIVE SITE ANALYSIS
DUALITY

A museum was designed based on a curatorial analysis of Lim Mu Hue’s woodblock prints. The form is de-
rived from the idea of movement; through dynamic and static spaces.

Lim Mu Hue was born in Singapore in 1936. NAFA alumnus and educator, Lim who was trained in Western
painting, was renowned for his skillful and elaborate woodblock prints. Drawing inspiration from kam-
pong scenes, puppet theatres and changing landscapes of Singapore, Lim’s paintings were rich in local
themes. One of the most innovative artists of his generation, Lim had explored and integrated Chinese and
Western painting methods and concepts to develop his own distinctive style.

“We see in order to move; we move in order to see.” - William Gibson


DUALITY

A museum was designed based on a curatorial analysis of Lim Mu Hue’s woodblock prints. The form is de-
rived from the idea of movement; through dynamic and static spaces.

Lim Mu Hue was born in Singapore in 1936. NAFA alumnus and educator, Lim who was trained in Western
painting, was renowned for his skillful and elaborate woodblock prints. Drawing inspiration from kam-
pong scenes, puppet theatres and changing landscapes of Singapore, Lim’s paintings were rich in local
themes. One of the most innovative artists of his generation, Lim had explored and integrated Chinese and
Western painting methods and concepts to develop his own distinctive style.

“We see in order to move; we move in order to see.” - William Gibson


The back alley is a much more dynamic space compared to the front with the presence of many pockets
of spaces i.e. parking lots. As an attempt to conform to the existing site conditions, the more dynamic
spaces in my museum will be located at the back. The spaces are also more transparent so they reveal
their functions to passer-bys, contrasting with the spaces in front which are completely opaque.

The museum also starts to break away from the grid established from the vertical axes from my facade
analysis towards the back. The static works will be placed at the back of the site, which engages interac-
tion between viewers. It also takes more effort to view all the works as they are disorderly arranged where
the various volumes interlock. The dynamic works will be placed at the front, where the space also over-
looks the entire site. This space is less accessible and therefore more private. The intermediate spaces
will house the semi-dynamic works, where they link the various zones together through a transient gallery
space. The staggering of floor height is apparent in such a space, to allow the viewer to sense a change in
zone as they enter and leave.
CONVERGENCE

Xochipilli, a work for wind quartet and percussion sextet, represents the synthesis and synergy of meticu-
lous research, cultural introspection, archaeological speculation, and musical imagination that character-
ize much of the music of Mexican composer Carlos Chávez.

The Music Pavilion is an interpretation of Carlo Chavez’s Xochipilli. The spaces are designed for listening
or performing music.

In Aztec mythology, Xochipilli is the god associated with flowers, music, and dance.
The different instruments are viewed as isolated elements, converging to form a whole. I define the per-
cussion solo as a core, that the wind instruments converge to and diverge from through the means of lay-
ering, as it defines the entire song. The modular planes are defined by a ratio of 5:8:10, which is how the
different wind instruments are related in terms of their pitch.
A different sensory experience was created through my music pavilion by having open, porous spaces, but
isolated sounds that may or may not overlay together depending on where the listener is positioned.
Spaces are differentiated by how well they contain sound, as well as the degree of privacy they provide.
Having no fixed program allows users to freely interpret how they interact with the spaces. The pavilion is
oriented in a way that allows the three spaces to relate to their immediate environment by assessing dif-
ferent human behavioural patterns within the existing site. As the spaces are not properly defined by
walls, intermediate spaces are created, allowing different user groups to interact with one another.
The spaces in the pavilion are defined by how well they contain sound. The more dispersed the intersec-
tions of the strings are (see above), the more diffused the quality of sound is. The most enclosed space
has a concentration of intersections in the middle whereas the semi-enclosed spaces have several dis-
persed intersections. The walls are cladded with sound baffles, which contain sound well. Unclear
thresholds of spaces promotes convergence of sound and people.

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