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Test Bank for Interpersonal Messages 4th Edition Joseph A.

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Berlin (CNN)By the time Lynn D. turned 2, he had already undergone seven
surgeries. His childhood memories -- in the German states of Bavaria and Hesse --
were shaped by monthly visits to the doctor, where he says up to 50 researchers
would observe examinations of his naked body.
When he reached puberty, Lynn was given growth blockers and high doses of
hormones; as a teenager, he started self-harming, developed post-traumatic stress
disorder and became suicidal.
Lynn, 34 -- who has asked CNN to identify him by his preferred name -- was born
with both male and female sex organs. His doctors and parents decided shortly
after he was born that his sex would be female, so his penis and testicles were
surgically removed. His ovaries were also removed.
Doctors had told Lynn's parents the surgeries were preventative, citing concerns
that he could develop cancer, but Lynn says there was no medical reason for him to
be operated on and that the surgeries were carried out with a "dubious motivation."
"The doctors advised my parents not to tell me about my sex and simply raise me
as a girl," Lynn told CNN. "And of course, it didn't work -- because I'm not a girl."
Lynn D. plans to register as intersex on his birth certificate in the new year.
Lynn D. plans to register as intersex on his birth certificate in the new year.
Lynn is intersex, an umbrella term used to describe a variety of conditions in which
a person is born with reproductive or sexual anatomy that does not fit into binary
definitions of female or male.
"I was labeled a girl; I wanted to be a girl and fit in -- but it did not work. I got
along better with boys so I thought, 'I'm a boy'. But then I realized that I'm not a
boy either ... boys also started to marginalize me. I did not have a good connection
with my body and nobody helped me to establish a good connection with my
body," Lynn said.
Lynn only learned that he was intersex during a therapy session at the age of 20. It
was a revelation for Lynn, who had struggled to fit in with his peers for so many
years.
While it helped him to move forward with his relationship with his own body,
Lynn says it damaged his relationship with his parents.
"My body was changed so much to fit in -- whether it happened consciously or
unconsciously. The whole experience broke my relationship with my parents. We
still have not gotten over this yet," Lynn said.
My body was changed so much to fit in
Lynn D.
When he first learned he was intersex, Lynn said, "it felt like as if someone said I
am an alien, you are from someplace else. You are a mutant."
"It took me a while to come to terms with my diagnosis and for me to (come to)
grips with it. But then I understood -- everything made sense to me. I no longer felt
restless. Suddenly I understood who I was."
More than a decade later, Lynn said he has evolved into an "enormously happy"
person, someone who is in a loving relationship with a woman, and who is fulfilled
by a career in engineering and gigging in a punk band.
While Lynn said he accepts being called "him" for now, he wishes that there was a
specific German pronoun to describe intersex people, and hopes that society will
one day understand what it means to live outside of binary definitions of sex and
gender -- and to accept intersex people for who they are.
A change to the German constitution could be the first step toward that
recognition.
On January 1, Germany will become the first country in the European Union to
offer a "third gender" option on birth certificates.
Intersex people -- and parents of intersex babies -- will be able to register as
"divers," or miscellaneous, on birth certificates, instead of having to choose
between male or female.
The law, passed in Germany's Bundestag earlier this month, was hailed as a "small
revolution" by some intersex activists. It came after a 2017 constitutional court
ruled in favor of an intersex person's right to change their birth certificate from
female to "divers."
Last year, Germany's highest court ruled in favor of Vanja's rights to
officially identify as an intersex person.
Last year, Germany's highest court ruled in favor of Vanja's rights to officially
identify as an intersex person.
The court ruled that Vanja -- an intersex person who goes by a one-name
pseudonym and uses the gender-neutral pronouns "they" and "them" -- had their
"right to positive gender recognition" violated and found that the current law was
unconstitutional.
Vanja, whose case was supported by advocacy group, "Dritte Option" or, the Third
Option, told CNN that having to decide between being a woman or a man on
official documents left them feeling "left out and overlooked."
While Vanja's official identification documents said they were female, this led to
"a lot of irritations with people" because they presented -- or physically appeared
in society -- as male.
Vanja initially considered changing their documents to male, but eventually
decided that decision would devalue their identity, which is intersex.
"I thought to myself, if I am going at lengths to change something within the red
tape system in Germany, I want to have something that suits me," they said.
Vanja plans to celebrate the new law by changing their birth certificate category to
"divers" in the new year, calling it both a personal and a practical step.
"I asked myself so many times what it means to be intersex; I often was upset
when I had to decide which box to tick -- male or female. I felt (like I was) being
pushed into the corner, that I had to adjust non-voluntarily. I think it will give me a
new feeling of peace," Vanja said, adding that they hope other countries in Europe
will follow suit.
Activists from "Dritte Option," or Third Option lobbied since 2014 for
a third gender to be officially recognized in Germany.
Activists from "Dritte Option," or Third Option lobbied since 2014 for a third
gender to be officially recognized in Germany.
But, like many in the intersex community, Vanja believes the law is just a stepping
stone.
"Societal acceptance cannot be mandated by a court ruling, but it is a step in the
right direction," Vanja said.
Lynn agrees. While he also plans to register as intersex -- and to officially change
his name to Lynn -- he said there are still many steps that need to be taken for
intersex people to be "fully integrated into society."
Still, he is hopeful the new law will help to bring attention to the medical treatment
of intersex people and open conversations for change.
'Ritualized, sexualized violence'
Infants born with visible variations in their sexual characteristics, like Lynn, often
undergo painful and irreversible surgery to give them the appearance of a
conventional male or female gender, according to an Amnesty International report
published last year.
The surgeries stem from a theory popularized in the United States in the 1960s by
the psychologist John Money, who believed that an intersex person's make-up was
a product of abnormal processes. Money believed that intersex people ought to
become either male or female and as a result, were in need of medical treatment.
Although that theory is no longer widely accepted in the medical community, its
"echoes can still be found within the medical establishment today," according to
the Amnesty report, citing interviews with medical professionals across Denmark,
Germany and the UK.
Those surgeries stripped Lynn of his bodily autonomy and left him with painful
scars.
"When they (doctors and parents) talked about my body, I had to go out and leave
the room. In hindsight, it was a practice I would now compare with a ritualized,
sexualized violence. It was massively traumatizing," Lynn says of his childhood
visits to the doctor.
READ: Shame, taboo, ignorance: Growing up intersex
A group of United Nations and international human rights experts called for "an
urgent end to human rights violations against intersex children and adults" in 2016,
calling on governments to ban harmful medical practices and protect intersex
people from discrimination.
Between 0.5% and 1.7% of the global population are born with intersex traits, and
are at risk of human rights violations that include surgery, discrimination and
torture, according to the UN.
In July, a group of European medical experts published a set of new guidelines that
urge doctors to defer medically unnecessary surgeries on intersex children until
they are old enough to consent. The European consensus said: "For sensitive and/or
irreversible procedures, such as genital surgery, we advise that the intervention be
postponed until the individual is old enough to be actively involved in the decision
whenever possible."
Grietje Baars, a senior lecturer at The City Law School in London, told CNN that
while the new law demonstrates a "greater recognition of life beyond the binary,"
the "third gender" option doesn't go far enough to fully recognize gender diversity.
Under the new law, people wanting to change their birth certificate to read "divers"
will only be able to do so with a medical certificate to prove it.
Baars -- who also goes by the gender-neutral pronouns, "they" and "them" -- says
that requirement could subject intersex people, who often have a history of
"traumatic medical interference with their genitalia" to additional trauma. Plus,
Baars says, the medical requirement reinforces an antiquated definition of gender
based solely on biology.
"You can not simply decide gender by looking at people's genitalia," they said,
adding that it might be time to remove gender from official documents altogether.
While Baars understands that this might sound radical, they argue that "abolishing
gender registration does not mean abolishing gender as such."
"It's like abolishing registering your religion or race on your ID or documents -- it
does not mean you can no longer be Catholic or black ... those things are not the
same. I am just saying that it is no business of the state to register and categorize
people in that manner," they said.
Challenging social norms
Although German law has allowed parents to leave the gender box blank on birth
certificates since 2013 -- and this will still be an option under the new legislation --
some experts say parents will still be inclined to choose a more traditional
approach, noting that in the two years after the blank box option came into effect,
only 12 children were registered without a sex marker in the birth registry.
Anike Krämer, a Ph.D. candidate in gender studies at Germany's Ruhr-University
Bochum, told CNN that she believes that parents of intersex children will have
"difficulties" with the choices presented with the new law.
"The structure we have right now simply does not allow for parents to embrace this
new law. The medical advice is still very conservative and advises to go with the
binary system," Krämer said.
You can not simply decide gender by looking at people's genitalia
Dr. Grietje Baars
Under German law, parents can not generally consent to "feminizing,"
"masculinizing" or "disambiguation" surgeries, unless it is deemed medically
necessary or life threatening, according to the German Inter-ministerial Working
Group, IMAG.
However, the law currently does not ban these surgeries for children too young to
consent, and leaves the often ambiguous question of what is deemed surgically
necessary up to medical professionals who might continue to characterize intersex
people's bodily traits as disorders.
Krämer says that parents are more concerned with the every day questions their
children will face in society: "How do I call my child; which pronoun should I use,
what do I tell my neighbor, how do I educate my intersex child?
"Sociologically speaking, parents lack options for action. Apart from medical
consultations they often lack alternatives. If there are true alternatives in place -- to
address the parents' questions, fears, difficulties and options, to speak with other
intersex individuals or other parents of intersex individuals -- then that would make
it easier for parents to perhaps choose the third option at the registry entry."
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"But Germany is not that far yet," Krämer said, adding that the law's medical
requirements "misses a chance to create a wider law for more people," and
sidelines other individuals who are not intersex but do not identify as only male or
female, such as members of the trans community.
And she is not alone.
Markus Ulrich, spokesman for the Lesbian and Gay Federation in Germany, told
CNN that the law "does not go far enough to protect people of non-binary
identities."
Ulrich said that while the law was "a huge step forward in acknowledging more
rights and ... visibility for people beyond 'man and woman,'" the government
effectively ignored an alternative option proposed by the constitutional court last
year to abolish gender registration all together -- a more inclusive option for people
whose birth sex doesn't fit their gender identity.
LGBTQ campaigners say the new law excludes members of the trans community.
LGBTQ campaigners say the new law excludes members of the trans community.
A handful of German politicians, including members of the Green Party and the
Social Democratic Party, have also criticized the law's medical certificate
stipulation, pointing to other countries that allow people who don't identify in
binary terms to change their official documents to match their gender identity.
In 2014, the Australian High Court ruled that the government should legally
recognize a third gender. And in 2017, California became the second US state
(after New York) to allow residents who don't identify as male or female to change
their birth certificates to match their gender identity.
Several other countries have provided gender-neutral options on passports and
official documents such as the census or ID cards, including Argentina,
Bangladesh, Canada, Denmark, India, Malta, Nepal, the Netherlands, New Zealand
and Pakistan.
While intersex, trans and other human rights advocates continue to call for
Germany's new law to be made more inclusive, Lynn hopes that at least this first
step will help society to understand intersex people better -- and to not be afraid.
"We are all normal people and want to live our lives like others,'' he said.
2018 was the year Facebook and Twitter grew up
Hadas Gold
By Hadas Gold, CNN Business
Updated 1549 GMT (2349 HKT) December 28, 2018
Zuckerberg survives Congress' softball hearing
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WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 09: Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO
Mark Zuckerberg awaits to testify before a combined Senate Judiciary and
Commerce committee hearing in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill
April 10, 2018 in Washington, DC. Zuckerberg, 33, was called to testify after it
was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information
harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the
Trump campaign. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
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LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 09: In this photo illustration, an image of the
Google logo is reflected on the eye of a young man on August 09, 2017 in London,
England. Founded in 1995 by Sergey Brin and Larry Page, Google now makes
hundreds of products used by billions of people across the globe, from YouTube
and Android to Smartbox and Google Search. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 09: Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO
Mark Zuckerberg awaits to testify before a combined Senate Judiciary and
Commerce committee hearing in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill
April 10, 2018 in Washington, DC. Zuckerberg, 33, was called to testify after it
was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information
harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the
Trump campaign. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Zuckerberg survives Congress' softball hearing
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LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 09: In this photo illustration, an image of the
Google logo is reflected on the eye of a young man on August 09, 2017 in London,
England. Founded in 1995 by Sergey Brin and Larry Page, Google now makes
hundreds of products used by billions of people across the globe, from YouTube
and Android to Smartbox and Google Search. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
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(CNN Business)When a young person turns 18, in most countries they are
considered adults, liable for their mistakes and misdeeds.

2018 was the year social media and tech companies like Facebook and Twitter
grew up.
From the continued effects of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, to social media
being used to help spur horrific violence in places like Myanmar, these tech firms
are no longer considered startups run by dorky whiz kids.
They are now the favorite target of angry users and hungry politicians — wanting
to make the companies pay both figuratively and literally after years of free rein.
Facebook's crisis year
Of all the platforms, Facebook (FB) and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg has become the
poster child for all the ills of the internet.
Zuckerberg himself was dragged in front of lawmakers in Washington and
Brussels, where he faced both anger and cluelessness.
NYT: Facebook offered big tech firms more user data than previously revealed
NYT: Facebook offered big tech firms more user data than previously revealed
He is still resisting several calls by UK lawmakers to answer questions in a similar
format. He even failed to do so when the committee investigating the company set
up shop in Washington in February for a special hearing. He did the same when it
invited lawmakers from eight different countries to join them for a "grant
international hearing" in November.
Instead Zuckerberg's deputies were dispatched to face the onslaught.
Beyond making Zuckerberg available for a hearing in the UK, Facebook is also
currently fighting a fine from a regulator related to the Cambridge Analytica
scandal.
And whereas once Zuckerberg scoffed at the idea that Facebook could have any
effect on an election, Facebook in 2018 was full of apologies and admissions they
could "do better" — all the while issuing several Friday night or holiday news
dumps.
Hate speech
Where these platforms once saw themselves as neutral blank canvases for their
users, they are now grappling with the reality that some of the lowest and worst of
our societies are thriving on their platforms — and many believe it is up to
companies like Facebook to control the spread.
In August, Facebook banned 20 organizations and individuals in Myanmar,
including a senior military commander, acknowledging that it was "too slow" to
prevent the spread of "hate and misinformation" in the country after the United
Nations "found evidence that many of these individuals and organizations
committed or enabled serious human rights abuses in the country."
Twitter (TWTR) also began to take more concrete steps to tackle hate speech and
harassment on their platform, after years of becoming known as a platform where
users sometimes faced sexist and racist attacks.
Play Video
Facebook's data scandals aren't just bad publicity 03:55
In September, Twitter announced a new policy prohibiting "dehumanizing speech,"
expanding on their hate speech conduct, banning direct attacks or threats of
violence based on race, sexual orientation or gender.
Infamous conspiracy theorist Alex Jones was banned from most online platforms,
including Twitter, after CNN pointed out that Jones' videos and posts flew directly
in the face of tech companies' rules and statements about their battles against
misinformation.
YouTube, which is owned by Google (GOOGL), came under fire for its suggested
and trending video algorithms, after a video suggesting one of the high school
students who survived the Parkland, Fl. shooting was a "crisis actor" appeared as
the number one trending video for hours.
Further investigations showed how the site's algorithm often recommended
conspiracy theory videos to users following major news events, even if the user
had not searched for it.
After months of criticism, the site announced in July that it was making changes to
put more "authoritative content" in front of users. A few months prior the site also
announced it would begin labeling content that came from state-sponsored outlets,
like Russia's RT network.
On the regulatory side, Germany began enforcing a hate speech law, requiring
social media sites remove hate speech within 24 hours or face fines of up to tens of
millions of dollars — but thus far no company has faced major fines from the law.
Bots
Both Facebook and Twitter faced intense criticism following the revelations that
foreign actors had used fake accounts, sometimes computerized "bots" to try and
influence elections around the world or just to sow divisions.
Under pressure from politicians in the United States and Europe, both platforms
made some of their most serious efforts to date to ban and remove millions of
accounts deemed to be inauthentic.
The leaders
A common thread for Facebook and Twitter this year came in their CEOs: men
considered amalgamations of aloof yet at times ruthless tech geniuses.
Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg was mocked on Saturday Night Live for appearing
like a robot in interviews and in hearings — seemingly just repeating well-
rehearsed talking points.
Twitter's Jack Dorsey was accused of being "tone deaf" after posting glowing
messages about a trip to Myanmar without mentioning the violence and
persecution being faced by the Rohingya minority.
UK releases Facebook emails

UK releases Facebook emails 01:33


Beyond being a source of jokes, Dorsey and Zuckerberg, along with their fellow
executives' demeanor has become an issue before the people who can really control
them: government regulators.
By appearing detached and repeating talking points, or in Zuckerberg's case, not
showing up at all to some hearings, politicians are getting increasingly angry and
frustrated as they weigh further laws and regulations.
As Sen. Mark Warner said during a September hearing in Washington with Dorsey
and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, "The era of the wild west in social media is
coming to an end."
GDPR
In Europe, the EU's big General Data Protection Regulation was finally
implemented in May. And beyond incessant pop-ups asking for consent, the law
was one of the first major sweeping attempts at regulating companies that have run
free with user data for years. If companies fail to prove they have been handling
data correctly, don't report security breaches within 72 hours, or hold data for
longer than is necessary, they face penalties of billions of dollars.
To hold Facebook accountable, stop calling it a tech company
To hold Facebook accountable, stop calling it a tech company
In the waning days of 2018, a European regulator announced Facebook could be
facing a multi-billion dollar fine if an investigation revealed the company failed to
protect user privacy.
The Irish Data Protection Commission, which oversees Facebook's compliance
with European law, said it received multiple reports of data breaches affecting the
company.
What's next
2019 will be the year of regulation and taxes.
A UK committee investigating fake news and user data privacy will likely release
its final report and begin proposing further rules and regulations.
GDPR will turn one and will likely begin to impose more fines.
How to tax tech companies will also become a major issue. A "digital services tax"
in the UK on the revenues of profitable tech companies was proposed to come into
force in 2020.
The French government has said, starting January 1, it will impose a new tax on
the likes of Google and Facebook as soon as January 2019 if a broader European
tax on such companies fails to pan out.
Whatever 2019 brings one thing is clear: The whiz kids are now the whiz adults.
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Could Ken soon have a same-sex partner?
How 2018 became Catholic Church's year from hell
How 2018 became the Catholic Church's year from hell
Daniel Burke-Profile-Image1
By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor
Updated 0540 GMT (1340 HKT) December 29, 2018
The Catholic Church's response to sexual abuse allegations
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Sistine Chapel which will indicate whether or not the College of Cardinals have
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to reach a two-thirds-plus-one vote majority to elect the 266th Pontiff. (Photo by
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The Catholic Church's response to sexual abuse allegations
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KAZUHIRO NOGI (Photo by KAZUHIRO NOGI / AFP) (Photo credit should
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VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - MARCH 13: A woman holds rosary beads while
she prays and waits for smoke to emanate from the chimney on the roof of the
Sistine Chapel which will indicate whether or not the College of Cardinals have
elected a new Pope on March 13, 2013 in Vatican City, Vatican. Pope Benedict
XVI's successor is being chosen by the College of Cardinals in Conclave in
the Sistine Chapel. The 115 cardinal-electors, meeting in strict secrecy, will need
to reach a two-thirds-plus-one vote majority to elect the 266th Pontiff. (Photo by
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
The Catholic Church's response to sexual abuse allegations
Police officers inspect a scene of a bus blast in Giza, Egypt, December 28, 2018.
REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
Deadly roadside bomb strikes tourist bus
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MAY 19: North Korean defectors tear a portrait of
North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un during a rally on May 19, 2018 in Seoul, South
Korea. North Korean defectors, now living in South Korea, and some activists held
a anti North Korea rally against North Korea and return of recent defectors and
denouncing inter-Korean Summit agreement. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty
Images)
Personal details of N. Korean defectors stolen
Golden coin turtles are endangered and only found in the wild in parts of Hong
Kong.
Conservationists fight to save endangered turtles
Crew of a whaling ship check a whaling gun or harpoon before departure at
Ayukawa port in Ishinomaki City on April 26, 2014. A Japanese whaling fleet left
port on April 26 under tight security in the first hunt since the UN's top court
last month ordered Tokyo to stop killing whales in the Antarctic. AFP PHOTO /
KAZUHIRO NOGI (Photo by KAZUHIRO NOGI / AFP) (Photo credit should
read KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images)
Japan will resume commercial whaling in 2019
From the left, Sergei Ivanov, Russian special representative on questions of
ecology and transport, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu, Russian President
Vladimir Putin, and Chief of General Staff of Russia Valery Gerasimov, oversee
the test launch of the Avangard hypersonic glide vehicle from the Defense
Ministry's control room in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018. In
the test, the Avangard was launched from the Dombarovskiy missile base in the
southern Ural Mountains. The Kremlin says it successfully hit a designated
practice target on the Kura shooting range on Kamchatka, 6,000 kilometers (3,700
miles) away. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
Putin teases hypersonic nuclear missiles
A photo of human rights lawyer Wang Quanzhang and his family taken before he
was detained in 2015.
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Queen Elizabeth II poses for a photo after she recorded her annual Christmas Day
message, in the White Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace in London, United
Kingdom.
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(CNN)A prominent cardinal resigned in disgrace. Grand jurors accused hundreds
of Catholic clerics of secretly abusing children. A former Vatican ambassador
urged the Pope himself to step down.
It was enough for New York's Cardinal Timothy Dolan to call it the Catholic
Church's "summer of hell."
The cardinal may have been overly optimistic.
In fact, the church's hellish year began in January, when Pope Francis forcefully
defended a Chilean bishop he had promoted. He later had to apologize and accept
the bishop's resignation.
But the clergy sex abuse scandal shows no signs of abating, with a federal
investigation and probes in 12 states and the District of Columbia in the works.
The Pope has convened a meeting of bishops from around the world in Rome next
February 21-24, saying he wants the church to tackle the scandal together. But lay
Catholics and law enforcement officials appear to be losing patience with the
church's hierarchy.
"The Catholic Church cannot police itself," said Lisa Madigan, Illinois' attorney
general, in announcing that Catholic leaders had withheld the names of 500 clergy
members accused of abuse.
The church's institutional crisis was mirrored by individual soul-searching, as
American Catholics questioned whether to stay in the church. 2018 saw parents
challenging priests at Mass, prominent Catholics urging the faithful to withhold
donations and parents worrying whether their children are safe in the sacristy.
One Catholic historian called it the church's greatest crisis since the Reformation in
1517.
Here's a guide to how the Catholic Church got to this point in 2018:
January
The Pope began the year with an apology to sexual abuse survivors in Chile, where
he aroused anger by saying he had seen no "proof" against Bishop Juan Barros,
who has been accused of covering up for an abusive priest.
Francis' top adviser on the issue, Cardinal Sean O'Malley of Boston, called the
Pope's comments "a source of great pain" for survivors of sexual abuse by clergy.
Barros denied the accusations and the Pope continued to defend him, even as he
sent the Vatican's top sex abuse adviser to Chile to investigate the allegations.
February
The Pope had received a letter from a Chilean abuse survivor in 2015, saying that
Barros had witnessed a priest molesting teenagers, according to the author of the
letter and another source. The news raised questions about whether the Pope had
read the letter and what, if anything, he did about it.
April
In a dramatic reversal, the Pope admits he made "grave errors" in handling the
accusations against Barros. After reviewing his investigator's report on Chile,
Francis said his previous comments were based on a "lack of truthful and balanced
information."
The Pope later meets with three Chilean survivors of sexual abuse, including Juan
Carlos Cruz, who says Francis told him, "I was part of the problem. I caused this
and I apologize to you."
May
Vatican treasurer Cardinal George Pell stands trial on multiple counts of historical
sexual abuse in his native Australia. Pell is the most senior figure in the Catholic
Church to face criminal charges for alleged assault.
Also in Australia, Archbishop Philip Wilson is convicted of covering up sexual
abuse, though his conviction was later overturned.
All of Chile's 34 bishops offer to resign, after a three-day emergency summit at the
Vatican. The simultaneous resignation of all the bishops in a single country is
thought to be unprecedented in the modern history of the Catholic church. The
Pope would later accept the resignation of seven bishops, including Barros.
June
Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, the former Archbishop of Washington and an
influential voice in the church and international politics, is removed from public
ministry by Pope Francis after a church investigation finds an allegation that
McCarrick sexually abused a minor in the 1970s "credible and substantiated."
McCarrick said he had "no recollection" of the alleged abuse.
McCarrick is also accused of sexual misconduct with adults "decades ago" while
he served as a bishop in Metuchen and Newark, New Jersey, the bishops of those
cities said. Two of those allegations resulted in settlements, the bishops said,
raising questions about how McCarrick rose through the church's ranks despite
rumors about his conduct.
McCarrick has not commented on those allegations.
July
After more media reports accuse McCarrick of abusive conduct with seminarians
and a young boy, Pope Francis demotes him from the College of Cardinals, a rare
step. McCarrick is ordered to lead "a life of prayer and penance until the
accusations made against him are examined in a regular canonical trial."
Pope Francis accepts the resignation of Australian Archbishop Philip Wilson, the
highest-ranking Catholic official ever to be convicted of covering up sex abuse.
August
A sweeping report by a grand jury in Pennsylvania accuses more than 300
"predator priests" of sexually abusing more than 1,000 children in six dioceses
since 1947. Though most of the accusations date back decades, before the church
instituted new protocols, the report plunges the church into crisis, as Catholics
across the country express outrage.
Two days later, a Vatican spokesman calls the alleged abuses detailed in the
Pennsylvania report "criminal and morally reprehensible."
Pope Francis pens a letter "To the People of God," in which he apologizes for the
Catholic Church's failure to protect children from abusive clergy. "We showed no
care for the little ones; we abandoned them."
The Pennsylvania grand jury report prompts law enforcement officials in other
states to begin investigating the Catholic Church. Eventually, 12 states and
Washington, DC, would announce probes of varying scope.
During a visit to Ireland, where government reports have found widespread abuses
by Catholic clergy, the Pope says the failure of church officials to address "these
appalling crimes has rightly given rise to outrage and remains a source of pain and
shame for the Catholic community."
In an 11-page "testimony" released to conservative Catholic media, a former
Vatican ambassador to the United States, Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, accuses
Francis of ignoring his warnings about McCarrick's conduct and calls on the Pope
to resign.
The Pope declines to answer Vigano's accusations, telling journalists to dig for the
truth.
New York's attorney general issues civil subpoenas for all eight Catholic dioceses
in the state to investigate how they handled accusations of clergy sexually abusing
children.
New Jersey's attorney general forms a task force to investigate allegations of
sexual abuse by clergy and any attempted cover-ups.
September
Vigano unveils a new charge against Francis and other high-ranking Vatican
officials: that they have told untruths about the Pope's controversial meeting in
2015 with Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who refused to sign same-sex marriage
certificates.
The Vatican announces that Pope Francis has summoned leaders of national
bishops' conferences from around the world to Rome to discuss the clergy sex
abuse crisis, an unprecedented step in the history of the church.
Pope Francis accepts the resignation of West Virginia Bishop Michael Bransfield
and orders an investigation into allegations that Bransfield sexually harassed
adults.
A week after meeting with Pope Francis in Rome, leaders of the US Conference of
Catholic Bishops say they intend to adopt new policies to hold bishops accused of
abuse or cover-ups accountable
More than 46,000 Catholic women sign an open letter asking Pope Francis to
answer Vigano's charges. Francis and his predecessor, Pope Emeritus Benedict
XVI, remain silent on the matter.
A report from Germany's Catholic bishops admits to "at least" 3,677 cases of child
sex abuse by the clergy between 1946 and 2014.
October
The sex abuse scandal sends the Pope's approval ratings among Americans to a
new low, according to Pew Research Center survey.
Michigan authorities seize records from every Catholic diocese in the state as part
of an investigation into possible sexual abuse by clergy
Under pressure to respond to Vigano's allegations, the Vatican says Pope Francis
ordered an investigation last year into the accusations against Archbishop
McCarrick, adding that the results will be released "in due course."
Pope Francis accepts the resignation of Cardinal Donald Wuerl, the embattled
archbishop of Washington, after the Pennsylvania grand jury report accuses the
former Pittsburgh bishop of mishandling clergy sex abuse cases.
Federal prosecutors in Philadelphia subpoena records from every diocese in
Pennsylvania, the first federal investigation of that size into the abuse of children
by priests and the cover-up of those crimes by Catholic leaders. The same federal
prosecutor tells every Catholic diocese in the country not to destroy records
pertaining to child sexual abuse.
Attorneys general in Washington, DC, and Virginia launch investigations into the
Catholic Church's handling of clergy sexual abuse.
A bishop in New York is removed pending an investigation into allegations that he
sexually abused a minor. The bishop denied the allegations.
November
The Vatican dramatically intervenes in the US Catholic bishops annual meeting,
instructing them not to adopt new policies to hold bishops accountable for
misconduct and failing to protect children from sexual abuse.
Law enforcement officials in Texas raid the offices of Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of
Houston, president of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, looking for files
related to a priest accused of abusing a minor. DiNardo's diocese said it is
cooperating with the investigation.
December
An Australian court overturns the conviction of Archbishop Philip Wilson, saying
there was reasonable doubt that he covered up the abuse of children.
Pope Francis removes three cardinals from his small council of advisers. Two have
been the subject of allegations relating to sexual abuse or covering it up.
Four Jesuit regional provinces in the United States reveal that at least 230 Jesuits
had been credibly accused of abusing minors since the 1950s. A fifth province will
release its list of abusive clergy in January.
Illinois' attorney general says the state's six dioceses have failed to disclose
accusations of sexual abuse against at least 500 priests and clergy members.
In a speech to the Vatican curia, Pope Francis tells priests who abuse minors to
turn themselves in to civil justice authorities and "prepare for divine justice."
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