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G R A D UAT E S T UDY

NORTHWESTE RN
ENGINEERING
W E A R E W H O L E- B R A IN T H IN K E R S

S EEIN G S IMP L I C I T Y IN T HE C O MP L E X ,

T HE C O MP L E X I T Y O F T HE S IMP L E.

W E A R E W H O L E- B R A IN E N G IN E E R S ,

B I G-P I C T UR E T HINK ER S , R E A L-T IME

C O L L A B O R ATO R S , A L L- O U T INN O VATO R S .


WE ARE
TA K I N G T H E
WO R L D I N
A WHOLE NEW
DIRECTION.
Driving progress through innovation and leadership.
Turning research into patented processes and
life-changing inventions. Bringing products to market
with smart risk-taking and entrepreneurship.

FIND YOUR DIREC T ION HER E .


G R A D U AT E S T U DY
AT N O R T H W E S T E R N
ENGINEERING
WHOLE-BR AIN THINKING.
E M P O W E R I N G O U R S T U D E N T S W I T H A D V A N C E D A N A LY T I C A L
A N D P R O B L E M -S O LV I N G S K I L L S
Analysis. Logic. Synthesis. Math. All are elements of “left-brain” ranked departments and beyond. They develop leadership
thinking, all critical to engineering success. To lead today in a skills inside and outside the classroom and lab. And, they expand
world of change, engineers require more. They need “right-brain” their career opportunities through career-focused initiatives
skills. Intuition. Metaphorical thinking. Creative problem solving. and cross-school partnerships that expand their perspectives
At Northwestern Engineering, we celebrate whole-brain thinking and strengthen business management skills.
and empower our students to become whole-brain engineers. Whatever direction our graduate students take, all develop the
Master’s and PhD program students at Northwestern Engineering highly advanced analytical and problem-solving skills required
take the concept to new heights. They conduct interdisciplinary to change the world for the better in material ways and to lead
research and collaborate with peers and faculty in other highly others to do the same.
WHOLE-BR AIN ENGINEERS.
P U R S U ING A DVA N C ED DEGR EE S
ACROSS A WIDE RANGE OF PROGRAMS
At every level in every program of study, Northwestern Engineering
P A R T-T I M E M S P R O G R A M S
students constantly advance in their development as whole-brain
engineers. Graduate students choose from an array of master’s Engineering management Executive management
and doctoral programs aligned with their career goals and personal for design and construction Information technology
passions. Master’s degree programs—full- and part-time—are Product design and development management
designed to meet ever-changing industry and research environ- Project management
ments. Doctoral candidates work side-by-side with world-class In addition to the programs listed above, part-time tracks are
faculty across disciplines researching advanced topics available for most full-time MS programs.
in engineering.

PHD PROGRAMS
F U L L-T I M E M S P R O G R A M S
Applied physics Biomedical engineering Chemical and
Analytics Artiicial intelligence Biomedical engineering biological engineering Civil and environmental engineering
Biotechnology Chemical and biological engineering Electrical engineering, computer engineering, and
Civil and environmental engineering Electrical engineering computer science Engineering sciences and applied
and computer science Engineering design innovation mathematics Industrial engineering and management
Engineering management Engineering sciences and sciences Materials science and engineering
applied mathematics Information technology Mechanical engineering Technology and social behavior
MMM (dual degree) Materials science and engineering
Theoretical and applied mechanics
Mechanical engineering Product design and
development management Project management
Robotics Theoretical and applied mechanics

W H AT E V E R D I R E C T I O N O U R G R A D U AT E
S T U D E N T S TA K E , A L L D E V E L O P T H E H I G H LY
A D VA N C E D A N A LY T I C A L A N D P R O B L E M -
S O LV I N G S K I L L S R E Q U I R E D T O C H A N G E T H E
W O R L D F O R T H E B E T T E R I N M AT E R I A L WAY S
AND TO LEAD OTHERS TO DO THE SAME.
R E S E A R C H E R S A N D C O L L A B O R AT O R S
B R E A K I N G B A R R I E R S A N D C R E AT I N G T H E F U T U R E
Northwestern Engineering’s more than 180 faculty systematically MAJOR CENTERS INCLUDE:
confront some of the world’s most pressing and complex challenges
in systems, materials, health and wellness, energy, and the environ- Northwestern-Argonne Institute for Science and Engineering
ment. Our interdisciplinary collaboration is exempliied by ongoing
research initiatives with more than 20 other departments in our Center for Quantum Devices
extended Northwestern family and dozens of other universities
Institute for Sustainability and Energy
and research centers worldwide.

While the majority of University research funding comes from International Institute for Nanotechnology
government sources, corporate-sponsored research represents
Materials Research Science and Engineering Center
a growing opportunity for professors.

Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems

Segal Design Institute

Transportation Center

CAREER-FOCUSED PROFE SSIONAL S


P R E P A R I N G F O R S U C C E S S I N B U S I N E S S , I N D U S T R Y,
AND ACADEMIA
Northwestern Engineering is committed to preparing students
for successful careers as leaders and researchers in business,
industry, and academia. The Engineering Career Development ofice
identiies and works with students to secure internship opportuni-
ties and provides other career advancement services. For doctoral
students, Management for Scientists and Engineers, an eight-week
summer course drawn from the Kellogg School of Management core
MBA curriculum, equips young researchers with the knowledge they
need to become better managers and leaders.

E N T R E P R E N E U R S A N D I N N O VAT O R S
C H A N G I N G T H E W O R L D F O R T H E B E T T E R E V E R Y D A Y.
NORTHWESTERN ENGINEERING’S
Northwestern Engineering students and faculty drive progress
ENTREPRENEURSHIP RESOURCES:
through innovation and leadership, turning research into patented
processes and life-changing inventions and bringing products
to market through smart risk-taking and entrepreneurship. They The Farley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation provides
typically account for a lion’s share of the University’s inventions incubators, mentorships, and seminars and encourages the ongoing
and faculty startups. development of new, interdisciplinary curricula.

NU vention courses engage interdisciplinary teams from across


the University in the entire innovation and entrepreneurial life
cycle, including how to transform innovations into viable business.

The Innovation and New Ventures Ofice ( INVO ) advises faculty


and students on the development of research with commercial
potential and provides seminars and educational programs
on entrepreneurship and innovation.

The Garage provides an entrepreneurship space for Northwestern


students to experiment, collaborate, and get their ideas built.
A COMMUNIT Y OF LE ADERS
GAINING EXPERIENCE INSIDE AND OUTSIDE
THE CL ASSROOMS AND L AB
The Graduate Leadership Council helps solidify a graduate student Chicago Graduate Student Association ( CGSA )
community among the eight departments within Northwestern
Engineering by organizing social, academic, and professional Black Graduate Student Association ( BGSA )
activities, and facilitates communication with the administration.
Chinese Students and Scholars Association ( CSSA )
Students can also participate in the Graduate Student
Association, department-centered student groups, and other Graduate Student Association for Latino
and Spanish Activities (G-SALSA )
student associations that promote interactions among graduate
students, provide academic and social programs, and serve
Indian Graduate Student and Scholars Association (IGSSA)
as student advocates, including:

Queer Pride Graduate Student Association (QPGSA )

Turkish Intercultural Club

C OL L E AGUE S, F RIENDS, A ND FA MILIE S


LIVING AND LEARNING IN ONE OF THE WORLD’S
M O S T DY N A M I C M E T R O P O L I TA N A R E A S
Stretching along the north shore of spectacular Lake Michigan, With downtown Chicago only 12 miles away and easily accessible
Northwestern’s Evanston campus provides an environment by public transportation or the intercampus shuttle, Northwestern
conducive to serious scholarship and rich in rewarding opportu- students have easy access to the wealth of professional sports,
nities for every lifestyle. Evanston boasts the amenities of a big music, art, and cultural diversity that the nation’s third-largest city
city in a manageable suburban setting. offers. Northwestern’s location also means unsurpassed access to
major corporations, research centers, and other organizations eager
to engage Northwestern Engineering students in experiential
learning, internships, and careers.
G R A D UAT E
A P P L I CAT I O N
INSTRUCTIONS
F O R 2 0 19
Northwestern Engineering has prepared this guide to help you M S A P P L I C AT I O N S
navigate the sometimes complex application process for MS or See below for information on departmental MS programs.
PhD admission. You can also refer to each department’s website
If you are interested in one of the following programs, please refer
for more information.
to the program’s website for application instructions and deadlines:
P H D A P P L I C AT I O N S Master of Science in Artiicial Intelligence ( MSAI ) Master of
If your ultimate goal is a PhD degree, apply for admission to the Science in Biotechnology Program ( MBP ) Master of
PhD program of your choice. Please note that PhD program admission Engineering Management ( MEM ) Master of Project Management
does not require an MS degree; very few of our new PhD students (MPM ) Master of Science in Information Technology ( MSIT )
hold an MS degree. Also note that if you are not admitted to a PhD The MMM Program Master of Science in Analytics (MSIA )
program, you may request admission for self-funded MS study in Master of Product Design and Development Management ( MPD2 )
most departments. Master of Science in Robotics ( MSR ) Master of Science
in Engineering Design Innovation (EDI ) Master of Science
in Executive Management and Design Construction (EMDC )
A P P L I C AT I O N P R O C E S S TRANSCRIPTS
AND DEADLINES
Applicants upload unoficial transcripts with the online application.
The online application websites open in September each year.
See The Graduate School website for more details.

You can begin your application in early September. During the Oficial transcripts will be required only for new students
process you can save your work and then delay submission of the who enroll at Northwestern. Those will be collected in the summer
application and application fee until closer to the deadline. months.

The application deadline for most PhD programs will be December 15. R E C O M M E N D AT I O N S
The deadline for engineering sciences and applied mathematics is
December 31. The deadline for industrial engineering and
All recommendations should be submitted through the
management sciences is December 5.
online process. Two or three recommendations are required
depending on the program.
MS application deadlines vary by program. Please refer
to departmental and program websites for speciic MS
Please do not have your references send hard copies by mail.
application deadlines.

ONCE YOU H AV E A PPLIED


S U P P O R T I N G M AT E R I A L S
F O R A P P L I C AT I O N S During the application process, you will work with the departmental
TEST SCORES graduate program assistant to complete your application ile. You will
also be able to track your status online in the application system.

Applicants can use the E TS system to send GRE and TOEFL scores
(if TOEFL is required for you) to Northwestern University (E TS code
1565).

Northwestern will accept scanned copies of score reports with the


online application and verify those scores with E TS.

The minimum Internet-based TOEFL scores are 90 for PhD


applicants and 80 for MS applicants in most programs. Higher
TOEFL scores may be required for some MS programs. Please
see departmental websites for that information. A score of 7.0 may
also be used from the IELTS.

R E S U M E /C V A N D S TAT E M E N T O F P U R P O S E

Please include your resume/CV and statement of purpose


with the online application.
ONCE YOU H AV E BEEN A DMIT TED
A P P L I C AT I O N
PhD programs: Admitted PhD students have until April 15 to accept CHECKLIST
or decline the offer of admission. Those residing in the United States
are invited to campus in late winter. Northwestern Engineering will
help defray expenses for your travel to Evanston. Please check with your speciic program for speciic instructions.

Complete online application


MS programs: Admitted MS students will receive speciic
I N C L U D E W I T H O N L I N E A P P L I C AT I O N
acceptance deadline information from their department or program.
Recommenders’ contact information

Resume/CV
FUNDING
Statement of purpose

Unoficial transcripts
PhD programs: Northwestern Engineering fully funds PhD
students with paid tuition, paid health insurance, and a monthly GRE scores
stipend. After admission, PhD applicants will receive a TOEFL scores (if required; if English was the language of instruction
formal PhD funding offer letter. at the institution where you received your bachelor’s or master’s
degree, then the TOEFL requirement is waived.)
MS programs: Northwestern Engineering generally does not fund
IELTS scores (as an alternative to TOEFL scores)
MS students. To help make sure that all of our master’s degree
Do not send hard copies of materials that have been submitted
students can fund their educations regardless of personal inancial
electronically. It slows the processing of your application.
circumstances, Northwestern Engineering provides opportunities for
access to a variety of federal and private loan and funding options.
(See end of the brochure for more inancial aid information.)

N E E D A S S I S TA N C E ? H AV E A Q U E S T I O N?

Please feel free to contact the graduate program assistant


for your chosen program or Bruce A. Lindvall, assistant
dean for graduate studies:

Bruce A. Lindvall
2145 Sheridan Road, Suite L-261
Evanston, IL 60208–3103
Phone 847–491–4547
b-lindvall@northwestern.edu
M AST E R O F S C I E N C E I N
E N G I N E E RI N G S C I E N C ES
& A P P L I E D M AT H E M AT I CS
THE DEPAR TMENT OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES AND APPLIED
M A T H E M A T I C S (ESAM) focuses on the formulation and solution of mathematical
problems arising across nearly all disciplines. The graduate program stresses both the
methodologies and techniques of applied mathematics and trains students in
mathematical modeling and solution methods in ields where mathematics are applied.
MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The applied mathematics faculty conducts research using a variety MS students must complete 12 units of course work. Each program
of mathematical methods associated with asymptotic analysis, is tailored to the needs and interests of the individual student, but
bifurcation theory, graph theory, scientiic computing, ordinary students must take:
and partial differential equations, probability and statistics,
singular perturbations, and stochastic processes. They employ these Two units of differential equations of mathematical physics
methods in the investigation of problems arising in areas like biome-
chanics, combustion theory, complex networks, diffusion processes,
One unit of asymptotic and perturbation methods
luid mechanics, geophysics, interfacial phenomena, materials sci-
ence, molecular biology, neurobiology, solid mechanics, statistical
mechanics, transport theory, and wave phenomena. Three units of mathematical modeling or one unit of modeling plus
two units of thesis research
The master of science program is designed for students seeking
advanced applied math skills for jobs in industry, or to build a stron-
ger resume for admission to PhD programs in applied mathematics. Three units of numerical and computational methods
Students can complete the program in three quarters of study. Grad-
uates typically go on to work in various industrial areas, inancial Three units of approved electives
markets, or other ields where high-level computational and model-
ing expertise is required. Some graduates go on to PhD programs in
applied mathematics or related ields.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Preference is given to applicants with an undergraduate degree


in mathematics, the physical sciences, or engineering. Prospective
students should have completed course work in linear algebra,
advanced calculus, and differential equations.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Each MS degree candidate must complete an approved program


of three full quarters of study. Candidates have the option of taking
all coursework with no thesis, or an MS thesis with up to two units
of research. Satisfactory progress in the program is determined by
department review of course grades and faculty recommendations.
FA C U LT Y

Daniel Abrams, associate professor: nonlinear dynamics;


mathematical geoscience; physics of social systems; pattern
formation; coupled oscillators

Jan Achenbach, Walter P. Murphy Professor Emeritus: propagation


of mechanical disturbances in solids; ultrasonic methods for
quantitative non-destructive evaluation of solids, including law
detection and characterization

Alvin Bayliss, professor: numerical solution of partial differential


equations, especially those modeling combusion; solid mechanics;
wave propagation; luid dynamics; population dynamics

Rosemary Braun, assistant professor: computational biology;


methods for analysis of genomic and proteomic data; bioinformatics

David Chopp, professor and chair, Charles Deering McCormick


Professor of Teaching Excellence: numerical methods; scientiic
computing; motion of interfaces. Applications include bacterial
bioilms, neurophysiology, crack propagation, and solidiication.

Stephen Davis, Walter P. Murphy Professor: theoretical luid


mechanics, especially hydrodynamic stability and interfacial
phenomena; materials science, especially thin ilms and crystal
growth; asymptotic and variational methods

Sandip Ghosal, associate professor: luid mechanics and biological


and soft systems; physics of ionic liquids—electrokinetics and
electrodiffusion at submicron scales; biomathematics; mechanics
of cell motility

William Kath, professor: computational neuroscience; iber optics;


wave propagation; nonlinear dynamics; complex systems

Erik Luijten, professor (with materials science and engineering):


Monte Carlo methods; computational statistical mechanics of
complex luids; electrostatically driven self-assembly phenomena;
phase behavior and kinetics of luids

Niall M. Mangan, assistant professor: mathematical modeling;


machine learning; systems biology; alternative energy

Madhav Mani, assistant professor: developmental dynamics;


mechanics of cell intercalation; intercellular signaling and the regu-
lation of proliferation; cell divisions: regulation and differentiation

Bernard Matkowsky, John Evans Professor: asymptotic and


perturbation methods; bifurcation and stability; nonlinear dynamics
and pattern formation; combustion; stochastic dynamical systems

Michael Miksis, professor: theoretical and computational luid


mechanics; materials science and biology, especially free boundary
problems, multiphase lows, and stability theory; asymptotic and
perturbation methods; computational methods

Jorge Nocedal, Sachs Professor of Industrial Engineering and


Management Sciences: computational and theoretical optimization;
machine learning; optimization of systems described by partial dif-
ferential equations; software and energy applications

Neelesh Patankar, professor: luid dynamics; eficient algorithms


for luid-immersed body simulations; bio- and neuromechanics of
animal locomotion; superhydrophobicity and ultra-low drag materials
Hermann Riecke, professor: pattern formation; spatially extended
FLUID MECHANICS
dynamical systems; bifurcation theory with symmetry; complex pat-
terns; spatiotemporal chaos; computational neuroscience: dynamics Fluids are found everywhere in our daily lives and are essential to
of neuronal networks with heterogeneous connectivity; information many industrial and scientiic applications. Research in the depart-
processing by neuronal networks in the olfactory bulb; adaptive ment involves using analytical and computational methods from
neural networks applied mathematics to study the dynamics of luids in areas includ-
ing bioluids and microluids. Recent topics of investigation
Petia Vlahovska, associate professor: theoretical and experimental
include the spreading and stability of thin liquid ilms, the motion
luid dynamics, membrane biophysics, active matter, and nonlinear
of gas bubbles and drops, particulate lows, convection, low in blood
physics
vesicles, the dynamics of lipid bilayer vesicles, bioilms, foams, and
Vladimir Volpert, professor: nonlinear dynamics and pattern reacting luids, including those in an astrophysical environment.
formation; bifurcation and stability; traveling waves in reaction-
diffusion systems; combustion; frontal polymerization; population
dynamics M AT E R I A L S S C I E N C E

Peter Voorhees, Frank C. Engelhart Professor of Materials Science Materials science concerns the fabrication and characterization
and Engineering: materials science; growth of nanostructures of physical properties of hard (crystalline) and soft (polymer, colloid,
and materials for energy applications; free boundary problems; or biological) materials, and aims to determine how to create new
pattern formation materials that possess the requirements of modern technologies.
In applied mathematics, one sets up mathematical models of pro-
cesses and uses analytical and numerical methods to analyze them
ARE AS OF RESE ARCH E XCELLENCE with the objective of understanding and predicting behavior.

COMPLEX SYSTEMS Some recent department projects include investigations into the
growth of nanowires, the creation of porous aluminum structures,
A system is called complex when it has a large number of elements,
the evolution of quantum dots, the polymerization of luids, and
building blocks, or agents capable of interacting with each other and
the self-assembly of polyelectrolyte complexes.
with their environment, and when it displays organization without
the application of any external organizing principle.

Research in the department currently focuses on social C O M P U TAT I O N A L A N D Q UA N T I TAT I V E B I O L O GY


dynamics and human transport, information processing in neurons Biological processes are inherently complex, and applied
and networks of neurons, and cellular processes. Applied mathematical research in this area presents new and exciting
mathemaics provides essential tools for understanding such challenges beyond the traditional approaches encountered in
complex systems and their behaviors. many biological studies. Understanding and broadening our knowl-
edge of these biological processes is critical to improvements in
medical treatment, agriculture, and the environment. These pro-
cesses range in scale from studying protein folding and binding
to population dynamics, and all scales in between.
Research in the department involves both modeling and
computation to better explain observed biological phenomena.
Recent projects have studied modeling and simulation of neurons,
communication systems in bacterial colonies, bioilms for waste
water treatment, morphogenesis of cells in Drosophila ly embryos,
formation and growth of cranial aneurysms, and the dynamics of
the olfactory system.

SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING

Scientiic computing plays an essential role in modern applied


mathematics, enabling the simulation of complex models of physical
and biological phenomena. This, in turn, can lead to the discovery
of new phenomena and provide a guide to experimentalists.

Scientiic computing activities within the department involve the


development of new computational procedures as well as the
adaptation and extension of existing procedures for modern multi-
processor architectures. Areas of current interest include level set
methods for computing the evolution of interfaces, adaptive discret-
ization procedures for computing localized regions of rapid variation,
high-order spectral methods for computations in which very high
accuracy is required, and stochastic methods for particle-based
simulations. In addition, parallel computing is an essential compo-
nent of many research projects. The department offers instruction
and resources for both distributed and GPU parallel architectures.

LEARN MORE

Additional information about the MS in engineering sciences


and applied mathematics can be found at the Northwestern
Engineering website:

http://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/applied-math/graduate/
masters/index.htm

G R A D U AT E S T Y P I C A L LY G O O N T O
WORK IN VA R IO U S IND U S T R I A L
AREAS, FINANCIAL MARKETS, OR
OTHER FIELDS WHERE HIGH-LEVEL
C O M P U TAT I O N A L A N D M O D E L I N G
E XPERTISE IS REQUIRED.
M M M P RO G R A M
T H E M M M P R O G R A M develops whole-brain innovators by combining the analytical thinking
and strategic leadership of an MBA with the human-centered approach to research, problem
framing, and concept development from an MS in Design Innovation. The interdisciplinary nature of
MMM uniquely positions its graduates for key roles across industries, where they can create value
and drive impact through innovation of services, products, and experiences.
PROGRAM OVERVIEW
DEGREES MMM coursework requires 28.5 credits and extends seven quarters.
Much of the core coursework in the curriculum requires technical
MMM graduates earn two master’s degrees: an MBA from the Kellogg aptitude and the capacity for both analytical and creative
School of Management and a Master of Science in Design Innovation thinking. Graduates leave with a new, unique perspective that
(MSDI) from Northwestern Engineering’s Segal Design Institute. balances big-picture ideas with the detailed processes that bring
those ideas to life. Required courses speciically for MMM students
include: Accounting for Decision Making, Business Analytics,
F O R M AT Business Innovation Lab, Business Strategy, Designing & Managing
Business Processes, Innovation in Context, Research-Design-Build,
The MMM Program is an immersive dual-degree, full-time program Whole-Brain Communication, Innovation Effectiveness,
that gives students a rigorous business education integrated with a Digital Design and Development I & II, Applied Advanced Analytics,
strong foundation in design innovation. The MMM Program comprises Managing Artiicial Intelligence Products, and Design Research.
lectures, experiential courses, and studio-based classes that take
place in both the day and evening. Students start as a cohort in June
and graduate in June two years later, completing a minimum of 28.5
credits during seven quarters of study, plus a summer internship at
the end of the irst year.

FA C U LT Y

MMM leverages the expertise of faculty from both the McCormick


School of Engineering and the Kellogg School of Management. MMM
faculty members maintain a dynamic relationship with the innovation
industry through research, consulting, and advisory board service
with companies from many sectors, including technology, design,
entrepreneurship, consumer products and services, inance,
marketing, and manufacturing.

CURRICULUM

The MMM Program maintains an enhanced design innovation and


business curriculum that prepares our graduates to tackle the
complex challenges of the 21st century. Over the course of two years,
students learn best-in-class methodologies for driving innovation,
utilizing design thinking tools such as user-centered research
methods, creative ideation, rapid prototyping, and operational
implementation.
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

In addition to a rigorous classroom education, MMM also offers a


variety of co-curricular, hands-on learning opportunities and ield
work, including: a capstone Business Innovation Lab project working
on a speciic solution-focused project with an innovation-driven
company; an exclusive MMM studio and prototyping space with
access to workshops, individual training, and technical support;
business and design competitions; exclusive workshops and
seminars with innovation business leaders; opportunities to visit and
work in professional design facilities, both domestic and
international; mentorship and support from professors and
administrators from Kellogg, Segal, and Northwestern Engineering.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ELIGIBILITY

Prospective students holding a bachelor’s or equivalent degree from


an accredited college or university are eligible to apply. MMM
students come from a large variety of backgrounds and industries.
This diversity across the program provides a rich learning environ-
ment and enables students to understand and leverage a variety of
viewpoints and perspectives through classroom discussion, team
project work, academic social clubs, and business challenges.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The admissions committee evaluates each applicant’s scholastic


ability, personal character, motivation, leadership ability,
interpersonal skills, career performance, and management potential.

Applicants are required to submit only one application and should


follow the instructions for applying to the MMM Program as outlined
in the Kellogg School’s application materials. Separate applications
to the McCormick School are not required.

The following materials are required for application to the program:


Academic transcripts, GMAT/GRE score, two letters of recommenda-
tion, resume, evaluative interview report, TOEFL scores (if appli-
cable), details of work experience (if applicable), two core essays
(topics change each year), essay on speciic interest in the MMM
Program, and video essay.

The required application materials will be reviewed to assess each


applicant’s candidacy compared to the pool of applicants. The
committee places high value in full-time professional experience
and accomplishments gained in a variety of work settings, includ-
ing military service and extracurricular activities. Work experience
demonstrates maturity and fosters career- and self-awareness,
which contribute to a student’s success.
O T H E R P R O G R A M I N F O R M AT I O N career advice tailored to each student’s aspirations. These centers
offer self-assessment workshops, resume critiques, videotaping
CAREER SUPPORT
of simulated interviews, opportunities to network with Kellogg and
MMM -speciic employers, and an experienced careers team.
MMM graduates are in high demand because of their unique skill
sets and real-world experience. Students intern and place in a wide
range of industries, functions, and locations. F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N

Over the past 25 years, students have pursued careers in product Learn more about MMM by attending one of our admissions events,
management, management and design consulting, innovation which are held worldwide throughout the year. For additional
strategy, digital design, and corporate operations. Others go on to information about admissions and upcoming admissions events,
launch new ventures, drawing on all the skills and opportunities please contact MBAadmissions@kellogg.northwestern.edu.
available to them through the MMM experience.
Visit us online at: mmm.northwestern.edu or kellogg.northwestern.
MMM students enjoy having a dedicated career adviser within edu/programs/full-time-mba/mmm-program.aspx
Kellogg’s Career Management Center in addition to having full
access to all other Kellogg resources and the McCormick Ofice of You may also contact MMM@northwestern.edu for more information.
Career Development, which offers one-on-one strategy sessions and

D E S I G N I N N O VAT I O N I S C R E AT I N G N E W
VA LUE U SING DE SIGN- CEN T R IC T O OL S
A N D F R A M E W O R K S , S U C H A S E M PAT H Y
A N D D E E P H U M A N U N D E R S TA N D I N G ,
V I S U A L I Z AT I O N , P R O T O T Y P I N G , A N D
I T E R AT I O N .
M AST E R O F S C I E N C E
I N A N A LY T I CS
T H E M A S T E R O F S C I E N C E I N A N A LY T I C S ( MSiA ) program within Northwestern
Engineering immerses students in a comprehensive and applied data science curriculum. With
intensive training in applied math, programming, and business, students learn to develop ma-
chine learning and artiicial intelligence solutions in a business context. Through coursework
and applied industry projects, the program prepares graduates for careers and leadership
positions in this fast-growing ield.
MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM INTERNSHIP

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Students gain valuable exposure working on data science teams
while completing required internships. The MSiA program brings
Students enter the program as a cohort in September and
more than 30 companies to campus each year for recruiting events
graduate in December of the following year. Students must complete
and maintains strong ties with industry leaders. Each cohort pursues
the following:
a range of industries often through connections fostered by the
program, faculty, and its alumni network.
15 units of coursework

An eight-month industry practicum

A minimum 10-week, full-time internship

A 10-week industry capstone project

COURSEWORK

Students complete a sequenced data science curriculum with a


business focus taught by tenured faculty from Northwestern’s
McCormick School of Engineering and Kellogg School of
Management, as well as industry professionals. Courses including
predictive analytics, deep learning, data visualization, analytics for
big data, data warehousing, and leadership for analytical
organizations and functions make up our core curriculum.
Throughout the program, students learn to identify patterns and
trends, gain insight from vast quantities of structured and
unstructured data, and communicate indings in practical and useful
terms.

Coursework includes advanced machine learning and artiicial


intelligence techniques in addition to traditional applied
statistical approaches. Students learn to think critically about
matching techniques and programming solutions to business
problems within an organizational context. To ground our curriculum
in practical data science, our faculty use case studies of real-world
analytics problems to foster discussion and reine mathematical,
computing, and operational skills.

Students learn how to effectively use tools such as Java, Python, R,


SQL, Tableau, D3, Spark, TensorFlow, and more in a business setting.
I N D U S T R Y- B A S E D P R O J E C T S

During the practicum and capstone projects, students work


collaboratively in teams for extended periods on industry-supplied
problems. Teams work with technical advisers, business advisers,
and company sponsors in order to scope projects, cleanse and
process data, and perform analytics before delivering inal
recommendations to the clients. These industry-based projects give
students crucial practical experience implementing data modelling
and business application strategies, as well as build collaboration
presentation skills that will translate to any career path.

SPEAKER SEMINAR SERIES

To complement academic instruction, our program also hosts guest


speakers throughout the academic year. Each quarter, we invite top
scholars and industry professionals who are innovating in the ield to
present guest lectures and workshops to our students.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The 15-month, full-time Master of Science in Analytics program


admits a small number of students each fall quarter (about 40).
Competitive candidates often have strong quantitative backgrounds
and programming experience, however, we encourage prospective
students from a variety of undergraduate and professional
disciplines to apply. The admissions review committee assesses
each application holistically in order to put together a cohort with a
diverse range of educational backgrounds and work experiences.

The MSIA admission season begins each September; applications are


accepted on a non-rolling basis. Application deadlines are:

Scholarship Priority: December 1


Regular: January 15

FELLOWSHIPS

Each year, the MSiA program offers a small number of merit-based,


partial-tuition scholarships. All applicants will be considered for
scholarship, however, those who submit and complete their
application by the Scholarship Priority deadline are likely to receive
the fullest consideration for scholarship by the admissions review
committee.

Those who submit and complete an application by the regular


deadline may still be considered for second-round scholarship
funding as available.

C O N TA C T

Learn more about the MSiA program at www.analytics.


northwestern.edu or contact analytics@northwestern.edu
with speciic questions.
M AST E R O F S C I E N C E
IN COMPUTER
E N G I N E E RI N G
THE COMPU TER ENGINEERING DIVISION WITHIN THE DEPAR TMENT OF
E L E C T R I C A L E N G I N E E R I N G A N D C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E ( EEC S ), the largest
department at Northwestern Engineering, offers an MS program in computer engineering that
prepares students to become leaders in academia, research, and industry. The division’s
internationally renowned and award-winning faculty, many of whom are members of
prestigious scholarly societies, are deeply committed to their students. The division has state-
of-the-art research equipment and the considerable resources of a prestigious university.
PROGRAM OVERVIEW In addition to course work, students working toward an MS degree
in computer engineering must choose one of the following plans and
Graduate study within the computer engineering division prepares
obtain approval from their adviser:
students to take the lead in university and industry settings through
an interdisciplinary program that mirrors the collaboration computer
engineers experience in professional and research settings. PL AN A (THESIS MS)
Courses and research in the MS in computer engineering program Students must write an MS thesis for which they may receive two
focus on expanding skills in foundational computer engineering or three units of research credit 590. This can be counted toward
topics including computer systems, computer architecture, distrib- the 12-unit requirement for the MS degree. The student’s MS
uted and parallel systems, parallel processing, parallel algorithms, examination committee must approve the thesis.
computer networks, hardware software interaction, VLSI design,
embedded systems, numerical analysis, systems simulation, robot-
ics, neural networks, switching networks, and large-scale systems. PL AN B (PRO JECT MS)

Students must complete a project and write a project report for


which they will receive one or two units of research credit 590,
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS which can be counted toward the 12-unit requirement for the MS
To maintain a proper balance between department resources and degree. The difference between an MS thesis and an MS project
the size of the graduate student population, the department limits is that the thesis normally has substantial original research results,
offers of admission to only the most qualiied applicants. Thus the while a project contains results based on existing theory or tech-
admission process is highly selective and competitive in nature. niques. The student’s MS examination committee must approve
the project report.
Faculty whose research interests fall into the applicant’s area of
specialization perform the initial evaluation of each application.
A typical applicant is expected to have a BS in electrical engineering,
computer engineering, computer science, or a related discipline
from a recognized institution. Highly qualiied candidates with other
academic backgrounds may also be considered.

The speciic undergraduate preparation required for graduate study


depends on the program and the area of specialization. An applicant
who has insuficient undergraduate preparation in a particular area,
but is well qualiied in every other respect, may be required to take
certain undergraduate courses as soon as possible after enrolling
at Northwestern. Such students are informed of this requirement
at the time of admission.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
At least 12 units of graduate study are required for the MS
degree. Typically, one unit of credit corresponds to a one-quarter
course. All course work for the MS degree must be taken within
the The Graduate School at Northwestern University and must be
com-pleted within ive years of enrollment. Every MS student is
required to take at least three relevant courses at the 400 level.
PL AN C (COURSE MS)

Students must take 12 courses approved by the student’s adviser.


The choice of courses must represent a coherent program of study
that prepares the student for advanced work in a speciic ield.
An MS examination committee evaluates the student’s performance
in the course work. Not all programs allow this option.

PROGRAM PLANNING

Each student is assigned an initial program adviser who will assist


with planning for the irst quarters of study. Students are encour-
aged to ind a permanent research adviser by the end of the irst
quarter. The research adviser serves as the student’s primary
contact with the department for the remainder of the program and
should be chosen to match the student’s research interests. Each
student completes a study plan, which is approved by the adviser
prior to registration and updated with any program changes and
grades each quarter.

The normal full-time program of graduate study is three units per


quarter. The maximum permitted is four. All students who receive
fellowships, research assistantships, or teaching assistantships
must register as full-time students.

For the convenience of graduate students who wish to pursue their


MS studies in the department on a part-time basis, the department
schedules certain courses in the late afternoon. However, it may
not be possible to take all required courses for the MS degree in
late-afternoon time slots. For further information, contact the
associate chair for graduate affairs.

ARE AS OF RESE ARCH E XCELLENCE

Areas of study in the computer engineering division include:

Computer architecture

Computer-aided design

Mobile systems

Parallel processing

Hardware software interaction

VLSI design

Embedded systems

Systems simulation

Robotics

Large-scale systems
FA C U LT Y C O N TA C T
The faculty in the computer engineering division consists of a large Learn more about the MS in computer engineering at our website:
number whose teaching and research interests lie primarily in www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/eecs/computer-engineering/
computer engineering, as well as a few members of the department graduate/masters/
with a secondary afiliation and a primary interest in either computer You may also email eecsgrad@northwestern.edu with speciic
science or electrical engineering. questions about the program.
Nabil Alshurafa Yan Chen Alok Choudary Peter Dinda
Jie Gu Nikos Hardavellas Larry Henschen Josiah Hester
Russell Joseph Gokhan Memik Seda Ogrenci Memik
Ilya Mikhelson Alan Sahakian Peter Scheuermann
Hai Zhou Qi Zhu

ADDITIONAL PROGRAM
I N F O R M AT I O N

C A R E E R PAT H S

A master’s degree in computer engineering from Northwestern


provides graduates with a variety of options. While some graduates
go on to PhD-granting programs at prestigious universities through-
out the world, others jump into working in design and management;
microchips and computers; application-speciic hardware and soft-
ware systems; and computer-aided design tools for digital,
aerospace, defense, and networked systems.
M AST E R O F
SCIENCE IN
COMPUTER SCIENCE
THE COMPU TER SCIENCE DIVISION WITHIN THE DEPAR TMENT OF
E L E C T R I C A L E N G I N E E R I N G A N D C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E ( EEC S ), the largest
department at Northwestern Engineering, offers a graduate degree program in computer
science with a curriculum that students can tailor to their research interests. The division’s
internationally renowned and award-winning faculty, many of whom are members of
prestigious scholarly societies, are deeply committed to their students. The division has state-
of-the-art research equipment and the considerable resources of a prestigious university.
In addition to course work, students working toward an MS degree in
computer science must choose one of the following plans and obtain
PROGRAM OVERVIEW
approval from their adviser:
Graduate study within the computer science division affords
students the lexibility to take courses and participate in research
that aligns with their career aspirations in this growing and PL AN A (THESIS MS)
increasingly important ield. Students must write an MS thesis for which they may receive two
Students can choose from courses and research in artiicial or three units of research credit 590. This can be counted toward
intelligence, human-computer interaction, distributed interactive the 12-unit requirement for the MS degree. The student’s MS
systems, theoretical computer science, and computer graphics and examination committee must approve the thesis.
human-computer interfaces for spatial applications, visualization,
and computer entertainment.
PL AN B (PRO JECT MS)

Students must complete a project and write a project report for


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS which they will receive one or two units of research credit 590,
which can be counted toward the 12-unit requirement for the MS
To maintain a proper balance between department resources and
degree. The difference between an MS thesis and an MS project
the size of the graduate student population, the department limits
is that the thesis normally has substantial original research results,
offers of admission to only the most qualiied applicants. Thus the
while a project contains results based on existing theory or tech-
admission process is highly selective and competitive in nature.
niques. The student’s MS examination committee must approve
Faculty whose research interests fall into the applicant’s area of the project report.
specialization perform the initial evaluation of each application.
A typical applicant is expected to have a BS in electrical engineering,
computer engineering, computer science, or a related discipline
from a recognized institution. Highly qualiied candidates with other
academic backgrounds may also be considered.

The speciic undergraduate preparation required for graduate study


depends on the program and the area of specialization. An applicant
who has insuficient undergraduate preparation in a particular area,
but is well qualiied in every other respect, may be required to take
certain undergraduate courses as soon as possible after enrolling
at Northwestern. Such students are informed of this requirement
at the time of admission.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
At least 12 units of graduate study are required for the MS
degree. Typically, one unit of credit corresponds to a one-quarter
course. All course work for the MS degree must be taken within
the The Graduate School at Northwestern University and must be
completed within ive years of enrollment. Every MS student is
required to take at least three relevant courses at the 400 level.
PL AN C (COURSE MS)

Students must take 12 courses approved by the student’s adviser.


The choice of courses must represent a coherent program of study
that prepares the student for advanced work in a speciic ield.
An MS examination committee evaluates the student’s performance
in the course work. Not all programs allow this option.

PROGRAM PLANNING

Each student is assigned an initial program adviser who will assist


with planning for the irst quarters of study. Students are
encouraged to ind a permanent research adviser by the end of the
irst quarter. The research adviser serves as the student’s primary
contact with the department for the remainder of the program and
should be chosen to match the student’s research interests. Each
student completes a study plan, which is approved by the adviser
prior to registration and updated with any program changes and
grades each quarter.

The normal full-time program of graduate study is three units per


quarter. The maximum permitted is four. All students who receive
fellowships, research assistantships, or teaching assistantships
must register as full-time students.

For the convenience of graduate students who wish to pursue their


MS studies in the department on a part-time basis, the department
schedules certain courses in the late afternoon. However, it may
not be possible to take all required courses for the MS degree in
late-afternoon time slots. For further information, contact the
associate chair for graduate affairs.

ARE AS OF RESE ARCH E XCELLENCE

SYSTEMS AND NETWORKING

Systems and networking focuses on networks, communication, and


control focus on communications, telecommunications and
communication networks, and control theory. Speciic areas of study
include mobile wireless multi-user communication, estimation and
detection, wireless networks, resource allocation in
communication networks, data network protocol design, network
performance modeling and analysis, nonlinear and robust control,
and stochastic hybrid systems.

FA C U LT Y

Fabián Bustamante Simone Campanoni Yan Chen


Christos Dimoulas Peter Dinda Robby Findler
Aleksandar Kuzmanovic Jennie Rogers Peter Scheuerman
Jesse Tov

THEORY

Theoretical computer science looks at fundamental questions about


computation by creating formal models of computation and under-
standing the resources needed to solve general and speciic algorith-
mic questions. Researchers study the design of eficient algorithms
and understanding the computational complexity of various
computational tasks that arise in computer science, statistics,
economics, and the other sciences.
The major research areas include design and analysis of algorithms, HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION
computational complexity, randomness in computation, Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is a rapidly expanding area of
combinatorial optimization, approximation algorithms, and online research and development that has transformed the way we use
algorithms. The theory group at Northwestern also has strong computers in the last 30 years. Northwestern hosts a vibrant HCI
interests in using computation as a fundamentally new lens to study community across schools with faculty and students involved in a
other fundamental sciences, leading to areas of algorithmic game wide range of projects. Research topics and areas include augment-
theory, machine learning, and bioinformatics. ed-reality, collective action, computer-mediated communication,
computer-supported collaborative work, crowdsourcing and social
computing, cyberlearning and future learning technologies, inclusive
FA C U LT Y
technologies and accessibility, interactive audio, mixed-initiative
Anindya De Jason Hartline Ming-Yang Kao systems, mobile interaction design, multi-touch interaction, social
Konstantin Makarychev Aravindan Vijayaraghavan media, social networks, tangible user interfaces, ubiquitous
computing, and user-centered design. Students in HCI are enrolled
in programs in computer science, communication, learning sciences,
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND MACHINE LEARNING
and technology and social behavior. Students also take courses and
Over the last decade, the rise of artiicial intelligence and its use attend seminars through the Segal Design Institute.
in the development of systems that can reason and respond to
increasingly complex situations has progressed dramatically. As AI
moves from idea to implementation, it is clear that future intelligent FA C U LT Y
systems will be designed to partner with, rather than replace or even Larry Birnbaum Jeremy Birnholtz Elizabeth Gerber
augment, human users. Research areas include machine learning Darren Gergle Kristian Hammond Michael Horn Ian Horswill
and interactive AI systems, human cognition, semantic information Bryan Pardo Anne Marie Piper Uri Wilensky Haoqi Zhang
processing, knowledge representation and commonsense reasoning,
collaborative system design, deep learning, software management
for AI, and interactive language systems. GRAPHICS

In computer graphics, researchers seek to model the physical


appearance of real life scenes by studying the complex interactions
FA C U LT Y
between light and materials. On the one hand, they use rendering
Brenna Argall Larry Birnbaum Oliver Cossairt techniques to synthesize computer generated images of virtual
Douglas Downey Ken Forbus Kristian Hammond scenes, enabling them to faithfully visualize the photo-realistic
Thomas Hinrichs Ian Horswill Bryan Pardo Chris Riesbeck and physically plausible appearance of computer models. However,
Michael Rubenstein Sara Owsley Sood Haoqi Zhang computer graphics is about much more than just generating pretty
pictures. Graphics has a natural synergy with many other ields in
computer science including robotics, computer vision, human-com-
puter interaction, and machine learning. As a result, many of the
algorithms developed have broad applications that extend beyond
simulation, modeling, and visualization. Indeed, the same physical
models used in graphics to render images (e.g. camera, material, ge-
ometry, and lighting models) can also be used to develop algorithms
that mine today’s vast collections of digital images for richer scene
understanding, paving the way towards more intelligent cameras that
augment visual perception.

FA C U LT Y

Oliver Cossairt Jack Tumblin

ROBOTICS

A robot is a machine that is capable of sensing and interacting with


its environment and taking action autonomously. The day is soon
coming where people will have robots integrated throughout society
— from homes to transportation to healthcare and beyond.

At Northwestern, researchers build a wide variety of robot


systems, studying how robots interact with the ground and air,
objects around them, humans who are their partners or who they are
helping, and even how robots interact with each other. Robotics uses
a broad range of disciplines within computer science and beyond,
from mathematics to mechanics to biology. Especially important
tools from computer science include artiicial intelligence and so-
phisticated sensor processing (e.g. computer vision). Researchers
are working to create robots that can improve our world for the
better: that assist humans with impairments, work together in large
teams, move in challenging environments, dexterously manipulate
objects, and provide information to humans.

FA C U LT Y

Brenna Argall Oliver Cossairt Michael Rubenstein

C S +X

Within the CS+X initiative, Northwestern is working to actively


discover and support transformational relationships among
computer science and other ields. Connecting CS with diverse
disciplines can drive transformational connections across the
University and potentially spark entirely new ields of study.

The CS+X initiative supports a focused set of activities aimed at


exploring how CS can interact with intersecting ields within the
University. These include: joint conferences and workshops to ex-
plore opportunities, visiting faculty and speakers at the intersection,
shared cross–functional project classes, classes aimed at students
from outside of computer science, shared student projects to explore
intersection opportunities, shared faculty research opportunities,
and joint hiring committees aimed at recruiting in intersection areas.

FA C U LT Y

Larry Birnbaum Oliver Cossairt Douglas Downey


Jennie Rogers Robby Findler Ken Forbus Kristian Hammond
Jason Hartline Thomas Hinrichs Michael Horn Ian Horswill
Ming-Yang Kao Bryan Pardo Chris Riesbeck
Aravindan Vijayaraghavan Uri Wilensky
ADDITIONAL PROGRAM C O N TA C T
I N F O R M AT I O N Learn more about the MS in computer science at our website:
mccormick.northwestern.edu/eecs/computer-science/graduate/
masters/
C A R E E R PAT H S
You may also email eecsgrad@northwestern.edu with speciic
Computer science graduates at Northwestern are recruited by
questions about the program.
employers in nearly every industry. The wide range of career options
for graduates includes software development and engineering, infor-
mation technology consulting, database and systems analysis, data
analytics, and inancial risk analysis and trading. The program also
provides effective preparation for PhD studies.
FINANCIAL AID
FO R MASTE R’S
DEG RE E PROG R AM
STUDENTS
Faculty and staff of the McCormick School of Engineering and Also, note that if your ultimate goal is to pursue a PhD, you may
Applied Science understands that inancing a master’s degree enter PhD programs without having completed an MS degree.
can play an important role in deciding which school you will attend.
To help make sure that all of our master’s degree students can
LOANS
fund their educations regardless of personal inancial circum-
stances, Northwestern Engineering provides opportunities for Northwestern loan procedures, deadlines, and downloadable
access to a variety of federal and private loan and funding options. forms are available at:

The Ofice of Student Financial Services assists current and http://www.northwestern.edu/sfs/inancial_aid/


incoming students with these funding processes and also student-loans/index.html
provides sound debt management services. You may contact Private student loan comparison for students not eligible
the ofice by phone at 847–491–8950 or by e-mail at for federal loans is available at:
gradinaid@northwestern.edu.
http://www.northwestern.edu/sfs/inancial_aid/
student-loans/private-alt/index.html
Financial literacy, federal loan programs, loan forgiveness
provisions, and repayment calculators are available at:

http://www.northwestern.edu/inancial-wellness/

Northwestern Financial Wellness has also partnered with the


non-proit organization American Student Assistance (ASA) to offer
SALT, a free online program designed to help students and alumni
manage their money and student loans. Learn more at:

http://www.northwestern.edu/inancial-wellness/money-101/salt.
html

TUITION

Tuition, fees, billing, and payment information is available at:

http://www.northwestern.edu/sfs/

SCHOLARSHIPS

Information about private outside scholarship assistance


may be found at:

http://petersons.com

Please feel free to follow up with the Ofice of Student Financial


Services or Bruce A. Lindvall, assistant dean for graduate studies
at McCormick, at b-lindvall@northwestern.edu or at 847–491–4547,
if you have questions about inancing your MS degree.