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Mastering Competencies Family Therapy

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Mastering Competencies Family Therapy 2nd Edition By Gehart -Test Bank

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Mastering Competencies in Family Therapy

Chapter 6: Experiential Family Therapies

1. Each of the following therapies fall into the category of experiential family therapies EXCEPT?
1. Satir growth model
2. Symbolic-experiential therapy
3. Emotionally focused therapy
4. External family systems

ANS: D

REF: Lay of the Land (p. 165)

1. Which of the following experiential family therapies is the leading evidence-based approach to
couples therapy that uses experiential, systemic, and attachment theories?
1. Satir growth model
2. Symbolic-experiential therapy
3. Emotionally focused therapy
4. Internal family systems

ANS: C

REF: Lay of the Land (p. 165)

1. It is said that rather than focus primarily on behavioral interaction sequences, experiential
family therapists focus more on the __________ layer of those interactions.
1. emotional
2. internal
3. external
4. intermittent

ANS: A

REF: Common Assumptions and Practices (p. 165-166)

1. Experiential therapists assert that warmth and empathy are essential to effective therapy. To
foster an environment where this is evident, a therapist must do which of the following?
1. Make a strong, affective connection with clients to create a sense of safety, allowing
clients to explore areas of emotional vulnerability.
2. Acknowledge that the client is the expert in their own life and the therapist is merely
there to facilitate the process of self-discovery.
3. Fully explore the amount of empathy the members of the family have for each other.
4. All the above.

ANS: D

REF: Common Assumptions and Practices (p. 166)

1. The Satir growth model focuses mostly on which of the following?


1. Fostering individual growth and improving family interactions
2. Reframing the problem in a completely positive light
3. Creating a sense of safety for interpersonal learning
4. Realigning the patterns and alliances the family has adhered to

ANS: A

REF: The Satir Growth Model (p. 166)

1. According to the Satir growth model, there are five communication strategies for survival.
Which of the following suggestions would be best for a therapist working with clients who have
adapted the placator stance or role?

1.
1. Encourage the client to take a firm stance from the onset of therapy.
2. Use less directive therapy methods, such as multiple choice questions and open-ended
reflections, to require them to voice their opinion and take a stand.
3. Use therapeutic techniques, such as reflecting, to highlight hidden emotions.
4. Applaud the placator; after all, they can be the easiest people to get along with.

ANS: B

REF: The Satir Growth Model (p. 167)

1. When a Satir-oriented therapist is working with a client who takes on a blamer stance, the
therapist should NOT do which of the following?
1. Placate the client by not speaking honestly and directly to them.
2. Increase the client’s awareness of the thoughts and feelings of others.
3. Help the client to communicate their personal perspectives in a way that is respectful of
others.
4. Directly confront the client when necessary.

ANS: A

REF: The Satir Growth Model (p. 168)

1. When a Satir-oriented therapist is spending time “floating” along with the client’s distractions to
identify the unique “anchors” of the client’s reality that the therapist can tap into, they might be
working with what type of client?
1. Placator
2. Blamer
3. Superreasonable
4. Irrelevant

ANS: D

REF: The Satir Growth Model (p. 168)

1. Satir’s six-stage model of change is best described by which of the following statements?
1. The model emphasizing the therapist perturbs the system, shakes it up and respects its
ability to naturally reorganize itself in a more useful way.
2. The model identifies the different communication stances each family adapts to through
the process of therapy.
3. The model addresses conflict resolution and recovery in the family system.
4. The model highlights the inconsistencies and patterns the family system has fallen into.

ANS: A

REF: The Satir Growth Model (p. 169-170)

1. There are four primary assumptions about people and therapy according to Satir and her
associates. Which of the following is NOT one of those assumptions?
1. People naturally tend toward positive growth.
2. All people possess the resources for positive growth.
3. Every person, thing, or situation impacts and is impacted by everyone and everything
else.
4. Therapy is a process that involves interaction between therapist and client; in this
relationship, the therapist is responsible for him/herself and the client.

ANS: D

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 170)

1. Satir’s work and relationships with clients was characterized by her foundation of warmth and
humanity. These conditions can be achieved by other therapists practicing the Satir model by
doing which of the following?
1. Emulating Virginia Satir
2. Reading Carl Roger’s On Becoming a Person
3. Systematically developing accurate empathy
4. Being congruent

ANS: D

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 171)

1. The importance of making contact and establishing credibility with clients, according to the Satir
model, can be established doing which of the following?
1. Using paradoxes in therapy
2. Asking family members to rearrange themselves in the therapy room
3. Sitting or standing at the same physical level so that eye contact is easy
4. Asking the family to engage in an enactment

ANS: C

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 171)


1. A Satir-oriented therapist says, “I believe this child’s exaggerated acting out and drug use may
serve to reduce tension in his parents’ marriage by getting his parents to focus on him.” What is
the therapist doing?
1. Determining the family life chronology
2. Viewing the symptoms as having a role in the family system
3. Figuring out the survival stance of the family
4. Using a mandala to understand the child’s drug use

ANS: B

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 172-173)

1. Power struggles, parental conflicts, lack of validation, and lack of intimacy, are considered what
according to the Satir model?
1. Family life chronology
2. Survival stances of the family
3. Family dynamics
4. Family role

ANS: C

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 173)

1. The use of which metaphor allows Satir practitioners to use six levels of experience to help
clients transform their feelings about feelings to make lasting change and more effectively meet
their underlying need for love and acceptance?
1. Ice cube
2. Iceberg
3. Ice age
4. Iceland

ANS: B

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 173-174)


1. Sacha, a Satir-oriented therapist, notices that her client, who often reports feeling
overwhelmed, is often ill and exhausted. What might Sacha be doing during her assessment of
the client?
1. Making a mind-body connection between her client’s emotional issues and how they
are manifesting in his or her body
2. Considering the specific aspects of self her client values and the aspects of which he or
she is ashamed.
3. Assessing the motivation behind the client’s problematic behaviors and interactions
4. Viewing the context for the potential problems and determining the client’s potential
weaknesses

ANS: A

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 174-175)

1. What is the heart of relational goals in Satir’s approach?


1. Restructuring the family boundaries
2. Reconfiguring the family’s interaction sequences
3. Congruent communication for all family members
4. Reducing emotional reactivity through detriangulation

ANS: C

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 175)

1. The overarching individual goal of Satir’s approach is consistent with other humanistic
approaches. Which of the following is the individual goal?
1. To promote self-actualization of members of the system
2. To promote independence of all members of the system
3. To promote interdependence of all members of the system
4. To promote self-assurance of all member of the system

ANS: A

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 175)


1. The ingredients of an interaction intervention detail the internal communication process of
clients and can be used to teach clients about internal and relational processes. This
intervention can be use with which type of clients?
1. Individuals
2. Couples
3. Families
4. All of the above

ANS: D

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 176-177)

1. A Satir-oriented therapist working in a session with a client said the following: “As I listen to you
explain what happened to you during that argument with your sister, I am getting a sense that
you were feeling hurt. Does that sound right?” What is the therapist attempting to do with the
client?
1. Understand the ingredients of the interaction.
2. Facilitate emotional expression.
3. Soften the family rule.
4. Coaching communication

ANS: B

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 177)

1. A Satir-oriented therapist working with a couple asks the partners to turn their chairs toward
each other and gives the following prompt: “Tell your partner how you feel about what
happened New Year’s Eve.” The therapist might be doing which of the following?
1. Understanding the ingredients of an interaction
2. Creating an enactment
3. Softening the family rules
4. Coaching communication

ANS: D

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 177-178)


1. Satir’s most distinctive intervention is family sculpting, which is done either with the family or in
a group setting. How is sculpting accomplished?
1. By enacting a new way of interacting and communicating among family members
2. By allowing individuals to convey how they believe they are viewed in the system,
therefore “sculpting” their image
3. By putting family members in physical positions that represent how the “sculptor” sees
each person’s role in the family
4. By self-reflecting in order to determine areas in need of personal growth and fostering
an environment where the individual can “sculpt” how they want to improve

ANS: C

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 178)

1. In most cases, sculpting is a highly-effective __________ confrontation that bypasses cognitive


defenses.
1. nonverbal
2. artistic
3. creative
4. problematic

ANS: A

REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 178)

1. When a Satir-oriented therapist is working with a client by facilitating a process in which the
client is better able to accept different aspects of self and to identify the contexts in which they
have been useful, the therapist might use which of the following interventions?
1. Ingredients of an interaction
2. Sculpting
3. Touch
4. Parts party

ANS: D
REF: Making Connections: The Therapeutic Relationship (p. 179)

1. Symbolic-experiential therapy is an experiential family therapy model developed by whom?


1. Virginia Satir
2. Carl Whitaker
3. Susan Johnson
4. Richard Schwartz

ANS: B

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 183-184)

1. Similarly to the Satir model of family therapy, Whitaker’s symbolic-experiential model focuses
on family structure and which of the following?
1. Behavioral sequences
2. Cognitive processes
3. Emotional Process
4. Structural Sequences

ANS: C

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 183-184)

1. The therapist needs to win the battle for structure because they are responsible for setting up a
program for change and need to ensure a structure for change is in place. Which of the
following factors is NOT noted for contributing to the structure for change?
1. The necessary people attend therapy
2. The therapy occurs frequently enough to produce progress
3. The session content goes into depth or cover necessary areas
4. The session process will produce change

ANS: C

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 184)


1. Which of the following statements most accurately summarizes Whitaker’s concept of the battle
for initiative?
1. Therapists should avoid tension and crisis in therapy at all costs.
2. Therapists should never work harder than their clients.
3. Clients should not initiate change, the therapist should.
4. Clients should allow their therapist to be overly helpful, push their change.

ANS: B

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 184)

1. In symbolic-experiential therapy, absurdity is used to do which of the following?


1. Perturb the family system in a compassionate and caring way.
2. To render the family system into a state of confusion.
3. Condition the family system into a meaningless existence.
4. Disturb over-involved family relationships in a shocking way.

ANS: A

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 185)

1. If a symbolic-experiential therapist is bored in session and shows it to their client or says


something about feeling bored, this is considered the therapist’s what?
1. Absurdity
2. Integrity
3. Authenticity
4. Professionalism

ANS: C

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 185-186)

1. In symbolic-experiential therapy, what is the therapist’s primary responsibility?


1. Be responsive to the family without being responsible for them.
2. Be responsible for the family without being responsive to them.
3. Both A and B.
4. Neither A nor B.

ANS: A

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 186)

1. Whitaker believed that therapists should walk away from therapy with which of the following?
1. Growing and becoming more fully authentic
2. Not having allowed therapy to transform them
3. Feeling more fully in charge of the process of therapy
4. Feeling they are the same person they were when they began working with the client

ANS: A

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 186)

1. During the assessment process, symbolic-experiential therapists attend to two broad patterns in
the family: the __________ of the family and the emotional processes and exchanges within the
family.
1. cognitive sequences
2. behavioral actions
3. triangulation
4. structural organization

ANS: D

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 187)

1. Symbolic-experiential therapists have three primary long-term goals for all clients. They include
all of the following EXCEPT?
1. Increase family cohesion by creating a sense of nurturance and confidence in problem-
solving.
2. Enact effective parental hierarchy and the severing of cross-generational coalitions.
3. Promote personal growth by supporting the completion of developmental tasks for all
family members.
4. Expand the family’s symbolic world.

ANS: B

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 188)

1. Symbolic-experiential family therapy involves increasing family cohesion and the authenticity of
family relationships. Therapists accomplish this goal by focusing on which two key areas?
1. Intrapersonal boundaries and transgenerational boundaries
2. Transgenerational boundaries and self-actualization
3. Interpersonal boundaries and self-actualization
4. Interpersonal boundaries and transgenerational boundaries

ANS: D

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 188)

1. More than many other family therapists, symbolic-experiential therapists focus on increasing
the sense of family cohesion. Family cohesion is defined as which of the following?
1. The symbiotic relationship the family has in place for all to benefit
2. Clear communication patterns between generations
3. A strong sense of belonging, being loved, being wanted and loyalty
4. There is no clear definition since each family system is affected by different cultural and
economic tendencies

ANS: C

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 188)

1. How will a therapist know when their client achieved personal growth and has successfully
navigated developmental tasks, a process also referred to as self-actualization?
1. Self-actualization is a lifelong process; therefore, only the client will know when they
have achieved self-actualization.
2. The therapist will know that their client has achieved self-actualization when the client
is no longer attending sessions regularly.
3. The therapist will know that their client is making progress towards self-actualization
when the client is no longer experiencing symptoms at the individual level and they are
able to function in most areas of daily life.
4. There is no clear definition of self-actualization; therefore, one can never fully achieve it.

ANS: C

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 189)

1. In the early phases of symbolic-experiential family therapy, therapists create which of the
following to break the family out of their rigid interaction patterns?
1. Confusion and disorganization
2. Hear-and-now experiencing
3. Redefining and expanding of Symptoms
4. Spontaneity and craziness

ANS: A

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 189)

1. A symbolic-experiential therapist working with a family says to the mother, “When did you
divorce your husband and marry your son?” The therapist is attempting to do which of the
following?
1. Deeply offend the family to the point of changing out of embarrassment.
2. Affectively confronting the family to interrupt rigid patterns.
3. Help the client to separate personal issues from interpersonal issues.
4. Expand the symptom from an individual matter to a family matter.

ANS: B

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 190-191)


1. When a client is unrealistically hopeless, the therapist might augment the clients despair and
amplify it so the client can see how the despair and negative assumptions are out of proportion
with the facts. This is also known as what type of technique?
1. Reframe
2. Triangle
3. Paradox
4. Boundary

ANS: C

REF: Symbolic-Experiential Therapy (p. 191)

1. When conceptualizing a case from a symbolic-experiential framework, it is important to assess


each of the following areas EXCEPT?
1. Structural organization
2. Emotional process
3. Lack of competency
4. Symptom development

ANS: C

REF: Putting it All Together: Case Conceptualization and Treatment Plan Templates (p.
192)

1. Aside from its shared humanistic assumptions common to all experiential approaches, internal
family systems is an integrative theory, integrating elements of which of the following?
1. Solution-focused, strategic, cognitive behavioral, and collaborative
2. Structural, strategic, cognitive behavioral, and collaborative
3. Structural, solution-focused, intergenerational, and narrative
4. Structural, strategic, intergenerational, and narrative

ANS: D

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 196)


1. The fundamental premise of internal family systems include all of the following EXCEPT?
1. Each person’s inner life has multiple parts that form a system that functions like a family
system.
2. Each person’s inner world is characterized as having various parts that interrelate as a
coherent system with the same dynamics one would see in a family.
3. When people experience trauma, family imbalance, or polarized relationships, their
inner system of parts takes on mild roles to cope with added stressors.
4. Each person has a Self — that is its core and distinct from its parts — that has vision,
compassion, and confidence. The goal of therapy is to have this Self provide inner
leadership to the various parts.

ANS: C

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 196)

1. Like other experiential approaches, the self-of-the-therapist is a key ingredient to successful


outcomes. Schwartz describes several common therapist parts that interfere with effectiveness.
These therapist parts include each of the following EXCEPT?
1. Striving managers
2. Approval-seeking managers
3. Caregiving managers
4. Positivity managers

ANS: D

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 197)

1. In internal family systems, a part of the client may react to the therapist as if the therapist was
someone from the client’s past. The same can happen to the therapist, responding to a client
based on another past relationship. What is this concept known as?
1. Transference/countertransference
2. Ego/superego
3. Attack/assumption
4. Interpersonal/Intrapersonal

ANS: A
REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 197)

1. In internal family systems, the Self is the seat of consciousness and is considered the natural
leader of the internal family system. When problems occur, what happens to the Self?
1. The Self remains the leader of the internal family system.
2. The parts protect the Self by balancing it with the other parts.
3. The parts remove the Self from leadership to safeguard it.
4. The Self takes on an extreme role to protect itself.

ANS: C

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 198)

1. Which of the following best describes exiles?


1. It is their duty to keep managers locked up so they cannot take control.
2. They are an oppressed group kept from the conscious mind at any cost.
3. They forcefully keep firefighters in check.
4. They help the Self to stay in control.

ANS: B

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 198)

1. The controller, the evaluator, the dependent one, the caretaker, and the worrier are all
examples of what kind of part?
1. The Self
2. Exiles
3. Managers
4. Firefighters

ANS: C

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 198-199)


1. When parts assume leadership (rather than the Self) in order to protect the Self, and one part
shifts into an extreme position while others oppose the extreme role, this is known as what?
1. Effectiveness
2. Polarization
3. Countermeasure
4. Imbalance

ANS: B

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 199)

1. Effective family leadership results in the balance of each of the following EXCEPT?
1. Resources and responsibilities
2. Healthy boundaries between members
3. Nurturance for the leader
4. A shared identity of vision

ANS: C

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 200)

1. An internal family systems therapist must also assess the relationship between parts of
individuals in relationships. Internal family systems therapists are looking for what types of
patterns?
1. Polarization and enmeshment
2. Triangulation and enmeshment
3. Polarization and paradoxes
4. Triangulation and paradoxes

ANS: A

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 200)


1. Which of the following refers to conflicts that result when two people frequently relate from
one or more of their respective manager positions rather than relating from positions of Self
leadership or other parts?
1. Manager-manager polarizations
2. Manager-exile polarizations
3. Manager-firefighter polarizations
4. Enmeshment between parts

ANS: A

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 200)

1. An internal family systems therapist observes that his teenaged client is rebelliously acting out
at home and her parents are frantically trying to manage her with greater and greater
punishments. How would the therapist identify this polarization?
1. Manager-manager polarizations
2. Manager-exile polarizations
3. Manager-firefighter polarizations
4. Enmeshment between parts

ANS: C

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 200)

1. The ultimate goal and definition of healthy functioning in internal family systems is defined by
what?
1. Self indulgence
2. Self regulation
3. Self esteem
4. Self leadership

ANS: D

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 200)


1. An internal family systems therapist asks questions such as “How do you feel toward this part of
yourself? How much influence do you have over this part? Where, when, and by whom is this
part activated?” The therapist is attempting to do what with their client?
1. Introduce the language of parts.
2. Assess and map the client’s internal relationships.
3. Control blending to prevent certain parts from activating.
4. Develop an image of the part.

ANS: B

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 201-202)

1. When a client has a part that is overwhelming or elusive, the therapist will use what type of
technique to help the client deal with the part better?
1. The pretend technique
2. The blending technique
3. The directing technique
4. The room technique

ANS: D

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 202-203)

1. Direct access in internal family systems refers to the therapist directly talking with parts as the
client speaks from various parts. This is similar to what other technique?
1. Gestalt’s empty-chair
2. Strategic’s pretend technique
3. Structural’s unbalancing the system
4. Satir’s sculpting

ANS: A

REF: Internal Family Systems Therapy (p. 203)


1. Which of the following factors has been researched and supported by the evidence base related
to experiential therapies?
1. The therapeutic relationship
2. The interventions
3. The client
4. The outcome

ANS: A

REF: Research and the Evidence Base (p. 208)

IMPORTANT NOTICE:

SECURE TEST BANK

Instructors: Please maintain careful security of this document as it is widely used by other
instructors. This test bank is intended for formal examination purposes only and students should
never be allowed unrestricted or unsupervised access to hard or digital copies at any time.

Mastering Competencies in Family Therapy

Chapter 7: Intergenerational and Psychoanalytic Family Therapies

1. Object relations family therapy, family-of-origin therapy, and contextual therapy share several
key concepts and practices. They include each of the following EXCEPT?
1. Examine a client’s early relationships to understand present functioning.
2. Trace transgenerational and extended family dynamics to understand a client’s
complaints.
3. Promote insight into extended family dynamics to facilitate change.
4. Focus on the nature of being human rather than families or family therapy.

ANS: D
REF: Lay of the Land (p. 229)

1. A key concept in Bowen’s intergenerational theory is the therapist’s use of which of the
following?
1. Techniques
2. Self
3. Interventions
4. Coaching

ANS: B

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 229-230)

1. Differentiation is one of the most useful concepts for understanding interpersonal relationships.
Which of the following statements is true?
1. Differentiation refers to a person’s ability to separate intrapersonal and interpersonal
distress.
2. Differentiation is the ability to balance two life forces: the need for togetherness and
the need for autonomy.
3. Differentiation is a lifelong journey that is colloquially referred to as “maturity” in the
broadest sense.
4. All of the above

ANS: D

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 230)

1. Which of the following does NOT accurately describe a differentiated person?


1. A person who is differentiated is better able to handle ups and downs of life.
2. A person who is differentiated has the ability to separate feelings and self from others.
3. A person who is differentiated lacks emotion or emotional expression in emotional
situations.
4. A person who is differentiated does not immediately react in emotional situations.

ANS: C
REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 230)

1. What is a genogram?

1.
1. A genealogy covering the complete history of a family
2. A type of self report and discovery of family secrets
3. A type of family tree that specifically maps key multigenerational processes
4. A complete medical history of a family

ANS: C

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 231)

1. In the hands of an intergenerational therapist, the genogram is used simultaneously as:


1. a way to help the family implement new patterns individually and as a family.
2. a way to map out family medical complications and how each affected the family.
3. an assessment instrument and intervention.
4. an intervention and tool for the closing phase of therapy.

ANS: C

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 231)

1. Intergenerational therapists focus on developing a therapeutic relationship that encourages all


parties to further their differentiation process. What does this mean?
1. Intergenerational therapists believe that clients are in charge of the therapeutic process.
2. Intergenerational therapists believe that clients can only differentiate as much as their
therapists have differentiated.
3. Intergenerational therapists believe that the differentiation of the client is the
technique.
4. Intergenerational therapists believe that they must take sides with the most
differentiated family member.

ANS: B
REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 232)

1. When an intergenerational therapist maintains an emotionally engaged stance that is


nonreactive — meaning that the therapist does not react to attacks, “bad” news, and so forth
without careful reflection — this is known as which of the following?
1. A detached presence
2. A non-caring presence
3. An emotional presence
4. A non-anxious presence

ANS: D

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 232-233)

1. The greater the therapist’s level of differentiation, the better able the therapist is to maintain a
nonanxious presence with clients. A nonanxious presence refers to which of the following?
1. A therapist who does not overreact to strong emotion and is able to reflect before
reacting
2. A therapist who is free and clear from any and all mental problems
3. A therapist who works better when his/her own emotions run high and who is aware of
any countertransference
4. A therapist who maintains a cold and detached stance that allows the clients to fully
explore themselves without the influence of the therapist

ANS: A

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 232-233)

1. Intergenerational therapists focus squarely on a family’s unique __________ rather than on


environmental or general cultural factors, and they seek to identify the rules that structure the
particular system.
1. interactive system
2. external system
3. self-esteem system
4. emotional system

ANS: D
REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 233)

1. When a family lacks sufficient differentiation, it may become emotionally fused, an


undifferentiated family __________.
1. ego mass
2. mess
3. cell
4. nucleus

ANS: A

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 231)

1. When working with a family, an intergenerational therapist can only accurately “see” what is
going on in the family or clearly conceptualize family dynamics if they are what?
1. Anxious
2. Differentiated
3. Emotionally distant
4. Disengaged

ANS: B

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 231)

1. Jordin, an intergenerational therapist, is working with a mom and daughter in therapy. The mom
feels extremely guilty about her daughter’s lack of social success in college. The mom, therefore
remains very involved and emotionally reactive in her daughter’s life, even though her daughter
is living in the dorms in another town. How might Jordin view the mother’s reactivity?
1. As low self-esteem
2. As chronic anxiety
3. As a paradox
4. As healthy

ANS: B
REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 233-234)

1. Differentiation is measured along a continuum that ranges from 1 to 100, with lower levels of
differentiation represented by lower numbers. Bowen believed that the average person or
people rarely reached higher than what on this scale?
1. 50
2. 95
3. 70
4. 65

ANS: C

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 234)

1. From the perspective of an intergenerational therapist, which of the following is NOT true of a
triangle?
1. A triangle is a stabilizing unit for the primary dyad.
2. A triangle is a process in which a dyad draws in a third person or thing.
3. A triangle is a healthy way to relieve tension.
4. A triangle is a fundamental process in natural systems.

ANS: C

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 234-235)

1. The father of a family in therapy complains that his wife is so involved with their children —
always running them back and forth to school, sports practices, dance recitals, and attending
PTA meetings — that he never sees her. When he does see his wife, they fight. According to a
Bowen intergenerational therapist, this might be considered a classic example of which of the
following?
1. Differentiation
2. Emotional triangle
3. Emotional cutoff
4. Regression
ANS: B

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 234-235)

1. Which of the following refers to situations in which a person no longer emotionally engages with
another in order to manage anxiety?
1. Differentiation
2. Emotional triangle
3. Emotional cutoff
4. Regression

ANS: C

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 235-236)

1. Like any theory with a definition of health, intergenerational therapy has clearly-defined, long-
term therapeutic goals that can be used with all clients. Which one of the following fits for this
theory?
1. Congruent communication for all family members
2. Effective parental hierarchy and the severing of cross-generational coalitions
3. Promote personal growth: support the completion of developmental tasks for all family
members
4. Increase each person’s level of differentiation (in specific contexts)

ANS: D

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 236)

1. Which of the following statements is TRUE about the intergenerational therapy goal to decrease
emotional reactivity to chronic anxiety in the system?
1. As differentiation increases, anxiety decreases.
2. As anxiety increases, differentiation increases.
3. As emotional cutoff increases, differentiation increases.
4. As emotional cutoff increases, anxiety decreases.
ANS: A

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 236)

1. A Bowen therapist asks a client, “How do the struggles you are experiencing with your wife now
compare to the struggles your own parents had? Are they similar or different?” The therapist is
asking which type of questions?
1. Projection questions
2. Protection questions
3. Process questions
4. Proactive questions

ANS: C

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 237)

1. Whether working with an individual, couple, or family, most therapists at some point will be
“invited” by clients to triangulate with them against a third party who may or may not be
present in the room. To be effective, the therapist must maintain therapeutic neutrality in order
to interrupt a client’s attempt to involve the therapist or someone else in a triangle. This ability
to be neutral is also known as what?
1. Chronic anxiety
2. Regression
3. Differentiation
4. Validation

ANS: C

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 237-238)

1. Which intervention is designed to interrupt triangulation by increasing direct communication


between the dyad experiencing problems or to reverse pursuer-distancer dynamics?
1. Relational experiments
2. Communication experiments
3. Acting “as if” experiments
4. Family attachment experiments
ANS: A

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 238)

1. Nathan and Alexander, a couple who have been in a relationship for 7 years, complain of a lack
of communication and a dissatisfying intimate life. Nathan says he wants more emotional and
physical intimacy with Alexander, but that Alexander is happy with cuddling on the couch or
doing activities such as gardening together. Alexander complains that their closeness is never
enough for Nathan and that he often feels pressured to do more to make Nathan happy. David,
a Bowenian therapist, might use which type of intervention with this couple to promote Nathan
and Alexander differentiating more and taking responsibility for their individual needs?
1. Teaching each person to self-soothe rather than demand the other to change
2. Hugging to relax and working with the couple to be “seen” by the other
3. Creating a genogram to identify patterns and alternative ways for relating to each other
4. All of the above

ANS: D

REF: Bowen Intergenerational Therapy (p. 237-239)

1. According to Boszormenyi-Nagy, families use which system to maintain trustworthiness,


fairness, and loyalty between family members (its breakdown results inindividual and/or
relational symptoms)?
1. Mechanical
2. Ethical
3. Electrical
4. Debt

ANS: B

REF: Psychoanalytic Family Therapies (p. 243)

1. Which classic psychoanalytic concept refers to when a client projects onto the therapist
attributes that stem from unresolved issues with primary caregivers (therapists use the
immediacy of these interactions to promote client insight)?
1. Countertransference
2. Transference
3. Protection
4. Centered holding

ANS: B

REF: Psychoanalytic Family Therapies (p. 244)

1. Which of the following statements is TRUE about the nature of the therapeutic relationship in
contextual family therapy?
1. Therapists are viewed as neutral blank screens.
2. Therapists keep their own feelings and expressions of empathy at bay.
3. Therapists are relationally focused, creating a relationship they call the holding
environment.
4. Therapists do not handle therapy arrangements; they leave that to the receptionist.

ANS: C

REF: Psychoanalytic Family Therapies (p. 244-245)

1. What does the concept of multidirected partiality in contextual family therapy mean?
1. The therapist must be accountable to extended family members not in the therapy
room.
2. The therapist must be accountable to monstrous family members.
3. The therapist must be accountable to the youngest family members.
4. All of the above

ANS: D

REF: Psychoanalytic Family Therapies (p. 245)

1. A therapist works with a couple where partner A sees partner B as “perfect” in the early parts of
the relationship. When partner B no longer conforms to expectations, however, partner B
becomes the enemy. The therapist might call this what?
1. Interlocking pathologies
2. Self-object relating
3. Splitting
4. Projective identification

ANS: C

REF: Psychoanalytic Family Therapies (p. 245)

1. According to Framo, what are parental interjects?


1. The internalized negative aspects of parents
2. When clients defend against anxiety by projecting certain split-off or unwanted parts of
themselves onto another person
3. Anxiety that is repressed when a child experiences separation from their primary
caregiver
4. Transference from one family member to another family member

ANS: A

REF: Psychoanalytic Family Therapies (p. 246)

1. Which of the following would NOT be considered a goal in psychoanalytic therapy?


1. Increase autonomy and ego-directed action by making conscious processes unconscious
2. Decrease interactions based on projections or a revolving slate of entitlements
3. Increase capacity for intimacy without loss of self (fusion with object)
4. Develop reciprocal commitments that include a fair balance of entitlements and
indebtedness

ANS: A

REF: Psychoanalytic Family Therapies (p. 245)

1. In psychoanalytic family therapy, when the therapist dismisses the symptomatic child from
therapy and proceeds to work with the couple to address the issues that created the need for
the child’s symptoms, the therapist is doing what type of intervention?
1. Interpreting
2. Detriangulating
3. Working through
4. Eliciting

ANS: B

REF: Psychoanalytic Family Therapies (p. 248)

1. Which therapist developed a three-stage model for working with couples that involved couples
therapy, couples group therapy, and family-of-origin therapy?
1. Boszormenyi-Nagy
2. Framo
3. Ackerman
4. Sharff

ANS: B

REF: Psychoanalytic Family Therapies (p. 248)

1. The Women’s Project was developed to promote a greater awareness of women’s issues in the
field of family therapy. Which of the following is one suggestion for how family therapists can
reduce sexism in their work with couples and families?
1. Openly discuss the gender role expectations of each partner and parent and point out
areas where the couple or family should increase those traditional roles.
2. Encourage men to take time for themselves to avoid losing their individual identity to
the roles of husband and father.
3. Use the self-of-the-therapist to model an attitude of gender equality.
4. Push women to take on equal responsibility in family relationships and the household,
as well as for scheduling therapy, attending therapy with children, and/or arranging for
babysitting for couples sessions.

ANS: C

REF: Tapestry Weaving: Working with Diverse Populations (p. 252-253)


1. Minority groups who prefer action and concrete suggestions from therapists may have difficulty
with Bowen intergenerational and psychoanalytic therapies. Which one of the following reasons
FALSELY reflects the risks?
1. These therapies are aimed at “thinking” — or psychologically-minded — clients, which
minority groups are not.
2. The therapist may use inappropriate cultural norms to analyze family dynamics, thereby
imposing a set of values and beliefs that are at odds with the minority clients’ culture.
3. The therapist will assume that attachment in all cultures looks the same and the
minority client may be inaccurately and unfairly evaluated.
4. The therapist may expect minority clients to conform to common cultural norms.

ANS: A

REF: Tapestry Weaving: Working with Diverse Populations (p. 253)

1. Which of the following statements is TRUE about research and the evidence-base for Bowenian
and psychoanalytic therapies?
1. Research is needed on the outcomes and effectiveness of Bowen and psychoanalytic
family therapies so that these models can be refined and further developed.
2. Research shows support for Bowen’s assumption that people marry a person with a
similar level of differentiation.
3. Research does not support the relation between differentiation and (a) chronic anxiety,
(b) marital satisfaction, and (c) psychological distress.
4. Research does not support the therapeutic alliance and therapeutic outcome from the
therapist’s relationship with his or her parents, discrediting the Bowenian emphasis on
the self-of-the-therapist.

ANS: A

REF: Research and the Evidence Base (p. 254)