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2017

A N N U A L R E P O R T
ON THE COVER clockwise from the top
Since 2015, students across South Africa have protested
proposed increases in education fees, which many
fear will prevent lower-income students from attending
university. Mott’s Civic Space work aims to ensure
that people all over the world have the opportunity to
make their voices heard. Photo Credit: Tony Carr

The Capitol Theatre is once again attracting


audiences to downtown Flint, Michigan. Restoration
of the historic venue was funded, in part, by the
Mott Foundation. Photo Credit: Mark Nader

A growing number of communities are using wetlands,


like this one in Milwaukee, to reduce the volume of
polluted storm water flowing into the Great Lakes.
Protecting the lakes is a cornerstone of Mott’s
Environment work. Photo Credit: Ivan LaBianca

An AmeriCorps member helps a young student with his


reading. Mott’s support for national service helps people
and communities meet a variety of educational, social
and economic needs. Photo Credit: Cristina Wright
TABLE OF CONTENTS
2017: THE YEAR IN REVIEW ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������2

FOUNDATION OVERVIEW ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 7


Our Founder �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������8
Our Values ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������9
Our Code of Ethics ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������9
Our Work ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 10

PROGRAMS & GRANTS ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 11


Civil Society ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 12
Education ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 16
Environment ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 20
Flint Area ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 24
Exploratory and Special Projects �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 28
Employee and Trustee Grants ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 28

FINANCE ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 29
Profile: 2017 Assets ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 30
Profile: 2017 Grantmaking �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 31
Statements of Financial Position �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 32
Statements of Activities ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 33

TRUSTEES & STAFF ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 34


Board and Committees���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 35
Officers and Staff�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 35
Transitions ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 36

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 1


Students at Educare Flint welcomed
visitors to the school’s grand
opening celebration.

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2017 THE YEAR IN REVIEW
You may notice that the Charles
Stewart Mott Foundation’s 2017
Annual Report is a bit shorter than
previous versions. That doesn’t mean
we have less to say regarding the issues
we care about or the work we support in our
hometown of Flint and around the world.
On the contrary, we want to share even more information
with you — but we’re going to do it differently. Instead
of producing a lengthy annual report, we’ll provide
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more updates throughout the year and share them


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via our website, e-newsletters and social media.


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The bottom line: you’ll be hearing from us more


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often — and in a timelier way — as we transition to a


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digital-first approach. We believe this will make our


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communications more relevant and accessible, while


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sparing trees and reducing our carbon footprint.


Flint students attended an event that
kicked off an afterschool partnership between
In this new format, we’re pleased to share highlights
Jazz at Lincoln Center and the Mott Foundation. of 2017 work from our four grantmaking programs:

2 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
2017 THE YE AR IN RE VIE W

FLINT AREA
In the second year of Mott’s five-year, $100 million In the second year of Mott’s
commitment to help our hometown recover and rise
five-year, $100 million
from the Flint water crisis, we awarded more than
$34 million in related grants. That total included commitment to help our
nearly $15 million to strengthen the local education
hometown recover and rise
continuum — from cradle to college and career.
The most significant milestone of this work was from the Flint water crisis, we
the opening of Educare Flint. In addition to directly awarded more than $34 million
serving up to 220 students, this new state-of-the-art
early childhood school will collaborate with other in related grants.
programs and partners to help provide more of our
city’s youngest residents with high-quality, year-
round early childhood education. Furthermore, this work has the potential to reach beyond Flint
by serving as a model for other communities and informing state and federal policies on early
learning. Also in 2017, we granted $8.4 million to help reignite the economic revitalization that
was underway in Flint before the water crisis hit. This included support for an ambitious
project that will transform a nearly two-mile stretch of the Flint River, creating new
recreational opportunities that will draw residents and visitors to the heart of the
city. Finally, reflecting Mott’s larger body of grantmaking in Flint, we joined
residents at year’s end to celebrate the historic restoration and grand
reopening of a beloved community jewel, The Capitol Theatre.

The Flint River


PHOTO CREDIT: MAYBERRY MEDIA

Restoration Project
will transform a
two-mile stretch of
the waterway into a
community gem.

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 3


EDUCATION

PHOTO CREDIT: COURTESY OF THE SAN FRANCISCO KINDERGARTEN TO


COLLEGE PROGRAM
At the national level, one of the more exciting
developments in 2017 was the forging of a
partnership between Jazz at Lincoln Center
and the Mott Foundation. Through Mott’s
50-state afterschool network, this and other
partnerships soon to follow will bring exciting
new content to young people in afterschool
programs nationwide. Our efforts to stimulate
interest and investments in children’s savings
accounts also are taking root. Over 40 new
programs were launched between 2012 Investing in their future, these California students make their first
deposits in savings accounts created for them by the San Francisco
and 2017, enabling more families to raise
Kindergarten to College Program.
their children’s expectations for academic
achievement and save for college or technical training. Closer to home, the Flint National
Service Accelerator has become a model for ways in which AmeriCorps and Senior
Corps members across the country can enhance school and community service.

CIVIL SOCIETY
In 2017, the world witnessed increasing efforts to suppress civic engagement as governments
around the globe adopted restrictive laws that challenged basic freedoms and stifled the voice
of the independent sector. An alarming resurgence in nationalism, xenophobia, intolerance
and inequality has been making it more difficult for
PHOTO CREDIT: COURTESY OF CIVICUS

people and organizations to find space to operate freely


and openly. That prompted us to take a hard look at
Mott’s Civil Society Program to ensure that we can
respond to changing dynamics while still achieving
impact. We spent much of 2017 developing a new
plan that focuses on addressing the closing space for
civic participation, helping community foundations
find local solutions to global problems, and promoting
access to justice for billions of people who are excluded
from understanding and using the law to advance
their own well-being and that of their communities.

A human rights defender displays the price she has paid


for her activism.

4 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
2017 THE YE AR IN RE VIE W

ENVIRONMENT
For more than three decades, the Mott Foundation has been part of the philanthropic community working to
restore and protect the Great Lakes. With support from Mott, nonprofit organizations educate citizens and
policymakers about the critical importance of protecting the largest source of surface freshwater on the
planet. They also conduct and share research regarding the actions and policies that will most effectively
protect the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem. We believe those efforts contributed to Congress’
decision in 2017 to continue funding the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a program that addresses the
worst threats facing the lakes. On the international front,

PHOTO CREDIT: RICK SMITH


grantees celebrated the World Bank’s decision to stop
funding oil and gas extraction projects that contribute to
climate change. Looking to the future, Mott-funded groups
joined a unique coalition of partners from the faith, finance
and international development communities to kick off
Shine, a global campaign to provide clean, reliable energy
to all people by 2030. Currently, nearly 1 billion people
in developing countries lack access to clean energy.
The Old Baldy sand dune is among the protected gems
Mott and our grantees are working to change that.
found at Arcadia Dunes: The C.S. Mott Nature Preserve.

The Mott Foundation values transparency in philanthropy. That’s why we’ll


PHOTO CREDIT: RICK SMITH

continue to publish lists of all the grants we make in a year, a summary of


our assets, statements of financial position and activities, and a list of our
trustees and staff. You’ll find all of that in the pages that follow.

To stay connected to the work of the Foundation and our grantees as it


happens, visit our , sign up for our and follow us on
, , , and .
What’s most important to know is that Mott’s entire leadership team, our
William S. White (left) and
Ridgway H. White — 2018. staff at every level and our grantees remain deeply engaged on major issues
of the day — in Flint, across the United States and around the world. And we
look forward to sharing more stories of that work, which we hope will inspire
additional efforts to promote a just, equitable and sustainable society.

William S. White, Chairman Ridgway H. White, President and CEO


Charles Stewart Mott Foundation Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
Board of Trustees

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 5


6 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
FOUNDATION
OVERVIEW

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 7


OUR FOUNDER
“It seems to me that every person, always, is in a kind of
informal partnership with his community. His own success
is dependent to a large degree on that community, and the
community, after all, is the sum total of the individuals who make it
up. The institutions of a community, in turn, are the means by which those
individuals express their faith, their ideals and their concern for fellow men. …
“So broad and so deep are the objectives of the Mott Foundation that
they touch almost every aspect of living, increasing the capacity for
accomplishment, the appreciation of values and the understanding of
the forces that make up the world we live in. In this sense, it may truly
be called a Foundation for Living — with the ultimate aim of developing
greater understanding among men.
“We recognize that our obligation to fellow men does not stop at the boundaries
of the community. In an even larger sense, every man is in partnership with the
rest of the human race in the eternal conquest which we call civilization.”

— CHARLES STEWART MOTT (1875-1973)

8 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
OUR VALUES
Charles Stewart Mott’s central belief in the partnership of humanity was the basis
upon which the Foundation was established. While this remains the guiding principle
of our grantmaking, the Foundation has refined and broadened our grantmaking over
time to reflect changing national and world conditions.
Through our programs of Civil Society, Education, Environment and Flint Area, and
their more specific program areas, the Foundation seeks to fulfill our mission of
supporting efforts that promote a just, equitable and sustainable society.
Inherent in all of Mott’s grantmaking is the desire to enhance the capacity of
individuals, families or institutions at the local level and beyond. We hope our
collective work in any program area will lead toward systemic change.
FUNDAMENTAL TO ALL MOTT GRANTMAKING ARE CERTAIN VALUES:
n Nurturing strong, self-reliant individuals with expanded capacity for
CHARLES STEWART MOTT, who accomplishment;
established his Foundation in 1926, n Learning how people can live together to create a sense of community, whether at
was deeply concerned from his earliest the neighborhood level or as a global society;
years in Flint, Michigan, with the welfare n Building strong communities through collaboration to provide a basis
of his adopted community. for positive change;
Soon after he had become one of the n Encouraging responsible citizen participation to help foster social cohesion;
city’s leading industrialists, this General n Promoting the social, economic and political empowerment of all individuals and
Motors pioneer found a practical and communities to preserve fundamental democratic principles and rights;
successful way to express his interest. n Developing leadership to build upon the needs and values of people and to inspire
He served three terms as mayor (in 1912, the aspirations and potential of others; and
1913 and 1918) during a period when n Respecting the diversity of life to maintain a sustainable human and
the swiftly growing city was beset with physical environment.
problems, with 40,000 people sharing
facilities adequate for only 10,000.
As a private citizen, he started a medical
OUR CODE OF ETHICS
n Respect for the communities we work with and serve.
and dental clinic for children and helped
n Integrity in our actions.
establish the Whaley Children’s Center,
n Responsibility for our decisions and their consequences.
as well as chapters of the YMCA and
Boy Scouts, in Flint.  E ARE COMMITTED TO:
W
Nine years after the Foundation n Acting honestly, truthfully and with integrity in all our transactions and dealings;
was incorporated for philanthropic, n Avoiding conflicts of interest;
charitable and educational purposes, n Appropriately handling actual or apparent conflicts of interest in our relationships;
it became a major factor in the life of n Treating our grantees fairly;
Flint through organized schoolground n Treating every individual with dignity and respect;
recreational activities, which developed n Treating our employees with respect, fairness and good faith and providing
into Mott’s nationwide community conditions of employment that safeguard their rights and welfare;
school/education program. n Being a good corporate citizen and complying with both the spirit
and the letter of the law;
From this start, the Foundation’s major n Acting responsibly toward the communities in which we work and for
concern has been the well-being of the the benefit of the communities that we serve;
community, including the individual, n Being responsible, transparent and accountable for all of our actions; and
the family, the neighborhood and the n Improving the accountability, transparency, ethical conduct
systems of government. This interest has and effectiveness of the nonprofit field.
continued to find expression in Flint and
also has taken the Foundation far beyond
our home city.

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 9


OUR WORK
Our Vision: The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation affirms our founder’s vision of a world in which
each of us is in partnership with the rest of the human race — where each individual’s quality of life is
connected to the well-being of the community, both locally and globally. We pursue this vision through
creative grantmaking, thoughtful communication and other activities that enhance community in its
many forms. The same vision of shared learning shapes our internal culture as we strive to maintain an
ethic of respect, integrity and responsibility. The Foundation seeks to strengthen, in people and their
organizations, what Mr. Mott called “the capacity for accomplishment.”
Our Mission: To support efforts that promote a just, equitable and sustainable society.
Our Programs: We pursue our vision and mission by making grants through four program teams, as well as
by supporting exploratory and special projects. You’ll find more information about the specific objectives of
each program area in the Programs & Grants section of this report.

CIVIL SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT


Purpose: To help foster engaged, empowered Purpose: To support programs around the world
and equitable communities throughout the world. that protect communities and the ecosystems
PROGRAM AREAS: upon which they depend.
n Strengthening Civic Space PROGRAM AREAS:
n Enhancing Community Philanthropy n Addressing the Freshwater Challenge
n Increasing Access to Justice n Transforming Development Finance
n Special Initiatives n Advancing Climate Change Solutions
EDUCATION n Special Initiatives
Purpose: To expand opportunities for FLINT AREA
children and youth to succeed in school, work Purpose: To help our hometown of Flint solve
and, ultimately, life. problems, create opportunities and build
PROGRAM AREAS: a vibrant future for the community and its
n Advancing Afterschool residents.
n Graduating High School College & Career Ready PROGRAM AREAS:
n Youth Engagement n Revitalizing the Education Continuum
n Special Initiatives n Enriching Lives Through Arts and Culture
n Restoring Community Vitality
n Meeting Evolving Community Needs
EXPLORATORY AND SPECIAL PROJECTS
Purpose: To support unusual or unique
opportunities addressing significant national and
international problems. Proposals are by invitation
only. Unsolicited proposals are discouraged.

10 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
PROGRAMS &
GRANTS

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 11


PHOTO CREDIT: COURTESY OF CIVICUS
Girls in Vinnytsia, Ukraine, held a flash mob to show their support for the LGBTQ community. CIVICUS, a longtime Mott grantee,
highlighted this image through its Active Citizens photo contest.

CIVIL SOCIETY OVERVIEW


To help foster engaged, empowered and equitable communities throughout the world, we make
grants in the following areas:

STRENGTHENING CIVIC SPACE INCREASING ACCESS TO JUSTICE


GOAL: Promote, protect and reinvigorate the space for GOAL: Promote social equity in communities by
civic engagement. increasing access to justice.

OBJECTIVES: OBJECTIVES:
Advocacy and Outreach: We support effective advocacy Development and Expansion: We strive to build the
and outreach to help strengthen the policy environment for capacity of community-based paralegal organizations in
civil society. selected countries.
Research and Innovation: We support research, policy Networking and Learning: We work to foster regional and
analysis and innovative practices that help advance civil global learning, networking and collaboration within the
society development. access to justice community.

ENHANCING COMMUNITY PHILANTHROPY SPECIAL INITIATIVES


GOAL: Support the development of community GOAL: Advance the Civil Society program mission by
foundations that foster just, equitable and sustainable ensuring flexibility and responsiveness.
societies.

OBJECTIVES: Note: The preceding overview of Mott’s Civil Society


Expansion and Development: We are working to expand Program reflects program areas, goals and objectives
and strengthen the community foundation field in Africa, that were approved by the Foundation’s board of trustees
Europe and Latin America. in March 2018. Because 2017 grants were awarded under
an earlier framework shown on the next page, the grants
Effectiveness and Leadership: We are helping community listed on pages 13-15 are categorized according to that
foundations advance progress toward achieving the United framework.
Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals at the local level.

12 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
Central/Eastern Europe Ideas Factory Association Workshop for Civic Initiatives
Sofia, Bulgaria Foundation
SOUTHEAST EUROPE $210,000 – 36 mos. Sofia, Bulgaria
Ana and Vlade Divac Foundation Hub for agents of social change $300,000 – 36 mos.
Belgrade, Serbia Initiative for Progress General purposes
$250,000 – 24 mos. Ferizaj, Kosovo $300,000 – 36 mos.
General purposes $50,000 – 17 mos. Bulgarian Community Foundations
Association for Community Relations School of Activism Development Fund
Cluj-Napoca, Romania International Association “Interactive Youth Communication Center –
$450,000 – 36 mos. Open Schools” Banja Luka
Community Foundation Development Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Program $100,000 – 36 mos. $100,000 – 24 mos.
Community Foundation Slagalica General purposes General purposes
Osijek, Croatia Mozaik Foundation Youth Initiative for Human Rights
$75,000 – 24 mos. Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina Belgrade, Serbia
General purposes $250,000 – 24 mos. $140,000 – 24 mos.
Community Volunteers Foundation General purposes General purposes
Istanbul, Turkey Romanian Environmental Partnership Youth Initiative for Human Rights –
$200,000 – 24 mos. Foundation Croatia
YouthBank development in Turkey Miercurea-Cuic, Romania Zagreb, Croatia
Documenta $1,140,000 – 60 mos. $70,000 – 24 mos.
Zagreb, Croatia Long-term sustainability of community General purposes
$250,000 – 30 mos. foundations in Romania YouthBuild USA
General purposes Romanian Federation of Community Somerville, MA
Foundation-Administered Project Foundations $400,000 – 24 mos.
$83,013 Cluj-Napoca, Romania YouthBuild in southeast Europe
Community-based approaches to $120,000 – 24 mos. Subtotal:$5,538,013
inclusion of migrants, refugees and General purposes
Southeast Europe
internally displaced people
Third Sector Foundation of Turkey
Hrant Dink Foundation Karakoy, Turkey
Istanbul, Turkey $200,000 – 24 mos. WESTERN FORMER SOVIET UNION
$200,000 – 24 mos. Philanthropy infrastructure development Centre for Society Research
General purposes in Turkey Kyiv, Ukraine
Humanitarian Law Center Trag Foundation $125,000 – 24 mos.
Belgrade, Serbia Belgrade, Serbia Strengthening civic participation in
$400,000 – 36 mos. $250,000 – 24 mos. Ukrainian cities
General purposes General purposes

CIVIL SOCIETY 2017 GRANT ACTIVITY


GRANT
DOLLARS NUMBER
CENTRAL/EASTERN EUROPE (in millions) OF GRANTS
Southeast Europe $  5.538 21
Western Former Soviet Union $   .830 6
CEE Regional $   .850 4 TOTAL
$16,154,311
SOUTH AFRICA
93 GRANTS
Community Advice Office Sector $   1.998 14
Philanthropy Development $   1.180 10
Special Opportunities $   .575 2

UNITED STATES
Nonprofit Sector Responsiveness $  2.278 18 in millions
Community Philanthropy $   .495 2 m Central/Eastern Europe $7.218 / 31 Grants
Special Opportunities $   .250 1 m South Africa $3.753 / 26 Grants
m United States $3.023 / 21 Grants
GLOBAL PHILANTHROPY AND NONPROFIT SECTOR
Philanthropy and Nonprofit Sector $  1.740 12 m Global Philanthropy and Nonprofit Sector
$2.160 / 15 Grants
Special Opportunities $   .420 3
TOTALS $ 16.154 93

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 13


Charity and Health Foundation Community Law and Rural Community Chest of the
Kherson, Ukraine Development Centre Western Cape
$100,000 – 24 mos. Durban, South Africa Cape Town, South Africa
Community resource centers in Ukraine $100,000 – 12 mos. $80,000 – 24 mos.
Civic Network “OPORA” General purposes Capacity building
Kyiv, Ukraine Democracy Development Programme DOCKDA Rural Development Agency
$150,000 – 24 mos. Durban, South Africa Cape Town, South Africa
General purposes $100,000 – 30 mos. $120,000 – 24 mos.
Ukrainian Catholic University Training of local government councillors General purposes
Lviv, Ukraine and communities in KwaZulu-Natal
Social Change Assistance Trust
$155,000 – 24 mos. Education and Training Unit Mowbray, South Africa
Enhancing civic engagement through Johannesburg, South Africa $100,000 – 24 mos.
active citizenship education $75,000 – 24 mos. General purposes
Ukrainian Philanthropists Forum Materials development and website
Social Justice Initiative
Kyiv, Ukraine management for paralegal training
Johannesburg, South Africa
$150,000 – 24 mos. Foundation-Administered Project $100,000 – 24 mos.
General purposes $27,674 General purposes
Ukrainian Women’s Fund Access to justice learning
South African Institute
Kyiv, Ukraine Hlanganisa Institute of Development for Advancement
$150,000 – 24 mos. Southern Africa NPC Cape Town, South Africa
Internally displaced persons and Johannesburg, South Africa $150,000 – 24 mos.
communities: building tolerance through $230,000 – 24 mos. Nonprofit clinic project
dialogue Multi-agency grants initiative: advice
Tides Center
Subtotal:$830,000 office regranting project
San Francisco, CA
Western Former Soviet Union Legal Resources Trust $60,000 – 24 mos.
Johannesburg, South Africa Africa Grantmakers’ Affinity Group
$150,000 – 24 mos.
CEE REGIONAL Uthungulu Community Foundation
Legal support services for nonprofit
KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
European Alternatives Limited organizations
$150,000 – 24 mos.
Paris, France National Alliance for the Development Capacity building for community-based
$200,000 – 24 mos. of Community Advice Offices organizations
Strengthening TRANSEUROPA network Johannesburg, South Africa
in CEE West Coast Community Foundation
$155,000 – 24 mos. Malmesbury, South Africa
European Venture Philanthropy Community advice office sustainability $150,000 – 24 mos.
Association project General purposes
Brussels, Belgium Project for Conflict Resolution
$200,000 – 24 mos. Women’s Hope, Education and
& Development Training (WHEAT) Trust
Introducing venture philanthropy in CEE ($90,000) Cape Town, South Africa
Fundacja TechSoup Adjustment to previous grant $120,000 – 24 mos.
Warsaw, Poland Rural Legal Trust General purposes
$400,000 – 24 mos. West Porgies, South Africa
Strengthening institutional capacity to Subtotal: $1,180,000
$50,000 – 12 mos.
provide information and communication Philanthropy Development
Advice office program
technology support to NGOs in CEE
Trust for Community Outreach and
Funding Network Education SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES
London, England Cape Town, South Africa Constitution Hill Trust
$50,000 – 36 mos. $200,000 – 24 mos. Johannesburg, South Africa
The Funding Network Global – General purposes $500,000 – 15 mos.
developing TFN in CEE/Russia
Umtapo Centre Memory center in Constitution Hill
Subtotal:$850,000 Durban, South Africa Museum
CEE Regional $150,000 – 24 mos. Southern African NGO Network
Program Area Total: $7,218,013 General purposes Johannesburg, South Africa
Central/Eastern Europe University of Cape Town $75,000 – 12 mos.
Cape Town, South Africa NGO Pulse and Prodder
$150,000 – 10 mos. Subtotal: $575,000
South Africa Access to justice and judiciary Special Opportunities
COMMUNITY ADVICE OFFICE SECTOR University of the Western Cape Program Area Total: $3,752,674
Association of University Legal Aid Bellville, South Africa South Africa
$100,000 – 24 mos.
Institutions Trust
Community Law Center – multi-level
Potchefstroom, South Africa
$300,000 – 24 mos.
government initiative United States
Advice office support project Subtotal: $1,997,674 NONPROFIT SECTOR RESPONSIVENESS
Centre for Community Justice Community Advice Office Sector
Aspen Institute
and Development Washington, DC
Pietermaritzburg, South Africa PHILANTHROPY DEVELOPMENT $75,000 – 24 mos.
$200,000 – 24 mos. Nonprofit data project
Advice office support Charities Aid Foundation
Southern Africa BoardSource
Centre for Rural Legal Studies Johannesburg, South Africa Washington, DC
Stellenbosch, South Africa $150,000 – 24 mos. $75,000 – 12 mos.
$100,000 – 24 mos. General purposes General purposes
General purposes

14 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
PHOTO CREDIT: BENEDICTE DESRUS / ALAMY
Council of Michigan Foundations
Grand Haven, MI
$245,000 – 24 mos.
General purposes
Council on Foundations
Arlington, VA
$60,000 – 24 mos.
General purposes
Exponent Philanthropy
Washington, DC
$100,000 – 36 mos.
General purposes
Foundation Center
New York, NY
$500,000 – 48 mos.
Building the future of philanthropy
Foundation-Administered Project
$123,624
Office of Foundation Liaison
Grand Valley State University
Allendale, MI Volunteers join workers in cleaning up a neighborhood following the earthquake that hit central
$40,000 – 12 mos.
LearnPhilanthropy Mexico in September 2017. Through our partnership with the Inter-American Foundation, Mott is
Independent Sector providing support to community foundations to assist with long-term recovery efforts.
Washington, DC
$300,000 – 24 mos. Inter-American Foundation
General purposes SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES
Washington, DC
Indiana University Center for Disaster Philanthropy $30,000 – 18 mos.
Indianapolis, IN Washington, DC Building broader communities in the
$75,000 – 16 mos. $250,000 – 12 mos. Americas
Philanthropy panel study Hurricane Harvey and other 2017 natural
disasters relief $100,000 – 36 mos.
Johns Hopkins University Mexican community foundation
Baltimore, MD Subtotal: $250,000 development
$150,000 – 21 mos. Special Opportunities
Network of European Foundations
Nonprofit employment data project Program Area Total: $3,023,624 for Innovative Cooperation
National Center on Philanthropy United States Brussels, Belgium
and the Law $50,000 – 24 mos.
New York, NY Membership and administrative support
$50,000 – 12 mos. Global Philanthropy and Worldwide Initiatives for Grantmaker
General purposes Nonprofit Sector Support
National Council of Nonprofits PHILANTHROPY AND NONPROFIT SECTOR São Paulo, Brazil
Washington, DC $400,000 – 24 mos.
Alliance Publishing Trust General purposes
$275,000 – 24 mos.
London, England
General purposes Subtotal:$1,740,000
$130,000 – 24 mos.
Philanthropy Roundtable General purposes Philanthropy and Nonprofit Sector
Washington, DC
CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen
$60,000 – 24 mos.
General purposes Participation SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES
Washington, DC Center for Strategic & International
Puerto Rico Foundations Network $200,000 – 24 mos.
San Juan, PR Studies
General purposes
$50,000 – 16 mos. Washington, DC
Strengthening Puerto Rico’s philanthropy Council on Foundations $200,000 – 14 mos.
infrastructure Arlington, VA Building sustainable civil society
$200,000 – 18 mos. in the 21st century
Urban Institute Global philanthropy program
Washington, DC European Foundation Centre
$100,000 – 24 mos. East-West Management Institute Brussels, Belgium
Tax policy and charities project New York, NY $20,000 – 12 mos.
$80,000 – 18 mos. Funders’ forum on sustainable cities
Subtotal: $2,278,624 Philanthropication through privatization
International Academy for Innovative
Nonprofit Sector Responsiveness initiative
Pedagogy, Psychology and Economy
European Foundation Centre gGmbH
COMMUNITY PHILANTHROPY Brussels, Belgium Berlin, Germany
$100,000 – 12 mos. $200,000 – 24 mos.
CFLeads General purposes Youth empowerment partnership
Accord, MA program
$200,000 – 24 mos. Global Fund for Community
General purposes Foundations Subtotal:$420,000
Johannesburg, South Africa Special Opportunities
Council of Michigan Foundations $200,000 – 24 mos.
Grand Haven, MI Global alliance for community Program Area Total:$2,160,000
$295,000 – 35 mos. philanthropy secretariat Global Philanthropy
Community foundations and clean and Nonprofit Sector
energy in Michigan $250,000 – 12 mos.
Small grants and capacity-building Program Total:$16,154,311
Subtotal: $495,000 program Civil Society
Community Philanthropy

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 15


PHOTO CREDIT: DANEN WILLIAMS

A young girl practices choreographed dance moves — and learns the value of physical fitness and teamwork — during a summer program
at Brownell-Holmes STEM Academy in Flint, Michigan. Mott has supported efforts to increase access to high-quality afterschool and
summer learning programs for more than 80 years.

EDUCATION OVERVIEW
To expand opportunities for children and youth to succeed in school, work and, ultimately, life,
we make grants in the following areas:
ADVANCING AFTERSCHOOL YOUTH ENGAGEMENT
GOAL: Promote access to quality afterschool educational GOAL: Advance strategies that lead to greater and more
opportunities. meaningful youth participation in schools, communities
and the economy.
OBJECTIVES:
Building an Afterschool Infrastructure: Our grants support OBJECTIVES:
a national infrastructure of organizations dedicated to Youth Entrepreneurship: We seek to expand
increasing the quality of afterschool programs for children, entrepreneurial education and experiences for youth in
youth and families. low- and moderate-income communities.
Fostering Afterschool Policy: Our funding supports Engaging Youth Through Service: We seek to increase
the development of effective policies and partnerships to youth engagement in the K-12 system through service.
increase quality afterschool programs for children, youth
and families. SPECIAL INITIATIVES
Improving Afterschool Quality & Innovation: Our GOAL: Maintain the Foundation’s flexibility to respond to
grantmaking advances research and exemplary models new strategies, unique opportunities and changing social,
that increase student engagement in learning and prepare economic and political contexts.
students for college and career.

GRADUATING HIGH SCHOOL COLLEGE & Note: The preceding overview of Mott’s Education Program
reflects program areas, goals and objectives that were
CAREER READY
approved by the Foundation’s board of trustees in June
GOAL: Increase high school graduation and college and 2017. Because 2017 grants were awarded under an earlier
career readiness outcomes for youth. framework shown on the next page, the grants listed on
OBJECTIVES: pages 17-19 are categorized according to that framework.
Expanding Quality Programs: Our funding supports efforts
to expand quality college and career readiness programming
through the afterschool infrastructure.
Advancing Innovations: Our funding seeks to broaden the
implementation of and investment in innovative college and
career readiness strategies.

16 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
Advancing Afterschool Colorado Nonprofit Development Marshfield Clinic Inc.
Center Marshfield, WI
BUILDING AN AFTERSCHOOL Denver, CO $200,000 – 24 mos.
INFRASTRUCTURE $225,000 – 36 mos. Afterschool policy and system-building
Afterschool Alliance Colorado statewide afterschool network initiative
Washington, DC Connecticut After School Network $225,000 – 36 mos.
$335,000 – 12 mos. Branford, CT Wisconsin statewide afterschool network
VISTA project $200,000 – 24 mos. Metropolitan Family Services
After-School All-Stars Afterschool policy and system-building Chicago, IL
Los Angeles, CA initiative $225,000 – 36 mos.
$112,500 – 18 mos. Foundation-Administered Project Illinois statewide afterschool network
Nevada statewide afterschool network $180,000 Nebraska Children and Families
Alaska Children’s Trust Advancing afterschool technical Foundation
Anchorage, AK assistance Lincoln, NE
$200,000 – 24 mos. $145,000 – 12 mos. $191,048 – 24 mos.
Afterschool policy and system-building Afterschool technical assistance Afterschool policy and system-building
initiative collaborative and statewide afterschool initiative
Arkansas State University networks
Oregon Association for the Education
Jonesboro, AR FowlerHoffman of Young Children
$225,000 – 36 mos. Richmond, CA Gladstone, OR
Arkansas statewide afterschool network $500,000 – 24 mos. $180,000 – 24 mos.
Auburn University Supporting statewide afterschool Afterschool policy and system-building
Auburn, AL networks initiative
$100,000 – 36 mos. Fund for Educational Excellence $225,000 – 36 mos.
Alabama statewide afterschool network Baltimore, MD Oregon statewide afterschool network
Children’s Services Council of Florida $200,000 – 24 mos. Public School Forum of North Carolina
Tallahassee, FL Afterschool policy and system-building Raleigh, NC
$225,000 – 36 mos. initiative $225,000 – 36 mos.
Florida statewide afterschool network Indiana Afterschool Network Inc. North Carolina statewide afterschool
Collaborative Communications Group Indianapolis, IN network
Washington, DC $190,000 – 24 mos. Rural Dynamics Inc.
$1,925,000 – 24 mos. Afterschool policy and system-building Great Falls, MT
Supporting national network of initiative $225,000 – 36 mos.
statewide afterschool networks Jannus Inc. Montana statewide afterschool network
Boise, ID
$225,000 – 36 mos.
Idaho statewide afterschool network

EDUCATION 2017 GRANT ACTIVITY


GRANT
DOLLARS NUMBER
ADVANCING AFTERSCHOOL (in millions) OF GRANTS

Building an Afterschool Infrastructure $  8.909 32


Fostering Afterschool Policy $  3.916 7
TOTAL
Improving Afterschool Quality & Innovation $  3.169 13
$23,392,425
GRADUATING HIGH SCHOOL COLLEGE & CAREER READY 77 GRANTS
Advancing Innovations $  2.769 10

YOUTH ENGAGEMENT
Youth Entrepreneurship $  1.899 5
Engaging Youth Through Service $  1.100 5 in millions
SPECIAL INITIATIVES m Advancing Afterschool $15.994 / 52 Grants

$  1.430 4 m Graduating High School College


Special Opportunities
& Career Ready $2.769 / 10 Grants
Microenterprise $  .200 1
m Youth Engagement $2.999 / 10 Grants
TOTALS $ 23.392 77
m Special Initiatives $1.630 / 5 Grants

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 17


South Carolina Afterschool Alliance University of Missouri – Columbia Grantmakers for Education
Columbia, SC Columbia, MO Portland, OR
$225,000 – 36 mos. $225,000 – 36 mos. $16,000 – 24 mos.
South Carolina statewide afterschool Missouri statewide afterschool network General purposes
network
University of Southern Maine Johns Hopkins University
Southeastern Regional Education Portland, ME Baltimore, MD
Service Center Inc. $225,000 – 36 mos. $400,000 – 15 mos.
Bedford, NH Maine statewide afterschool network School success mentor program
$225,000 – 36 mos. Voices for Georgia’s Children
New Hampshire statewide afterschool
LA’s BEST
Atlanta, GA Los Angeles, CA
network $200,000 – 24 mos. $100,000 – 24 mos.
Texas Partnership for Out of School Afterschool policy and system-building General purposes
Time initiative
Austin, TX Subtotal:$3,916,000
Subtotal:$8,908,548 Fostering Afterschool Policy
$225,000 – 36 mos. Building an Afterschool Infrastructure
Texas statewide afterschool network
United Way of Rhode Island IMPROVING AFTERSCHOOL
Providence, RI FOSTERING AFTERSCHOOL POLICY QUALITY & INNOVATION
$225,000 – 36 mos. Afterschool Alliance American Youth Policy Forum
Rhode Island statewide afterschool Washington, DC Washington, DC
network $2,700,000 – 12 mos. $125,000 – 12 mos.
United Ways of Tennessee General purposes Integrating afterschool and school-
Franklin, TN Collaborative Communications Group community partnerships
$225,000 – 36 mos. Washington, DC ArtsConnection
Tennessee statewide afterschool network $400,000 – 12 mos. New York, NY
University of Hawaii Afterschool education and outreach $30,000 – 12 mos.
Honolulu, HI project Teen reviewers and critics program
$225,000 – 36 mos. Furman University Children’s Aid Society
Hawaii statewide afterschool network Greenville, SC New York, NY
University of Kansas Center $300,000 – 24 mos. $300,000 – 24 mos.
Establishment of education policy Afterschool and community schools
for Research Inc.
institute initiative
Lawrence, KS
$225,000 – 36 mos.
Kansas statewide afterschool network
PHOTO CREDIT: SARAH CRICHLOW

In 1998, Mott entered into a unique public-private partnership with the U.S. Department of Education to pilot, test and expand the 21st Century
Community Learning Centers initiative. Today, 21st CCLC programs like this one in Fairbanks, Alaska, serve more than 1.7 million children each year.

18 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
Foundations Inc. City and County of San Francisco ENGAGING YOUTH THROUGH SERVICE
Mt. Laurel, NJ San Francisco, CA
$75,000 – 12 mos. $304,674 – 24 mos.
America’s Service Commissions
Washington, DC
21st Century Community Learning Kindergarten to college program
$250,000 – 24 mos.
Centers Institute
Civic Nation Expanding afterschool opportunities
Illinois State Board of Education Washington, DC through national service
Chicago, IL $325,000 – 24 mos.
$300,000 – 24 mos. College promise campaign
City Year Inc.
Boston, MA
Collaboration for healthy and thriving
Commonwealth $50,000 – 18 mos.
students
Boston, MA Service education and outreach project
Marquette University $85,000 – 15 mos.
Milwaukee, WI Flint children’s savings account feasibility
National Youth Leadership Council
St. Paul, MN
$200,000 – 12 mos. study
$400,000 – 24 mos.
Study on afterschool access
National College Access Network Afterschool and service-learning initiative
and participation
Washington, DC
McLean Hospital $270,000 – 36 mos.
United Way of Genesee County
Flint, MI
Belmont, MA Linking children’s savings accounts to
$100,000 – 9 mos.
$200,000 – 12 mos. college access and success strategies
National service and volunteer center
Increasing science, technology,
National Mentoring Partnership capacity building
engineering and math in afterschool
Boston, MA
Pacific Science Center $300,000 – 24 mos.
Youth Service America
Washington, DC
Seattle, WA Advancing relationship-center
$300,000 – 12 mos.
$100,000 – 9 mos. interventions
Engaging youth in service
Science, technology, engineering and
New America Foundation
math fellowship Subtotal:$1,100,000
Washington, DC
STEM Next Opportunity Fund $250,000 – 24 mos. Engaging Youth Through Service
San Diego, CA Asset building program Program Area Total:$2,998,875
$730,000 – 12 mos. Youth Engagement
Philanthropy New York
Increasing science, technology,
New York, NY
engineering and math in afterschool
$200,000 – 24 mos.
Synergy Enterprises Inc. Asset funders network Special Initiatives
Silver Spring, MD
Washington University SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES
$250,000 – 6 mos.
St. Louis, MO
21st Century Community Learning Editorial Projects in Education
$300,000 – 24 mos.
Centers summer institute Bethesda, MD
Expanding child savings accounts
Third Sector New England for educational success and lifelong $400,000 – 36 mos.
Boston, MA asset building Promoting learning opportunities
$34,200 – 13 mos. and supports for youth
Afterschool evaluation and dissemination Subtotal:$2,769,674
Advancing Innovations Focus: HOPE
project Detroit, MI
Tides Foundation Program Area Total:$2,769,674 $750,000 – 12 mos.
San Francisco, CA Graduating High School General purposes
$300,000 – 24 mos. College & Career Ready Harlem Children’s Zone
Campaign for grade-level reading New York, NY
University of California – Irvine $150,000 – 12 mos.
Irvine, CA Youth Engagement General purposes
$525,000 – 24 mos. YOUTH ENTREPRENEURSHIP Michigan State University
Impact of program and practice East Lansing, MI
characteristics on participant outcomes Aspen Institute
$130,128 – 12 mos.
Washington, DC
Subtotal:$3,169,200 Michigan at a Crossroads policy guide
$400,000 – 18 mos.
Improving Afterschool Quality & Innovation Opportunity youth entrepreneurship Subtotal:$1,430,128
initiative Special Opportunities
Program Area Total:$15,993,748
Advancing Afterschool Community Foundation for Southeast
Michigan MICROENTERPRISE
Detroit, MI
Association for Enterprise Opportunity
Graduating High School College & $750,000 – 126 mos.
New Economy Initiative for Southeast Washington, DC
Career Ready Michigan $200,000 – 12 mos.
General purposes
ADVANCING INNOVATIONS Network for Teaching
Entrepreneurship Subtotal:$200,000
Brandeis University Microenterprise
Waltham, MA New York, NY
$435,000 – 24 mos. $400,000 – 30 mos. Program Area Total:$1,630,128
Assets evaluation and data collection Gateway to youth entrepreneurship Special Initiatives
project program
Program Total:$23,392,425
CFLeads VentureLab Education
Accord, MA San Antonio, TX
$300,000 – 12 mos. $348,875 – 18 mos.
Children’s savings account strategies Youth entrepreneurship curriculum
for community foundations for afterschool programs
Subtotal:$1,898,875
Youth Entrepreneurship

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 19


PHOTO CREDIT: SANDRA SMITHEY
A store owner in Ilemba shows off a refrigerator/freezer that’s powered by the sun. With help from Mott grantees, remote villages
in Tanzania are installing solar power systems and mini-grids to generate clean energy for homes and small businesses.

ENVIRONMENT OVERVIEW
To support programs around the world that protect communities and the ecosystems upon
which they depend, we make grants in the following areas:
ADDRESSING THE FRESHWATER CHALLENGE ADVANCING CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS
GOAL: Secure sustainable levels of clean water for people GOAL: Advance the adoption of clean energy
and the environment, particularly in the Great Lakes basin. technologies at the community level in developing
countries.
OBJECTIVES:
Strengthening the Environmental Community: We OBJECTIVE:
seek a strong, effective and sustainable community of Providing Access to Clean Energy in Developing
nongovernmental organizations dedicated to the long-term Countries: We seek to increase the use of renewable
conservation of freshwater ecosystems. energy systems in rural areas of South America and Africa.
Informing Sound Public Policies: We seek well-designed
and effectively implemented policies that advance the
SPECIAL INITIATIVES
conservation of freshwater ecosystems. GOAL: Respond to unique opportunities to advance
environmental protection in the U.S. and internationally.
TRANSFORMING DEVELOPMENT FINANCE
GOAL: Shape international investment to support Note: The preceding overview of Mott’s Environment
sustainable development and reduce environmental Program reflects program areas, goals and objectives
degradation. that were approved by the Foundation’s board of trustees
in September 2017. Because 2017 grants were awarded
OBJECTIVES: under an earlier framework shown on the next page, the
Securing Infrastructure and Energy for a Sustainable grants listed on pages 21-23 are categorized according to
Future: We envision infrastructure and energy investments that framework.
that contribute to environmental sustainability and offer local
economic opportunity.
Promoting Sustainable Regional Development and
Integration: We seek international and regional investments
that contribute to local sustainable development, with a focus
on South America.

20 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
Addressing the Freshwater Michigan Environmental Council American Rivers
Lansing, MI Washington, DC
Challenge $350,000 – 24 mos. $165,000 – 12 mos.
STRENGTHENING THE Great Lakes program Promoting integrated water
ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNITY management in Great Lakes
Minnesota Environmental Partnership
Alliance for the Great Lakes St. Paul, MN $185,000 – 12 mos.
Chicago, IL $50,000 – 24 mos. Ensuring healthy river flows
$400,000 – 24 mos. Northeast Minnesota program Bipartisan Policy Center
General purposes Ohio Environmental Council Washington, DC
Citizens Campaign Fund Columbus, OH $100,000 – 12 mos.
for the Environment $300,000 – 24 mos. Drinking water infrastructure program
Farmingdale, NY Great Lakes ecosystem project Bonneville Environmental Foundation
$150,000 – 24 mos. River Network Portland, OR
Great Lakes program Boulder, CO $15,000 – 33 mos.
Environmental Defence $400,000 – 24 mos. Change the Course
Toronto, Canada Building citizen capacity for freshwater Center for Neighborhood Technology
$150,000 – 24 mos. protection Chicago, IL
Great Lakes water program University of Michigan – Ann Arbor $40,000 – 24 mos.
Environmental Leadership Program Ann Arbor, MI Great Lakes water infrastructure project
Greenbelt, MD $250,000 – 24 mos. Chattahoochee Riverkeeper
$150,000 – 24 mos. Outreach to new freshwater Atlanta, GA
Great Lakes leadership project constituencies project $250,000 – 10 mos.
Flint River Watershed Coalition Subtotal:$2,650,000 New approach to water management
Flint, MI Strengthening the in Georgia
$80,000 – 12 mos. Environmental Community Conference of Great Lakes and St.
General purposes Lawrence Governors and Premiers
Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities PUBLIC POLICIES Chicago, IL
Initiative $50,000 – 12 mos.
Alabama Rivers Alliance Great Lakes summit
Chicago, IL Birmingham, AL
$250,000 – 24 mos. $75,000 – 19 mos. Flint Riverkeeper
General purposes Alabama water-management project Albany, GA
Heart of the Lakes Center for Land $40,000 – 12 mos.
General purposes
Conservation Policy
Bay City, MI
$120,000 – 24 mos.
General purposes

ENVIRONMENT 2017 GRANT ACTIVITY

GRANT
ADDRESSING THE FRESHWATER DOLLARS NUMBER
CHALLENGE (in millions) OF GRANTS
Strengthening the Environmental Community $  2.650 12
Informing Sound Public Policies $  3.180 21

TRANSFORMING DEVELOPMENT FINANCE


TOTAL
$20,471,201
Securing Infrastructure and Energy $  3.040 14 87 GRANTS
for a Sustainable Future
Promoting Sustainable Regional Development $  2.100 13
and Integration
ADVANCING CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS
Providing Access to Clean Energy $  3.350 13 in millions
in Developing Countries
m Addressing the Freshwater Challenge
Stimulating Clean Energy Use in Michigan $  .920 9 $5.830 / 33 Grants
m Transforming Development Finance
SPECIAL INITIATIVES
$5.140 / 27 Grants
Special Opportunities $  5.231 5
m Advancing Climate Change Solutions
TOTALS $ 20.471 87 $4.270 / 22 Grants
m Special Initiatives $5.231 / 5 Grants

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 21


Great Lakes Commission Christian Aid Fundacion Ambiente y Recursos
Ann Arbor, MI London, England Naturales
$335,000 – 12 mos. $210,000 – 24 mos. Capital Federal, Argentina
Determining economic impact of African Development Bank energy $25,000 – 24 mos.
protecting and restoring Great Lakes financing Monitoring infrastructure investments
Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife EarthRights International in Argentina
Commission Washington, DC Getulio Vargas Foundation
Odanah, WI $150,000 – 12 mos. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
$150,000 – 24 mos. Transcontinental dialogue on Chinese $300,000 – 24 mos.
Great Lakes sulfide-ore mining project investment and financing in global south Monitoring hydropower impacts
Foundation-Administered Project in the Amazon
Michigan United Conservation Clubs
Lansing, MI $40,558 iBase
$50,000 – 18 mos. Transform Development Finance Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Michigan land and water policy project convenings $50,000 – 12 mos.
Friends of the Earth Monitoring BNDES investments
National Wildlife Federation
Washington, DC in energy and infrastructure
Reston, VA
$500,000 – 24 mos. $300,000 – 24 mos. INESC
Sustaining Great Lakes project Advancing and protecting sustainability Brasilia, Brazil
standards in development finance $250,000 – 24 mos.
Nature Conservancy
Institute for Policy Studies Finance for sustainable development
Arlington, VA
Washington, DC in South America
$520,000 – 24 mos.
Saginaw Bay initiative $40,000 – 33 mos. Instituto Centro de Vida
$40,000 – 12 mos. Global finance for climate sustainability Cuiaba, Brazil
Lower Flint River project NGO Forum on ADB $200,000 – 24 mos.
Quezon City, Philippines Energy and infrastructure development
Northeast-Midwest Institute in the Amazon
Washington, DC $100,000 – 28 mos.
$150,000 – 24 mos. General purposes Mongabay.org
Great Lakes Washington program Oil Change International Emerald Hills, CA
Washington, DC $100,000 – 24 mos.
River Network BNDES and the Amazon
Boulder, CO $150,000 – 24 mos.
$250,000 – 21 mos. International program Pontifical Catholic University
Southeastern water supply security and Oxfam America Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
sustainability Boston, MA $50,000 – 24 mos.
$300,000 – 24 mos. Strengthening new development bank
Southern Environmental Law Center safeguards
Charlottesville, VA Shifting the narrative: addressing Africa’s
$165,000 – 18 mos. energy poverty challenge Socio-Environmental Fund CASA
Southern water-management project Social and Environmental Sao Paulo, Brazil
$500,000 – 24 mos.
University of Wisconsin-Madison Entrepreneurs
South America small grants program
Madison, WI Calabasas, CA
$100,000 – 12 mos. $150,000 – 24 mos. Uma Gota no Oceano
Healthy public water systems in the Building capacity to monitor Chinese Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Great Lakes Basin – mayor’s innovation investment in Asia $100,000 – 29 mos.
project Spotlighting Tapajos hydro development
Vasudha Foundation
Subtotal:$3,180,000 Sugar Land, TX Uniselva Foundation
Public Policies $250,000 – 24 mos. Mato Grosso, Brazil
Exploring best-practice models and $200,000 – 24 mos.
Program Area Total:$5,830,000 pathways for international clean energy Strengthening environmental-social
Addressing the Freshwater Challenges finance framework in South America
World Resources Institute Subtotal:$2,100,000
Washington, DC Sustainable Regional Development
Transforming Development Finance $350,000 – 24 mos. and Integration
Sustainable Finance Center
SECURING INFRASTRUCTURE AND Program Area Total:$5,140,558
ENERGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Subtotal:$3,040,558 Transforming Development Finance
Infrastructure and Energy
Bank Information Center for a Sustainable Future
Washington, DC
$400,000 – 24 mos. Advancing Climate Change
General purposes PROMOTING SUSTAINABLE REGIONAL Solutions
Boston University DEVELOPMENT AND INTEGRATION
PROVIDING ACCESS TO
Boston, MA ActionAid Brasil
$200,000 – 24 mos.
CLEAN ENERGY
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
Development banks and sustainable $100,000 – 12 mos.
development Monitoring BRICS development in Brazil Amazon Conservation Team
Both Ends Foundation Arlington, VA
Asociacion Ambiente y Sociedad $200,000 – 24 mos.
Amsterdam, Netherlands Bogotá, Colombia
$200,000 – 24 mos. Solar energy for Chiribiquete forest
$200,000 – 24 mos. dwellers
International financial institutions Sustainable development finance
program in South America Catholic Agency for Overseas
Center for International Development
Derecho Ambiente y Recursos London, England
Environmental Law Naturales
Washington, DC $200,000 – 24 mos.
Lima, Peru Sustainable energy access
$200,000 – 24 mos. $25,000 – 24 mos.
Ensuring development and climate General purposes
finance support sustainable development

22 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
Centro de Estudios y Promocion EcoWorks Special Initiatives
del Desarrollo Detroit, MI
Lima, Peru $75,000 – 12 mos. SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES
$200,000 – 24 mos. Community energy management Climate Leadership Council
Clean energy access in Andes/Amazon in southeast Michigan Washington, DC
EnAccess Fresh Energy $100,000 – 12 mos.
Amsterdam, Netherlands Saint Paul, MN General purposes
$500,000 – 24 mos. $100,000 – 24 mos. Foundation-Administered Project
General purposes Midwest Energy News in Michigan $35,643
IDEAAS-Instituto para o Groundwork Center for Resilient Blue Accounting communications
Desenvolvimento de Energias Communities Grand Traverse Regional Land
Alternativas e da Auto Traverse City, MI Conservancy
Sustentabilidade $25,000 – 24 mos. Traverse City, MI
Porto Alegre, Brazil Sustainable energy use in northern $4,500,000 – 48 mos.
$200,000 – 24 mos. Michigan Love the Land, Pass it On stewardship
Light for a Better Life Michigan Municipal League endowment
Instituto Socioambiental Foundation $500,000 – 24 mos.
Sao Paulo, Brazil Lansing, MI Love the Land campaign universal
$200,000 – 24 mos. $100,000 – 24 mos. access trails
Energy distributed to isolated Michigan Green Communities Network
Regulatory Assistance Project
communities SEEDS Montpelier, VT
International Institute for Traverse City, MI $75,000 – 22 mos.
Environment and Development $50,000 – 12 mos. Performance-based regulation study
London, England Advancing climate solutions in
Virginia Organizing Inc.
$200,000 – 24 mos. Traverse City
Charlottesville, VA
Financing clean energy access Superior Watershed Partnership $20,000 – 12 mos.
New Venture Fund Marquette, MI Health and environmental funders
Washington, DC $50,000 – 12 mos. network
$250,000 – 24 mos. Upper Peninsula energy-planning project
Subtotal:$5,230,643
Shine: investing in energy access for all Wind on the Wires Special Opportunities
Practical Action St. Paul, MN
$50,000 – 12 mos. Program Area Total:$5,230,643
Rugby, England Special Initiatives
$125,000 – 39 mos. Wind energy stakeholder committee
Strengthening evidence, engagement Subtotal:$920,000 Program Total:$20,471,201
and impact on energy poverty Environment
Stimulating Clean Energy Use
Renove in Michigan
Porto Alegre, Brazil
$200,000 – 24 mos. Program Area Total:$4,270,000
Building Latin American platform Advancing Climate Change Solutions
for sustainable energy and equity
Solar Energy Light Company
Foundation
PHOTO CREDIT: NEAL HEGARTY

Bangalore, India
$300,000 – 24 mos.
Sharing Indian social entrepreneurs’
lessons for African off-grid energy
SunFunder
San Francisco, CA
$575,000 – 24 mos.
Addressing East Africa DRE financing
Tanzania Traditional Energy
Development Organisation
Ubungo, Tanzania
$200,000 – 24 mos.
Development of Tanzanian renewable
energy micro-grids for rural communities
Subtotal:$3,350,000
Providing Access to Clean Energy
in Developing Countries

STIMULATING CLEAN ENERGY


USE IN MICHIGAN
Clean Energy Coalition
Ann Arbor, MI
$180,000 – 18 mos.
Flint anchor institutions clean energy
initiative
Ecology Center Large-scale infrastructure projects in developing countries, such as the Belo Monte Dam
Ann Arbor, MI
$290,000 – 24 mos. in the Brazilian Amazon, can cause severe damage to the environment and communities.
Clean energy solutions for Michigan Mott grantees work to strengthen the social and environmental standards used by
schools international development banks to finance such projects.

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 23


PHOTO CREDIT: CRISTINA WRIGHT

Afterschool activities, like this robotics club at the Durant-Tuuri-Mott Elementary School, are part of a Mott-funded community education initiative
that’s in place throughout Flint Community Schools.

FLINT AREA OVERVIEW


To help our hometown of Flint solve problems, create opportunities and build a vibrant future
for the community and its residents, we make grants in the following areas:
REVITALIZING THE EDUCATION CONTINUUM RESTORING COMMUNITY VITALITY
GOAL: Increase educational opportunities that will help GOAL: Stimulate local job growth, revitalize the city center
Flint area children, youth and adults achieve success in the and spark new economic energy in the greater Flint area.
classroom and the workplace.
OBJECTIVES:
OBJECTIVES: Regional Economy: We envision a vibrant and diverse
Flint K–12 Education: We strive for a strong, sustainable economy that builds on the area’s strengths and assets.
K–12 system that provides local families with high‑quality Downtown Revitalization: We strive for a city center that
educational choices. attracts both public and private investment.
Community Schools: We support the district-wide adoption Community Development: We seek affordable housing
of a re-envisioned approach to community schools. opportunities and strong neighborhoods in and around the
College, Careers and Connections: We aim for broad city.
access among residents to multiple educational and career Entrepreneurship: We aim for a vibrant and connected
pathways. community of local entrepreneurs and small businesses.
ENRICHING LIVES THROUGH ARTS MEETING EVOLVING COMMUNITY NEEDS
AND CULTURE
GOAL: Strengthen the capacity of Flint area programs and
GOAL: Support local arts and cultural organizations as organizations to help children and families meet their needs
critical forces for positive change in Flint. and improve their lives.
OBJECTIVES: OBJECTIVES:
Flint Cultural Center Campus: We strive to ensure that Nonprofit/Philanthropic Sector: We envision a strong
the Flint Cultural Center is strong, sustainable and has the nonprofit and philanthropic sector that contributes to quality
capacity it needs to provide area residents, especially youth, of life in Flint.
with diverse, quality programming.
Special Opportunities: We strive to maintain the flexibility
Smaller Arts Organizations: We seek to strengthen the overall to help leverage opportunities and resources for the Flint
arts community in Flint in ways that cultivate and connect local community, test new ideas, incubate local projects and meet
artists, patrons and residents. specific, unforeseen needs as they arise.

24 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
Revitalizing the Education Continuum COMMUNITY SCHOOLS Genesee Area Focus Fund
($120,000)
FLINT K-12 EDUCATION Boys & Girls Club of Greater Flint Adjustment to previous grant
Flint, MI
Education Trust Inc. $50,000 – 12 mos. $3,000,000 – 12 mos.
Washington, DC General purposes YouthQuest afterschool initiative
$300,000 – 9 mos.
Schools of choice academic impact study Community Foundation Oakland Schools Education
of Greater Flint Foundation
Flint Community Schools Flint, MI Waterford, MI
Flint, MI $350,000 – 12 mos. $100,000 – 13 mos.
$160,425 – 12 mos. Early childhood capacity building School finance research project
Parking lot improvements
$50,000 – 3 mos. Subtotal:$9,221,458
$150,000 – 12 mos. Coordinated enrollment research Community Schools
Instructional innovation fund
$986,948 – 12 mos.
Cranbrook Educational Community
Bloomfield Hills, MI COLLEGE, CAREERS AND CONNECTIONS
Reading, language arts and social
$520,000 – 12 mos.
studies curriculum Genesee Area Focus Fund
Flint Community Schools Young Scientists
$989,780 – 12 mos. Flint, MI
Framework for aligning teaching and Crim Fitness Foundation $825,000 – 12 mos.
learning Flint, MI Summer Youth Initiative and TeenQuest
$2,950,000 – 12 mos.
$278,400 – 12 mos. Community education initiative Genesee Intermediate School District
Student retention and recruitment Flint, MI
$110,000 – 18 mos. $150,000 – 10 mos.
$400,000 – 15 mos. Community education innovation fund
Superintendent technical assistance Genesee Early College
Flint Community Schools Greater Flint Health Coalition
Flint Cultural Center Corporation Flint, MI
Flint, MI Flint, MI
$40,600 – 6 mos. $175,000 – 12 mos.
$375,000 – 12 mos. Case management system
Cultural center school feasibility study Flint Healthcare Employment
$170,858 – 3 mos. Opportunities program
Michigan State University Summer Tot Lot program
East Lansing, MI Mott Community College
$1,000,000 – 12 mos. Foundation for Flint Flint, MI
Technical assistance for improved Flint, MI $700,000 – 36 mos.
teaching and learning $2,000,000 – 15 mos. Mott Middle/Early College replication
Early childhood education facility $150,000 – 36 mos.
Subtotal:$4,640,553 construction GAPS: transition program
Flint K-12 Education

FLINT AREA 2017 GRANT ACTIVITY

GRANT
REVITALIZING THE EDUCATION DOLLARS NUMBER
CONTINUUM (in millions) OF GRANTS
Flint K–12 Education $  4.641 9
Community Schools $  9.221 12
College, Careers and Connections $  2.651 8 TOTAL
$58,202,817
ENRICHING LIVES THROUGH ARTS AND CULTURE 113 GRANTS
Flint Cultural Center Campus $  19.524 13
Smaller Arts Organizations $  .628 7

RESTORING COMMUNITY VITALITY


Regional Economy $  2.643 8 in millions
Downtown Revitalization $  6.250 8 m Revitalizing the Education Continuum
$16.513 / 29 Grants
Community Development $  3.725 15
m Enriching Lives Through Arts and Culture
Entrepreneurship $  1.244 8 $20.152 / 20 Grants
m Restoring Community Vitality
MEETING EVOLVING COMMUNITY NEEDS $13.862 / 39 Grants
Nonprofit/Philanthropic Sector $  2.606 15 m Meeting Evolving Community Needs
Special Opportunities $  5.070 10 $7.676 / 25 Grants

TOTALS $ 58.203 113

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 25


Specialized Employment Services Inc. SMALLER ARTS ORGANIZATIONS Subtotal:$2,643,249
Flint, MI Regional Economy
$150,000 – 12 mos.
Buckham Fine Arts Project
Flint, MI
Flint STRIVE replication program
$20,000 – 13 mos.
$85,000 – 12 mos. General purposes DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION
Flint STRIVE Academy youth Flint Cultural Center Foundation
empowerment program City of Flint
Flint, MI Flint, MI
University of Michigan-Flint $133,290 – 7 mos. $500,000 – 7 mos.
Flint, MI Event policing and public safety Capitol Theatre equipment
$415,700 – 12 mos. Foundation for the Uptown
Committed to Excellence and Community Foundation
of Greater Flint Reinvestment Corporation
Opportunity program Flint, MI
Flint, MI
Subtotal:$2,650,700 $100,000 – 12 mos. $935,000 – 12 mos.
College, Careers and Connections S. Jean Simi Fund for the Arts Operating support
$222,073 – 12 mos.
Program Area Total:$16,512,711 Flint Downtown Development Downtown security
Revitalizing the Education Continuum Authority
Flint, MI $275,000 – 24 mos.
$25,000 – 1 mo. Downtown hotel pre-design study
Enriching Lives Through Arts and Downtown festivals $200,000 – 12 mos.
Culture Greater Flint Arts Council Flint Farmers’ Market operating support
FLINT CULTURAL CENTER CAMPUS Flint, MI Foundation-Administered Project
$150,000 – 12 mos. $118,253
Community Foundation General purposes Technical assistance for downtown Flint
of Greater Flint $120,000 – 12 mos. revitalization
Flint, MI
Parade of festivals Mott Community College
$2,146,068 – 12 mos.
Endowment funds Red Ink Flint Flint, MI
Flint, MI $4,000,000 – 24 mos.
Flint Cultural Center Corporation $80,000 – 12 mos. Culinary arts project
Flint, MI
General purposes Subtotal:$6,250,326
$2,700,000 – 12 mos.
Operating support Subtotal:$628,290 Downtown Revitalization
$150,000 – 12 mos. Smaller Arts Organizations
Capitol Theatre re-opening community Program Area Total:$20,151,958 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
engagement project Enriching Lives Through Arts and Culture Center for Community Progress
$100,000 – 12 mos. Flint, MI
School and community programming $1,750,000 – 12 mos.
Flint Cultural Center Foundation
Restoring Community Vitality General purposes
Flint, MI REGIONAL ECONOMY Communities First Inc.
$10,000,000 – 28 mos. Brookings Institution Flint, MI
Sloan Museum renovation and Washington, DC $500,000 – 24 mos.
expansion project $100,000 – 12 mos. Coolidge Park Apartments
Flint Institute of Arts Metropolitan policy program $80,000 – 12 mos.
Flint, MI Detroit Regional Chamber Foundation Capacity building
$2,200,000 – 12 mos. Detroit, MI $200,000 – 12 mos.
Operating support $20,000 – 8 mos. Property acquisition and demolition
Flint Institute of Music Policy conference
Court Street Village Non-Profit
Flint, MI $20,000 – 5 mos.
$60,000 – 6 mos. Housing Corporation
Policy conference 2017 Flint, MI
Tapology Tap Dance Festival for Youth
Genesee Area Focus Fund $40,000 – 12 mos.
$55,000 – 6 mos. Flint, MI General purposes
Music around town $2,000,000 – 12 mos. Genesee Chamber Foundation
$1,300,000 – 12 mos. Education and economic development Flint, MI
Operating support initiatives $160,000 – 12 mos.
$84,300 – 24 mos. Genesee Chamber Foundation Online Flint publication
Flint School of Performing Arts Flint, MI Genesee County Habitat for Humanity
scholarships $75,000 – 24 mos. Flint, MI
$84,300 – 36 mos. Buick City pre-development assessment $140,000 – 12 mos.
Endowment fund Michigan Municipal League Flint BRAND program
Flint Public Library Foundation $100,000 – 12 mos.
Flint, MI Lansing, MI Homeowner occupied repair program
$544,000 – 11 mos. $36,300 – 9 mos.
Municipal finance system reform Genesee County Land Bank Authority
Design a library for the future Flint, MI
Sphinx Organization Michigan State University $240,000 – 12 mos.
Detroit, MI East Lansing, MI Neighborhood and community planning
$100,000 – 12 mos. $261,949 – 24 mos. $200,000 – 12 mos.
Overture program and partnership Finding a path forward for fiscally Blight elimination and neighborhood
with Flint Institute of Music sustainable cities in Michigan stabilization
Subtotal:$19,523,668 University of Michigan-Flint Hispanic Technology & Community
Flint Cultural Center Campus Flint, MI Center of Greater Flint
$130,000 – 12 mos. Flint, MI
Economic and entrepreneurial outreach $50,000 – 24 mos.
Capacity building

26 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
Local Initiatives Support Corporation Crim Fitness Foundation SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES
New York, NY Flint, MI
$100,000 – 12 mos. $100,000 – 12 mos.
Arab American Heritage Council
Flint, MI
Flint and Genesee County community General purposes
$40,000 – 12 mos.
development project
Fair Food Network Immigration services
Metro Community Development Ann Arbor, MI
Flint, MI $150,000 – 12 mos.
City of Flint
Flint, MI
$135,000 – 12 mos. Double Up Food Bucks project
$60,000 – 6 mos.
Capacity building
Flint Jewish Federation Residential service line technical
Village Information Center Flint, MI assistance
Flint, MI $6,000 – 12 mos.
$30,000 – 12 mos. General purposes
Flint Odyssey House Inc.
Flint, MI
General purposes
Food Bank of Eastern Michigan $265,348 – 12 mos.
Subtotal:$3,725,000 Flint, MI Healthy Flint research coordinating
Community Development $110,000 – 12 mos. center-community core
Increasing food distribution and access
Genesee County Parks & Recreation
ENTREPRENEURSHIP $20,000 – 12 mos. Commission
Flint diaper bank Flint, MI
Ferris Wheel Innovation Center $4,250,000 – 11 mos.
Flint, MI Greater Flint Health Coalition
Flint, MI Flint River restoration project
$500,000 – 12 mos.
100K IDEAS $245,000 – 12 mos. Genesee Health System
General purposes Flint, MI
Formative Evaluation Research $200,000 – 12 mos.
Salvation Army of Genesee County
Associates Flint, MI Mobile mental health unit project
Ann Arbor, MI
$100,000 – 12 mos. Mott Community College
$40,000 – 8 mos.
Rent and utility assistance program Flint, MI
Youth entrepreneurship landscape scan
Shelter of Flint Inc. $25,000 – 12 mos.
Foundation for the Uptown Flint, MI Flint and Genesee Literacy Network
Reinvestment Corporation $50,000 – 12 mos. capacity building
Flint, MI One Stop Housing Resource Center
$85,000 – 12 mos. University of Michigan-Flint
Flint Food Works commercial kitchen United Way of Genesee County Flint, MI
Flint, MI $30,000 – 12 mos.
Mott Community College $410,000 – 12 mos. Flint community data platform
Flint, MI General purposes
$68,000 – 13 mos. Whaley Historical House
Teen CEO initiative $220,000 – 12 mos. Association Inc.
Building Excellence, Sustainability and Flint, MI
$130,000 – 13 mos. Trust (BEST) nonprofit capacity building $199,895 – 8 mos.
Teen CEO initiative expansion Whaley Historic House restoration
$75,000 – 12 mos.
$85,330 – 12 mos. Flint national service accelerator project
FABLAB for the community initiative Subtotal:$5,070,243
Red Ink Flint YWCA of Greater Flint Special Opportunities
Flint, MI Flint, MI
$100,000 – 12 mos. Program Area Total:$7,676,243
$250,000 – 60 mos. Meeting Evolving Community Needs
Factory Two project Domestic violence services reserve fund
XLerateHealth Program Total:$58,202,817
Subtotal:$2,606,000 Flint Area
Louisville, KY
$235,000 – 12 mos. Nonprofit/Philanthropic Sector
Healthcare startup accelerator

PHOTO CREDIT: COURTESY OF THEHUB FLINT/PAUL ENGSTROM


Subtotal:$1,243,330
Entrepreneurship
Program Area Total:$13,861,905
Restoring Community Vitality

Meeting Evolving Community Needs


NONPROFIT/PHILANTHROPIC SECTOR
Carriage Town Ministries
Flint, MI
$60,000 – 12 mos.
Increasing food distribution
Catholic Charities of Shiawassee
and Genesee Counties
Flint, MI
$290,000 – 12 mos.
North End Soup Kitchen, warming center
and medical transportation
Community Foundation
of Greater Flint
Flint, MI
$520,000 – 12 mos.
Flint national service accelerator fund Mott’s grantmaking in 2017 included support for Double-Up Food Bucks, a program that helps area
residents like Jon Guice to put more fresh, healthy food on her family’s table.

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 27


PROGRAM OVERVIEW 2017

EXPLORATORY AND SPECIAL PROJECTS


SPECIAL PROJECTS Forum 2000 Foundation
PURPOSE: To support unusual Alliance of Religions and
Prague, Czech Republic
$25,000 – 12 mos.
or unique opportunities Conservation Vaclav Havel Circle
Bath, England
National Public Radio
addressing significant national $60,000 – 12 mos.
Washington, DC
Faith in finance convening
and international problems. $80,000 – 12 mos.
$200,000 – 24 mos.
News and information programs
Wildlife trade program
Proposals are by invitation Center for Michigan
Program Area Total: $440,000
Special Projects
only. Unsolicited proposals are Ann Arbor, MI
$75,000 – 12 mos. Program Total: $440,000
discouraged. General purposes Exploratory & Special Projects

EMPLOYEE AND TRUSTEE GRANTS


EMPLOYEE/TRUSTEE MATCHING GRANTS
In addition to its regular
Program Area Total: $2,070,384
grantmaking, the Foundation Employee/Trustee
Matching Grants
encourages charitable giving
TOTAL
by its trustees and staff. The TRUSTEE-INITIATED GRANTS
$3,578,384
Foundation’s match to these Program Area Total:
Trustee-Initiated
$1,508,000

contributions is included as part Program Total: $3,578,384


Employee/Trustee Matching
of our total grant budget. and Trustee-Initiated

in millions
m E mployee/Trustee Matching Grants $2.070
m T rustee-Initiated Grants $1.508

TOTAL MOTT GRANTMAKING IN 2017: $122,239,138

28 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
FINANCE

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 29


PROFILE: 2017 ASSETS

TOTAL FOUNDATION ASSETS ASSET ALLOCATION 12.31.17


Market Value vs. Inflation Adjusted in millions

$4500

$4000

$3500
$3,098,258,647
$3000 TOTAL
$2500
ASSETS
$3,098,258,647
$2000

$1500

$1000

$500 $4,431,186
$ 320,000
$0
in millions
1926 1936 1946 1956 1966 1976 1986 1996 2006 2017
m T otal Growth Assets $1,741.5 / 56.2%
Total Assets Total Assets in 2017 Dollars
m T otal Risk Reduction Assets $902.6 / 29.1%
m T otal Real Assets $434.1 / 14.0%
mO
 ther Assets $20.1 / 0.7%

2008–2017 SELECTED FINANCIAL INFORMATION in millions


2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Total Assets – Fair Value $1,929.9 $2,079.9 $2,227.4 $2,159.9 $2,301.1 $2,584.0 $2,794.6 $2,720.8 $2,788.2 $3,098.3

Total Assets – 2,263.1 2,374.4 2,505.3 2,359.4 2,470.7 2,733.4 2,934.0 2,835.8 2,847.0 3,098.3
2017 Dollars

12–Month Rolling 2,380.2 1,916.0 2,063.4 2,227.7 2,246.8 2,393.3 2,657.5 2,786.7 2,709.0 2,918.3
Average Assets

Total Investment (684.6) 289.3 275.5 62.8 252.7 401.4 313.9 81.8 209.4 454.4
Income (Loss)

Total Investment Income (802.8) 330.2 309.8 68.6 271.3 424.6 329.6 85.2 213.8 454.4
(Loss) 2017 Dollars

Total Grants Awarded 110.4 109.3 92.9 89.3 91.0 101.0 101.4 119.1 124.4 122.2

Total Expenditures* 100.6 134.2 127.9 130.0 110.9 137.1 95.9 154.7 143.6 150.6

NOTE: Private foundations are required to make qualifying distributions (grant payments and reasonable administrative expenses) equal to roughly 5 percent of
their average assets each year. The basis of the 5 percent calculation is a rolling, or 12-month, average of the foundation’s investment assets.
*Total expenditures include grant payments, foundation-administered projects, administrative expenses, excise and income taxes, and investment expenses.

30 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
PROFILE: 2017 GRANTMAKING
GRANTMAKING ACTIVITIES 2017

TOTAL TOTAL
Total Grants:
375 GRANTS $122,239,138
400

mC  ivil Society 93 Grants / 24.8% in millions


m E ducation 77 Grants / 20.5% mC  ivil Society $16.1 / 13.2% m Exploratory & Special
Projects $0.4 / 0.3%
m E nvironment 87 Grants / 23.2% m E ducation $23.4 / 19.2%
m E nvironment $20.5 / 16.8% m Employee/Trustee Matching
m F lint Area 113 Grants / 30.2% & Trustee-Initiated Grants
m E xploratory & Special Projects 5 Grants / 1.3% m F lint Area $58.2 / 47.6% $3.6 / 2.9%
Does not include Employee/Trustee Matching
& Trustee-Initiated Grants

2008–2017 GRANTS AWARDED BY PROGRAM in millions

$125
Employee/Trustee
Employee/Trustee
Matching
Matching

Exploratory
Exploratory
$100 Flint Area

Flint Area
Environment

Education
Environment
Civil Society
$75
Education

Civil Society

$50

$25

$0
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 31


STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION
Years Ended December 31,
ASSETS 2017 2016
Investments, at fair value:

Cash equivalents $ 69,309,790 $ 109,525,718

Public equities 487,677,676 414,665,494

Fixed income securities 263,042,953 151,948,970

Alternatives – limited partnerships 1,554,023,444 1,386,640,285

Alternatives – nonpartnerships 669,561,385 671,812,635

Investment deposits in transit 25,000,000 10,000,000

Investment trades receivable 9,566,136 33,689,822

3,078,181,384 2,778,282,924
Cash 9,608,750 3,876,163

Accrued interest and dividends 807,491 590,217

Land, building and improvements, net 3,066,346 3,252,224

Other assets 6,594,676 2,189,531


TOTAL ASSETS $ 3,098,258,647 $ 2,788,191,059

LIABILITIES AND UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS


Investment trades payable $ 1,241,333 $ 2,008,268

Grants payable 25,820,483 26,450,320

Accounts payable and other liabilities 43,428,186 38,584,333

Deferred excise tax 18,996,296 13,570,585


Total liabilities 89,486,298 80,613,506

Unrestricted net assets 3,008,772,349 2,707,577,553


TOTAL LIABILITIES AND UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS $ 3,098,258,647 $ 2,788,191,059

32 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES
Years Ended December 31,
2017 2016
Income:
Dividends and interest $ 18,133,830 $ 15,688,692
Limited partnership income (loss) 124,286,645 67,328,644
Net realized gain (loss) on investments 57,503,274 13,925,723
Net unrealized gain (loss) on investments 256,609,696 113,780,664
Other income (expense) (2,176,540) (1,372,465)
454,356,905 209,351,258
Investment expenses:
Direct investment expenses 7,308,039 7,110,659
Provision for taxes:
Current excise tax 1,427,192 1,302,442
Deferred excise tax expense (income) 5,425,711 1,559,027
Unrelated business income tax — 95,526
State income tax 350,000 94,930
14,510,942 10,162,584

Net investment income 439,845,963 199,188,674

Grants and operating expenses:


Grants, net of refunds 121,886,310 123,919,223
Foundation-administered projects 753,765 930,784
Administration expenses 17,983,632 17,878,902
140,623,707 142,728,909

Net operating income (loss) 299,222,256 56,459,765

Other changes in unrestricted net assets:


Pension changes other than net
periodic benefit cost 3,070,057 (3,199,338)
Post-retirement healthcare changes
other than net periodic benefit cost (1,097,517) (88,402)

Increase (decrease) in unrestricted net assets 301,194,796 53,172,025

Unrestricted net assets:


Beginning of year 2,707,577,553 2,654,405,528
End of year $ 3,008,772,349 $ 2,707,577,553

FINANCIAL STATEMENT NOTES


An audit of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation’s financial statements is conducted annually by an independent accounting firm. The
Statements of Financial Position and Statements of Activities (including changes in net assets) presented here were derived from the
Mott Foundation’s audited financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2017. The audit was performed by Grant Thornton, LLP.
The complete audited financial statements, along with Grant Thornton’s unqualified opinion, are available on the Foundation’s website:
www.mott.org.

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 33


TRUSTEES & STAFF

34 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
Board and Committees Officers and Staff Human Resources
BOARD OF TRUSTEES* EXECUTIVE OFFICE Julie M. Flynn
William S. White Human Resources Manager
Ridgway H. White
Chairman President and Chief Executive Officer Aria K. Sanders
Frederick S. Kirkpatrick+ Human Resources Administrator
Jennifer L. Liversedge
Vice Chairman Program Officer and Information Services
A. Marshall Acuff, Jr. Trustee Meeting Coordinator Gavin T. Clabaugh
Lizabeth Ardisana Lisa R. Maxwell Vice President – Information Services
Tiffany W. Lovett Administrative Assistant to the Michael L. Wright
Webb F. Martin President/CEO and Board of Trustees Information Services Manager
Olivia P. Maynard Glen A. Birdsall
John Morning# ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP
Librarian
Maryanne Mott Mary A. Gailbreath
Vice President – Administration, Ellen Chien
Charlie Nelms IT Support Analyst
Douglas X. Patiño Chief Financial Officer and
Secretary/Treasurer Joumana M. Klanseck
Jeremy R. M. Piper
Database Administrator
William H. Piper Administrative Services
George E. Ross Gregory S. Hopton Ryan C. Madar
Marise M.M. Stewart Accounting and Tax Manager Systems Engineer
Helen J. Taylor Collette R. Pries Asia B. McHaney
Ridgway H. White Senior Accountant Administrative Assistant
AUDIT COMMITTEE Brittany M. Knox COMMUNICATIONS
Webb F. Martin Accountant Kathryn A. Thomas
Chairman Debra L. Cormier Vice President – Communications
A. Marshall Acuff, Jr. Payroll Administrator Ann F. Richards
Frederick S. Kirkpatrick Annette M. Chamberlain Senior Communications Officer
Olivia P. Maynard Ona Kay Goza Jeffrey F. Alexander
Charlie Nelms Lynne M. Mortellaro Duane M. Elling
Jeremy R.M. Piper Administrative Assistants Jessica M. Jones
Kim R. McDonald Communications Officers
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
William S. White Office Assistant Macie D. Schriner
Chairman Debra E. Bullen Communications Officer – Online
Building Manager Strategies
Frederick S. Kirkpatrick
Webb F. Martin Billy M. Powell Cristina G. Wright
Maryanne Mott Building Operations Supervisor Web Administrator
William H. Piper Gilbert Medrano Craig Kelley Jr.
Ridgway H. White Building Operations Assistant Communications Assistant
Patrick J. Turowicz Jon’Tise S. Lewis
INVESTMENT COMMITTEE
HVAC/Facilities Technician Administrative Assistant
William S. White
Chairman Grants Administration INVESTMENTS
A. Marshall Acuff, Jr. Michael S. Birchmeier Jay C. Flaherty
John K. Butler Director – Grants Administration and Vice President – Investments and
Elizabeth T. Frank Assistant Secretary/Treasurer Chief Investment Officer
Frederick S. Kirkpatrick Cindy S. Compeau Kenneth C. Austin
Webb F. Martin Grants Manager Cheryl Garneau
William H. Piper Ashley R. Johnson Stephen W. Vessells
Alan H. Van Noord Senior Accountant Investment Managers
Ridgway H. White S. Renee Jackson Laura R. Bechard
*The Members of the corporation are Frederick Grants Accountant Investment Operations Manager
S. Kirkpatrick, Tiffany W. Lovett, Maryanne Alicia T. Aguilar
Mott, William H. Piper, Marise M.M. Stewart, Jean M. Bamberg
Ridgway H. White and William S. White. Administrative Assistant Assistant Investment Administrator
+
Serves as presiding/lead outside director. Jill A. Powell Laura D. Franco
#
Trustee Emeritus Office Assistant Kelly A. Swoszowski
Administrative Assistants

2017 ANNUAL REPORT 35


PROGRAMS Environment Education
Neal R. Hegarty Sam Passmore Benita D. Melton
Vice President – Programs Program Director Program Director
Crystal L. Bright Tim A. Eder Gwynn Hughes
Administrative Assistant Traci R. Romine Senior Program Officer
Sandra N. Smithey Angelina Garner
Civil Society Program Officers Program Officer
Shannon L. Lawder
Sandra J. Smith Arielle Milton
Program Director
Judy L. Wallace Kari M. Pardoe
J. Walter Viers Administrative Assistants Associate Program Officers
Senior Program Officer
Vera B. Dakova Flint Area
LOANED STAFF
Nicholas S. Deychakiwsky Kimberly S. Roberson
Karen B. Aldridge-Eason
Ross Maclaren Program Director
Foundation Liaison
Mamotshidisi P. Mohapi Jennifer M. Acree Office of the Governor,
Lorenzo M. Wakefield Joseph M. Martin State of Michigan
Program Officers Program Officers
Carlos Rios-Santiago Kaitlyn C. Adler CONTRACT EMPLOYEES/CONSULTANTS
Program Assistant Brian R. Larkin Linda W. Helstowski
Natalie LaCour Christopher J. Stallworth Environment program
Lydia Molapo Associate Program Officers
Michele H. Neumann Amy Hovey
Administrative Assistants Special Projects Coordinator
Christine L. Anderson
Delia Cappel
Administrative Assistants

Trustees and staff listings are current as of October 31, 2018.


For up-to-date listings, please visit our website at mott.org.

TRANSITIONS
With the enthusiastic approval of our trustees, Mott Foundation President Ridgway H. White was
appointed CEO in October 2018. With nearly a half-century of leadership at the Foundation,
William S. White continues to serve as chairman of our board of trustees.

We bid fond farewells to five long-time employees this past year. Fred Kump, who was interim director
of Grants Administration and assistant secretary/assistant treasurer for the Foundation, retired after
18 years of service in a variety of capacities. Rebecca Burns, hired in 1994 as an administrative
accountant, retired after 23 years of work in Mott’s Administrative Services division. Three
administrative assistants — Deborah K. Reid, Mary Beth Smith and Ruth M. Woodruff — also
retired. Collectively, these employees contributed almost 100 years of service to the
Foundation. They will be missed.

36 CH A R L E S S T E WA RT M OT T F O UNDAT I O N
PRODUCTION CREDITS
CHARLES STEWART MOTT FOUNDATION
Contributing writers: Jeff Alexander, Duane Elling, Jessica Martin Jones, Ann Richards
Editor: Kathryn Thomas
Project support: Greg Hopton, Renee Jackson, Craig Kelley Jr., Jon’Tise Lewis, Macie Schriner, Cristina Wright

GRAPHIC DESIGN & PRODUCTION


Olmsted Associates Inc., Flint, Michigan

PRODUCTION ASSISTANCE
Sheila Beachum Bilby

PRINTING
Riegle Press, Davison, Michigan

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503 S. SAGINAW ST., STE. 1200
FLINT, MI 48502-1851
WEBSITE: WWW.MOTT.ORG
EMAIL: INFO@MOTT.ORG
PHONE: +1.810.238.5651