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Issue #760 Harrisburg, PA Jan.

21, 2019

PA Environment Digest Blog​ ​Twitter Feed​ ​ Facebook Page

Gov. Wolf Nominates Patrick McDonnell For DEP, Cindy Adams Dunn For DCNR,
Russell Redding For Agriculture

On January 16, Gov. Tom Wolf


formally nominated Patrick
McDonnell for DEP Secretary,
Cindy Adams Dunn for DCNR
Secretary and Russell Redding
for Agriculture Secretary in his
second term.
Patrick McDonnell
McDonnell has lead
DEP since he was nominated as
Acting Secretary on May 20,
2016 and was later confirmed by the Senate. Prior to his appointment in 2016, McDonnell served
as Director of DEP’s Policy Office.
Prior to returning to DEP, Mr. McDonnell was executive policy manager for former
Commissioner Pamela A. Witmer of the Public Utility Commission, focusing on electric, natural
gas and water issues as well as cybersecurity and the impact of environmental regulation on
energy markets.
Previously, McDonnell spent 13 years with DEP in a variety of roles. As deputy secretary
for administration, he managed the budget, human resources, information technology and
oversaw the facilities management functions of the agency. He also previously served as policy
director and as an assistant to the special deputy secretary.
Cindy Adams Dunn
Dunn had lead DCNR since she was nominated as Acting Secretary in January 2015 and
was later confirmed by the Senate. She returned to the agency where she worked under three
governors in multiple positions over the last two decades.
Since November 2013, Dunn had served as the president and chief executive officer of
PennFuture, a statewide environmental advocacy organization.
Prior to her time at PennFuture, Dunn served as DCNR’s Deputy Secretary of

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Conservation and Technical Services from 2007-2013, where she led DCNR's conservation
landscape program and oversaw the community conservation partnerships grant program, which
provides $30-$60 million annually for conservation and recreation throughout the
Commonwealth.
Russell Redding
Redding has lead the Department of Agriculture since being named Acting Secretary in
January 2015 and was later confirmed by the Senate.
Redding is the former dean of the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences at
Delaware Valley College.
Redding has extensive experience as a public servant, having spent more than 20 years
serving Pennsylvania in Harrisburg and Washington D.C. He worked on Capitol Hill as Ag
Policy Advisor to U.S. Senator Harris Wofford and served for 16 years in the Pennsylvania
Department of Agriculture, serving as secretary from 2009-2011 under Governor Rendell.
The Senate must confirm these nominations.
Click Here​ for the complete list of nominations announced Wednesday.
Related Stories:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
Growing A Cleaner, Greener Pennsylvania In 2019; Opportunities for House And Senate
Leadership
[Posted: Jan. 16, 2019]

Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help
Meet PA Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5

On January 16, the ​PA Chesapeake Bay


Watershed Planning Steering Committee
heard updates from two of the counties
involved in the ​County Clean Water
Planning Pilot Project​ and their strategies
for reducing local water pollution.
The Committee also heard a presentation
from the Penn State Agriculture and
Environment Center on more Farm Survey
results.
Lancaster County Strategy
Allyson Gibson and the ​Lancaster Clean Water Partners​ gave a presentation on the status
of Lancaster County’s action strategy for meeting nutrient and sediment pollution reduction
targets.
As presented, the strategy will achieve about 80 percent of the needed nitrogen reductions
and exceed required phosphorus reductions. Lancaster County alone is responsible for 20
percent of the nutrient reductions needed to meet Pennsylvania’s Chesapeake Bay Watershed
cleanup obligations.
The strategy makes a series of recommendations in 6 areas-- Data Management,
Agriculture, Stormwater, Stream Buffers, Stream Restoration and Land Use and Preservation.

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Among the most significant recommendations are--
-- Find a way to end winter spreading of manure and identify, promote alternative practices in
priority locations
-- Build new manure storages and implement barnyard management in priority areas
-- Support state efforts to ensure all individuals have met baseline agriculture environmental
compliance, which requires drafting 2,400 new conservation plans for farms across the county
-- Outreach to private landowners to install 5,000 to 7,500 acres of new stream buffers (the
county does about 580 acres per year now), priorities are on agriculture lands and headwaters
streams
-- Accomplish 50 new stream restoration projects, including floodplain (legacy sediment),
wetland and in-stream restoration projects in priority watersheds
-- Work with developers to incorporate Best Management Practices into their projects like has
been done by ​Rock Lititz​ and in ​Lime Spring​. [See: ​Triple Benefits of Green Infrastructure​]
There are many more recommendations made in the strategy and outlined in the handouts
available to the Steering Committee​--
-- ​Lancaster Presentation Slides
-- ​Lancaster Narrative Highlights of Strategy
-- ​Lancaster - Overall Snapshot Of What Plan Would Accomplish
-- ​Lancaster Agricultural Template Showing Recommended Actions
-- ​Lancaster Buffers Template Showing Recommended Actions
-- ​Lancaster Stream Restoration Template Showing Recommended Actions
-- ​Lancaster Land Use & Preservation Template Showing Recommended Actions
-- ​Lancaster Stormwater Template Showing Recommended Actions
-- ​Lancaster Data Management Template Showing Recommended Actions
Click Here​ to read more about the inclusive process Lancaster Clean Water Partners used
to develop the plan.
York County
Felicia Dell, Pam Shellenberger and John Seitz from the ​York County Planning
Commission​ provided a similar presentation for the York County action plan. Among the
recommendations in the York County strategy developed in cooperation with the York County
Conservation District and a variety of local stakeholders are--
-- Form a countywide stormwater authority to develop a sustainable, efficient, responsible county
entity that can fund, administer, coordinate and achieve countywide water quality/flooding
efforts on behalf of all county stakeholders including the agricultural community, municipalities,
industrial and commercial entities and residents.
-- Change DEP’s stormwater permit program to allow for watershed-wide permits and allow the
installation of best management practices anywhere in the county.
-- A whole series of recommendations, like in the Lancaster strategy, on the installation of
stream buffers, increasing tree plantings, installing green infrastructure with new development.
The presenters pointed out how critical DEP and other technical help was in developing
their plan.
The recommendations also achieve about 80 percent of the necessary nitrogen reduction
goal. York County has already met the phosphorus reduction goal thanks to investments made
by wastewater treatment plants.
There are many other recommendations in the proposed plan. Available handouts--

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-- ​York Plan Narrative Highlights Of Plan
-- ​York - Overall Snapshot Of What Plan Would Accomplish
-- ​York Watershed Implementation Plan Template Showing Recommended Actions
-- ​York Detailed Best Management Practices Template Showing Recommended Actions
-- ​York State Programmatic Template Showing Recommended Actions
Farm Survey Results
Penn State Agriculture and Environment Center​ Director Matt Royer gave a presentation
on the results of their deeper dive into the ​2016 Farm Survey the Center​ undertook to help
identify additional conservation measures farmers adopted in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed
that were not previously counted.
The results from over 7,000 farms were reviewed again by the Center to determine trends
of adopting farm conservation measures based on size of farms, type of farms, funding
assistance, location in the watershed and other factors
The trends uncovered in the Center’s additional analysis will be presented to help guide
decisions about the best way to provide farmers with assistance to get more conservation
practices on the ground.
Click Here​ for a copy of the Farm Trends Presentation.
Next Meeting
The next meeting of the Steering Committee will be on February 20 when they will hear
from the other 2 counties in the Pilot Clean Water Planning Project-- Adams and Franklin.
The meeting will be in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building in Harrisburg from 1:00
to 3:30. ​Click Here​ to register to attend the meeting by webinar. Participants will also need to
call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE: 640 189 982.
For more information, visit the ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering
Committee​ webpage.
​Governor's Budget Address
Gov. Wolf presents his 2019-20 budget request to the General Assembly on February 5.
No word yet on whether there will be any proposals to address the obvious need to help farmers
and local governments meet their water pollution reduction obligations across the state.
Governors in ​Maryland​,​ ​New York​ and​ ​Virginia​, upstream and downstream of
Pennsylvania in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, have already laid out extensive plans in their
states for funding local water pollution reduction projects and to help farmers reduce pollution
from agricultural runoff.
At the beginning of the LAST legislative session-- January 24, 2017-- a bipartisan group
of Pennsylvania House and Senate members on the Chesapeake Bay Commission ​wrote to all
members of the General Assembly​ pointing out the obvious need for new, dedicated funding to
address the water pollution cleanup problems across the state, but no action to fund the initiative
was ever taken.
The need for funding local green infrastructure projects with multiple benefits that help
reduce pollution AND stormwater flooding across the state has only grown as a result of the
local flooding from significant storms.
As the widespread “small stream” flooding from storms this past summer has made very
clear, the frequency and severity of heavy precipitation events is increasing. A ​Center for Rural
Pennsylvania study in 2017​ found these heavy events (5-Year, 2-Day events) have increased in
frequency and duration by 71 percent between 1958 and 2013.

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The burden for dealing with these issues has squarely fallen entirely on local
governments who have no choice but to adopt local stormwater fees on property owners to fund
local solutions, and that’s exactly what they are doing.
Those in control of the General Assembly have failed to provide the financial support to
farmers and communities needed to deal with these issues, as well as pollution from abandoned
mine drainage. We’ll see if this year is different.
(Written by David Hess, Former Secretary of DEP. Send comments to:
PaEnviroDigest@gmail.com.​ )
NewsClips:
WITF Smart Talk: Chesapeake Bay Report Card, CBF’s Harry Campbell, Wil Baker
Venesky: Local Impacts Contribute To Increased Pollution In Chesapeake Bay
Editorial: Climate Change Complicates Efforts To Protect Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Wyoming Valley Authority Sets Jan. 31 Public Meeting On Stormwater Fee
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
Bay Journal: Federal Farm Bill Increases Funding To Control Ag Runoff In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
NewsClips - Chesapeake Bay - Other States
Maryland Governor Proposes Major Investments For Environment, Chesapeake Bay
Maryland Gov. Hogan Proposes Major Funding To Restore Chesapeake Bay, Environment
NY Governor Goes Big On Water, Proposes Doubling Of Clean Water Investments
New York Governor Unveils Funding Initiative To Help Farmers Protect Water Quality
Virginia’s Governor Proposes Major Investments To Protect Water Quality, Accelerate
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Presented With Most Detailed
Recommendations Yet
Growing A Cleaner, Greener Pennsylvania In 2019; Opportunities for House And Senate
Leadership
Related Stories This Week:
DEP Awards 7 Growing Greener Grants Totaling $224,717 For Stream Restoration Projects In
Allegheny, Cambria, Northampton, Tioga, Union Counties This Week
Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For Water
Infrastructure Projects Workshops Feb. 20, 21
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware

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Watersheds
PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
[Posted: Jan. 16, 2019]

Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College

The ​PA Environmental Council​, ​PA


Organization For Watersheds and Rivers​ and
other partners are now accepting registrations
for the statewide ​Watershed Connections -
Leveraging Our Power For Watershed Health-
Conference​ on February 24-25 in State College.
The Conference will be a significant
education, training and networking opportunity
for anyone involved in watershed groups,
restoration, water quality monitoring, building
organizational capacity and more.
The program will feature national, state and local presenters, exhibits, one-on-one
mentorship opportunities and engaging keynote and guest speakers.
PEC held workshops​ in each of DEP’s six Regional Office areas over the last year to, in
part, help develop the agenda for the Conference.
Sponsorship​ opportunities are also available. ​Click Here​ for more information.
Check the ​Watershed Connections Conference​ webpage for updates and information
about final program. Questions should be directed to Susan Myerov by sending email to:
smyerov@pecpa.org​ or call 267-479-6102.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ and ​PA Organization For Watersheds and Rivers​ websites, visit the ​PEC
Blog​, follow ​PEC on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest
podcasts. ​Click Here​ to receive regular updates from PEC.
Related Stories:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
DEP Awards 7 Growing Greener Grants Totaling $224,717 For Stream Restoration Projects In
Allegheny, Cambria, Northampton, Tioga, Union Counties This Week
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For Water
Infrastructure Projects Workshops Feb. 20, 21
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
NewsClips:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitment; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5

6
WITF Smart Talk: Chesapeake Bay Report Card, CBF’s Harry Campbell, Wil Baker
Bay Journal: Federal Farm Bill Increases Funding To Control Ag Runoff In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Venesky: Local Impacts Contribute To Increased Pollution In Chesapeake Bay
Editorial: Climate Change Complicates Efforts To Protect Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Sen. Scarnati Announces Tioga County Growing Greener Grant
DEP Funds Lewisburg School’s Wetland Project
Growing Greener Grant Continues Support Of Villanova’s Campus Stormwater Efforts
Which Streams In The Delaware Watershed Are Too Dirty For Swimming, Fishing?
How Federal Clean Water Act Fixed The Delaware River’s Pollution Problem
Reviving The River: The Delaware River’s Invisible Threats
Kummer: $7.9M Mussel Hatchery At Bartram’s Garden Will Help Water Quality In Delaware
River
Delaware RiverKeeper Jan. 18 RiverWatch Video Report
Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Wyoming Valley Authority Sets Jan. 31 Public Meeting On Stormwater Fee
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley Authority Extends Stormwater Fee Payment Deadline, Appeal Charge Waived
Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority Contesting Stormwater Fee
Luzerne County Flood Authority Questions Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Roils Harveys Lake Residents
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
DEP Grant Funding Announced For Cambria Conservation District
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

Clarion River Named 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year

A Wild and Scenic River that draws legions of


anglers, paddlers and other outdoors enthusiasts
throughout the seasons, the Clarion River in
northwestern Pennsylvania has been voted the
state’s ​2019 River of the Year​.
The public was invited to vote online, choosing
from among four waterways nominated across the

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state. Results were announced jointly today by the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources and the ​PA Organization for Waterways and Rivers​.
Other waterways nominated were: Conodoguinet Creek, Delaware River and
Lackawanna River.
“Congratulations to the supporting groups who rallied around a waterway most deserving
of River of the Year honors,” said DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn. “Beyond its Wild and
Scenic River status, this icon of our Pennsylvania Wilds defines a wilderness of clean water and
healthy forests that draws back visitors again and again.
“This annual honor recognizes not only our state’s wealth of rivers and streams, but also
the core of dedicated folks who fight to protect them.”
A total of 14,790 votes were cast, with the Clarion receiving 5,850; Delaware River,
4,748; Lackawanna River, 2,852; and Conodoguinet Creek, 1,340.
DCNR and POWR will work with the Allegheny Watershed Improvement Needs
(WINS) Coalition to create a free, commemorative poster celebrating the Clarion River as the
2019 PA River of the Year.
The Clarion River will also be ​recognized by the U.S. Postal Service during 2019​ on a
Forever Stamp.
As acting fiscal agent for the WINs Coalition, the ​Western PA Conservancy,​ will receive
a $10,000 Leadership Grant to help fund a slate of year-long River of the Year activities.
The WINS Coalition is a collaborative network of 35 organizations, including members
from non-profits and local watershed groups, as well as county, state, and federal agencies, all of
whom will plan and coordinate the celebration events to be held throughout the year.
The WINS Coalition was formed in 2007 with the goals of protecting, restoring, and
improving habitat in watersheds throughout the ​Allegheny National Forest​.
“Having just observed the 2018 50th Anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act by
hailing the conservation of nearly 52 miles of the Clarion River protected under that designation,
we are elated to continue to honor the Clarion as the 2019 Pennsylvania River of the Year to
celebrate its remarkable recovery and pay tribute to it as a treasured resource of the state,” said
Kylie Maland of the Allegheny Watershed Improvement Needs (WINs) Coalition.
In cooperation with DCNR, selection of public voting choices was overseen by the PA
Organization for Watersheds and Rivers, an affiliate of the ​PA Environmental Council​.
“POWR is excited to partner once again with DCNR on River of the Year Program,”
POWR Executive Director Janet Sweeney said. “The River of the Year program is a great way
for us to highlight the opportunities and challenges facing the state’s waterways. As part of the
larger river sojourn program, the River of the Year honor helps connect thousands of
Pennsylvanians to the water, as well as highlights the great work being done in Pennsylvania
communities on these valuable resources.”
POWR administers the River of the Year program with funding from DCNR. Presented
annually since 1983, the 2018 River of the Year designation was awarded to Loyalsock Creek in
Northcentral Pennsylvania.
A commemorative River of the Year sojourn is among many paddling trips supported by
DCNR and POWR each year. An independent program, the ​Pennsylvania Sojourn Program​, is a
unique series of a dozen such trips on the state’s rivers.
These water-based journeys for canoeists, kayakers and others raise awareness of the
environmental, recreational, tourism and heritage values of rivers. For more information about

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the sojourn program, visit the POWR ​Pennsylvania Sojourn Program​ webpage..
Visit the ​PA River of the Year Program ​webpage for more information on the program.
To learn more about DCNR’s Rivers Program, visit ​DCNR’s Rivers Conservation
webpage.
NewsClips:
Clarion River Waterway Goes From Most Polluted To River Of The Year
Clarion River Named PA 2019 River Of The Year
Clarion River Named 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year
Clarion Named PA’s River Of The Year By Public Vote
2 Pennsylvanians Receive International Emerging Trail Leaders Recognition By American Trails
Related Stories:
U.S. Postal Service 2019 Forever Stamp Series Features PA’s Clarion River
Related Stories This Week:
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Hear About State Parks, Forests
Infrastructure Needs Report Jan. 23
2 Pennsylvanians Receive International Emerging Trail Leaders Recognition By American Trails
PA Organization For Watersheds & Rivers Now Accepting Applications For Sojourn Grants
DCNR To Acquire 987-Acre Parcel To Expand White Clay Creek Preserve In Chester County
Brandywine Conservancy To Hold Public Meetings On Chester County Greenway Water Trail
Project On Feb. 5, 12
[Posted: Jan. 16, 2019]

DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Hear About State Parks,
Forests Infrastructure Needs Report Jan. 23

The ​DCNR Conservation and Natural Resources Advisory


Council​ is scheduled to meet on January 23 and on the agenda
is a State Parks and Forests infrastructure needs report by
Marci Mowery from the ​PA Parks and Forests Foundation​.
Last May, the PA Parks and Forest Foundation published a
preview​ of its forthcoming report on State Park and Forest
infrastructure needs entitled The Legacy of Pennsylvania’s
State Parks and Forests: The Future Is In Our Hands.
The preview said the report identifies more than $1 billion
in state park and forest infrastructure needs, which range from
bridges to wastewater treatment facilities, from dams to
invasive plant removal, and from roads to trails.
Click Here​ for the latest status of the report.
Also on the agenda​ is ​Tim Schaeffer, the new Executive
Director​ of the Fish and Boat Commission as well as regular
reports from DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn and
Council Work Groups.
The meeting will be held in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building in Harrisburg
starting at 10:00.
For more information and available handouts, visit the ​DCNR Conservation and Natural

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Resources Council​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Gretchen Leslie, 717-772-9084 or
send email to: ​gleslie@pa.gov​.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
Related Stories:
Clarion River Named 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year
2 Pennsylvanians Receive International Emerging Trail Leaders Recognition By American Trails
PA Organization For Watersheds & Rivers Now Accepting Applications For Sojourn Grants
DCNR To Acquire 987-Acre Parcel To Expand White Clay Creek Preserve In Chester County
Brandywine Conservancy To Hold Public Meetings On Chester County Greenway Water Trail
Project On Feb. 5, 12
[Posted: Jan. 14, 2019]

2 Pennsylvanians Receive International Emerging Trail Leaders Recognition By American


Trails

American Trails​ has named 2


Pennsylvanians-- Alyssa Wentz from
DCNR and Mark Rooney from
Downtown Inc. In York--
international ​Emerging Trail Leaders​.
Alyssa Wentz is a GIS
specialist for the Department of
Conservation and Natural Resources
and lives in Mechanicsburg and Mark
Rooney is a project administrator for
Downtown Inc in York​ who lives in Red Lion.
They will attend the ​2019 International Trails Symposium and Training Institute​ as part
of the Hulet Hornbeck Emerging Trail Leaders Scholarship Program which brings together 16
young adults from across the United States, Canada and Panama at the Symposium.
Click Here​ to see the other individuals named.
Though the scholarship application period for 2019 is closed, interested young adults are
encouraged to apply in 2020. ​Click Here​ to learn more about the scholarship program
(​Photo:​ Alyssa Wentz, Mark Rooney.)
Related Story:
Call For Proposals: PA Greenways & Trails Summit Sept. 22-24 At Shippensburg University
Related Stories This Week:
Clarion River Named 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Hear About State Parks, Forests
Infrastructure Needs Report Jan. 23
PA Organization For Watersheds & Rivers Now Accepting Applications For Sojourn Grants
DCNR To Acquire 987-Acre Parcel To Expand White Clay Creek Preserve In Chester County
Brandywine Conservancy To Hold Public Meetings On Chester County Greenway Water Trail

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Project On Feb. 5, 12
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Post-Gazette: PUC Rejects Emergency Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines; Full
Case Will Move Forward

On January 17, ​Laura Legere reported in the


Pittsburgh Post-Gazette​ the Public Utility
Commission voted unanimously to uphold an
administrative law ​judge’s decision not to grant​ a
request for an emergency shutdown order for the
Mariner East Pipelines made by Chester and
Delaware County residents.
The underlying case against the Mariner
East Pipelines will now move forward to
examine the compliance record, safety and siting issues raised by the residents. The case also
involves the fact Mariner East 2 Pipeline is now operating with a “workaround” pipeline.
The complaint originating this case was filed on November 19, 2018. There are several
other cases pending against the Mariner East Pipelines, including a complaint filed by Sen. Andy
Dinniman (D-Chester).
Click Here​ for the order denying the shutdown request. ​Click Here​ to review all
documents file in this case: Docket Number C-2018-3006116.
Click Here​ for the complete story.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: PUC Rejects Emergency Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines,
Full Case Will Move Forward
Legere: PUC Rejects Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines, Underlying Case Moves
Forward
Mariner East 2 Pipeline Worker’s Obscene Comments Draw Ire Of Chester County DA
Op-Ed: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Will Energize PA Economy
Litvak: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To Stabilized Beaver County
Pipeline Explosion Site
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To
Stabilized Beaver County Pipeline Explosion Site
PMA: PA Needs Pipeline Infrastructure To Boost Manufacturing Investments
New Pipeline To Feed Natural Gas To Shell Plant
Shell Gets Approval of Ambridge Water Authority For Ethane Pipeline
DEP Invites Comments On Federal Coastal Zone Consistency Determination For The Adelphia
Pipeline Gateway Project In Delaware County
FERC: West Rockhill Site Optimal For Pipeline Compressor Station In Bucks County
Editorial: Gas Pipelines Take Another Hit In Maryland Ruling
Related Stories:
PUC Judge Denies Petition For Emergency Order To Shutdown Interim Plan To Ship Natural
Gas Liquids Through Mariner East Pipelines
PUC Enforcement Bureau Proposes $225,000 Penalty For 2017 Ethane/Propane Leak From

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Mariner East 1 Pipeline In Berks County
Related Stories This Week:
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To Stabilize
Beaver County Pipeline Explosion Site
DEP Re-Publishes Notice Of Final Water Quality Certification For National Fuel Gas Line N To
Monaca Pipeline, Beaver, Washington Counties
DEP Invites Comments On Federal Coastal Zone Consistency Determination For The Adelphia
Pipeline Gateway Project In Delaware County
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Post-Gazette: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To Stabilize
Beaver County Pipeline Explosion Site

On January 18, ​Anya Litvak of the Pittsburgh


Post-Gazette reported​ Energy Transfer LP, the owner
of the company that built and operates the new
Revolution natural gas pipeline that exploded in
Beaver County in September, is not complying with an
order to stabilize the site of the explosion.
The company blames the explosion on a landslide in
the area, but so far the company has not been able to
show DEP the site is stable enough to run heavy
machinery on.
In October, DEP inspections​ along the length of the
pipeline running through Allegheny, Beaver, Butler and Washington counties in Pennsylvania
found unreported landslides, soil flowing into streams and acid mine drainage where the pipeline
cut through old reclaimed surface mines on the right-of-way.
On January 10, DEP wrote a letter to Energy Transfer LP saying, according to the
Post-Gazette, the company has failed to stabilize the right-of-way and still has not submit
acceptable plans for temporary and long-term step it plans to take to prevent damage to the
pipeline.
The company did not comment for the article.
Click Here​ to read the complete article.
A landslide was blamed as the cause of another explosion of a ​newly constructed
TransCanada natural gas pipeline​ in West Virginia in July.
NewsClips:
Litvak: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To Stabilized Beaver County
Pipeline Explosion Site
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To
Stabilized Beaver County Pipeline Explosion Site
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: PUC Rejects Emergency Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines,
Full Case Will Move Forward
Legere: PUC Rejects Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines, Underlying Case Moves
Forward
Mariner East 2 Pipeline Worker’s Obscene Comments Draw Ire Of Chester County DA

12
Op-Ed: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Will Energize PA Economy
PMA: PA Needs Pipeline Infrastructure To Boost Manufacturing Investments
New Pipeline To Feed Natural Gas To Shell Plant
Shell Gets Approval of Ambridge Water Authority For Ethane Pipeline
DEP Invites Comments On Federal Coastal Zone Consistency Determination For The Adelphia
Pipeline Gateway Project In Delaware County
FERC: West Rockhill Site Optimal For Pipeline Compressor Station In Bucks County
Editorial: Gas Pipelines Take Another Hit In Maryland Ruling
Related Story:
PUC Pipeline Safety Division Working To Investigate Beaver County Pipeline Explosion
Related Stories This Week:
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: PUC Rejects Emergency Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines;
Full Case Will Move Forward
DEP Re-Publishes Notice Of Final Water Quality Certification For National Fuel Gas Line N To
Monaca Pipeline, Beaver, Washington Counties
DEP Invites Comments On Federal Coastal Zone Consistency Determination For The Adelphia
Pipeline Gateway Project In Delaware County
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Registration Now Open For Keep PA Beautiful's 15th Annual Great American Cleanup Of
PA; Video Contest

On January 17, ​Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful


announced registration for the ​2019 Great
American Cleanup of PA​ is now open.
Cleanups for this annual event begin on March
1st and ends on May 31st. During this period,
registered events can get free trash bags, gloves,
and safety vests donated by PennDOT, the
Department of Environmental Protection, and
Keep America Beautiful, as supplies last.
Events can include litter cleanups, illegal dump
cleanups, beautification projects, special
collections, and education events and must be registered through the ​Great American Cleanup of
PA​ website to receive free cleanup supplies.
As part of this event, the Department of Environmental Protection and Pennsylvania
Waste Industries Association are sponsoring Let’s Pick It Up PA – Everyday from April 13
through May 6. During this time, trash collected at registered events can be taken to participating
landfills free or for a reduced cost with prior approval.
During the 2018 Great American Cleanup ​108,638 volunteers were instrumental in
cleaning up over 6.6 million pounds of trash​ during 5,362 events held across the state.
Groups, individuals and local governments anticipate the annual initiative as a way to
rally volunteers, reduce cleanup costs and be connected to a larger movement.
Video Contest
Anyone participating in Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful’s Great American Cleanup of PA

13
can earn cash for their nonprofit or charity of choice by entering the ​Great American Cleanup
Video Contest​.
To participate, send Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful a 60-second video of your Great
American Cleanup of PA event showing how you keep Pennsylvania beautiful.
Click Here​ to watch last year’s winners.
“We are so grateful to our volunteers and sponsors who help make the Great American
Cleanup of PA, Pennsylvania’s premier community improvement initiative possible,” said
Shannon Reiter, President of Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. “Many communities depend on
volunteers to clean up litter. This initiative provides the tools and resources our residents need to
keep our communities clean and beautiful. This year we hope to inspire even more
Pennsylvania’s to come out between March and May to participate in the Great American
Cleanup of PA.”
Current 2019 supporters include: ​PA Waste Industries Association​, ​Columbia Gas of PA​,
PA Food Merchants Association​, ​Mahantango,​ ​Lancaster County Solid Waste Management
Authority​ and ​Republic Services​.
If you are interested in becoming a supporter of the 2019 Great American Cleanup of PA
contact Shannon Reiter at 724-836-4121 or ​sreiter@keeppabeautiful.org​.
To host an event or join a cleanup event near you visit the ​Great American Cleanup of
PA​ website. Questions can be answered by Michelle Dunn, Great American Cleanup of PA
Program Coordinator, at 1-877-772-3673 ext. 113 or send email to:
mdunn@keeppabeautiful.org​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
NewsClips:
Keep PA Beautiful Accepting Registrations For 2019 Great American Cleanup Of PA
Illegal Dumping A Growing Frustration In York County
Philly Street Cleaning Pilot Will Blow Trash Into Street To Bypass Parking Issues
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Better Path Coalition Hosts Environmental Rights Amendment Events Jan. 27, 28 In
Harrisburg

The ​Better Path Coalition​ will host a program on


Pennsylvania’s Environmental Rights Amendment
January 27 at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Cathedral,
221 N. Front Street in Harrisburg starting at 2:30.
Opportunity and Obligation: Article 1,
Section 21, Pennsylvania’s Green Amendment will
feature a panel discussion on the amendment and
its importance.
The Amendment says, “The people have a

14
right to clean air, pure water, and to the preservation of the natural, scenic, historic and esthetic
values of the environment. Pennsylvania’s public natural resources are the common property of
all the people, including generations yet to come. As trustee of these resources, the
Commonwealth shall conserve and maintain them for the benefit of all the people.”
The panel speakers are--
-- Franklin Kury,​ former PA State Senator, Representative and author of Article 1, Section 27
-- Maya van Rossum​, the Delaware Riverkeeper and author of the book, The Green Amendment
-- Jordan Yeager,​ partner at Curtin & Heefner whose legal arguments concerning Article I,
Section 27 resulted in the landmark Act 13 (Robinson Township, Delaware Riverkeeper
Network et. al v Commonwealth) ruling that breathed life into the amendment
-- Anthony Ingraffea,​ Dwight C. Baum Professor Emeritus, Cornell University who will discuss
shale gas development’s role in climate change and environmental devastation in Pennsylvania
-- Pouné Saberi​, President of the Board of Directors of Physicians for Social Responsibility,
Philadelphia
-- Ashton Clatterbuck​, Sunrise Movement organizer and member of Lancaster Against
Pipelines
-- Karen Feridun​, Better Path Coalition
At 4:30, attendees will be invited to walk from St. Stephen’s to the Capitol steps for a
candlelight vigil.
On January 28, there will be a Team Lorax Rally and Petition Delivery events starting at
11:30 in the Capitol Rotunda.
Children dressed as the Lorax will deliver the petition and copies of the Seuss classic to
Gov. Wolf and legislators. Freshman legislators will also receive a copy of the award-winning
book, The Green Amendment, so they can fully understand their obligation to protect our
environmental rights.
The petition calls on our elected officials to uphold Pennsylvania’s Green Amendment by
taking strong action on climate change and to prevent pollution and environmental devastation
occurring in the state.
Questions about these events should be directed to Karen Feridun, Better Path Coalition,
610-678-7726, ​betterpathpa@gmail.com​.
For more information on this initiative, visit the ​Better Path Coalition​ website.
Resource Link:
Dr. Seuss: The Lorax Project
Seussville: The Lorax Project In The Classroom
Seussville: How To Host A Lorax Project Student Earth Day Event
Related Stories:
StateImpact Video: The Story Of Environmental Rights In Pennsylvania
Op-Ed: Taking The Public Trust Seriously: The PA Supreme Court’s Landmark Decision In
PEDF v. Commonwealth
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

PA Conservation Heritage: New Penn's Woods Cradle Of Conservation Documentary Now


Online

The ​PA Conservation Heritage Project's​ newest

15
documentary-- ​Penn's Woods: Cradle Of Conservation-​- premiered on WITF-TV on January
17. Now the ​documentary is available online.
The hour-long program weaves together the state's rich environmental history,
highlighting accomplishments and challenges along the way.
When King Charles II granted William Penn his North American colony in 1681 Penn's
Woods was lush with trees.
According to Mark Madison, Historian for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, "The forest
canopy was so dense it's been said that a squirrel could travel across Pennsylvania branch to
branch without ever touching the ground."
But by 1900, the state had lost more than 60 percent of its forests. Dr. Joseph Rothrock,
the father of Pennsylvania Forestry, called the vast wasteland the "Pennsylvania Desert."
During the height of the Industrial Revolution coal, iron and steel production voraciously
gobbled up resources. Along with economic booms and revolutions in natural resource
extraction, came an environmental price.
Pennsylvania found itself poised to become a pioneer in environmental protection.
Professor of History & Environmental Studies at Penn State Altoona Dr. Brian Black teaches his
students about this legacy.
"We have used the natural resources with all different kinds of ethics. And just like we
have can say that we're the cradle of industrialization in the United States,” Dr. Black said. “We
can also say that we're the cradle of the conservation movement."
Pennsylvanians set about restoring the state's environmental riches and in the process
helped shape the national conservation and environmental movements of the twentieth century.
"We had great conservationists totally transform how we look at the environment and
how we protect it. Gifford Pinchot basically saved the nation's forests. Rachel Carson woke up
the whole world to the dangers of toxins and pesticides. Anybody can make a difference,"
reflects Mark Madison.
Today Pennsylvania's ecosystem is in the midst of transformation. As we grapple with
the environmental impact of the Marcellus Shale gas industry and come to grips with the
growing challenges of global warming, there are lessons to be learned from the past.
According to ​Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation​ President Marci Mowery,
"Pennsylvania's conservation heritage is important. It defines who we are and defines the places
where we grew up. It defines the places where we recreate. We can't be informed citizens if we
don't understand and know our history and we can't keep an eye out for any red flags that might
be arising because we're going down a similar path."
Click Here​ to watch this new documentary online. ​Click Here​ to watch documentaries in
this series.
Explore more information, watch this and other other documentaries in the Pennsylvania
Conservation Heritage series and more online at the ​PA Conservation Heritage Project​ website.

(​Reprinted largely from the WITF-TV website​. Written by Heather Woolridge.)


[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

PUC Urges Residents To Prepare Now As Winter Storm Harper Approaches; Offers
Safety Tips; Gov. Wolf Declares Emergency

16
On January 18, Public Utility Commission offered tips to residents as Winter Storm Harper
approaches the Commonwealth as part of its ongoing Prepare Now utility awareness campaign.
Gov. Wolf also declared an emergency​ ahead of the storm and impost road and speed
restrictions on major highways.
“The combination of snow, ice, high winds and bitter cold temperatures has the potential
to disrupt utility service,” said PUC Chairman Gladys M. Brown. “Time spent on planning and
preparing before a storm can go a long way toward keeping yourself and your family safe when
severe weather hits.”
The Commission also highlighted a ​short video highlighting storm outage heating safety
tips​, available on the PUC YouTube channel.
During storm emergencies, the PUC continuously monitors utility issues and works
closely with the Governor’s Office and the other state agencies involved in Pennsylvania’s
coordinated storm response.
Across the state, there is extensive behind-the-scenes work when storms are forecast,
focused on quickly addressing problems and restoring service as rapidly as possible. Utilities are
putting their severe weather plans into motion; crews and equipment are being positioned for
quick response to outages; and communication with emergency management coordinators is
enhanced.
The Commission also encourages residents to monitor storm forecasts and official
information as this storm approaches, and to take steps to safeguard themselves and their
families before, during and after any severe weather.
Pre-Storm tips:
-- Write down, print or save toll-free outage hotlines for your ​electric utility​ and/or your ​natural
gas utility​, which are listed on your monthly bills and posted on the PUC website.
-- Save the website address for your utility’s outage reporting system, which can provide updates
on repair and restoration efforts. Those ​electric utility outage sites​ and ​natural gas company
websites are available on the PUC website.
-- Keep cell phones charged, so you can contact your utility, other emergency services and
family members during any power outage.
-- Secure necessary food, medicine and other supplies, including batteries for flashlights.
Should you lose power during a storm, consider the following:
-- Call your ​utility hotline to report outages​ - Do not assume that the utility already knows about
your outage or that others have already called.
-- Stay away from objects or puddles in contact with downed power lines.
-- Do NOT touch or approach any fallen lines.
-- Do NOT try to remove trees or limbs from power lines.
-- Do NOT call 9-1-1 to report power outages. Those calls take dispatchers away from other
emergencies and can also slow a storm response because you're not talking directly to the utility.
-- SPECIAL NOTE: If you have a downed power line or another hazardous situation, call 9-1-1
and then contact your utility.
Tips to help stay safe until power is restored:
-- Use flashlights or battery-operated lanterns for emergency lighting. Do not use candles or
other potential fire hazards.
-- If you use a generator, do NOT run it inside a home or garage. Also, connect the equipment
you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator, not your home's electrical system,

17
which could shock or injure utility crews working on nearby power lines. ​Additional generator
tips are available here​.
-- Turn off lights and electrical appliances (except for the refrigerator and freezer). When power
comes back on, it may come back with momentary "surges" or "spikes" that can damage
equipment.
-- After you turn the lights off, turn one lamp on so you will know when power is restored. Wait
at least 15 minutes after power is restored before turning on other appliances.
-- Check on elderly neighbors and those with special needs who might need additional
assistance.
Consumers using natural gas appliances can also be impacted by storms:
-- Electric power outages can affect gas furnaces and other appliances. If they do not function
properly when power is restored, call a professional for service.
-- If you smell natural gas, get everyone out of the building immediately.
-- Leave the door open and do NOT use phones, switch lights or turn appliances on or off, or
take any other action while inside the building.
-- After you are safely outside, call 9-1-1 from your cell phone or neighbor’s home.
In addition to storm safety, the ​PUC’s Prepare Now​ campaign focuses on educating
consumers about the availability of low-income programs; increasing consumer awareness of
ways to reduce winter heating costs; educating consumers on energy conservation; encouraging
consumers to check electric and natural gas bills and supplier contracts; and informing customers
about ​PAPowerSwitch.com​ and ​PAGasSwitch.com​ as resources to shop for energy suppliers and
learn more about efficiency and conservation measures.
NewsClip:
Gov. Wolf Declares Emergency Ahead Of Winter Storm, Road Restrictions Set
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule

This section includes a lot of the nitty-gritty legislative stuff you need to keep track of
environmental legislation and legislative schedules.

Committee Meetings This Week

House:​ ​House Democratic Policy Committee​ hearing on childhood blood lead test act in
Philadelphia. <> ​Click Here​ for full House Committee Schedule.

Senate:​ <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Committee Schedule.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

House and Senate Co-Sponsorship Memos

18
House: ​Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos
Senate: ​Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
January 28, 29, 30
February 4, 5, 6
Budget Hearings: Feb. 19, 20, 21, 25, 26, 27, 28, March 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
March 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

House
January 28, 29, 30
February 4, 5, 6, 19, 20, 21
Budget Hearings: Feb. 11 March 7
March 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

Sen. Richard Alloway Announces Retirement From The Senate, Active On Chesapeake
Bay Issues

On January 18, Sen. Richard Alloway (R-Adams) announced he


would be retiring from the Senate effective February 28 after serving
for 10 years.
Sen. Alloway was a member of Senate Republican leadership as
Caucus Secretary responsible for overseeing and reviewing all
nominations by the Governor.
He was also one of Pennsylvania's 6 representatives on the interstate
Chesapeake Bay Commission​ and last session ​sponsored Senate Bill
792​ that would have regulated the application of fertilizer by
19
homeowners and others. The bill passed the Senate last year, but got hung up in the House.
As a member of the Chesapeake Bay Commission, Sen. Alloway joined his Pennsylvania
colleagues in ​writing to all members of the Senate and House in January 2017​ outlining the need
to address the state’s statewide water pollution cleanup problems and the need for new, dedicated
funding to address it.
He was also ​active in community tree planting efforts​ in his district participating in the
Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay’s Trees For Tomorrow Program.
“It has been an honor and a privilege to hold this position and to be the voice for local
communities in Harrisburg for the past decade in the Senate,” said Sen. Alloway. “I am
extremely grateful for the trust that has been placed in me by community residents, and from the
bottom of my heart, I thank all of my constituents for giving me that amazing opportunity and for
helping me to be a better elected official.
“I treasure the personal relationships that I have forged over the years with various
citizens and with my colleagues in the Capitol. Every single one holds a special place in my
heart.
“However, our forefathers never envisioned public service as a lifetime vocation,” said
Sen. Alloway. “After a decade of fighting to ensure our interests are represented in the General
Assembly, the time has come for me to move on to other endeavors and pursue new
opportunities. I wish all of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle nothing but the best.”
Sen. Alloway ​told the Associated Press​ he would be exploring going into private practice
as a lawyer or a lobbyist.
NewsClips:
Thompson: Sen. Alloway Plans To Resign From Senate
Meyer: Sen. Alloway Announces Resignation, Kicks Off Another Special Election
AP: Sen. Alloway To Leave Seat In Middle Of Term
Editorial: Rep. Metcalfe Will Do Damage As Environmental Committee Chair
[Posted: Jan. 19, 2019]

Rep. Mehaffie Named One Of 4 Co-Chairs Of PA Nuclear Energy Caucus

On January 18, Rep. Tom Mehaffie (R-Dauphin) announced he has


been invited to serve as co-chair of Pennsylvania’s Nuclear Energy
Caucus.
The Nuclear Energy Caucus is a bipartisan, bicameral group which
researches and holds discussions relating to nuclear energy’s
economic and environmental value, as well as its electric power
reliability, affordability and safety.
Formed in spring 2017, the Nuclear Energy Caucus has more than 70
members. Sen. Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster) currently chairs the
caucus, along with other co-chairs Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne)
and Rep. Rob Matzie (D-Beaver).
Pennsylvania is home to five nuclear stations, making it the second
largest nuclear capacity state in America. The electricity produced
from Pennsylvania’s nuclear sources represents nearly 37 percent of the Commonwealth’s total
power production, helping make the state a top net exporter of electricity.

20
“Nuclear power is considered one of the cleanest, safest, most reliable sources of
electricity today,” Rep. Mehaffie said. “In addition, our nuclear power stations, including Three
Mile Island, employ thousands of Pennsylvanians and contribute millions to our communities.
I’m excited to hit the ground running to help educate the General Assembly on the benefits of
nuclear energy and develop inclusive energy policies that value the contributions of all of our
resources.”
Rep. Mehaffie’s legislative district borders Three Mile Island, which announced it will
close in fall 2019.
“The facility’s closure would have a very negative effect on our communities. The plant
employs 675 people. It would also negatively impact many local businesses, and we would lose
the more than $1 million in revenue that TMI pays in taxes, which goes to our local schools and
social services,” Rep. Mehaffie said. “This isn’t an isolated issue. Plants across Pennsylvania are
struggling and have limited time to do something about it.”
“I’ve been an active member of the caucus for the past two years, and I look forward to
joining the other co-chairs and members of the caucus in searching for and supporting a solution
that keeps these plants operational, because the positive impact they have on our communities is
irreplaceable.”
Rep. Mehaffie can be contacted by calling 717-787-2684 or by sending email to:
tmehaffie@pahousegop.com​.
NewsClips:
State Lawmakers Push To Save Nuclear Power
Editorial: Rep. Metcalfe Will Do Damage As Environmental Committee Chair
WITF: Do You Remember The TMI Nuclear Power Plant Accident? Share Your Story
Litvack: What Does Westinghouse Have In Common With Uber, Airbnb?
Hitachi Scraps $16 Billion Nuclear Power Station In Wales, 2nd Nuclear Project Abandoned In 2
Months
Related Story:
Nuclear Energy Caucus Releases Report On The Impact Of Closing Nuclear Power Plants,
Possible Solutions
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Senate Democratic Members On Environmental Committee Remain The Same

On January 16, Senate Democrats named their members to each standing committee. There were
no changes in their members on the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.
Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne) remains the Minority Chair. The other Democratic
members include-- Andrew Dinniman (D-Chester), Daylin Leach (D-Montgomery) and Anthony
Williams (D-Philadelphia).
Click Here​ for the entire committee assignment list. The other legislative caucuses
should be appointing their committee members soon.
NewsClip:
Editorial: Rep. Metcalfe Will Do Damage As House Environmental Committee Chair
[Posted: Jan. 16, 2019]

PA Environmental Council Adding New Bills, Regulations To Tracking Webpage

21
The ​PA Environmental Council​ has begun entering environmental and
energy bills in the ​PEC Bill Tracker​ for the new legislative session to
make it easy for the public to identify and track important legislative
proposals.
The Tracker also follows important regulatory proposals through
the process and highlights upcoming advisory committee meetings
where proposals will be discussed.
Check in with the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ often!
For more information on programs, initiatives and special
events, visit the ​PA Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​,
PEC Bill/Regulation Tracker​, follow ​PEC on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on
Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts. ​Click Here
to receive regular updates from PEC.
[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

News From Around The State

DEP Awards 7 Growing Greener Grants Totaling $224,717 For Stream Restoration
Projects In Allegheny, Cambria, Northampton, Tioga, Union Counties This Week

On January 14 and 16, the Department of Environmental


Protection announced the award of 7 Growing Greener
grants totaling $224,717 for stream restoration projects in
Allegheny, Cambria, Northampton, Tioga and Union
counties.
Allegheny County
DEP awarded a $18,000 Growing Greener Grant to
Bethel Park in Allegheny County to reduce sediment
pollution along Saw Mill Run.
The grant and will stabilize 36 feet of streambanks
along Saw Mill Run, which is listed as an impaired stream,
and reduce sediment by over 2.5 tons per year. This project was proposed by Bethel Park as part
of the municipality’s pollution reduction plan to meet their municipal separate storm sewer
systems (MS4) requirements.
“Reducing erosion and runoff pollution from damaging our streams is a critical part of
maintaining a healthy environment,” said Department of Environmental Protection Secretary
Patrick McDonnell. “Investments like this can help restore stream health and pay environmental
dividends far into the future.”
Cambria County
DEP announced the award of 3 Growing Greener Grants totaling $105,797 to the
Cambria County Conservation District to stabilize stream banks and restore fish habitats in
Cambria County.
Grants of $52,499 will be used to shore up 1,000 feet of stream reaches in the headwaters
area of the West Branch Susquehanna River and $19,170 will go to stabilize stream banks on
22
Laurel Lick Run to combat active erosion on 785 feet of stream, both in the Susquehanna River
watershed.
Cambria County Conservation District will also receive a grant of $34,128 to install 15
stream bank protection/fish habitat structures on approximately 1,250 feet of the North Branch of
Blacklick Creek.
“Through partnerships with the county conservation district and local watershed groups
we’re furthering conservation efforts and improving water quality,” said DEP Secretary Patrick
McDonnell.
Northampton County
DEP announced the award of a $57,600 grant to ​Bethlehem Township in Northampton
County​ to implement the Nancy Run Tributary Restoration Project.
This Growing Greener grant will fund a project to restore an unnamed small stream that
feeds into Nancy Run, a creek that flows through Municipal Park, a township-owned recreational
area and into the Lehigh River.
The work includes stabilizing and grading the eroding streambank and reconstructing a
90-degree turn in the stream channel to improve flow. During heavy rains, water from the stream
floods out into nearby grassy areas used by geese. The heavy flow then allows pathogens to enter
the water.
“Anytime you can fund work to restore a creek, you are investing in that community,”
said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “When this work begins on Nancy Run, residents will
see improvements to stream life and the area surrounding the stream.”
Other work includes planting three acres of riparian vegetation along the restored stream
corridor to improve water quality. As a result, park infrastructure, like bridges and walkways,
will be protected and wildlife habitat in the stream will be created.
Tioga County
DEP awarded a $25,430 grant to the ​Tioga County Conservation District​ to stabilize
streams and reduce sediment pollution in the Canoe Camp Creek Watershed
“Canoe Camp Creek is impacted by sediment and nutrient pollution from nonpoint
sources, including streambank erosion and agricultural runoff,” said Department of
Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “These projects will expand riparian
buffers, enhance fish habitat, and improve water quality in Tioga County.”
Union County
The Department of Environmental Protection awarded a $17,920 grant to the ​Union
County Conservation District​ to re-establish a native wetland habitat to filter stormwater runoff
pollution and provide a hands-on educational site for students.
The grant will fund the Eichhorn Middle School Habitat Restoration Project, owned by
the Lewisburg Area School District. The project partners plan to implement Best Management
Practices (BMPs) by enhancing and expanding existing wetlands on the middle school property
to capture more stormwater runoff.
“This exceptional project will create exponential benefits because the site will be used as
a living laboratory to teach the next generation about the science of wetlands, stream health, and
how our land and water stewardship choices impact our waterways,” said Department of
Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell.
The improved wetlands will slow the runoff coming from the school’s impervious
surfaces, such as roofs and parking lots, filter pollutants out of the water, and allow the water to

23
absorb naturally back into the ground. Native plants will also be established to benefit
pollinators.
Previous Growing Greener-funded work has been completed in the Limestone Run
watershed, which is impaired by nonpoint source pollution, including stormwater runoff.
The grant recipients will match the award with $7,870 of funds and in-kind services. The
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service created the wetland restoration plan for the site.
Announcements To Date
Since December 21, the Department of Environmental Protection has announced a total
of $12,084,161 in Growing Greener grants for watershed restoration, mine drainage treatment,
flood damage reduction and water quality improvement projects in Allegheny, Beaver, Bradford,
Cambria, Centre, Clarion, Dauphin, Delaware, Erie, Lancaster, Lehigh, Lycoming, Luzerne,
McKean, Montgomery, Northampton, Northumberland, Philadelphia, Schuylkill, Tioga, Union,
Venango, Washington, Wyoming and York counties.
The Growing Greener grant program is supported by the Environmental Stewardship
Fund, which receives its funding from landfill tipping fees and a transfer from the Marcellus
Shale Legacy Fund.
Click Here​ for more information on DEP’s Growing Greener Plus Grant Program.
Resources
For more information on buffers, financial and technical assistance available, visit
DCNR’s ​Forest Buffers​ and DEP’s ​Stormwater Management​ webpages.
CFA Accepting Applications
The ​Commonwealth Financing Authority ​will accept applications from February 1 to
May 31 for its Act 13 Watershed Restoration Grants which includes funding control nonpoint
source pollution runoff, which includes agricultural operations. ​ ​Click Here​ for more.
New DCNR Grant Round
Learn more about grant opportunities to support riparian buffer, trail and recreation
projects, visit DCNR’s ​Community Conservation Grant Program​ webpage. A new grant round is
opening January 22 and will close April 10. ​Click Here​ for more.
Forest Buffer Summit
Registration is now open for the DCNR and Western PA Conservancy ​Pennsylvania
Riparian Forest Buffer Summit​ on February 20-21 at the Best Western Premier Conference
Center, 800 East Park Drive in Harrisburg. ​Click Here​ for more.
Related Stories:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For Water
Infrastructure Projects Workshops Feb. 20, 21
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
NewsClips:
Sen. Scarnati Announces Tioga County Growing Greener Grant

24
DEP Funds Lewisburg School’s Wetland Project
DEP Grant Funding Announced For Cambria Conservation District
Growing Greener Grant Continues Support Of Villanova’s Campus Stormwater Efforts
Venesky: Local Impacts Contribute To Increased Pollution In Chesapeake Bay
Editorial: Climate Change Complicates Efforts To Protect Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Wyoming Valley Authority Sets Jan. 31 Public Meeting On Stormwater Fee
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley Authority Extends Stormwater Fee Payment Deadline, Appeal Charge Waived
Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority Contesting Stormwater Fee
Luzerne County Flood Authority Questions Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Roils Harveys Lake Residents
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
[Posted: Jan. 14, 2019]

Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For Water
Infrastructure Projects Workshops Feb. 20, 21

The ​Southwest Pennsylvania Commission​ ​Water


Resource Center​ is hosting 2 workshops on Winning
Public Support For Water Infrastructure Projects
February 20 and 21 in Allegheny and Westmoreland
counties.
Public officials (both elected and unelected)
constantly struggle to communicate the value of
infrastructure investments in a way that builds
broad-based support from constituents.
These workshops cover the best strategies for
planning and successfully engaging the public on
difficult-to-win topics like infrastructure investments, tax increases, and municipal compliance
activities.
Mark Heckmann will be the speaker at both workshops. He serves as Council President
in Castle Shannon Borough in Allegheny County.
Heckmann is also the CEO of ​WebKite​, a programmatic advertising company that helps
global companies in the automotive, healthcare and real estate sectors publish their inventory
online. He consults with companies and municipalities on how to model and generate support for
investment opportunities via his LLC, MJH Advisors.
The workshops will be held at these locations from 9:00 to Noon--
-- February 20:​ Fisher Hall at Burrell Lake Park, 209 Delberta Road, Lower Burrell,
Westmoreland County- ​Click Here​ to register; and

25
-- February 21:​ Findlay Township Activity Center, 310 Main Street in Imperial, Allegheny
County- ​Click Here​ to register.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​SPC
Water Resource Center​ website.
NewsClips:
Wyoming Valley Authority Sets Jan. 31 Public Meeting On Stormwater Fee
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley Authority Extends Stormwater Fee Payment Deadline, Appeal Charge Waived
Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority Contesting Stormwater Fee
Luzerne County Flood Authority Questions Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Roils Harveys Lake Residents
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
Related Stories:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
DEP Awards 7 Growing Greener Grants Totaling $224,717 For Stream Restoration Projects In
Allegheny, Cambria, Northampton, Tioga, Union Counties This Week
Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
[Posted: Jan. 17, 2019]

PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna,
Delaware Watersheds

The Penn State ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant Program​ has


issued a ​2020-21 Request For Proposals​ for research
projects in the Lake Erie, Delaware and Susquehanna
watershed that address priority areas. Proposals are due
March 11.
Principal investigators should focus on outcomes that can
be achieved in a 24-month period. Proposals must include
a clear outreach plan for disseminating information to
targeted audiences.
The Program anticipates funding 7 to 9 grants at
approximately $60,000 per year per grant. A 50 percent non-federal match is required-- one

26
non-federal dollar for every two federal dollars requested.
Funding requests for one-year projects may not exceed $60,000 and requests for two-year
projects may not exceed $120,000. Funding is contingent upon NOAA approval and
congressional appropriation of funds.
Faculty members and researchers from colleges and universities, state agencies, and other
Pennsylvania not-for-profit research organizations are eligible. Pennsylvania Sea Grant support
is offered on an open, competitive basis.
Click Here​ for a copy of the RFP. Questions should be directed to Research Director,
Sean Rafferty by sending email to: ​sdr138@psu.edu​ or calling 814-217-9011 x 102.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the
Pennsylvania Sea Grant Program​ website.
Related Stories:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
DEP Awards 7 Growing Greener Grants Totaling $224,717 For Stream Restoration Projects In
Allegheny, Cambria, Northampton, Tioga, Union Counties This Week
Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For Water
Infrastructure Projects Workshops Feb. 20, 21
PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9

The ​Delaware RiverKeeper Network​ and its


partners are now accepting registrations for the
2019 Watershed Congress Along the Schuylkill​ to
be held March 9 at the Pottstown campus of the
Montgomery County Community College​.
The annual Watershed Congress melds science,
policy, and practical applications into one
program that highlights the best available
information and techniques for protecting and
restoring watersheds.
The 2019 program will offer a keynote that explores the results of a decade of restoration
and monitoring in the Brandywine Watershed, information-packed breakout sessions, a poster
session, displays, and much more.
The Watershed Congress is also presented by ​Berks County Conservation District​ • ​Berks
Nature​ • ​Bucks County Conservation District​ • ​Cadastral Consulting, LLC​ • ​Center in the
Park/Senior Environment Corps​ • ​Chester-Ridley-Crum Watersheds Association​ • ​Darby Creek
Valley Association​ • ​Delaware Nature Society​ • ​Delaware River Steamboat Floating Classroom,
Inc. SPLASH​ • ​Delaware Valley University​ • ​Green Valleys Watershed Association​ • ​Lehigh
County Conservation District​ • ​A.D. Marble & Company​ • ​Montgomery County Community

27
College​ • ​Montgomery County Conservation District​ • ​Octoraro Native Plant Nursery​ •
Outdoor Design​ • ​Partnership for the Delaware Estuary​ • Penn State University, ​Pennsylvania
Sea Grant​ • Pennsylvania ​Department of Conservation & Natural Resources​ • ​Pennsylvania
Environmental Council​ • ​Pennsylvania Horticultural Society​ • ​Perkiomen Watershed
Conservancy​ • ​Reading Area Community College​ • ​Schuylkill River Greenways NHA​ • ​Stroud
Water Research Center​; ​Sustainable Choices, LLC​ & ​Philadelphia Water ​• ​Temple University
• ​Trout Unlimited, Valley Forge Chapter​ • ​The Write Beat​ • ​Yellow Springs Farm​.
To register or for more information, visit the ​2019 Watershed Congress Along the
Schuylkill​ webpage.
Related Stories:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
DEP Awards 7 Growing Greener Grants Totaling $224,717 For Stream Restoration Projects In
Allegheny, Cambria, Northampton, Tioga, Union Counties This Week
Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For Water
Infrastructure Projects Workshops Feb. 20, 21
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
[Posted: Jan. 14, 2019]

PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest

The ​PA Lake Management Society​ is now


accepting entries for its 2019 Photo Context
that showcase the amazing attributes of lakes
in Pennsylvania. The deadline for entries is
March 6.
Winners will be selected at the PALMS
Conference. You are not required to be
present to win. Prizes will be awarded for the
top three photos. In addition, the first place
photo may be featured on the PALMS website and showcased in the PALMS newsletter What’s
Wet.
Submission Information:
-- Please include your name, address, affiliation, photo location, and photo title
-- Photograph must have been taken by the person submitting the photo.
-- Photo must be of, or related to, ponds and lakes in Pennsylvania.
-- Only the first 15 entries will be considered.
-- No more than 2 entries per person.
Click Here​ to view past winners.
All submitted photos will become property of PALMS and may be utilized in a variety of
PALMS publications. Submission of a photo signifies permission for PALMS to use the material

28
(with credit) as desired.
Entries must be submitted by email to: ​info@palakes.org​. Questions can be directed to
the same email.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PA Lake
Management Society​ website.
(​Photos:​ Winners from 2017 Photo Contest.)
Related Stories:
Registration Now Open For PA Lake Management Society Conference March 6-7
PA Lake Management Society Accepting Nominations For Annual Awards
Related Stories This Week:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
DEP Awards 7 Growing Greener Grants Totaling $224,717 For Stream Restoration Projects In
Allegheny, Cambria, Northampton, Tioga, Union Counties This Week
Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For Water
Infrastructure Projects Workshops Feb. 20, 21
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

Pittsburgh Water Authority’s Latest Drinking Water Samples Show Lead Levels Above
EPA Standard

On January 18, the ​Pittsburgh Water and Sewer


Authority​ announced the results of its latest round of
drinking water samples in December show 15 percent
are at 20 parts per billion, above the EPA lead action
level.
The Water Authority must meet a requirement that
10 percent of samples are no higher than 15 parts per
billion.
The Authority noted in its announcement there is no
safe level of lead and residents should continue to
consider the recommendations provided by PWSA to
reduce exposure to lead.
Of the 161 drinking water samples analysed in December, 137 are below the 15 parts per
billion EPA standard-- 85 percent. 24 are above the standard.
Click Here​ for the Authority’s complete announcement, including steps customers can
take to reduce their exposure to lead.
For more information on what Authority customers can do, visit the ​Authority’s
Community Lead Response​ webpage.
Visit DEP’s ​Pittsburgh Water Authority​ webpage for more information on DEP’s actions

29
on the lead service line issue in Pittsburgh.
For more information on health threats from lead in drinking water, visit DEP’s ​Lead In
Drinking Water​ webpage.
More Resources
The ​Joint State Government Commission​ and a special ​Senate Lead Exposure Task
Force​ will be making recommendations on reducing exposure to lead as early as April as a result
of ​Senate Resolution 33​, sponsored by Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne), Minority Chair of the
Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.
For information on health threats from lead from other sources, visit the Department of
Health’s ​Lead Poisoning​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Lead Levels Up Again In Pittsburgh According To Most Recent Data
Overbrook Residents Win Round 3 In Legal Battle With Pittsburgh Water Authority
[Posted: Jan. 19, 2019]

Susquehanna River Basin Commission Hearing Feb. 7 On Proposed Water Withdrawal


Requests

The ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ is scheduled to hold a hearing February 7 ​on
proposed water withdrawal actions tentatively on the March business meeting agenda of the
Commission. ​formal notice and agenda​)
Click Here​ for a list of items on the agenda.
The hearing will be held ​in Hearing Room 1 of the North Office Building in Harrisburg
starting at 2:30.
For more information, visit the SRBC’s ​February 7 event​ webpage. Questions should be
directed to Ava Stoops, Administrative Specialist, 717-238-0423, fax 717-238-2436.
For more information on programs, training opportunities and upcoming events, visit the
Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for SRBC’s newsletter.
Follow SRBC on Twitter​, ​visit them on YouTube​.
Related Stories:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitments; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
DEP Awards 7 Growing Greener Grants Totaling $224,717 For Stream Restoration Projects In
Allegheny, Cambria, Northampton, Tioga, Union Counties This Week
Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public Support For Water
Infrastructure Projects Workshops Feb. 20, 21
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

DEP Receives 2 Proposed Good Samaritan Gas Well Plugging Project Requests

30
The Department of Environmental Protection has
received 2 proposed Good Samaritan abandoned oil
gas well plugging project requests for wells in Warren
and Westmorland County. ​(J​ an. 19 PA Bulletin page
338​)
DEP regularly receives proposals under the state
Environmental Good Samaritan Act Program for both
mine reclamation​ and ​oil and gas well plugging​.
The Good Samaritan Program is for landowners,
citizens, watershed associations, environmental
organizations and, governmental entities who do not
have a legal responsibility to reclaim abandoned lands, abate water pollution or plug abandoned
wells, but are interested in addressing these problems.
In Warren County, Gas and Oil Management Association, Inc. is proposing to plug an
abandoned oil and gas well in Pleasant Township.
In Westmoreland County, the Westmoreland County Industrial Development Corporation
is proposing to plug an abandoned oil and gas well in Sewickley Township.
Copies of the proposals are available for inspection at the Department’s ​Northwest
Regional Office​, 230 Chestnut Street, Meadville, PA 16335, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4
p.m. For more information call 814-332-6945.
Click Here​ to use DEP’s interactive GIS map to show Good Samaritan oil and gas well
projects (orange squares).
Click Here​ for a map of mine reclamation projects. ​Click Here​ for a list of projects.
Visit DEP’s ​Abandoned & Orphan Well Program​ webpage for more information.
Questions about well plugging through the Environmental Good Samaritan Act can be addressed
by contacting the ​DEP Bureau of Oil and Gas Planning and Program Management​ ​or the district
office where the project is located.
Related Story:
DEP’s Good Samaritan Program Encourages Proposals To Plug Abandoned Oil & Gas Wells,
Treat Mine Drainage
Related Story This Week:
Citizens Advisory Council To Hear Update On DEP Oil & Gas Regulatory Program Jan. 22
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24

Join the ​Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay​ for the


16th Annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival​ on
January 24 at the ​Spring House Brewing
Company​, 209 Hazel Street in Lancaster from
6:00 to 9:00.
The Festival brings together incredible selections
of films that inform, inspire, and ignite solutions
and possibilities to restore the earth and human

31
communities while creating a positive future for the next generation.
Festival-goers can expect to see award-winning films about nature, community activism,
adventure, conservation, water, energy and climate change, wildlife, environmental justice,
agriculture, Native American and indigenous cultures.
Click Here​ to watch a trailer for the Festival. ​LandStudies​ is one of the sponsors of this
special event.
Click Here​ to purchase tickets. Questions should be directed to Jenna Mackley by
sending email to: ​jmackley@allianceforthebay.org​ or call 717-517-8698.
More information is available on programs, initiatives and special events on the ​Alliance
for the Chesapeake Bay​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Alliance,
Like the ​Alliance on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​, and visit the Alliance’s ​YouTube
Channel​. ​Click Here​ to support the Alliance’s work.
NewsClips:
WITF Smart Talk: Chesapeake Bay Report Card, CBF’s Harry Campbell, Wil Baker
Venesky: Local Impacts Contribute To Increased Pollution In Chesapeake Bay
Editorial: Climate Change Complicates Efforts To Protect Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Wyoming Valley Authority Sets Jan. 31 Public Meeting On Stormwater Fee
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
Bay Journal: Federal Farm Bill Increases Funding To Control Ag Runoff In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Chesapeake Bay - Other States
Maryland Governor Proposes Major Investments For Environment, Chesapeake Bay
Maryland Gov. Hogan Proposes Major Funding To Restore Chesapeake Bay, Environment
NY Governor Goes Big On Water, Proposes Doubling Of Clean Water Investments
New York Governor Unveils Funding Initiative To Help Farmers Protect Water Quality
Virginia’s Governor Proposes Major Investments To Protect Water Quality, Accelerate
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Related Story:
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitment; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
[Posted: Jan. 19, 2019]

Deadline Extended: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Motivated Students To Become


Youth Conservation Ambassadors

The​ Wildlife Leadership Academy​ in

32
Union County has opened its exclusive Youth Conservation Ambassador nomination process to
the public and is currently seeking referrals of motivated students ages 14 to 17 to become
Certified Conservation Ambassadors​.
The deadline for nominations is now February 15.
Nominated students should have demonstrated interest in wildlife and/or fisheries
conservation.
Accepted nominees will become certified Conservation Ambassadors through attending a
5-day residential summer field schools which focuses on a particular wildlife species, including
white-tailed deer, bass, brook trout, ruffed grouse, and/or turkey.
Students in each field school will gain extensive knowledge about natural resource
conservation, leadership experience, and communication skills.
Applicants may be nominated by an adult who knows them well, but is not a relative--
teacher, school counselor, ​Envirothon​ advisor, employer, youth group leader, etc..
As Conservation Ambassadors, students can receive a letter of a recommendation for
college applications; certification of community service work, and a certificate designating them
as Conservation Ambassadors.
Students are also eligible to apply for three college credits through ​Cedar Crest College​,
return to the Academy tuition free the following year, compete for college scholarships, and join
an Academy Alumni Network of wildlife, fisheries, and conservation professionals.
Academy Alumni and Conservation Ambassador Aubree Reiter of Blair County
describes her participation in the program as an “absolutely amazing experience.”
“Everything was absolutely amazing. The people we met were extraordinary and the
amount of information we obtained was just mind boggling. I still talk about my experience to
my family and I am constantly referencing my notes. I can’t wait for my future! The field school
reached beyond my expectations,” said Reiter.
The mission of the Wildlife Leadership Academy is to engage and empower high school
age youth to become Conservation Ambassadors to ensure a sustained wildlife, fisheries and
natural resource legacy for future generations. The Academy, a 501(c)(3) non-profit
organization, is a cooperative initiative involving state agencies and conservation organizations.
For more information, visit the ​Certified Conservation Ambassadors​ webpage or contact
Program and Outreach Coordinator, Katie Cassidy by sending email to:
kcassidy@wildlifeleadershipacademy.org​ or call 570-939-5109.
You can also connect with the Academy by visit the ​Wildlife Leadership Academy
website or ​on Facebook​.
Related Story:
Boy Scout Takes On 4 Conservation Projects To Qualify For Prestigious William T. Hornaday
Silver Award
Related Story This Week:
Berks Nature Summer 2019 Eco-Camp Registration Now Open For Students Pre-school To 8th
Grade
Interns Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Summer Program Interns
Interns Wanted: Department Of Environmental Protection Looking For Summer Interns
Interns Wanted: Lacawac Sanctuary Biological Field Station Research, Education Experience
Deadline Extended: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Motivated Students To Become Youth
Conservation Ambassadors

33
[Posted: Jan. 14, 2019]

Berks Nature Summer 2019 Eco-Camp Registration Now Open For Students Pre-school To
8th Grade

Berks Nature​ is now accepting registrations for


summer 2019 Eco-Camp​ with sessions for pre-school,
grades K to 4 and 5 to 8 grade students.
Eco-Camp is the perfect way to pass down how
essential nature is to our quality of life to your children
or grandchildren. Berks Nature is excited to welcome
campers back this summer for another season of
exploration, learning, fun and nature-play at The
Nature Place at ​Angelica Park​!
Click Here​ to register or for more information.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit ​Berks
Nature
Related Stories:
Interns Wanted: Department Of Environmental Protection Looking For Summer Interns
Interns Wanted: Lacawac Sanctuary Biological Field Station Research, Education Experience
Interns Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Summer Program Interns
Deadline Extended: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Motivated Students To Become Youth
Conservation Ambassadors
[Posted: Jan. 17, 2019]

Interns Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Summer Program Interns

The Union County-based ​Wildlife


Leadership Academy​ is seeking
applicants for full-time ​summer
program Intern positions​ to support the
Academy Director and Coordinators at
the wildlife/fisheries summer field
schools to ensure that a high-quality
experience is provided to all Academy participants, instructors, and volunteers.
Click Here​ for all the details. The deadline for applications is February 8. Questions
should be directed to Katie Cassidy, Program and Outreach Coordinator, by sending email to:
kcassidy@wildlifeleadershipacademy.org​.
Related Stories:
Berks Nature Summer 2019 Eco-Camp Registration Now Open For Students Pre-school To 8th
Grade
Interns Wanted: Department Of Environmental Protection Looking For Summer Interns
Interns Wanted: Lacawac Sanctuary Biological Field Station Research, Education Experience
Deadline Extended: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Motivated Students To Become Youth
Conservation Ambassadors

34
[Posted: Jan. 14, 2019]

Interns Wanted: Lacawac Sanctuary Biological Field Station Research, Education


Experience

The ​Lacawac Sanctuary Biological Field Station​ in


Wayne County is now accepting applications for its
9-week Undergraduate Research and Education
Experience running June 3 to August 2.
Review of applications will begin March 1.
Lacawac interns participate in the Sanctuary’s
missions of Research, Education, and Preservation.
Interns spend considerable time participating in field
work and laboratory analysis, educational and public
programs for all ages, and various outreach activities.
The Sanctuary is looking for enthusiastic interns who
work well with others, have excellent attitudes, and a record of academic achievement. Interns
must be able to work independently as well as part of a team.
Students working towards a degree in the natural sciences and/or an interest in ecology,
conservation, or environmental education are encouraged to apply. Previous field or laboratory
research experience is preferred but not required.
Interns receive a modest stipend and free housing in a historic Adirondack-style lodge
with shared living areas, bathroom, and kitchen and dorm-style bunk rooms for the duration of
the internship. The internship is from June 3rd through August 2nd, with negotiable start/stop
dates.
Click Here​ for all the details. To apply, please submit a letter of interest, resume,
unofficial transcripts, and a list of 3 professional references (including email addresses and
phone numbers) to Dr. Beth Norman, Director of Science and Research by email to:
beth.norman@lacawac.org​. Please put “2019 Internship Application” in the subject line.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Lacawac Sanctuary​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates (right panel). ​Follow on
Twitter​. ​Like on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
Related Stories:
Berks Nature Summer 2019 Eco-Camp Registration Now Open For Students Pre-school To 8th
Grade
Interns Wanted: Department Of Environmental Protection Looking For Summer Interns
Interns Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Summer Program Interns
Deadline Extended: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Motivated Students To Become Youth
Conservation Ambassadors
[Posted: Jan. 16, 2019]

AeroAggregates Doubles Production Capacity Of Foamed Glass Aggregate Made From


Recycled Glass

On January 15, ​AeroAggregates​ in Delaware

35
County announced it has completed installation and is now operating its second kiln, doubling
production capacity to meet growing U.S. demand.
The kilns at AeroAggregates use 100 percent post-consumer recycled glass to produce a
building aggregate that is lightweight, non-combustible, insulating, free-draining, non-absorbent,
and resistant to chemicals, rot and acid.
This makes its closed cell foamed glass aggregates produce superior for construction,
lightweight embankments, load distribution platforms and insulating subgrade, as well as lateral
load reduction behind retaining walls and structures.
Foamed glass aggregates also possess a highly frictional surface which makes it ideal as a
lightweight backfill.
“Our ultra-lightweight FGA can solve the challenges of today’s infrastructure projects,
especially for those that require fill to be placed over soft compressible materials, weight-bearing
structures or over areas with sensitive underground infrastructure,” explained Archie Filshill,
CEO and Co-Founder of AeroAggregates. “We’re excited to fire up our second kiln in order to
meet increased demand from the civil engineering and construction markets that require
sustainable, lightweight materials due to specialized design and constructability requirements.”
With the addition of the new AeroAggregates kiln, the equivalent of more than 140
million recycled curbside glass bottles (or 32,000 tons) will be diverted each year, bringing relief
to municipal recycling operations.
According to a recent study, municipal recycling programs spend approximately $150
million annually to dispose of unwanted glass.
The FGA manufacturing process employed by AeroAggregates can utilize mixed color
glass and due to its advanced cleaning system is unaffected by small amounts of residual paper
and other contaminants.
Recognition
In 2018, ​AeroAggregates was recognized with the Governor’s Award for Environmental
Excellence​ for its glass recycling operation.
The company was also highlighted by the Department of Environmental Protection as a
successful brownfield site reuse project​.
For more information on the product and the company, visit the ​AeroAggregates​ website.
NewsClips:
Glass Recycling Company Doubles Operations At Former Baldwin Locomotive Works Building
O’Neill: Single-Stream Recycling Run Roughshod Over Quality Of End Product
Lackawanna County Recycling Coordinator Urges Officials, Residents To Get Back To Basics
Centre County Recycling Reminders For The New Year
Erie County HHW, E-Waste Recycling Event Draws 183 Customers
Editorial: Recycling Is Costly, But It Shouldn’t Be Curtailed
Pittsburgh Art Exhibit Made From Restaurants’ Plastic Waste Focuses On Sustainability
Latrobe OKs 26% Hike In Garbage Fees
[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

PUC Report Finds Low-Income Households Participating In Assistance Programs Have


Double The Energy Cost Burden Than Those Without Assistance

On January 17, the Public Utility

36
Commission issued a report on the results of a study regarding home energy-- electric and
natural gas-- burdens for low-income Pennsylvanians and opened a public comment period for
interested parties.
The Commission voted 5-0 to release the report, “​Home Energy Affordability for
Low-Income Customers in Pennsylvania​,” prepared by Commission staff.
The report found low-income households, even with the help of utility customer
assistance programs, still had a higher energy cost burden-- 8 to 10 percent of income for heating
customers-- than those not participating-- 4 percent-- regardless of heating, non-heating or
energy type.
The federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, which is separate from
utility customer assistance programs, had a measurable impact on reducing the energy cost
burden of CAP customers by approximately 5 to 6 percentage points for gas heating, 6 to 8
percentage points for electric non-heating, and approximately 7 to 9 percentage points for
electric heating.
The report said these findings, however, do not meet the desired outcome called for in
PUC guidance for customer assistance programs.
Although nearly 8 in 10 Pennsylvanians live in urban areas, households in rural areas
may experience the highest energy burden levels due to poor housing stock, the report said.
Focusing energy-efficient education and weatherization services can help to reduce the energy
burden disparity in these areas and help make CAPs more effective.
The report also noted energy efficiency and conservation can play major roles in making
energy bills more affordable. The impact of these programs on energy burden levels, however,
was not measured as part of this study.
This report is the Commission’s starting point for an evaluation of the effectiveness of
customer assistance programs (CAPs) and other Universal Service programs that are intended to
help low-income consumers maintain essential utility services.
A key factor of this review involves examination of the “energy burden,” which refers to
the percentage of household income that is dedicated to paying energy-related utility bills.
“The energy burden for low-income customers in Pennsylvania is higher than most
comparable states,” said ​Vice Chairman David W. Sweet​, who issued a statement at the
Commission’s public meeting. “We now need to determine if there is sufficient funding for
assistance programs and also whether there needs to be more efficient oversight of them.”
“There are questions that are yet to be answered before we can put forth a final
recommendation,” said ​Commissioner Andrew G. Place​ in his statement. “I look forward to the
continued engagement with stakeholders as we progress. This continues to be an important and
complex undertaking, a task to which we remain committed.”
Along with publication of the Home Energy Affordability report, the Commission
requested additional information from the natural gas and electric utilities to be filed by February
19, 2019.
After that additional utility information has been filed, interested parties will have a
20-day period to submit written comments for consideration by the Commission (until March 11,
2019), and another 15 days for reply comments (until March 26, 2019).
Comments and reply comments may be submitted using the ​Commission’s e-filing
system​ or printed copies may be filed with the Secretary of the PUC, ​referencing Docket
#M-2017-2587711​, at the following address: Public Utility Commission, Commonwealth

37
Keystone Building, 400 North Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17120.
Click Here​ for a copy of the report.
Stakeholder Meeting Feb. 6
Also, as part of the review and comment process, the Commission will convene a
stakeholder meeting on February 6, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., in Harrisburg, to allow discussion of
the report among interested parties and Commission staff.
A Universal Service Reporting Working Group consisting of Commission staff, utilities,
and stakeholders will be established to address inconsistencies and limitations in utility data.
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Code requires that universal service and energy
conservation programs be developed, maintained, and appropriately funded to serve low-income
customers.
Affordability concerns have been raised in cases before the Commission – and the
Commission has stated in the past that energy burden levels in Pennsylvania may be too high and
that policies may need to be revised. The Commission’s CAP Policy Statement was
promulgated in 1992 and revised in 1999.
A 2017 Commission order directed staff to initiate a study to determine what constitutes
an affordable energy burden for the state’s low-income households and, based on this analysis,
whether any changes are needed to bring CAP and Universal Service programs into alignment
with affordability recommendations.
That study resulted in the report released January 17.
NewsClips:
PUC Seeks Comment On Electricity Marketing Practices Of Vista Energy
Letter: Increase Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

1,485-Megawatt Natural Gas-Fired Power Plant Goes Online In Lackawanna County

On January 15, Invenergy announced the


Lackawanna Energy Center​ natural gas-fired
power plant in Jessup, Lackawanna County has
begun commercial operations.
The facility is located just outside of
Scranton, historically known as the "Electric
City" for its early adoption of electric lighting.
The 1,485-megawatt natural gas
combined-cycle electric generation facility has
the capacity to power more than 1 million
American homes. The plant will generate more
than $50 million in revenue for its host community, the Borough of Jessup, Pennsylvania, over
the life of the project.
Thirty full-time operations positions were created in addition to the project having
provided jobs for over 1,200 workers at peak construction.
With its highly-efficient design and operational flexibility, Lackawanna Energy Center is
expected to displace generation from older, dirtier units in the PJM Interconnection, the largest
organized power market in the U.S.

38
The facility's Administration and Control Building is LEED-Gold certified, featuring a
solar array on the roof and a design that is 60 percent more energy efficient than similar
conventional buildings.
"We are tremendously proud to go online with the Lackawanna Energy Center, the
largest and most technically sophisticated power plant Invenergy has ever developed, built and
operated," said Michael Polsky, Invenergy Founder & CEO. "This milestone is an incredible
achievement for our team and project partners, who have delivered on our commitment to
generate clean power, good jobs, and local community investment through this project."
Invenergy partnered with Kiewit Power Constructors on facility construction.
Construction began in March 2016, and stayed ahead of an aggressive construction schedule
despite delays including stoppage due to Winter Storm Stella in the spring of 2017.
The facility features an innovative single-shaft design where each of three 500-megawatt
power islands are comprised of a combustion turbine and steam turbine that share a single
generator, maximizing facility efficiency while still allowing for the independent operation of
each natural gas turbine.
"Designing and building the Lackawanna Energy Center required the largest staff and
craft workforce ever assembled by Kiewit Power Constructors Co.," said Dave Flickinger,
Executive Vice President, Kiewit Corporation. "It's been an excellent experience partnering with
Invenergy, who values worker safety and project execution as much as we do. We're proud to
have been part of the team that successfully delivered this important project."
Lackawanna Energy Center generates power from three General Electric 7HA.02
high-efficiency, air-cooled natural gas combustion turbines. In addition to world-class energy
efficiency, the HClass units enable operational flexibility that allows the facility to generate
baseload power as well as to respond quickly to variations in energy demand, supporting the
continued growth of renewable resources in the region.
"GE and Invenergy's long-standing relationship brings together two organizations
focused on powering the world more efficiently and sustainably with the world's most advanced
technology," said Chuck Nugent, President and CEO of GE Power's Gas Power Systems
business. "We are proud to continue this relationship and to supply Invenergy's state-of-the-art
Lackawanna facility with the HA turbine, the world's largest and most efficient gas turbine."
Cabot Oil & Gas Corporate supplies all of the natural gas fuel to the facility. South Jersey
Resources Group, LLC, a subsidiary of energy holding company South Jersey Industries
provides fuel management services.
A fund managed by the Global Energy & Power Infrastructure team at BlackRock Real
Assets is a major investor in the Lackawanna Energy Center. BlackRock is a global leader in
investment management, risk management and advisory services.
"We are incredibly proud to invest in a facility of this caliber on behalf of our clients,"
said Mark Florian, Head of the Global Energy & Power Infrastructure team at BlackRock Real
Assets. "The innovative Lackawanna Energy Center will reduce the carbon footprint of the
nation's energy system and provide reliable and efficient power for a growing population.
Invenergy's demonstrated expertise and experience as a leading sustainable developer has made
them an invaluable partner on this project."
Since the start of construction, Lackawanna Energy Center has invested more than $285
million in the local economy, including $170 million in wages and benefits for workers.
Project partners have also made over $400,000 in donations to several non-profit

39
organizations in Jessup and the surrounding communities.
Six students at Lackawanna College School of Petroleum and Natural Gas have had their
education furthered through Invenergy's Advanced Energy Scholarship.
For more information, visit the ​Lackawanna Energy Center​ website.
NewsClips:
Lackawanna Energy Center Announces It Is Fully Operational
Lackawanna Natural Gas-Fired Power Plant Comes Online
[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

DEP Invites Comments On Federal Coastal Zone Consistency Determination For The
Adelphia Pipeline Gateway Project In Delaware County

The Department of Environmental Protection


published notice in the January 19 PA Bulletin
inviting comments on the proposed federal Coastal
Zone Management Act consistency determination
for the ​Adelphia Pipeline Gateway Project​ in
Delaware County.
The entire proposed project includes 4.4 miles of
existing 20-inch mainline pipeline, 84 miles of
existing 18-inch mainline pipeline, two new
compressor stations, two new lateral pipelines,
seven new blowdown assemblies, one new tap
valve and two new mainline valves.
The project components proposed within the Delaware Estuary Coastal Zone include a
new Marcus Hook Compressor Station, portions of the existing 18-inch mainline, a portion of the
Parkway Lateral, and the Tilghman Lateral and its associated meter stations.
The Marcus Hook Compressor Station includes expansion and improvements to ground
facilities at the existing Marcus Hook Terminal. The site is located entirely on existing
paved/graveled industrial-use land.
Read the entire PA Bulletin notice​ for all the details. More information may be posted on
DEP’s eComment ​webpage.
DEP is accepting comments until February 4 through the DEP eComment webpage.
Matthew Walderon, Federal Consistency Coordinator, send email to:
RA-Fed_Consistency@pa.gov​ or call 717-772-2196.
Related Stories:
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: PUC Rejects Emergency Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines;
Full Case Will Move Forward
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To Stabilize
Beaver County Pipeline Explosion Site
DEP Re-Publishes Notice Of Final Water Quality Certification For National Fuel Gas Line N To
Monaca Pipeline, Beaver, Washington Counties
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: PUC Rejects Emergency Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines,
Full Case Will Move Forward

40
Legere: PUC Rejects Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines, Underlying Case Moves
Forward
Mariner East 2 Pipeline Worker’s Obscene Comments Draw Ire Of Chester County DA
Op-Ed: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Will Energize PA Economy
Litvak: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To Stabilized Beaver County
Pipeline Explosion Site
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To
Stabilized Beaver County Pipeline Explosion Site
PMA: PA Needs Pipeline Infrastructure To Boost Manufacturing Investments
New Pipeline To Feed Natural Gas To Shell Plant
Shell Gets Approval of Ambridge Water Authority For Ethane Pipeline
FERC: West Rockhill Site Optimal For Pipeline Compressor Station In Bucks County
Editorial: Gas Pipelines Take Another Hit In Maryland Ruling
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

DEP Re-Publishes Notice Of Final Water Quality Certification For National Fuel Gas Line
N To Monaca Pipeline, Beaver, Washington Counties

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the January 19 PA Bulletin


(​page 336​) re-publishing the notice of final Section 401 Water Quality Certification for Line N to
the Monaca Natural Gas Pipeline in Beaver and Washington counties.
The project is a 4.5 mile long, 12-inch pipeline transporting natural gas from Line N to
the Shell Ethane Plant.
The pipeline route is in Center and Potter townships, Beaver County and Buffalo
Township, Washington County.
Related Stories:
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: PUC Rejects Emergency Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines;
Full Case Will Move Forward
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To Stabilize
Beaver County Pipeline Explosion Site
DEP Invites Comments On Federal Coastal Zone Consistency Determination For The Adelphia
Pipeline Gateway Project In Delaware County
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: PUC Rejects Emergency Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines,
Full Case Will Move Forward
Legere: PUC Rejects Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines, Underlying Case Moves
Forward
Mariner East 2 Pipeline Worker’s Obscene Comments Draw Ire Of Chester County DA
Op-Ed: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Will Energize PA Economy
Litvak: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To Stabilized Beaver County
Pipeline Explosion Site
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To
Stabilized Beaver County Pipeline Explosion Site
PMA: PA Needs Pipeline Infrastructure To Boost Manufacturing Investments
New Pipeline To Feed Natural Gas To Shell Plant

41
Shell Gets Approval of Ambridge Water Authority For Ethane Pipeline
FERC: West Rockhill Site Optimal For Pipeline Compressor Station In Bucks County
Editorial: Gas Pipelines Take Another Hit In Maryland Ruling
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Pittsburgh Green Building Alliance Inspired Speakers Series Presents Inspirational Stories
Of A Vibrant, Just Region Jan. 31

The Pittsburgh-based ​Green Building Alliance​ will


present another special event in its Inspired Speakers
Series on January 31 with the theme ​A Vibrant and
Just Region​.
Join this 4th annual Moth-style event jam packed with
a line up of movers and shakers that will challenge
you to be the change you seek to find.
This event will feature stories from--
-- Tami Dixon:​ Ms. Dixon is the writer and director of The Forest of Everywhere, her first
immersive for children with developmental differences, and also serves as the lead writer for the
Bricolage Production Company’s critically acclaimed Midnight Radio series, now in its 10th
season.
-- Jordan Jones: ​Mr. Jones works as a Cultural Literacy teacher at the Environmental Charter
School in Pittsburgh.
-- Olah Mandley:​ Ms. Mandley has dedicated her career to community health, focusing on the
cultivation and preparation of natural and organic food.
-- Sandra Taylor:​ Ms. Taylor is an internationally recognized expert in corporate social
responsibility and environmental sustainability in supply chains.
-- Georgia Petropoulos: ​With over 20 years of experience in the community and economic
development industry, Ms. Petropoulos is directly involved in the transformation of Pittsburgh.
-- Mike Walsh:​ Mr. Walsh is Deputy Secretary for Administration at DCNR, Mike manages the
human resources, finance, and information technology operations of the 2300 person agency
responsible for Pennsylvania’s 121 state parks and 2.2 million acres of forests.
-- Chuck Herring (Emcee):​ A nationally acclaimed educator, author, entrepreneur, and speaker,
Charles Herring draws from a wellspring of experience to engage audiences with humor and
nuance.
Feed your mind, and your belly, and indulge in the delightful diversity that is the human
experience.
The program will be held at the ​Elsie H. Hillman Auditorium​ at the Kauffman Center,
1825 Centre Avenue in Pittsburgh from 5:30 to 8:30.
Click Here​ to register and for more details.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​Green
Building Alliance​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Alliance, ​Like
them on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​. ​Click Here​ to
support their work.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the ​Pittsburgh Green
Story​ website.

42
[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

Updated Schedule: Harrisburg University Distinguished Speaker Series On Climate


Disruption, Sustainable Development

Harrisburg University of Science and


Technology​ recently announced it will host a
series of six public lectures in 2019-- from
January through May-- featuring thought
leaders who will speak on a variety of topics
related to climate disruption and sustainable
development.
One of the speakers-- Dr. Karl Hausker--
had to move his event to February 8 from February 7 because he was asked by members of
Congress to brief them on renewable energy and climate issues. See the revised schedule below.
Click Here ​to watch a video of John Quigley, Director of the Center for Environment,
Energy and Economy talk about this lecture series.
Background
The ​Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA)​ was released in November 2018. It
assesses the science of climate change and variability and its impacts across the United States,
both now and through the end of this century.
The Fourth NCA found that climate disruption presents grave present risks, and
intensifying future risks, to communities-- particularly indigenous communities, our economy,
ecosystems, the environment and the natural world, public health, water quantity and quality,
agriculture, and infrastructure.
Harrisburg University’s 2019 Distinguished Speaker Series on Climate Disruption and
Sustainable Development, organized by ​HU’s Center for Environment, Energy, and Economy
(E3)​, will present thought-provoking discussions on this vitally important topic.
Harrisburg University President Eric Darr said, “Harrisburg University is proud to
present this series of in-depth discussions on the magnitude of the climate risk, approaches to
mitigation, and available legal and policy tools. The series will culminate with three sessions on
relevant cutting-edge research and technology development being conducted at Harrisburg
University. We welcome our students, faculty, and the community to these important
conversations.”
The events, which are free and open to the public, will take place at Harrisburg
University main campus in downtown Harrisburg, 14th Floor Auditorium, except the April 19
event which is in Room 1151.
Each event in the speaker series will run from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.. From 11:30 a.m.
to noon, there will be networking and a complimentary lunch. The lectures begin at noon with
time for Q&A following. The series will also be webcast.
The events will be moderated by John Quigley, Director of HU’s Center for E3.
Registration for these events is requested. ​Click Here​ to RSVP.
Schedule
-- ​CHANGE OF DATE​: February 8: Is 100% Renewable Energy the Answer to Climate
Change?​: Technical and Economic Implications of the Clean Energy Transition – Karl Hausker,

43
Ph.D., Senior Fellow, World Resources Institute
This briefing will explore how assumptions regarding the availability, performance, and
integration of various energy technologies drive the climate and economic implications of
contrasting pathways to the “deep decarbonization” of the U.S. economy. Implications for
energy policy and R&D portfolios will also be explored.
-- March 15: Legal Pathways to Zero Greenhouse Gas Emissions​ – John Dernbach,
Commonwealth Professor of Environmental Law and Sustainability and Director, Environmental
Law and Sustainability Center, Widener University Commonwealth Law School, Harrisburg, PA
Scientific reports are increasingly urgent about the need to act on climate change. But
what do we do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions?
This presentation will discuss the findings in a new book that describes and analyzes
more than 1,000 legal tools for reducing U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to zero, or nearly zero,
by midcentury.
The book is Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States (Michael B.
Gerrard & John C. Dernbach, editors, Environmental Law Institute Press, forthcoming March
2019).
The book provides tools for policy makers, lawyers, and the public to address what is
easily one of the most challenging problems of our time.
-- March 29: Natural Gas in Pennsylvania: Energy, Innovation, and the Environment​ –
Arvind P. Ravikumar, PhD, Assistant Professor in Energy Engineering, Harrisburg University
Natural Gas in Pennsylvania: Energy, Innovation, and the Environment
Pennsylvania is one of the largest producers of natural gas in the United States. The shale
boom of the past decade had many benefits – it reduced air pollution, created jobs, and provided
local economic growth.
More importantly, it has also made US a net importer of oil and gas resources – a feat
that was considered impossible just 10 years ago.
In this talk, Dr. Ravikumar will discuss how Pennsylvania can harness advances in new
technological innovation to make the natural gas industry more sustainable, while creating
hundreds of local, high-paying jobs.
Despite this success of natural gas development in recent years, it has also brought its
own challenges – methane emissions. Methane is the major component of natural gas that heats
our homes and cooks our food.
However, leaks in the natural gas supply chain often releases methane directly into our
atmosphere. This is a problem.
Methane is a greenhouse gas that is far more powerful than carbon dioxide and
contributes to climate change. Near the ground, it can lead to ozone formation and local air
pollution. The challenge, therefore, to Pennsylvania and the U.S., is to strike a balance between
effective environmental regulations and economic development.
Fortunately, the last 5 years has seen tremendous technological innovation in the methane
space. Many start-up companies in the US are developing methane leak detection sensors that are
faster, cheaper, and more effective than existing solutions.
These new sensors, often on mobile platforms such as drones, trucks, planes, and even
satellites, can enable the sustainable development of the natural gas industry. In this lecture, we
will explore this technological revolution, understand its impact on the energy industry, and
discuss what it means to Pennsylvania.

44
-- April 5: Towards a Public Web-Platform for Limiting Methane Emissions from the Oil
and Gas Sector:​ Iheb Abdellatif, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Information Systems Engineering
and Management, Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, with Arvind P. Ravikumar,
PhD, Assistant Professor in Energy Engineering, Harrisburg University
FEAST (Fugitive Emissions Abatement Simulation Testbed) is a tool for modeling the
performance of methane leak detection and repair programs that can be used to evaluate the
effectiveness of detection technologies and proposed mitigation policies.
Originally developed by HU Professor Arvind Ravikumar and colleagues at Stanford
University, FEAST is now being refined at Harrisburg University.
Dr. Abdellatif will discuss how Harrisburg University is enhancing the FEAST tool and
migrating it to a web-based platform to meet widespread interest among regulators, industry, and
other academics in using a tool like FEAST to understand the economics of methane mitigation
policy. T
his project is part of HU efforts to comprehensively advance the business case for
methane emission reduction from energy production across the full value chain – from
production through distribution.
-- April 19: Using the Latest Digital Innovations to Address Energy Poverty in Developing
Countries ​[Room 1151]– Festus Odubo, Ph.D., Public Utility/Energy Advisor/ Rate Case
Review Specialist and Agency Representative, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Public Utility
Commission (PA PUC) and Amjad Umar, Ph.D., Professor and Director of the Management and
eBusiness degree program and the Information Systems Engineering and Management (ISEM)
programs, Harrisburg University; and Senior Advisor to the United Nations and a Fulbright
Senior Specialist with the US Council for International Exchange of Scholars
Dr. Odubo will present his work on the technical and economic/financial issues that
impact the commercial viability and effectiveness of microgrid systems in Nigeria and the
viability of existing and future microgrid projects in the country.
Dr. Umar will present a model of how the latest digital innovations and computer-aided
planning can be deployed to address the issues and foster a bottom-up, community-based
approach to addressing energy policy and sustainable development in developing and least
developed countries.
About the Center for E3
Harrisburg University’s ​Center for Environment, Energy, and Economy (E3)​ was created
in August 2017 to connect HU’s faculty, curriculum, and students to change-makers who work to
combine environmental protection and sustainability practices with economic development.
The Center partners with and solves problems for businesses and governmental entities,
focusing on IT, data, and systems-based projects that can support evidence-based
decision-making systems, policy development, and practice.
For more information, visit the ​Harrisburg University​ website.
NewsClips:
Micek: Wolf’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Vow Is Part Of A Bigger Regional Push
Editorial: Wolf Climate Order Right Course To Cleaner Air
Letter: We Only Have 12 Years To Save The Planet
Puko: Fmr Fed Leaders, Economists Rally Around Carbon Tax
Trump EPA Nominee Would Not Call Climate Change The Greatest Crisis Facing The Planet
PG&E To File For Bankruptcy Over Catastrophic Wildfires In California

45
Vanguard Holds Half Of $920M In PG&E Bonds Close To Bankruptcy Due To Wildfires
What You Need To Know About Trump’s Quiet Order To Fight Wildfires
Oceans Had Their Hottest Year On Record In 2018, Scientists Say
Are UN’s Environmental Goals An Investment Strategy? Federal To Push Companies To Go
Antarctica Losing 6 Times More Ice As 4 Decades Ago Research Finds
[Posted: Jan. 14, 2019]

DCNR To Acquire 987-Acre Parcel To Expand White Clay Creek Preserve In Chester
County

The Department of Conservation and Natural


Resources ​published notice​ in the January 19 PA
Bulletin it intends to purchase the 987-acre
Strawbridge Property to expand its ​White Clay Creek
Preserve​ in Elk, Franklin and New London townships
in Chester County.
The Property includes more than 7 miles of Big Elk
Creek and its tributaries, important forested riparian
buffers along them, over 353 acres of mature and
young woodlands, over 145 acres of floodplain, 668
acres of prime farmland soils and soils of Statewide
importance, and moderate and steep slopes.
It also contains habitat for various threatened and endangered plant and animal species
and represents a critical resource in a rapidly developing area of southeastern Pennsylvania.
Portions of the property are currently being farmed.
DCNR intends to use the property to provide passive recreation such as hiking, hunting
and wildlife watching. No recreational facilities are proposed to be developed at this time.
Another purpose of this purchase is to resolve several instances where land purchased
with federal Land and Water Conservation Fund monies were converted to other uses.
The property will be purchased from the ​Conservation Fund.
DCNR is accepting comments on this transaction through March 5.
Click Here​ for a environmental assessment of the property. Questions and comments
should be directed to Thomas Ford, Director, Bureau of Recreation and Conservation, by sending
email to: ​RA-NRBRC_CONVERSIONS@pa.gov​ or call 717-787-6674.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Planners Back Penn State Plan To Keep Tract As Green Space
Crable: Girl Scouts Set $1.5M Sale Price For Camp Furnace Hills
Related Stories:
Clarion River Named 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Hear About State Parks, Forests
Infrastructure Needs Report Jan. 23

46
2 Pennsylvanians Receive International Emerging Trail Leaders Recognition By American Trails
PA Organization For Watersheds & Rivers Now Accepting Applications For Sojourn Grants
Brandywine Conservancy To Hold Public Meetings On Chester County Greenway Water Trail
Project On Feb. 5, 12
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

PA Organization For Watersheds & Rivers Now Accepting Applications For Sojourn
Grants

On January 15, the ​PA Organization for Watersheds and


Rivers​ announced it is now accepting applications for
2019 Pennsylvania River Sojourn Grants cycle. The
deadline for applications is February 26.
Grants are available on a competitive basis for single
and multi-day paddling events on Pennsylvania Rivers.
Sojourns must incorporate significant educational
programming, and be open to all participants (i.e.,
private trips are not eligible).
Applicants can request $900 per day for multi-day
sojourns and $500 for a single-day sojourn. A total of
$30,000 in funding is available.
The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is the prime sponsor of the
program.
Click Here​ for application instructions. ​Click Here​ for a copy of the application.
Click Here​ for more general information on the program. Questions should be directed to
Janet Sweeney or Angela Vitkoski, POWR, by calling 570-718-6507 or sending email to:
jsweeney@pecpa.org​ or ​avitkoski@pecpa.org​.
POWR, an affiliate of the ​PA Environmental Council​, administers the ​Pennsylvania
Sojourn Program​. POWR has been in place for over a decade and has sponsored sojourn and
paddling trips on many of the Commonwealth’s rivers and streams.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​, ​PEC Bill/Regulation Tracker​, follow ​PEC
on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts. ​Click
Here​ to receive regular updates from PEC.
Related Stories:
Clarion River Named 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Hear About State Parks, Forests
Infrastructure Needs Report Jan. 23
2 Pennsylvanians Receive International Emerging Trail Leaders Recognition By American Trails
DCNR To Acquire 987-Acre Parcel To Expand White Clay Creek Preserve In Chester County
Brandywine Conservancy To Hold Public Meetings On Chester County Greenway Water Trail
Project On Feb. 5, 12
[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

Brandywine Conservancy To Hold Public Meetings On Chester County Greenway Water

47
Trail Project On Feb. 5, 12

On January 15, the ​Brandywine Conservancy​ and


the ​Chester County Planning Commission
announced they will hold public meetings on
February 5 and 12 on a feasibility study for the
Brandywine Water Trail as part of the
Brandywine Creek Greenway Initiative​.
The public meetings are designed to get
input from the community on routes that are
currently used; areas that are unsafe and need
improvement; areas where additional access
would be helpful; and opportunities for
stewardship and education.
The meetings will be held--
-- February 5​, from 5-7 p.m., at the Downingtown Borough Annex, 4 West Lancaster Ave.,
Downingtown, ​Click Here to register​; and.
-- February 12​, from 5-7 p.m., at the Brandywine River Museum of Art, 1 Hoffman’s Mill Rd.,
Chadds Ford, ​Click Here to register​. There is no cost to register.
Both meetings will be held open house style, and attendees can arrive at any time during
the two-hour window. Families are welcome to attend, and light refreshments will be provided.
Once complete, the Brandywine Water Trail will be a 22-mile bi-state water route that
connects communities to the river in Pennsylvania and Delaware, improving access to the
waterway for increased recreational and educational use, while also protecting and enhancing the
natural, scenic, cultural and historic resources along the river.
The feasibility study will focus on the east and west branches of the Brandywine starting
from Coatesville and Downingtown to the ​Brandywine Creek State Park​ in Delaware. Residents
of both states are welcome and encouraged to attend one or both of the meetings to provide
input.
Visit the ​Brandywine Creek Greenway Initiative​ webpage to learn more about the
greenway.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Brandywine
Conservancy​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Conservancy (middle
of the webpage.) Visit the ​Conservancy’s Blog​, ​Like the Conservancy​ on Facebook and ​Follow
them on Instagram​.
Related Stories:
Clarion River Named 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Hear About State Parks, Forests
Infrastructure Needs Report Jan. 23
2 Pennsylvanians Receive International Emerging Trail Leaders Recognition By American Trails
PA Organization For Watersheds & Rivers Now Accepting Applications For Sojourn Grants
DCNR To Acquire 987-Acre Parcel To Expand White Clay Creek Preserve In Chester County
[Posted: Jan. 15, 2019]

Manada Conservancy Pre-Sale Now Open For May 4 Native Plant Sale In Dauphin County

48
The ​Manada Conservancy​ has opened pre-sale
orders for the ​May 4 Native Plant Sale​ to be held at
the Hummelstown Boro Park, Poplar Avenue and
Water Street in Hummelstown, Dauphin County.
April 15 is the deadline for pre-sale orders of native
perennials, trees and shrubs at a 10 percent discount.
Orders must be picked up on Sale Day, May 4.
Click Here​ for all the details.
Feb. 21 Spotted Lanternfly
Click Here​ to check out an upcoming program on the Spotted Lanternfly on February 21
at the Hershey Conservatory.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Manada Conservancy​ website.
Related Story:
Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service​ [Recommended]
Native Plant Resources
There are lots of resources available to help property owners landscape with native
plants, and now is the best time to start planning for Spring projects. Here are just of a few of
the resources available--
-- ​DCNR Landscaping With Native Plants
-- Game Commission: ​Common Beneficial Plants Found In Wildlife Habitat
-- U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: ​Native Plants For Wildlife Habitat And Conservation
Landscaping
-- ​Chesapeake Bay Sustainable Landscape Professional Directory
-- Brandywine Conservancy: ​Forested Riparian Buffer Planting Guide
-- Audubon PA: ​Bird Habitat Recognition Program
-- National Audubon: ​Native Plants Database
-- ​Xerces Society For Invertebrate Conservation
-- ​Gardening For Butterflies: Penn State Extension
-- ​Planting For Pollinators: Penn State Extension
-- ​Center For Pollinator Research, Penn State
-- ​Pennsylvania Pollinator Protection Plan ​- Learn Why Pollinators Are At Risk In PA
-- ​Ernst Seeds - Pollinator Habitat Restoration
-- ​Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
You can also check with ​land trusts​, ​watershed groups​, ​PA Audubon​ and ​Trout Unlimited
Chapters, ​county conservation districts​ or other groups near you to see how they can help.
NewsClips:
After Numerous Offers, Terminally Ill Lancaster Woman Finds Home For Beloved Plant
Editorial: Cruel & Unnecessary: Japan Should End Its Whaling Industry
Related Stories:
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species And Preserving Pollinators
Feature: Recognizing The Value Of Native Plants For Pollinators​ - Dr. Doug Tallamy
Agriculture, Penn State Release PA Pollinator Protection Plan Recommendations
Pollinator Population Is Going Down In PA Due To Pesticides, Parasites And Pathogens

49
Sen. Yudichak, Cong. Barletta, Author Caroline Jones Celebrate The Launch Of We Saved The
Bees And The Butterflies Children's Book
[Posted: Jan. 14, 2019]

Skelly & Loy Hosts 2-Day Bog Turtle Consultation Training April 10-11 In York County

Skelly and Loy​ will offer a ​2-day training course


on project consultation for the
federally-threatened bog turtle on April 10-11 in
Shrewsbury, York County.
The training course will use classroom
discussion and field exercises to explore aspects
of project consultation for the species, including
natural history, habitat evaluations,
presence/absence surveys,
avoidance/minimization measures, and
conservation banking.
Click Here​ for more information, training
fee and to register.
NewsClips:
After Numerous Offers, Terminally Ill Lancaster Woman Finds Home For Beloved Plant
Editorial: Cruel & Unnecessary: Japan Should End Its Whaling Industry
Related Story:
Game Commission Reminds Public Of Dangers In Attempting To Care For Wildlife
[Posted: Jan. 14, 2019]

Game Commission Reminds Public Of Dangers In Attempting To Care For Wildlife

In response to the incident that took place at ​Gifford Pinchot State Park​ in York County, the
Game Commission​ on January 18 reminded the public that wildlife cannot be taken from the
wild.
Under Pennsylvania law, it is illegal to take or possess wildlife. These laws were put in
place to protect both wildlife and humans.
On January 12, several deer were seen stuck in a partially-frozen lake at Gifford Pinchot
State Park. Personnel from the Game Commission, Wellsville Fire Department and state
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources assisted in rescuing at least three deer from
the ice.
One of the deer was removed from the area by a member of the public. The Game
Commission officials who were on the scene were not made aware of the deer’s whereabouts
until pictures appeared on social media later that night. The deer died at the home of the
individual on Sunday morning.
The situation remains under investigation, and no charges have been filed at this time.
“People want to help wildlife that appears to be in trouble, but what they often don’t
realize is that when they attempt to intervene they are making the situation worse through putting
the wild animal under significant stress,” said Matthew Schnupp, the Game Commission’s

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wildlife management director. “Leaving such an animal alone is the best, most-caring thing you
can do for it.”
Proper Wildlife Rehabilitation
Only trained, wildlife rehabilitators, who are licensed by the Game Commission, are
permitted to care for injured wildlife for the purposes of eventual release back into the wild.
For those who find wildlife that truly is in need of assistance, a listing of licensed wildlife
rehabilitators can be found on the ​PA Association of Wildlife Rehabilitators​ website.
If you are unable to identify a wildlife rehabilitator in your area, contact the Game
Commission region office that serves the county in which the animal is found so that you can be
referred to the appropriate licensed wildlife rehabilitator.
The Game Commission urges Pennsylvanians to resist the urge to interfere with wildlife
or remove any wild animal from its natural setting. Such contact can be harmful to both people
and wildlife. Wild animals can lose their natural fear of humans, making it difficult, even
impossible, for them to ever again live normally in the wild.
Wildlife that becomes habituated to humans also can pose a public-safety risk. A few
years ago, a yearling, six-point buck attacked and severely injured two people. The investigation
into the incident revealed that a neighboring family had illegally taken the deer into their home
and fed it as a fawn, and they continued to feed the deer right up until the time of the attack.
For more information on wildlife, visit the ​Game Commission​ website.
NewsClips:
Deer Rescued After Falling Thru Ice At Pinchot State Park
Despite Rescuers’ Efforts, Deer Pulled From Gifford Pinchot Lake Dies
Crable: Man Helps Rescue Deer From Frozen Lake, Takes Buck Home, May Get Fined
Game Commission Reminds Public Of Dangers In Attempting To Care For Wildlife
Game Commission Responds To Deer Rescue Incident
Wellsville Man Faces Citation For Taking Deer Rescued From Pinchot Park Lake
Game Commission To Vote On Moving Opening Day Of Deer Season
Related Story:
Skelly & Loy Hosts 2-Day Bog Turtle Consultation Training April 10-11 In York County
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Help Wanted: Berks Conservation District Urban Resource Conservationist

The ​Berks County Conservation District​ is now accepting applications for an ​Urban Resource
Conservationist​ position to review NPDES water quality permits, Chapter 102 erosion and
sedimentation control plans and Chapter 105 permits.
Click Here​ for all the details. The deadline for applications is February 1.
For more job postings, visit the PA Association of Conservation Districts’ ​Jobs webpage​.
[Posted: Jan. 18, 2019]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

51
The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​, ​Twitter Feed​ and ​add ​PaEnviroDigest Google+​ to your Circle.

Gov. Wolf Nominates Patrick McDonnell For DEP, Cindy Adams Dunn For DCNR, Russell
Redding For Agriculture Secretaries
2nd Term
AP: Scolforo, Levy: Wolf Begins 2nd Term As PA Governor
Gov. Wolf’s Inauguration Remarks
Wolf’s Inauguration Remarks - Annotated
Thompson: Wolf Comes Out As PA’s Encourager-In-Chief In Inaugural Address
Micek: Wolf: Let’s Have Faith In What We Can Fix Together
Gov. Tom Wolf’s Inauguration Speech: 7 Takeaways
Thompson: Wolf To Focus On Achievable Goals In 2nd Term
AP-Levy: Wolf’s First Term: Wins, Losses, Big Budget Fights
John Baer: Will Wolf Start His 2nd Term The Way He Started His First?
Unfettered By Reelection, Will Wolf Return To Progressive Roots In 2nd Term?
Wolf’s 1st Term: Tax Increases, Decreases
Meyer: PA Readies For The Start Of Wolf’s Second Term
Op-Ed: Wolf’s Inaugural Address Will Set Tone For Next 4 Years
PA Environmental Council Adding New Bills, Regulations To Tracking Webpage
Politics
Editorial: Rep. Metcalfe Will Do Damage As Environmental Committee Chair
Sen. Richard Alloway Announces Retirement From The Senate, Active On Chesapeake Bay
Issues
Thompson: Sen. Alloway Plans To Resign From Senate
Meyer: Sen. Alloway Announces Resignation, Kicks Off Another Special Election
AP: Sen. Alloway To Leave Seat In Middle Of Term
Click Here for a Week’s Worth Of Political NewsClips
Air
Doctor: Bad Air May Aggravate Asthma In Clairton Students
Fiat Chrysler Settles With PA Over Emissions Cheating
Kids In Clairton Experiencing Decreased Lung Funding Following Coke (Coal) Plant Fire
Frazier: Lawmakers Demand Fix For Clairton Coke Works Air Issues
Editorial: Wolf Climate Order Right Course To Cleaner Air
Alternative Fuels
Pennsylvania May Have Found Keys To Next Wave Of Transportation Electrification
Awards & Recognition
Clarion River Waterway Goes From Most Polluted To River Of The Year
Clarion River Named PA 2019 River Of The Year
Clarion River Named 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year
Clarion Named PA’s River Of The Year By Public Vote
2 Pennsylvanians Receive International Emerging Trail Leaders Recognition By American Trails
Beautification
Erie Considers New Rules For LED Business Signs
Erie Council OKs Hearing On LED Signs

52
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
Skelly & Loy Hosts 2-Day Bog Turtle Consultation Training April 10-11 In York County
After Numerous Offers, Terminally Ill Lancaster Woman Finds Home For Beloved Plant
Editorial: Cruel & Unnecessary: Japan Should End Its Whaling Industry
Budget
Editorial: Tight Monitoring Of Gas Well Fees Legit
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Hear About State Parks, Forests
Infrastructure Needs Report Jan. 23
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley Authority Extends Stormwater Fee Payment Deadline, Appeal Charge Waived
Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority Contesting Stormwater Fee
Luzerne County Flood Authority Questions Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Roils Harveys Lake Residents
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
Pittsburgh Mayor Promotes In-Lieu Of Taxes Initiative To Fund Housing, Clean Air, Water
Editorial: Pittsburgh Mayor’s In-Lieu Of Tax Plan Needs More Details
Puko: Fmr Fed Leaders, Economists Rally Around Carbon Tax
Chesapeake Bay
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitment; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
WITF Smart Talk: Chesapeake Bay Report Card, CBF’s Harry Campbell, Wil Baker
Venesky: Local Impacts Contribute To Increased Pollution In Chesapeake Bay
Editorial: Climate Change Complicates Efforts To Protect Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Wyoming Valley Authority Sets Jan. 31 Public Meeting On Stormwater Fee
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
Bay Journal: Federal Farm Bill Increases Funding To Control Ag Runoff In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal

53
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Chesapeake Bay - Other States
Maryland Governor Proposes Major Investments For Environment, Chesapeake Bay
Maryland Gov. Hogan Proposes Major Funding To Restore Chesapeake Bay, Environment
NY Governor Goes Big On Water, Proposes Doubling Of Clean Water Investments
New York Governor Unveils Funding Initiative To Help Farmers Protect Water Quality
Virginia’s Governor Proposes Major Investments To Protect Water Quality, Accelerate
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Citizen Action
Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Hosts Wild & Scenic Film Festival In Lancaster Jan. 24
Climate
Micek: Wolf’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Vow Is Part Of A Bigger Regional Push
Editorial: Wolf Climate Order Right Course To Cleaner Air
Letter: We Only Have 12 Years To Save The Planet
Puko: Fmr Fed Leaders, Economists Rally Around Carbon Tax
Trump EPA Nominee Would Not Call Climate Change The Greatest Crisis Facing The Planet
PG&E To File For Bankruptcy Over Catastrophic Wildfires In California
Vanguard Holds Half Of $920M In PG&E Bonds Close To Bankruptcy Due To Wildfires
What You Need To Know About Trump’s Quiet Order To Fight Wildfires
Oceans Had Their Hottest Year On Record In 2018, Scientists Say
Are UN’s Environmental Goals An Investment Strategy? Federal To Push Companies To Go
Antarctica Losing 6 Times More Ice As 4 Decades Ago Research Finds
Coal Mining
Op-Ed: A New Year Means A New Era For The Coal Industry
Knox Mine Disaster Documentary To Debut On Disaster’s 60th Anniversary
Local Artist Explores Coal Breaker Communities In New Art Exhibit At King’s College
Coal Mine Collapses In China Killing At Least 21
Compliance Actions
Fiat Chrysler Settles With PA Over Emissions Cheating
AP: EPA Criminal Actions Against Polluters Hit 30-Year Low
Delaware River
Which Streams In The Delaware Watershed Are Too Dirty For Swimming, Fishing?
How Federal Clean Water Act Fixed The Delaware River’s Pollution Problem
Kummer: $7.9M Mussel Hatchery At Bartram’s Garden Will Help Water Quality In Delaware
River
Reviving The River: The Death Of The Delaware River
Reviving The River: The Delaware River’s Invisible Threats
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
Growing Greener Grant Continues Support Of Villanova’s Campus Stormwater Efforts
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
Delaware RiverKeeper Jan. 18 RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water

54
Pittsburgh Water Authority’s Latest Drinking Water Samples Show Lead Levels Above EPA
Standard
Lead Levels Up Again In Pittsburgh According To Most Recent Data
Overbrook Residents Win Round 3 In Legal Battle With Pittsburgh Water Authority
Education
Deadline Extended: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Motivated Students To Become Youth
Conservation Ambassadors
Interns Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Summer Program Interns
Interns Wanted: Lacawac Sanctuary Biological Field Station Research, Education Experience
Murphy: PA Educators Want Science Standards To Do More Than Teach Students To Win On
Jeopardy!
Better Path Coalition Hosts Environmental Rights Amendment Events Jan. 27, 28 In Harrisburg
Schneck: Super Blood Moon Eclipse Coming Sunday Into Monday
AP: Archaeologists Find Ancient Tool In Luzerne County That Can Unlock Age
Emergency Response
Gov. Wolf Declares Emergency Ahead Of Winter Storm, Road Restrictions Set
PUC Urges Residents To Prepare Now As Winter Storm Harper Approaches; Offers Safety Tips;
Gov. Wolf Declares Emergency
Energy
PUC Report Finds Low-Income Households Participating In Assistance Programs Have Double
The Energy Cost Burdens Than Those Without Assistance
Pennsylvania May Have Found Keys To Next Wave Of Transportation Electrification
State Lawmakers Push To Save Nuclear Power
Litvack: What Does Westinghouse Have In Common With Uber, Airbnb?
Letter: PA Should Join Exploration Into Appalachia Energy Hub
PUC Seeks Comment On Electricity Marketing Practices Of Vista Energy
StateImpact Podcast: What Responsible Reporting On Energy Scientific Research Looks Like
Energy Conservation
PUC Report Finds Low-Income Households Participating In Assistance Programs Have Double
The Energy Cost Burdens Than Those Without Assistance
Letter: Increase Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy
Environmental Heritage
PA Conservation Heritage: New Penn’s Woods Cradle Of Conservation Documentary Now
Online
AP: Knox Mine Disaster Film To Premiere On 60th Anniversary Of Disaster
Farming
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitment; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
WITF Smart Talk: Chesapeake Bay Report Card, CBF’s Harry Campbell, Wil Baker
Westmoreland Farmer: To Save Dairies, Modernize Milk Pricing System
Industrial Hemp Could Become Common Sight In PA Once Again
Editorial: PA Company Provides Lower Cost Produce, Prevents Waste
Bay Journal: Federal Farm Bill Increases Funding To Control Ag Runoff In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Govt. Shutdown Is A Growing Concern For PA, NJ Farmers

55
Trump Recalls 2,500 USDA Workers To Help Farmers Hurt By Shutdown Working For No Pay
Flooding
Feb. 11 Deadline For Applying For SBA Disaster Assistance In Parts Of PA
Wilkes-Barre Mayor: Contractor Pulled Of Creek Flood Wall Won’t Be Paid
Look Back: Blizzard Of 1996 Followed By Flood
Forests
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Hear About State Parks, Forests
Infrastructure Needs Report Jan. 23
What Have You Found In The Woods Of Lancaster County?
Forests - Wildfires
What You Need To Know About Trump’s Quiet Order To Fight Wildfires
California Storms Bring Mudslide Fears, Blizzard Warning
PG&E To File For Bankruptcy Over Catastrophic Wildfires In California
Vanguard Holds Half Of $920M In PG&E Bonds Close To Bankruptcy Due To Wildfires
Geologic Hazards
No Tsunami Alert After Earthquake Off Maryland Coast
Green Infrastructure
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitment; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
Sen. Scarnati Announces Tioga County Growing Greener Grant
DEP Funds Lewisburg School’s Wetland Project
DEP Grant Funding Announced For Cambria Conservation District
Growing Greener Grant Continues Support Of Villanova’s Campus Stormwater Efforts
Venesky: Local Impacts Contribute To Increased Pollution In Chesapeake Bay
Editorial: Climate Change Complicates Efforts To Protect Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Wyoming Valley Authority Sets Jan. 31 Public Meeting On Stormwater Fee
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley Authority Extends Stormwater Fee Payment Deadline, Appeal Charge Waived
Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority Contesting Stormwater Fee
Luzerne County Flood Authority Questions Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Roils Harveys Lake Residents
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
Hazardous Substances
Pittsburgh Water Authority’s Latest Drinking Water Samples Show Lead Levels Above EPA
Standard
Lead Levels Up Again In Pittsburgh According To Most Recent Data
Lake Erie
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds

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Land Conservation
Planners Back Penn State Plan To Keep Tract As Green Space
Crable: Girl Scouts Set $1.5M Sale Price For Camp Furnace Hills
DCNR To Acquire 987-Acre Parcel To Expand White Clay Creek Preserve In Chester County
Littering/Illegal Dumping
Registration Now Open For Keep PA Beautiful's 15th Annual Great American Cleanup Of PA;
Video Contest
Keep PA Beautiful Accepting Registrations For 2019 Great American Cleanup Of PA
Illegal Dumping A Growing Frustration In York County
Philly Street Cleaning Pilot Will Blow Trash Into Street To Bypass Parking Issues
Noncoal Mining
Bagenstose: Documents Raise Questions On East Rockhill Quarry’s Past
Oil & Gas
Editorial: Tight Monitoring Of Gas Well Fees Legit
Citizens Advisory Council To Hear Update On DEP Oil & Gas Regulatory Program Jan. 22
DEP Receives 2 Proposed Good Samaritan Gas Well Plugging Project Requests
Frazier: Pittsburgh Suburb is Deciding Whether To Allow Fracking Beneath Local Park
Sisk: Pittsburgh Suburb Says No To Drilling Under Park
More, Deeper Wells Planned For Existing Marcellus Site In Westmoreland County
1,385-Megawatt Natural Gas-Fired Power Plant Goes Online In Lackawanna County
Lackawanna Energy Center Announces It Is Fully Operational
Lackawanna Natural Gas-Fired Power Plant Comes Online
Letter: PA Should Join Exploration Into Appalachia Energy Hub
Permitting
Water Resources Advisory Committee Meets On Chapt. 102 ePermitting, Alternative To
TMDLs, Small Project Permit, Floodplain Restoration Jan. 24
Pipelines
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: PUC Rejects Emergency Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines,
Full Case Will Move Forward
Legere: PUC Rejects Shutdown Request For Mariner East Pipelines, Underlying Case Moves
Forward
Mariner East 2 Pipeline Worker’s Obscene Comments Draw Ire Of Chester County DA
Op-Ed: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Will Energize PA Economy
Litvak: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To Stabilized Beaver County
Pipeline Explosion Site
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: DEP Says Energy Transfer LP Not Complying With Order To
Stabilized Beaver County Pipeline Explosion Site
PMA: PA Needs Pipeline Infrastructure To Boost Manufacturing Investments
New Pipeline To Feed Natural Gas To Shell Plant
Shell Gets Approval of Ambridge Water Authority For Ethane Pipeline
DEP Invites Comments On Federal Coastal Zone Consistency Determination For The Adelphia
Pipeline Gateway Project In Delaware County
FERC: West Rockhill Site Optimal For Pipeline Compressor Station In Bucks County
Editorial: Gas Pipelines Take Another Hit In Maryland Ruling
Radiation Protection

57
State Lawmakers Push To Save Nuclear Power
Rep. Mehaffie Named One Of 4 Co-Chairs Of PA Nuclear Energy Caucus
WITF: Do You Remember The TMI Nuclear Power Plant Accident? Share Your Story
Litvack: What Does Westinghouse Have In Common With Uber, Airbnb?
Hitachi Scraps $16 Billion Nuclear Power Station In Wales, 2nd Nuclear Project Abandoned In 2
Months
Recreation
Clarion River Named 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year
Clarion Named PA’s River Of The Year By Public Vote
2 Pennsylvanians Receive International Emerging Trail Leaders Recognition By American Trails
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council To Hear About State Parks, Forests
Infrastructure Needs Report Jan. 23
DCNR To Acquire 987-Acre Parcel To Expand White Clay Creek Preserve In Chester County
Jan. 18 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
PA Organization For Watersheds & Rivers Now Accepting Applications For Sojourn Grants
Schneck: Unique Cagins, Lodges For Winter Stays In PA State Parks
Brandywine Conservancy To Hold Public Meetings On Chester County Water Trail Feb. 5, 12
8 Best Places For A Winter Hike In Lancaster County
Deer Rescued After Falling Thru Ice At Pinchot State Park
Despite Rescuers’ Efforts, Deer Pulled From Gifford Pinchot Lake Dies
Wellsville Man Faces Citation For Taking Deer Rescued From Pinchot Park Lake
Schneck: Snowmobiling In PA: Where, When?
Editorial: Hoops At Williamsport Memorial Park A Good Thing
Federal Govt. Shutdown Means Little Gets Done In Delaware Water Gap Park
Editorial: If Visitors Can’t Behave In National Parks, They Should Close
Recycling/Waste
O’Neill: Single-Stream Recycling Run Roughshod Over Quality Of End Product
Lackawanna County Recycling Coordinator Urges Officials, Residents To Get Back To Basics
Centre County Recycling Reminders For The New Year
Erie County HHW, E-Waste Recycling Event Draws 183 Customers
Editorial: Recycling Is Costly, But It Shouldn’t Be Curtailed
Pittsburgh Art Exhibit Made From Restaurants’ Plastic Waste Focuses On Sustainability
Latrobe OKs 26% Hike In Garbage Fees
Aero Aggregates Doubles Production Capacity Of Foamed Glass Aggregates Made From
Recycled Glass
Glass Recycling Company Doubles Operations At Former Baldwin Locomotive Works Building
Renewable Energy
Letter: Increase Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy
New York Governor Moves To Double Solar, Triple Offshore Wind Capacity Targets
Maryland Scales Back EV Charger Program Nearly 80 Percent
Susquehanna River
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
Schuylkill River
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9

58
Stormwater
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitment; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
Sen. Scarnati Announces Tioga County Growing Greener Grant
DEP Funds Lewisburg School’s Wetland Project
Wyoming Valley Authority Sets Jan. 31 Public Meeting On Stormwater Fee
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley Authority Extends Stormwater Fee Payment Deadline, Appeal Charge Waived
Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority Contesting Stormwater Fee
Luzerne County Flood Authority Questions Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Roils Harveys Lake Residents
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
Venesky: Local Impacts Contribute To Increased Pollution In Chesapeake Bay
Sustainability
Pittsburgh Green Building Alliance Inspired Speakers Series Presents Inspirational Stories Of A
Vibrant, Just Region Jan. 31
Watershed Protection
Lancaster, York Counties Present Strategies To Reduce Local Water Pollution To Help Meet PA
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Commitment; Wolf Presents Budget Request Feb. 5
WITF Smart Talk: Chesapeake Bay Report Card, CBF’s Harry Campbell, Wil Baker
Bay Journal: Federal Farm Bill Increases Funding To Control Ag Runoff In Chesapeake Bay
Watershed
Venesky: Local Impacts Contribute To Increased Pollution In Chesapeake Bay
Editorial: Climate Change Complicates Efforts To Protect Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Sen. Scarnati Announces Tioga County Growing Greener Grant
DEP Funds Lewisburg School’s Wetland Project
Growing Greener Grant Continues Support Of Villanova’s Campus Stormwater Efforts
Which Streams In The Delaware Watershed Are Too Dirty For Swimming, Fishing?
How Federal Clean Water Act Fixed The Delaware River’s Pollution Problem
Reviving The River: The Delaware River’s Invisible Threats
Kummer: $7.9M Mussel Hatchery At Bartram’s Garden Will Help Water Quality In Delaware
River
Delaware RiverKeeper Jan. 18 RiverWatch Video Report
Register Now! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
More Than 3,000 Face Highest Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Level
Wyoming Valley Authority Sets Jan. 31 Public Meeting On Stormwater Fee
Answering Your Questions About The Wyoming Valley Authority Stormwater Fee
Proposal For Wyoming Boro To Back Out Of Stormwater Fee Fails
Wyoming Valley Authority Extends Stormwater Fee Payment Deadline, Appeal Charge Waived

59
Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority Contesting Stormwater Fee
Luzerne County Flood Authority Questions Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Roils Harveys Lake Residents
Wyoming Valley West School District Looking For Options To Reduce Stormwater Fee Bill
Wyoming Valley West School District Could Pay $30K In Stormwater Fees
Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee: Explaining The Appeals Process
Editorial: Counties Best To Manage Stormwater
Editorial: Wyoming Valley Stormwater Fee Fight Shows Power Still With People
DEP Grant Funding Announced For Cambria Conservation District
Registration Now Open For 2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill March 9
PA Sea Grant Program Accepting Research Proposals For Lake Erie, Susquehanna, Delaware
Watersheds
PA Lake Management Society Now Accepting Entries For 2019 Photo Contest
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Wildlife
Deer Rescued After Falling Thru Ice At Pinchot State Park
Despite Rescuers’ Efforts, Deer Pulled From Gifford Pinchot Lake Dies
Crable: Man Helps Rescue Deer From Frozen Lake, Takes Buck Home, May Get Fined
Game Commission Reminds Public Of Dangers In Attempting To Care For Wildlife
Game Commission Responds To Deer Rescue Incident
Wellsville Man Faces Citation For Taking Deer Rescued From Pinchot Park Lake
Game Commission To Vote On Moving Opening Day Of Deer Season
Rare Snow Goose, Gadwall Duck Founding During Christmas Bird Count
Erie Nature Watch: Bald Eagles Abound On Presque Isle Bay, Hunting Ducks
Deadline Extended: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Motivated Students To Become Youth
Conservation Ambassadors
Interns Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Seeks Summer Program Interns
Schneck: Hawk Mountain Makes Appearance In Cranston Movie The Upside
Video: Wally The Emotional Support Alligator In York County
Federal Policy
Op-Ed: Recycled Green New Deal
Op-Ed: Proposed Border Wall Is An Ecological Catastrophe

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

Note: ​DEP published the 2019 schedules of its advisory committees, councils and board
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meetings in the ​Dec. 10 PA Bulletin, page 7708​.

January 19--​ ​Brodhead Watershed Association. Schisler Museum Naturalist Hike - Students,
Adults​. East Stroudsburg University, Monroe County. 1:00- Students, 3:00- Adults

January 22--​ ​NEW​. ​House Democratic Policy Committee​ hearing on childhood blood lead test
act. National Constitution center, Kirby Auditorium, 525 Arch St., Philadelphia. 10:00. ​Click
Here​ for the agenda.

January 22--​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council ​meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or
ksalador@pa.gov​. ​Click Here​ for more on agenda items.

January 23-- ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee​ meeting.
12th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Nancy Herb,
717-783-9269 or ​nherb@pa.gov​.

January 23--​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DCNR Conservation and Natural Resources Council​ meeting.
Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DCNR Contact: Gretchen Leslie, 717-772-9084 or
send email to: ​gleslie@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​) C
​ lick Here​ for more on meeting topics.

January 24--​ ​NEW​. ​House Democratic Policy Committee​ hearing on methane and climate
change. Haverford Twp Building, 1014 Darby Road, Havertown, Delaware County. 10:00.

January 24--​ ​Agenda Posted.​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 9:30. Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3720 or ​diawilson@pa.gov​.
Click Here​ for more on agenda items.

January 24--​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Aggregate Advisory Board​ Regulatory, Legislative &
Technical Committee meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
Conference call option: 1-650-479-3208 Access Code: 642 489 443 Password: Envi$ci1000.
DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden, 717-783-8846 or ​dsnowden@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice)​

January 24--​ ​Penn State Extension, Partners Online Tree Tender Training​. First of weekly
sessions through March 7. Noon, 7:00.

January 24--​ ​NEW​. ​Alliance For Chesapeake Bay Wild & Scenic Film Festival​. ​Spring House
Brewing Company​, 209 Hazel Street, Lancaster. 6:00 to 9:00

January 26--​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. Noon to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

January 27-28--​ ​NEW​. ​Better Path Coalition Environmental Rights Amendment Events​. St.
Stephen’s Episcopal Cathedral, 221 N. Front Street, Harrisburg. 2:30.

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January 27-30--​ ​Partnership For The Delaware Estuary​. ​2019 Delaware Estuary Science &
Environmental Summit​. Cape May, NJ.

January 28-- ​Berks County Master Watershed Stewards Volunteer Information Meeting​. Berks
County Ag Center Auditorium, 1238 County Welfare Road, Leesport. 6:00.

January 29--​ ​StateImpact PA Public Climate Forum On A Zero Carbon Future​. ​Energy
Innovation Center,​ 1435 Bedford Avenue, Pittsburgh. 6:15 to 8:30.

January 30--​ ​DEP Open House/Hearing On Specialty Granules, LLC NPDES Water Quality
Permit for a Mining Operation In Adams County​. ​Fairfield Fire and EMS Building​, 106
Steelman Street, Fairfield. 6:00

January 30--​ ​DCNR Webinar On Applying For Recreation, Conservation, Trail and Riparian
Buffer Grants​. 10:00 to 11:30.

January 31--​ ​DEP Small Water Systems Technical Assistance Center Board​ meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. Contact: Dawn Hissner, 717-772-2189 or ​dhissner@pa.gov​.

January 31--​ ​NEW​. ​Green Building Alliance​ ​Inspired Speakers Series - A Vibrant And Just
Region​. ​Elsie H. Hillman Auditorium​ at the Kauffman Center, 1825 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh.
5:30 to 8:30.

February 2--​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. 10:00 to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

February 5- ​Governor’s Budget Address.

February 5--​ ​NEW​. ​Brandywine Conservancy Public Meeting On Chester County Greenway
Water Trail Project​. Downingtown Borough Annex, 4 West Lancaster Ave., Downingtown. 5:00
to 7:00.

February 5-6--​ ​Monroe, Pike Conservation Districts Hold Water Quality Permitting, Green
Infrastructure, Invasive Species Workshop​. Keystone Hall and Gallery, Room 202,​ ​Northampton
Community College - Monroe Campus​, 2411 Rte. 715, Tannersville.

February 6--​ ​Penn State Extension Woods In Your Backyard Webinar Series Starts​. 7:00 to
8:00 p.m.

February 6--​ ​NEW.​ ​Public Utility Commission Low-Income Utility Customer Assistance
Program Stakeholder Group​.

February 6-8--​ ​Penn State Agriculture & Environment Center​. ​PA In The Balance Conference
On Farm Conservation​. Hershey Lodge, Hershey.

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February 6-9--​ ​PA Association For Sustainable Agriculture​. ​Pennsylvania Sustainable
Agriculture Conference​. ​Lancaster County Convention Center​, Lancaster.

February 7--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Next
scheduled meeting is April 11. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to:
kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

February 7--​ ​NEW​. ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ hearing on proposed water
withdrawal actions tentatively on the March agenda of the Commission. Hearing Room 1, North
Office Building, Harrisburg. 2:30. SRBC Contact: Ava Stoops, Administrative Specialist,
717-238-0423, fax 717-238-2436. ​(​formal notice and agenda)​

February 8--​ ​Change Of Date.​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy &
Economy Climate Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Is 100% Renewable Energy
The Answer To Climate Change?. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market
Street, Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

February 11--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Independent Fiscal
​ ouse Republican
Office. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the H
Caucus​ website.

February 11-- ​Berks County Master Watershed Stewards Volunteer Information Meeting​. Berks
County Ag Center Auditorium, 1238 County Welfare Road, Leesport. 6:00.

February 12--​ ​NEW​. ​Brandywine Conservancy Public Meeting On Chester County Greenway
Water Trail Project​. ​Brandywine River Museum of Art​, 1 Hoffman’s Mill Rd., Chadds Ford.
5:00 to 7:00.

February 12-13--​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​.


Dauphin County Agriculture & Natural Resources Center​, 1451 Peters Mountain Road, Dauphin,
Dauphin County.​ ​Click Here to register​.

February 13--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- State Treasurer, 1:00-
Auditor General, 3:00- Attorney General. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
webcast through the H

February 14--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of


Environmental Protection, 1:00- Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources. Room 140 Main
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the H

February 19--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10::00- Dept. of


Revenue/Lottery, 1:00- Independent Fiscal Office, 3:00- Public Utility Commission. Hearing
Room 1, North Office Building.

February 20--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​Geodesign: Using Data

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Transparency And Community Voices For Enhanced Land Use Planning​. Noon to 1:15.

February 20--​ ​NEW​. ​Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public
Support For Water Infrastructure Projects Workshop​. ​Fisher Hall at Burrell Lake Park, 209
Delberta Road, Lower Burrell, Westmoreland County. 9:00 to Noon.

February 20-21--​ ​DCNR, Western PA Conservancy. PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit​. Best
Western Premier Conference Center, 800 East Park Drive, Harrisburg.

February 21--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- State Police/Homeland
Security, 3:00- PA Emergency Management Agency/Fire Commissioner. Hearing Room 1,
North Office Building.

February 21-- ​PA Resources Council. Zero Waste Pennsylvania. Green Building Alliance. True
Zero Waste Symposium​. ​Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens​, Pittsburgh. 8:00 to 3:00.

February 21--​ ​NEW​. ​Southwest PA Commission Water Resource Center Winning Public
Support For Water Infrastructure Projects Workshop​. ​Findlay Township Activity Center, 310
Main Street in Imperial, Allegheny County. 9:00 to Noon.

February 21-- ​NEW​. ​Manada Conservancy Spotted Lanternfly Program​. Hershey Conservatory
at Hershey Gardens, Dauphin County. 7:00 to 8:00.

February 22--​ ​Foundation for Sustainable Forests. French Creek Valley Conservancy. Woods &
Waters Film Series​. ​Erie National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center​, 11296 Wood Duck Lance,
Guys Mills, Crawford County. 6:30.

February 24-25--​ ​PA Environmental Council​, ​PA Organization For Watersheds & Rivers​.
Statewide Watershed Connections Conference​. State College.

February 25--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- State


Police/Homeland Security, 3:00- Dept. of Health. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
typically webcast through the H

February 25--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 3:00- Dept. of


Transportation. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

February 26--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of


Transportation, 3:00- Dept. of General Services. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
typically webcast through the H

February 27--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of Community &
Economic Development. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the
House Republican Caucus​ website.

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February 27--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of Health.
Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

February 27--​ ​DCNR Webinar On Applying For Statewide and Regional Partnership Grants​.
10:00 to 11:30.

February 28--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 3:00- Dept. of


Environmental Protection. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

March 2--​ ​PA Wilds.​ ​Retailers, Producers, Public 3rd Annual PA Wilds Buyer’s Market​.
Gemmell Student Complex Multi-Purpose Room​, Clarion University.

March 4--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of Education.
Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the ​House Republican Caucus
website.

March 4--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 3:00- Dept. of Conservation &
Natural Resources. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

March 5--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Dept. of Agriculture.
Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the ​House Republican Caucus
website.

March 5-- ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Ebensburg Office, 286 Industrial
Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143,
mscheloske@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

March 5-6--​ ​Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance​. ​Healthcare Industry Forum On Energy
Efficiency​. Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, State College, Centre County.

March 6--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Governor’s Budget
​ ouse
Secretary. Room 140 Main Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the H
Republican Caucus​ website.

March 6--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of Agriculture.
Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

March 6-7--​ ​PA Lake Management Society Conference​. Ramada Conference Center, State
College.

March 7--​ ​House Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 10:00- Open. Room 140 Main
​ ouse Republican Caucus​ website.
Capitol. ​Hearings are typically webcast through the H

March 7--​ ​Senate Appropriations Committee Budget Hearings​: 1:00- Dept. of Community &
Economic Development, 3:00- Budget Secretary. Hearing Room 1, North Office Building.

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March 9--​ ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River​. Montgomery County
Community College​ ​campus in Pottstown​.

March 9--​ ​Penn State Extension York County Master Gardeners GardenWise Native Plants,
Ecosystems Gardening Workshop​ ​Central York Middle School​, 1950 N. Hills Road, York. 7:30
to 4:00.

March 15--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Legal Pathways To Zero Greenhouse Gas
Emissions. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market Street, Harrisburg. 11:30
to 1:00.

March 18-19-- ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Educators​. ​2019 Cityscapes & Greenscapes
Conference​. Philadelphia.

March 19--​ ​DCNR, Penn State Extension Forest Health, Insect & Disease Briefing​. Penn Stater
Hotel and Conference Center, State College. 8:30 to 3:30

March 20--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​Options For Meeting MS4
Stormwater Pollution Reduction Requirements Without Breaking The Budget​. Noon to 1:15.

March 20-21-​- ​Northeast Recycling Council Spring Conference.​ Wilmington, DE.

March 21-- ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​

March 22-23--​ ​Penn State Center For Private Forests 4th Biennial Forest Landowners
Conference​. Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, State College.

March 27-28--​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​. ​Jennings
Environmental Education Center​, 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock, Butler County.​ ​Click
Here to register​.

March 29--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Natural Gas In PA: Energy, Innovation And The
Environment. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market Street, Harrisburg.
11:30 to 1:00.

April 5-- ​Wildlife For Everyone We Love Wild Things & Wild Places Gala​.

April 5--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate Disruption
& Sustainable Development Series​: Towards A Public Web-Platform For Limiting Methane
Emissions From The Oil & Gas Sector. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326

66
Market Street, Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

April 7-9--​ ​CMU Mascaro Center For Sustainable Innovation. 2019 Engineering Sustainability
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

April 11--​NEW​. ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to:
kdalal@pa.gov​.

April 16-18-- ​PA American Water Works Association Annual Conference​. Hershey Lodge and
Convention Center.

April 17--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​Making The Most Of Historical And
Heritage Assets​. Noon to 1:15.

April 19--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Using The Latest Digital Innovations To Address
Energy Poverty In Developing Counties. Harrisburg University, Room 1151, 326 Market Street,
Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

April 29 to May 2--​ ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National Watershed and Stormwater
Conference​. South Carolina.

May 1--​ ​Pennsylvania Groundwater Symposium​. State College.

May 4--​ ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR Moshannon State Forest Tree Planting, Clearfield
County​.

May 4--​ ​NEW​. ​Manada Conservancy Native Plant Sale​. Hummelstown Boro Park, Poplar
Avenue and Water Street in Hummelstown, Dauphin County.

May 8-10--​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

May 15--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​The Benefits And Challenges of
Ridesharing On The Transportation System​. Noon to 1:15.

May 16-18--​ ​PA Land Trust Association​. ​Land Conservation Conference​. Monroe County.

June 16-21--​ ​Cumberland Valley TU Rivers Conservation & Fly-Fishing Youth Camp​. ​Messiah
College​, Grantham, Cumberland County.

July 24-26-- ​Professional Recyclers Of PA​. ​Annual Recycling & Organics Conference​.
Harrisburg.

67
September 22-24--​ ​Pennsylvania Greenways And Trails Summit​. Shippensburg University
Conference Center.

October 8-10--​ ​Natural Areas Association Natural Areas Conference​. Pittsburgh.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.


Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.
Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.
Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.
DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel
DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events
Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and
Flickr.
Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule
You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

January 18--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Spirit Of South Mountain Award


January 18--​ ​PA Land Trust Assn. Lifetime Achievement Award
January 22--​ ​Accepting. DCNR Community Conservation Partnership, Buffer Grants
January 25--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
January 25--​ ​Appalachian Audubon Hog Island Youth Education Scholarship
January 25--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
January 25--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
January 25--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
January 25--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
January 31--​ ​NFWF Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Grants
January 31--​ ​EPA Brownfields Assessment, Cleanup and Multipurpose Grants
January 31--​ ​Appalachian Trail Museum Hall Of Fame Nominations
February 1--​ ​Accepting CFA Act 13 Watershed Restoration Grants
February 1--​ ​Accepting CFA Act 13 Abandoned Mine Drainage Treatment Grants
February 1--​ ​Accepting CFA Act 13 Orphan or Abandoned Well Plugging Grants
February 1--​ ​Accepting CFA Act 13 Baseline Water Quality Data Grants
February 1--​ ​Accepting CFA Act 13 Sewage Facilities Grants
February 1--​ ​Accepting CFA Act 13 Flood Mitigation Grants
February 1--​ ​Accepting CFA Act 13 Greenways, Trails & Recreation Grants
February 4-- ​PA Environmental Professionals College Scholarships
February 4--​ ​Accepting Game Commission Seedlings For Schools
February 8--​ ​PEC, Dominion Energy Western PA Environmental Awards
68
February 8--​ ​Pocono Arts Council Entries To Earth Speaks V Exhibition
February 8--​ ​DEP FAST Act Alternative Fuels Corridor Infrastructure Grants
February 11--​ ​PA Land Trust Assn. Government Leadership Award
February 15-- ​Extended.​ ​Wildlife Leadership Academy Youth Conservation Ambassador
February 15--​ ​Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Water Quality Improvement Grants
February 15--​ ​EPA Environmental Justice Small Grants
February 15--​PA Lake Management Society Awards
February 15--​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission Winter Photo Contest
February 15--​ ​Green Stormwater Infrastructure Partners Awards - Philly Area
February 20--​ ​NOAA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Education & Training Grants
February 22--​ ​Celebrating Women In Conservation Awards
February 26--​ ​NEW​. ​POWR PA Sojourn Grants
February 28--​ ​PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau Winter Photo Contest
March 1--​ ​PHMC Keystone Fund Historic, Archaeological Protection Grants
March 1--​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Wilderness Wheels Grants​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
March 1--​ ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Investment Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
March 4-- ​DCNR PA Outdoor Corps Young Adult Crews​ ​(At The Very Latest!)
March 6-- ​NEW​. ​PA Lake Management Society Photo Contest
March 11-- ​NEW​. ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant Research Grants
March 15-- ​WPC TreeVitalize Pittsburgh, Allegheny County Tree Planting Grants
March 21--​ ​Rivers Conservation & Fly-Fishing Youth Camp
March 22--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
March 22--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
March 22--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
March 22--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
March 31--​ ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
March 31--​ ​DEP Municipal, Hazardous Waste Host Municipality Inspector Grants
April 10--​ ​DCNR Community Conservation Partnership, Recreation, Buffer Grants
April 18-- ​Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Land Transaction Grants
May 10-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
May 17--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Watershed Restoration Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Abandoned Mine Drainage Abatement and Treatment Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Orphan or Abandoned Well Plugging Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Baseline Water Quality Data Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Sewage Facilities Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Flood Mitigation Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Greenways, Trails And Recreation Grants
July 15--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
July 19--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding

69
July 19--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
December 16--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
March 22--​ ​DEP Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
June 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 23-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
December 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.
-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

No new regulations were published this week. ​Pennsylvania Bulletin - January 19, 2019

Technical Guidance -------------------

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice​ in the January 19 PA Bulletin


announcing the availability of the final Land Recycling Program Technical Guidance Manual
and the rescission of the Total Coliform Rule Guidance as obsolete.

Permits ------------

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice in the January 19 PA Bulletin


inviting comments on the proposed federal Coastal Zone Management Act consistency
determination for the ​Adelphia Pipeline Gateway Project​ in Delaware County. ​Click Here​ for
more.

DEP also published notices in the January 19 PA Bulletin of proposed federal Coastal Zone
Management Act consistency determinations for dredging and bank stabilization along the
Delaware River in Marcus Hook Borough​; maintenance dredging by Sunoco Partners Marketing
and Terminals at ​Hog Island Wharf in Delaware County​; and promulgating uniform national
discharge ​standards for vessels of the armed forces​-Phase II Batch 2.

DEP published notice of changes in the list of businesses certified to perform radon-related
activities in Pennsylvania in the January 19 PA Bulletin (​page 335​).

70
Note:​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 51 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the January 19 PA Bulletin -
pages 287 to 338​.

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Related Tools ----------------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

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