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For Curriculum Office Use Only

Date Submitted: 2017-09-01 Approval date by Faculty Senate and Provost:


School: HU Division : HULC Department: HUMA Catalog Year: 1819

Salt Lake Community College


Course Curriculum Outline (CCO)
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Faculty Contact: Jane Drexler, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy
Action: Name Change and Change of General Education Designation
Rationale for action; include what is being changed:
Changing the name of the course to better align with USHE institutions. Changing the designation from
ID to HU: Reduced focus on psychological and anthropological dimensions of relativism, egoism and
other moral theories and issues, in order orient course back to general HU designation, to better align
with USHE institutions and best practices.
If other than next catalog year, semester of implementation:

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Course Prefix: PHIL Course Number: 1120


Course Title: Social Ethics (HU)
If different than above, Full Course Title:
Course Description: The philosophical study of moral values, how we understand what is right and wrong,
and how we make moral decisions and act in the world. Through classic philosophical texts and contemporary
writers, we explore moral philosophies and principles, and we develop skills to analyze and respond to moral
dilemmas surrounding death, punishment, war; love and hate; animals and the environment, and more.

Pre-Requisite(s): None
Recommended Pre-Requisite(s): None
Co-Requisite(s): None
Recommended Co-Requisite(s): None
Other Registration Restriction(s): None
Semester(s) Taught: All
SLCC Equivalent Course(s): None
For Credit Courses For Clock Hour Courses
Credit hours: 3 Clock hours:
Total contact hours: 3 Billable hours:
Lecture: 3 Total contact hours:
Lab: 0
Other: 0

Can this course be repeated for additional credit? No


If yes, what’s the repeat limit?
Is this course designed for General Education? Yes
If yes, indicate General Education designations: HU Humanities
Complete the General Education Rationale.
Is there an equivalent (or potentially equivalent) course at other USHE institution(s)?
If yes, explain:
University of Utah: PHIL 1001: Philosophy and Ethical Dilemmas in the Contemporary World (HF)
Utah State University: PHIL 1120: Social Ethics (BHU)
Weber State University: PHIL 1120: Contemporary Moral Problems (HU)
Utah Valley University: PHIL 2050: Ethics and Values (an institutional requirement for all UVU students)
Dixie State: PHIL 1120: Social Ethics: (HU)
Snow College: PHIL 2050: Ethics and Values (HU)
(and also Westminster: PHIL 206: Introduction to Ethics (Liberal Ed Requirement)
__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Course Student Learning Outcomes mapped to SLCC College-Wide Student Learning Outcomes.
1. Acquire substantive knowledge 5. Become a community engaged learner
2. Communicate effectively 6. Work in a professional & constructive manner
3. Develop quantitative literacies 7. Develop computer & information literacy
4. Think critically & creatively 8. Develop lifelong wellness

Course Learning Outcomes SLCC CWSLO #


Students will explain how traditional ethical theories (e.g. Utilitarianism, Kantian Deontology, 1, 2, 4, 5
rights-based theories, and more) inform us about how humans have understood and approached,
analyzed and resolved contemporary and classic moral issues.
Students will explore and critically assess arguments put forth by different historical and cultural 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7
perspectives regarding many of the most important social issues citizens face in our times.
Given real-life ethical dilemmas, Students will clearly present theoretical issues and concepts that 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7
are applicable, and suggest possible ethically-grounded solutions and conclusions.
Students will effectively and concisely offer written arguments and analysis in order to 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7
communicate their understandings of the theoretical frameworks and substantive knowledge,
apply theories to cases, expand points of inquiry, and persuade their audience to a particular
position.
Students will be able compare and analyze the variety of theoretical approaches they encounter 1, 4, 7
through an exploration of the primary texts and styles of the philosophers from whom those ideas
originate, as well as their respondents.
Students will demonstrate their abilities to identify and evaluate the impact, implications and 1, 4, 5
applications of ethical theories, exploring how value systems and conceptual frameworks manifest
in daily thinking and real ethical dilemmas, such as euthanasia, animal rights, Just War and
Terrorism, death penalty, abortion and other reproductive issues, and so forth; and to critically
recognize not only the important contributions a theory can offer to the analysis and response to
moral issues, but also its limitations.
Students will demonstrate their ability to shift analytical lenses between various theoretical and 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7
conceptual frameworks, as well as various social and historical locations.
Students will develop skills of critical analysis and evaluation of ethical theory and practice for the 1, 2, 4, 5, 6
express purpose of improving their abilities to engage in creative, intelligent and coherent
discussion and problem-solving regarding moral issues which pose critical challenges to our
world—locally, nationally and globally.
Students will develop skills that will enable them to respectfully and effectively participate in 1, 2, 4, 5, 6
public life with those who differ in perspectives and positions on important issues.
Students will demonstrate understanding of the complexities involved in moral issues, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6
perspectives and approaches. This attention to complexity and multiplicity will contribute to their
active engagement in civic life.
See SLCC Assessment webpage for additional details about College-Wide Student Learning Outcomes

A representative syllabus must be included.


__________________________________________________________________________________________________

How were AIC comments addressed by School Curriculum Committee?

For Catalog & Scheduling Office Use Only


Course Level: Grading Mode:
Occupational Code: Classification:
Impact on other SLCC courses and/or programs:

SLCC Curriculum & Articulation Office // Approved by Faculty Senate (2017-05-01)


For Curriculum Office Use Only
Date Submitted: Approval date by Faculty Senate and Provost:
School: Division: Department: Catalog Year:
Date of Course Approval/Previous Review:

Salt Lake Community College


General Education Course Rationale
__________________________________________________________________________________________

Course Prefix: PHIL Course Number: 1120

Course Title: Social Ethics (HU)

General Education Designation(s): Humanities (HU)

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Submitted by: Jane Drexler, Ph.D, Associate Professor, Philosophy Date: Aug 24, 2017
Associate Dean: Paul Allen, Ph.D. Date: Aug. 24, 2017
Dean: Date:

Is this a new General Education Course? No, but the designation is changing, as is the name

Is this a review of an existing General Education Course?

Is the provided representative syllabus reflective of syllabi used in all sections of the course?

Explain why or why not.

Yes. All sections use a shared set of Readings Packets.

And each section follows these special instructions:

1. Instructors must cover at least four moral theories and/or meta-ethical theories, and at least one

non-traditional area of ethical theory.

2. Instructors must cover at least three classic/contemporary moral issues

3. In line with the HU designation criteria, instructors must substantively use primary texts.

4. At least one assignment must be a philosophical analysis/position paper on an ethical issue.

5. Special sections of this course may be focused on particular areas in professional applied ethics:
Business Ethics, Health Care Ethics, or the like, based on need and coordination with professional programs.

Are students in all sections asked to archive at least one signature assignment and reflection in their General
Education ePortfolio? Explain the signature assignment including the student reflection piece.

This course requires that students develop at least one reason-based, defended position on a moral issue, drawing
on primary and secondary philosophical texts, and grounded in an analysis of the moral philosophies encountered in
the course using analytical skills developed during the course of the semester. The nuts and bolts of this assignment
are integrated throughout the semester's course content and skills-building; and the final product is uploaded onto
an ePortfolio with a substantive reflection essay designed to focus on at least two General Education learning
outcomes--most often Civic Engagement and Critical Thinking. While most often philosophical analysis happens in
written work, other Signature Assignments may be included in an ePortfolio, and may be designed to incorporate
multi-media and other non-traditional modalities for presenting philosophical argument.

For General Education Course Review only:

Since course approval, or last review, how has the course changed? List changes and associated rationale:

Changing the name from Ethical Theory and Moral Problems to “Social Ethics” to better align with USHE and to
offer to students a clearer sense of the content of the course.

Changing designation from ID to HU. Reduced focus on psychological and anthropological dimensions of
relativism, egoism and other moral theories and issues, in order orient course back to general HU designation, to
better align with USHE institutions and best practices.

Developed essay collection of primary texts in theory and application.

What assessments were completed on this course?

Ongoing assessment of gen ed outcomes -- Critical Thinking, Civic Engagement, and Communication--led to
instructor efforts and training to improve SAs and ePortfolio.

What actions are planned based on the assessment results?


Our current goal is to work with Ethics faculty to improve our use of ePortfolios—as learning tools and reflective
devises throughout the semester. These efforts will continue to be informed by the literature on best (high
impact) practices for the discipline of philosophy.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

1. How does the course meet the broader General Education philosophy and criteria as articulated in Section 1
of the General Education Handbook?

Through sustained attention and analysis of multiple value systems, moral theories and current issues, PHIL
1120 helps students develop broader perspectives and deeper understandings of their communities and the
world; discover new interests and uncover new talents, and identify and challenge assumptions. Through the
development of writing and speaking skills, as well as evaluation and critical an, students develop vital skills for
the workplace and civic engagement.

2. How does the course meet the criteria established for its purported General Education designation as
described in Appendix 1 of the General Education Handbook?

This course explores the history and theories of moral reasoning through the original philosophical texts and
their applications to perennial and current moral dilemmas, and as such it focuses on cultural and intellectual
expressions through historical, philosophical, hermeneutic, and cultural investigations.

This course contextualizes the histories of moral ideas--exploring the historical and cultural circumstances that
inform and are informed by conceptual frameworks and value systems, and as such it situates the events,
customs and values of people throughout time in their appropriate cultural contexts.

This course's activities and methodologies center on the acquisition and development of critical analysis skills--
through textual analysis of conceptual, ideological and logical structures; contextualization and identification of
hidden assumptions; and as such it attends to the development of critical analysis skills: the tools to assay
essential features and qualities of philosophical texts in order to analyze and evaluate the historical, cultural,
and moral forces that shape and are shaped by them.

This course organizes its units around the application of theories to current and perennial moral problems,
through case study analysis, group workshops and discussions--in addition to the sustained attention to
developing analytical writing skills, and as such it cultivates attentiveness to expressions, the written word,
consideration of multiple perspectives, balancing disparate value systems and meanings, and being responsive
to the complexities of our moral dilemmas.

In these ways, it meets the criteria established for the Humanities designation

3. How does the course meet the teaching methods standards as articulated in Section 6 of the General
Education Handbook?
This course uses a variety of teaching methods: case study workshops, debate-style discussion and argument
evaluation; small and large group discussions, interactive lecture. It may also include service-learning
components, student presentations, multimedia projects, or the like.

4. How does the course meet the ePortfolio standards as articulated in Section 7 of the General Education
Handbook? See the Gen Ed ePortfolio Integration Rubric on the SLCC Faculty ePortfolio Resource Site for
additional assistance.

The final signature assignment is uploaded onto an ePortfolio with a substantive reflective essay designed to
focus on at least two General Education learning outcomes--most often Civic Engagement and Critical Thinking.
Additionally, the reflective aspects of the ePortfolio ask students to integrate their learning in this course with
their other experiences in and beyond general education coursework.
Prompt questions designed to elicit substantive responses are provided to students.

Additionally, while most often philosophical analysis happens in written work, supplementary Signature
Assignments which integrate creative, multi-disciplinary and non-traditional modes of expression may be
included in course ePortfolios.

5. How does the course meet the criteria established for a Diversity course? (if applicable)

6. How does the course help students communicate effectively?

This course focuses on developing written and oral communication skills, creating and articulating defendable
positions in conversation with others. Much focus is given to the crucial skill of "shifting perspectives"--seeing
issues from multiple points of view and value frameworks. This skill is necessary for effective communication,
persuasion, and decision-making in the complex worlds of professional, public and private life.

7. How does the course help students develop quantitative literacy?

8. How does the course help students think critically and/or creatively?

Through the exploration, analysis and evaluation of value systems and conceptual frameworks underlying
multiple moral standpoints, and through the application of moral analysis skills to contemporary and perennial
ethical dilemmas--in professional, public and private spheres--students develop skills for shifting perspectives,
identifying and interrogating unstated assumptions, articulating and evaluating the strength of moral
arguments, and engaging in group problem-solving and decision-making.

9. How does the course help students gain the knowledge and skills to be civically/community engaged?

Through the application of moral theories and conceptual frameworks to current "real-life" moral dilemmas
affecting themselves, their community and the world, students come to see themselves as participants in the
public sphere, and to see the world and its practices and beliefs as unfixed and changeable. Philosophy allows
for the exploration of *why* social and civic institutions, practices and values are the way they are.
Philosophical exploration is essential to civic engagement because it looks at social phenomena from the inside-
out--from the internal logic and value systems at its core.

10. How does the course help students learn to work professionally and constructively with others?

Through building skills of shifting perspectives and identifying underlying conceptual frameworks and unstated
assumptions, students develop skills of empathy. Understanding multiple viewpoints allows for effective
communication across difference, with professionalism and respect, and with an eye towards collective
decision-making and identifying and maximizing shared values.

11. How does the course help students gain computer and/or information literacy?

Students learn to use electronic resources for research, writing and presentation, including the continued
development of an electronic portfolio.

Additionally, This course asks students to seek out and evaluate the quality of sources on current and perennial
moral issues. Students learn to identify underlying value frameworks and assumptions of the different sources
they encounter.

12. How does the course help students develop the attitudes and skills for lifelong wellness? (if applicable)

SLCC Curriculum & Articulation Office // Approved by Faculty Senate (2017-05-01)


Sample Syllabus
PHIL 1120: Social Ethics (HU)
Professor: Dr. Jane Drexler
Office: AAB 237R
Office Hours: W 3-4, T 1-3, or by appt.
email: through Canvas mail system, or jane.drexler@slcc.edu
office phone: 801-957-4438

Course description: Ethics is the philosophical study of moral values, how we understand what is right and
wrong, and how we make moral decisions and act in the world. In a very general sense, ethics is also and
primarily concerned with how things "ought" to be and how we '"ought" to act, which often times is vastly
different than how things "are." Ethics requires an open mind, a concern for respectful dialogue (particularly
since ethical issues often include disagreements), and a commitment to understanding diverse (and often, but
not always, competing) ethical frameworks and interpretations of issues involved in particular moral dilemmas.
By the end of term, you will have developed a familiarity with the classic ethical philosophies of Utilitarianism,
Kantian Deontology, Virtue Ethics, Relativism, Egoism, and more. You will also explore a variety of
contemporary and classic moral dilemmas within law, public policy and personal ethics, including issues
surrounding death, punishment, war; love and hate; animals and the environment, and more.

Required Text:
 Reading Packets to be purchased from the Redwood Campus Bookstore.
o Reading Packet: Theories and Perspectives (yes, buy this one)
o Case Studies Packet: buy at least ONE of following: (Pick whichever one(s) that cover
subjects that interest you most)
 Case Studies Packet #1: Abortion; Death Penalty; Violence, Just War and Terrorism
 CS Packet #2: Marriage and LGBT Rights, Hate Speech and First Amendment, Euthanasia
 CS Packet #3: Animals/Environment; Civil Disobedience; Wealth, Work, Hunger

Course Canvas Site On the main page of slcc.edu, under “MYSLCC” click on “Canvas” and
sign in using your MyPage login. Choose PHIL 1120 from your Courses tab.

Course Objectives:
 Students will explain how traditional ethical theories (e.g. Utilitarianism, Kantian Deontology, rights-
based theories, and more) inform us about how humans have understood and approached, analyzed and
resolved contemporary and classic moral issues
 Students will compare and analyze the variety of theoretical approaches they encounter through an
exploration of the primary texts and styles of the philosophers from whom those ideas originate, as well
as their respondents
 Given real-life ethical dilemmas, Students will clearly present theoretical issues and concepts that are
applicable, and suggest possible ethically-grounded solutions and conclusions
 Students will demonstrate their abilities to identify and evaluate the impact, implications and
applications of ethical theories, exploring how value systems and conceptual frameworks manifest in
daily thinking and real ethical dilemmas, such as euthanasia, animal rights, Just War and Terrorism,
death penalty, abortion and other reproductive issues, and so forth; and to critically recognize not only
the important contributions a theory can offer to the analysis and response to moral issues, but also its
limitations.
 Students will explore and critically assess arguments put forth by different historical and cultural
perspectives regarding many of the most important social issues citizens face in our times
 Students will effectively and concisely offer written arguments and analysis in order to communicate
their understandings of the theoretical frameworks and substantive knowledge, apply theories to cases,
expand points of inquiry, and persuade their audience to a particular position
 Students will demonstrate their ability to shift analytical lenses between various theoretical and
conceptual frameworks, as well as various social and historical locations
 Students will develop skills that will enable them to respectfully and effectively participate in public life
with those who differ in perspectives and positions on important issues
 Students will develop skills of critical analysis and evaluation of ethical theory and practice for the
express purpose of improving their abilities to engage in creative, intelligent and coherent discussion
and problem-solving regarding moral issues which pose critical challenges to our world—locally,
nationally and globally
 Students will demonstrate understanding of the complexities involved in moral issues, perspectives and
approaches. This attention to complexity and multiplicity will contribute to their active engagement in
civic life

Course Requirements
Reading Questions. (7 @ 2 points each)
Throughout the semester, you will be required to turn in SEVEN “RQ” assignments (due dates are on the
reading schedule). For each RQ, you will write responses to questions I provide, which can be found under
“Reading Questions” in our Canvas site’s “Syllabus and Essential Documents” page. Purpose: These RQs are
designed for several purposes: a) to help you develop argument identification and analysis skills; b) to prepare
you for class-discussion; and c) to give yourself a good reference for studying for the exams. Point-Value:
Each assignment will be worth 2 points. They will be graded on a point/no-point basis: if your answer is
complete and shows careful attention to the reading, you will receive a point; if it is incomplete or shows a lack
of careful attention (otherwise called “B.S.ing”), you will not receive a point. Format: These are to be
TYPED and DOUBLE-SPACED, 10-12 pt font. At least 1 full page, not including the text of the questions
themselves. Late Policy: I will not accept these late. If you miss one, you cannot make it up. But, there are a
lot more than seven to choose from, so you can totally skip a few and still get your required seven in.

Unit Exams (3 @ 15 points each)


At the end of each main unit, you will take a unit exam, focused on gauging understanding and competence in
each unit’s substantive material and analytical skills. These exams will combine multiple choice and other
objective formats, as well as short and long essays.
Late Policy: These exams cannot be made up unless you have a documented, excused absence (i.e. doctor’s
note for the date in question), or if you make PRIOR arrangements with me to take the exam in the testing
center. If you come to me after the exam, without an excused absence, asking to make it up, you will not be
able to.

Case Study Workshops Activities (2 @ 4 points)


Over the course of the semester, you will be participating in several group case study workshops on topics that
you select from your Moral Issues Reading Packets. The purpose of these workshops is to explore and analyze
a classic moral dilemma by applying the philosophical theories we have been learning in class up to that point.
These case studies frame each module, and are really the “hubs” of the course, around which course content has
been organized. For two of the Case Studies (your choice of which two), you will turn in a set of Activities,
similar to the Unit Signature Activities (see below). More information will be available on these we begin our
case study workshopping.

Unit Signature Activities (2 @ 4 points each).


These Signature Activities are designed to practice and develop key skills and abilities. You only need to
complete TWO during the semester, though that must be from two different units. There are typically
several to choose from within each unit, so you get to decide which kind of activity you want to do, but
remember you can only get a score for one activity in any single unit. Late policy: you can turn these in late,
but you lose one point for every class meeting late it is. (So, in other words, if it is one week late (two class
meetings, that is) you can only earn 1 point, and if you turn it in much later than that, it’s not worth anything.)
These Module Activities may include the following types of activities:
 Phil in the Blanks: these are structured and short writing assignments, following a template that I’ve
provided, to help students connect philosophers’ ideas and arguments to larger conversations, to understand
why particular ideas matter and to whom thinkers are responding. These activities are designed to develop
analytical skills and to practice contextualizing ideas, backing up claims with textual evidence and the like.
 “In the News” Ethical Analyses: for these kinds of activities, I ask you to consider a particular current
event or issue through the lens of the philosophical theories we have been learning about. These are 2-3
page write-ups designed to develop skills of critical analysis, drawing from specific philosophical texts and
theories and applying them to pressing issues, like heath care law, fracking, rising costs of tuition and
books, the role of the U.S. in international affairs, food production, gun control, sports, or whatever. You
may also decide to analyze moral issues specific to your major field of study or some other topic that is
pressing to you.
 Poster/Flyer/other visual form of presentation: for these kinds of activities, I ask you to design a one-
page “poster” that presents (through images and words) a central point/concept/idea of a philosopher, or
highlights the primary concepts and dilemmas of an issue. These types of activities are meant to encourage
creative expression and artistic engagements with academic and intellectual ideas. Usually, people have a
lot of fun with these too.

Final Signature Paper – Case Study Analysis Paper (1 @ 10 points)


You will be required to turn in ONE 5-7 page Philosophical Analysis Paper which will be based on a Case
Study Workshops of your choice. Each Case Study Workshop includes a “topic question” (called a “Prompt
Question”) which serves not only as the foundation for the discussions, but also as a framing question for a
Paper. (Alternate Paper Idea: Instead of choosing one of the Case Study Workshop topic from the semester,
you may choose another current or perennial issue that we did not have time to cover, but that particularly
interests you (you may have even done a Unit Activity on the topic). If you choose this option, you must run
your topic/issue choice past me). Late Policy: The final paper can be turned in after the due date, for a late
penalty, but only up until the end of finals week.

E-portfolio (5 points)
All General Education classes at SLCC—including this one—require that you upload “Signature Assignments”
to a “General Education ePortfolio” that you create. A Gen-Ed Portfolio is a kind of academic/professional
website where you upload key assignments from your General Education classes, and reflect on those
assignments and the class, as well as on your general education experience (like, for instance, how this class
connects to other general education courses and your career/education/life). In our class, you will be
uploading your final paper, as well as some Unit Activities you’re particularly pleased with.

Your ePortfolio should include four elements:


1) a reflection essay (expect to write at least two substantive paragraphs) that attends to at least two of the
question-sets I have provided for you, and introduces the contents of your ePortfolio page.
2) your uploaded final paper, with an explanation of the assignment and what you wrote on.
3) Two sample Unit Activities that you are particularly pleased with, each with an explanation about what
each the activity was.
4) attention to visual presentation

When I grade your ePortfolio, I will be evaluating it according to a rubric which considers the quality of your
reflection essay, your formal analysis paper upload, the presentation of your two chosen unit activities, and the
general formatting and aesthetics of the PHIL1120 page of your ePortfolio.
Late Policy: Your ePortfolio can be submitted in after the due date, for a late penalty, but only up until the end
of finals week.

Participation. (10 points)


Participation is expected and required, and will be primarily evaluated on the basis of your work within small
and large group discussions, workshops and so forth, but also on the basis of preparedness, attentiveness, and
respectful and thoughtful listening and commenting.
 Point-Value: 10 points of your final grade will be based on your participation
 Note: I understand that people participate in different ways, but there are some minimum,
non-negotiable expectations from me—that each brings their texts and reads before class, that an attempt
is made by the quieter ones to offer their perspectives, that an attempt is made by the confident speakers
to include the less confident, and that there is an appreciation and respect for other viewpoints.

Readings
Each class, you will be assigned articles or a section of a text to have read before the next class. (you can find
these assignments on the reading schedule—the date under which the reading is listed is the date by which you
are expected to have read it).
 Allow Time to Read: The reading load is sufficient to require that you plan in advance enough time to
read. If you leave it to the last minute, you won't get it done. Also, in some cases, these are difficult and
complex texts, so treat them as such, and give yourself enough time to read them thoughtfully.
 Preparedness Policy: All students will be required to come to class with the assigned texts in hand,
and having already read them. Let me re-iterate: You MUST bring your text to class. If you are
sharing a book with a classmate, that’s fine with me, but you MUST make your own copy of the
materials so that you will have the reading in front of you during class, with your own highlights and
notes. If I notice a pattern of not bringing your text or of not being prepared, I will speak to you about it.
Once I speak with you, further failures to bring your text or be prepared will be counted as ABSENCES,
whether you are physically in-class or not.

Attendance.
This is required. I understand that circumstances come up sometimes, or maybe you just don't feel like coming
to class. That's cool and I can understand that. Therefore, I give you two free absences to use however you like.
Go to a carnival, study for your biology exam, Whatever. Regardless, however, you only receive those two free
ones. (If you have a bad flu or other medical issue, you can bring in a doctor’s note and it will not count
towards those absences). (If you need to go out of town for work, and have some documentation for that, let me
know beforehand and we can negotiate that as well (obviously, within reason)).
 How excessive absence effects your grade: After your second un-documented absence, every further
absence results in a lowering of your final grade by a “1/3” (i.e. A → A- → B+ → B → B- → C+, etc.).
 Arriving-Late policy: Additionally, you must arrive to class on time. Two "Lates" equal an absence, so
be careful to arrive on time. ("Late" equals five minutes late).
 Important Note: One more thing on attendance: if you miss a class, the responsibility for turning
in assignments on time, getting caught up on readings, staying aware of scheduling changes,
acquiring class handouts and notes, getting documentation to me, making alternate arrangements,
and so forth, is entirely on you. (Note: class handouts are usually also available on our Canvas site,
or can be emailed to you on request)
Grade Breakdown
% of Final Grade
Reading Questions (7 @ 2 point each) 1 4 15
Unit Exams (3 @ 15 pts each) 45 30
Unit Signature Activities (2 @ 4 points each) 8 15
Final Signature Paper 10 15
ePortfolio 5 5
Case Study Activities (2 @ 4 points each) 8 10
Participation/Preparedness 10 10
Total 100 100

Total Points Grade Breakdown


930-1005 A 900-930 A-
870-899 B+ 831-869 B 800-830 B-
770-799 C+ 731-769 C 700-730 C-
670-699 D+ 631-669 D 600-630 D-
0-599 E

General Syllabus Announcements


Syllabus Changes. All items on this syllabus are subject to change. Any changes made during the course of
the semester become part of this syllabus. If I do find it necessary to change the reading schedule or other part
of this syllabus, I will give you reasonable advance-notice.

Academic Honesty. Plagiarism and Cheating are prohibited. Plagiarism is defined as taking or using the
thoughts, writings, or inventions of another as one's own. It also means using direct quotations without credit
and quotation marks, as well as using the ideas of another without proper credit. This includes copying from
Wikipedia or any other internet source. If you intentionally misrepresent the source, nature, or other
conditions of academic work so as to use others’ work to earn yourself college credit, then you will be subject
to the sanctions outlined in the section "Academic Honesty”" in the SLCC Student Code of Conduct
(http://www.slcc.edu/policies/docs/Student_Code_of_Conduct.pdf). The penalties vary, but at the very least,
plagiarism or cheating will result in a failure of the assignment, for a first offense, and failure of the course, for
a second offense. Avoid this situation. If in doubt about whether or not, or how, you should collaborate with
other classmates and/or cite particular ideas or text, ask me before you turn in your assignment.

Student Code of Conduct. The student is expected to follow the SLCC Student Code of Conduct.
https://www.slcc.edu/policies/docs/Student_Code_of_Conduct.pdf

Grievance Procedure. The Humanities Department procedure for handling student grievances is in conformity
with the "Student Grievance” Process set down in the SLCC Student Code of Conduct.

Disability Resource Center. SLCC values inclusive learning environments and strives to make all aspects of
the College accessible to our students. If you have a disability and believe you need accommodations to
improve access to learning materials or the learning environment, please contact the Disability Resource Center:
(phone) 801-957-4659; (email) drc@slcc.edu; (website) www.slcc.edu/drc.

Title IX Information: Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination based on sex
in any educational institution that receives federal funding. Salt Lake Community College does not tolerate sex
discrimination of any kind including: sexual misconduct; sexual harassment; relationship/sexual violence and
stalking. These incidents may interfere with or limit an individual’s ability to benefit from or participate in the
College’s educational programs or activities. If you have questions or concerns regarding your rights or
responsibilities, or if you would like to file a Title IX complaint please contact:

Kenneth Stonebrook, J.D.


Title IX Coordinator
Salt Lake Community College
Taylorsville Redwood Campus – STC 276A
(801) 957-5027
ken.stonebrook@slcc.edu

Online Reporting Form: http://www.slcc.edu/eeo/title-ix/complaint.aspx Students may also report incidents to


an SLCC faculty or staff member, who are required by law to notify the Title IX Coordinator. If a student
wishes to keep the information confidential, the student may speak with staff members of the Center for Health
and Counseling, (801) 957-4268. For more information about Title IX, go to: http://www.slcc.edu/eeo/title-
ix/index.aspx

Departmental Diversity Statement


The Humanities, Language and Culture Department supports learning for all members of an increasingly
diverse campus community. This diversity is a source of intellectual enrichment, but it can also lead to social
friction. In an academic community all viewpoints will be and should be critically interrogated. The
department fosters the free exchange of ideas in an atmosphere of mutual respect, in an inclusive classroom, as
these form necessary conditions for effective learning. All viewpoints are welcome, with an understanding that
as students of the humanities, we will strive to challenge our own cultural biases and understand new
perspectives and ideas.

General Education Statement


This course fulfills the Humanities (HU) requirement for the General Education Program at Salt Lake
Community College. It is designed not only to teach the information and skills required by the discipline, but
also to develop vital workplace skills and to teach strategies and skills that can be used for life-long learning.
General Education courses teach basic skills as well as broaden a student’s knowledge of a wide range of
subjects. Education is much more than the acquisition of facts; it is being able to use information in meaningful
ways in order to enrich one’s life.
While the subject of each course is important and useful, we become truly educated through making
connections between such varied information and with the different methods of organizing human experience
that are practiced by different disciplines. Therefore, this course, when combined with other General Education
courses, will enable you to develop broader perspectives and deeper understandings of your community and the
world, as well as challenge previously held assumptions about the world and its inhabitants.

General Education ePortfolio Statement


Each student in General Education courses at SLCC maintains a General Education ePortfolio. Instructors in
every Gen Ed course will ask you to put at least one assignment from the course into your ePortfolio, and
accompany it with reflective writing. It is a requirement in this class for you to add to your ePortfolio, and this
syllabus details the assignments and reflections you are to include. Your ePortfolio will allow you to include
your educational goals, describe your extracurricular activities, and post your resume. When you finish your
time at SLCC, your ePortfolio will then be a multi-media showcase of your educational experience.

For detailed information visit: http://www.slcc.edu/gened/eportfolio or http://eportresource.weebly.com


Starting Fall 2016, all students new to SLCC will use Digication as their ePortfolio platform. Any students who
have created ePortfolios prior to Fall 2016 on other platforms will be allowed to continue using those sites. For
Digication tutorials, please go to the following site:
https://slcc.digication.com/slcc_digication_tutorials/Welcome/

If you would like in-person help with your ePortfolio please visit an ePortfolio Lab on the Taylorsville-
Redwood, Jordan, or South City Campus during business hours, and staff will help you. No appointment
necessary. For lab hours and locations please look at the following site: http://eportresource.weebly.com/lab-
information.html

Questions regarding the ePortfolio can be directed to Emily.Dibble@slcc.edu.


Reading and Assignments Schedule