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Competency #1: Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior.

Practice Behaviors:

Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.

​ se my supervisors (Mr. Tubergen and Mrs. Dawson) as resources when I have


Task: U

questions/concerns in the workplace.

Evidence:​ 1 page paper on a conversation that I had with Mr. Tubergen regarding faith in the

public school.

Hudsonville Public Schools prides itself in being an institution in which all students,

regardless of gender, race, socioeconomic status, or ability are welcome and encouraged to

learn to the best of their ability. The Staff Handbook states three belief statements that I

feel align with the CSWE Code of Ethics. These three beliefs are:

➔ “The Hudsonville Public School District believes that all students can learn.”

➔ “The Hudsonville Public School District is committed to providing a challenging and

engaging curriculum, effective instruction, and a positive supportive environment.”

➔ “The Hudsonville Public School District realizes success will be achieved through a

cooperative partnership of students, teachers, support staff, administrators, board

members, parents, and the community.”

These are related to the Code of Ethics because all three of them are primarily about the

success and well-being of the students. This is important because school is one of the

largest parts of an individual's life between the ages of 5-18 years old. When the school has

the child’s best interest in mind, that sets them up to be more successful in their future

lives. These three beliefs focus mostly on the “Person in Environment” lens of Social Work. I
believe this because HPS has many policies and regulations put in place to honor each

student and their success.


Competency #5: Engage in policy practice

Practice Behaviors:

Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance

human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

​ nalyze and evaluate the new Emotionally Impaired program that was implemented
Task: A

this year at HHS.

Evidence: ​1-2 page reflection on what aspects of the program are working and notes from my

observation.

The Emotional Impairment program is new to Hudsonville this year. It is a smaller and

more intimate group. On average, there are about 4-5 students to 3 adults in the room at a

time. There is one lead teacher and two paraprofessionals. This program is special because

it focuses on the student’s needs in regards to their social and academic health. I really

enjoyed observing this room and feel they have a strong relationship with the students and

a welcoming environment in the classroom. They have several rules and systems in place

to ensure the students are on their best behavior.

The level system:

Level 3- Students get to leave 5 minutes early to lunch and can have their cell phone for

day (only may use it at certain times of the day.)

Level 2- Students get to leave 2 minutes early to lunch and can have their cell phone at

lunch only.

Level 1- Students are walked down to the lunchroom and assigned seat, they do not get

their phone at all throughout the day. ​Levels change by day


Point sheet:

Students get a “point” if they are misbehaving. They get one warning and then a point. If

they receive a certain amount of points, they drop down a level.

Team goal (class goal):

The class as a whole works to get 85% or more each week. If they are successful, the

teacher fills in a sliver of pie on the chart (on the whiteboard). Once the pie is filled in, they

earn something (pizza party, movie etc).

This program has had a positive impact on the students and their behaviors. They have one

student who earns nearly 98% (on the point system) every week. He is being considered

for the MERIT program (another program within the Special Education Department at

HHS). Hudsonville has an impressive and effective Special Education program and I have

enjoyed learning from the teachers and leaders.


Competency #6: Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and

communities

Practice Behaviors:

Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment,

person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage

with clients and constituencies; and

Task:​ While meeting with a student who experienced sexual abuse, recognize her trauma and

how developmentally she may struggle in school and in classes.

Evidence:​ Micro case study on this student and how Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs could be

helpful in the engagement process.

One of the students on my caseload recently experienced sexual abuse from a family

member. She had missed a few days of school because she was testifying in court. This was

important information that I took with me into my first meeting with her. I was very aware

of the words I used and how I interacted with her, I let her choose where she wanted to sit

first, left the door open, and let her lead the conversation. Seeing as it was the second week

of school, her grades were not yet a concern.

Having prior knowledge about the psychologist Abraham Maslow, I immediately dove into

conversation with the student about ways I could help make her feel most comfortable at

school. If this (or any) student does not feel safe at school then they will not be concerned

about learning. According to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs listed below, each student needs

to fulfill the first tier before moving onto the next. With physical safety being one of the first

needs, it is crucial for all students to feel comfortable and safe in the school so they can
focus on reaching the other levels. Once the

first three/four levels are met, then students

will focus on learning. This is important to keep

in mind while working with students.

https://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html
Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients

and constituencies.

​ ngage with students in their senior interviews, some of which may experience
Task: E

challenges in their post-graduation plans. These may be demographic, direction or viability

challenges.

Evidence:​ Micro case study on a student that is working through his post-graduation plans.

Every student has their own idea for post-graduation plans. While meeting with seniors in

their Senior Interview we talk about those plans and help them through the process of

applying for college, sending their transcripts, searching for jobs, researching different

branches of the military or whatever they need in preparation for graduation. Some

students know exactly what they want to do for a career, where they want to attend college

and have no stress about the financial side of their plan. Other students are not as certain. It

is often that a student comes in and wants to spend the time exploring different career

paths, or looking into different scholarships and financial aid offered. There are many

students who experience barriers around their dreams and aspirations. It is not rare for a

student to attend community college first to save money, or even work for a few years

before taking the next step in their education. We also have several students who choose to

go into a trade or the military.

One of the students I met with during his senior interview expressed his passion for the

automotive industry. His plan is to attend Grand Rapids Community College and get his

associates degree and then work as a mechanic. This student also expressed interest in the
Navy. During his senior interview, he started his GRCC application and then we explored

the Navy’s website to see what type of jobs are available. By the end of our meeting he was

excited and motivated to finish out the year strong so he can pursue his passions.

Senior Interviews are valuable because they are led mostly by the student. Whatever they

need to talk about or do during that time in respect to their future is free to happen. I really

enjoy these meetings for that reason. It has given me the opportunity to meet with many

different students with many different post-graduation plans. It is important to recognize

that there is a path for every student and being a small part of that process is so rewarding

to me.
Competency 8: Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and

communities.

Practice Behaviors:

Use interprofessional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice

outcomes;

Task:​ Due to a students medical condition, she is homebound for the foreseeable future but is

still interested in taking classes. I will work together with my supervisor to create a list of

possible online classes for this student to take.

Evidence:​ Copy of the list of classes we created.

Fashion & Interior Design


Do you have a flair for fashion? Are you constantly redecorating your room? If so, the design industry might just
be for you! In this course, you’ll explore what it is like to work in the industry by exploring career possibilities and
the background that you need to pursue them. Get ready to try your hand at designing as you learn the basics of
color and design then test your skills through hands-on projects. In addition, you’ll develop the essential
communication skills that build success in any business. By the end of the course, you’ll be well on your way to
developing the portfolio you need to get your stylishly clad foot in the door of this exciting field.
Foundations of Personal Wellness A
Exploring a combination of health and fitness concepts, this first semester of a full year comprehensive and
cohesive course explores all aspects of wellness. Designed for high school students, coursework uses pedagogical
planning to ensure that students explore fitness and physical health and encourages students to learn about the
nature of social interactions and how to plan a healthy lifestyle.
Foundations of Personal Wellness B
Exploring a combination of health and fitness concepts, his second semester of a full year comprehensive and
cohesive course explores all aspects of wellness. Designed for high school students, coursework uses pedagogical
planning to ensure that students explore fitness and physical health and encourages students to learn about the
nature of social interactions and how to plan a healthy lifestyle.
Mythology & Folklore: Legendary Tales
Mighty heroes. Angry gods and goddesses. Cunning animals. Since the first people gathered around fires,
mythology and folklore has been used as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. Beginning with an
overview of mythology and different kinds of folklore, students will journey with ancient heroes as they slay
dragons and outwit gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle, and watch as clever monsters outwit those
stronger than themselves. They will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see
how these are still used to shape society today.
Intro to Art
Covering art appreciation and the beginning of art history, this course encourages students to gain an
understanding and appreciation of art in their everyday lives. Presented in an engaging format, this
one-semester course provides an overview of many introductory themes: the definition of art, the cultural
purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology and principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional
media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, high school students enrolled in the course also explore the
following time periods and places: prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400.
Introduction to Art History
In this course, students will master the basic art history elements of the Western world, from prehistoric to
modern times. Students will explore art exhibits, analyze buildings and architecture, and examine art in everyday
life. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to describe art history, examine art from 22,000 BC
through 400 AD, distinguish art from 401 AD through 1450 AD, and analyze art from 1451 AD through 1800 AD.
They will also be able to categorize art from 1801 AD through 1900 AD and interpret art from 1901 AD through
the present.
Introduction to Psychology
In this course, students will become familiar with the basic principles of psychology and the scientific method.
Students will study a variety of topics, including the brain, learning and memory, personality, social influence,
child and lifespan development, and psychopathology. Students will demonstrate the application of these topics
to everyday situations. Upon course completion, students will be able to identify foundational philosophies,
therapies, and specializations in the field of psychology; analyze developmental psychology across lifespans; and
identify theories of personality and personality assessment. They will also be able to articulate scientific research
methodology, analytical approaches in the field of psychology, and how the brain and psychological factors
impact mental health and behavior, as well as classify psychological disorders and their impact on well-being.
Introduction to Social Media: Our Connected World
Have a Facebook account? What about Twitter? Whether you’ve already dipped your toes in the waters of social
media or are still standing on the shore wondering what to make of it all, learning how to interact on various
social media platforms is crucial in order to survive and thrive in this age of digital communication. In this
course, you’ll learn the ins and outs of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and
more. You’ll also discover other types of social media you may not have been aware of and how to use them for
your benefit—personally, academically, and eventually professionally as well. If you thought social media
platforms were just a place to keep track of friends and share personal photos, this course will show you how to
use these resources in much more powerful ways.
Introduction to Sociology
This course will encompass the basic principles of sociology. Students will learn a variety of topics including
sociological theory and basic research methods, as well as specific theories of culture, deviance, social
interaction, diversity, stratification, education, technology, and health in modern society. Students will
demonstrate the application of these topics to everyday situations. Upon course completion, students will be able
to identify foundational philosophies, theories, and methods in the field of sociology and apply principles of
culture and deviance to real-life scenarios. They will be able to analyze social interaction and collective behavior
in a real-world context; identify and apply elements of diversity, stratification, and inequality in real life; and
analyze sociological perspectives on elements of modern society.
Nutrition and Wellness
of nutritional principles and guidelines. Students learn about worldwide views of nutrition, essential nutrient
requirements, physiological processes, food labeling, weight management, healthy food choices, fitness,
diet-related diseases and disorders, food handling, healthy cooking, nutrition for different populations, and more.
Students gain important knowledge and skills to aid them in attaining and maintaining a healthy and nutritious
lifestyle.
Personal Finance
This introductory finance course teaches what it takes to understand the world of finance and make informed
decisions about managing finances. Students learn more about economics and become more confident in setting
and researching financial goals as they develop the core skills needed to be successful. In this one-semester
course, students learn how to open bank accounts, invest money, apply for loans, apply for insurance, explore
careers, manage business finances, make decisions about major purchases, and more. Students will be inspired by
stories from finance professionals and individuals who have reached their financial goals.
Theater, Cinema & Film Production
Lights! Camera! Action! This course will introduce students to the basics of film and theater productions.
Students will learn about the basics of lighting, sound, wardrobe, and camerawork for both film and theater
settings. The course also explores the history of film and theater and the influence that they have had on society.
Students will analyze and critique three influential American films, Casablanca, Singin’ in the Rain, and The
Wizard of Oz.
Western Hemisphere Studies A
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the first semester of a two-semester middle school course that
helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the western hemisphere. The course will
challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare
theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities
modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and
conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the
various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will
grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course
encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns.
Western Hemisphere Studies B
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the second semester of a two-semester middle school course that
helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the western hemisphere. The course will
challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare
theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities
modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and
conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the
various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will
grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course
encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns.
World Religions: Exploring Diversity
Throughout the ages, religions from around the world have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects of
societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including
Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taosim. Students will trace the
major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The
course will also discuss some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examine the
connections and influences they have.
Competency 9: Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and

communities

Practice Behaviors:

Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment,

person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the

evaluation of outcomes;

​ o give students a real world experience, I will help chaperone a field trip to two
Task: T

different manufacturing companies (Royal Technologies and Ranger Die) and engage with

students in their future career goals and aspirations.

Evidence:​ A write up of the day

One of the days at my internship I had the opportunity to chaperone a field trip to two

factories with around 50 students in attendance. We toured both Ranger Die and Royal

Technologies and got to compare and contrast the two companies. This was a really

interesting opportunity for me because I got to see first hand what factory work is like and

how hard the workers work. I also really enjoyed getting to interact with the students

outside of school and talk with them about their future plans because many of them are

going to pursue a job at businesses like the ones we visited.