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Easington (UK Parliament constituency)

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<a href=Coordinates : 54.790°N 1.352°W " id="pdf-obj-0-16" src="pdf-obj-0-16.jpg">
   

Easington

 
 
<a href=Coordinates : 54.790°N 1.352°W Easington County constituency for the House of Commons Boundary of Easington in County Durham . Location o f County Durham w ithin England. County County Durham Electorate 65,618 (December 2010 ) [1] Current constituency Created 1950 Member of parliament Grahame Morris ( Labour ) " id="pdf-obj-0-34" src="pdf-obj-0-34.jpg">

Boundary of Easington in County Durham.

 
<a href=Coordinates : 54.790°N 1.352°W Easington County constituency for the House of Commons Boundary of Easington in County Durham . Location o f County Durham w ithin England. County County Durham Electorate 65,618 (December 2010 ) [1] Current constituency Created 1950 Member of parliament Grahame Morris ( Labour ) " id="pdf-obj-0-43" src="pdf-obj-0-43.jpg">

Location of County Durham within England.

 
 

65,618 (December 2010) [1]

 

Current constituency

Created

   

Number of members

One

Created from

 

Overlaps

   

Easington is a constituency [n 1] created in 1950 represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Grahame Morris of the Labour Party. [n 2]

Contents
Contents

Constituency profile[edit]

Constituents' occupations include to a significant degree agriculture and the service sector, however the area was formerly heavily economically supported by the mining of coal, iron ore and businesses in the county still extract gangue minerals in present mining, such as fluorspar for the smelting of aluminium, to the south in the county is Darlington, which has particular strengths in international transport construction, including bridges. To the north is the large city of Sunderland which has a large service sector.

History[edit]

Creation

Following their review the Boundary Commission for England created the political division. It chiefly replaced the bulk or all of the Seaham seat.

Results of the winning party

The area has been held by the Labour Party since the 1922 election (including predecessor seat), when the seat was held by the party leader and Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald. Labour's majority in the seat has never fallen below 33%(the result in the party's 1983 landslide defeat) in its history, and has only been below 40% twice (in 1979 and 1983). The 2015 result made the seat the 27th safest of Labour's 232 seats by percentage of majority. [2]

Results of other parties

The 2015 general election saw (with +18.7%) more than the national average swing (+9.5%) to UKIP. The Conservative Party last fielded a candidate taking second place in 2001. Labour's candidate won more than threefold the UKIP votes in 2015, scoring 61% whereas UKIP polled the strongest second-place since 1983. 2017 saw the UKIP vote collapse and the Conservative vote rise, although a slight rise in the Labour vote ensured the majority remained above 40%.

Turnout

Turnout has ranged from 87.7% in 1950 to 52.1% in 2005. Turnout has been somewhat inconsistent with national averages, falling in 1992 and 2005 when national turnout increased.

Boundaries[edit]

1950-1974: The Rural District of Easington.

1974-1983: The Rural District of Stockton, and in the Rural District of Easington the parishes of Castle Eden, Easington, Haswell, Hawthorn, Horden, Hutton Henry, Monk Hesleden, Nesbitt, Peterlee, Sheraton with Hulam, Shotton, Thornley, and Wingate.

1983-2010: The District of Easington wards of Acre Rigg, Blackhalls, Dawdon, Dene House, Deneside, Easington Colliery, Easington Village, Eden Hill, Haswell, High Colliery, Horden North, Horden South, Howletch, Murton East, Murton West, Park, Passfield, Seaham, Shotton, South, and South Hetton.

2010-present: The District of Easington wards of Acre Rigg, Blackhalls, Dawdon, Dene House, Deneside, Easington Colliery, Easington Village and South Hetton, Eden Hill, Haswell and Shotton, Horden North, Horden South, Howletch, Hutton Henry, Murton East, Murton West, Passfield, Seaham Harbour, and Seaham North.

The constituency comprises the majority of the district of the same name, which takes in the coastal portion of the administrative county of Durham. The principal towns are Peterlee and Seaham. A seat of former mining traditions, it is one of Labour's safest in Britain party firebrand Manny Shinwell was MP for 20 years.

Boundary review[edit]

Following their review of parliamentary representation in County Durham, the Boundary Commission for England has made only minor changes to the boundaries of Easington constituency (on the southern part of the boundary with Sedgefield constituency). It was first fought at the 2010 general election.

Members of Parliament[edit]

Election

Member [3]

Party

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

23,152

63.7

+2.6

 

Barney Campbell

8,260

22.7

+9.8

 

Susan McDonnell

2,355

 
  • 6.6 +4.1

 

Allyn Roberts

1,727

 
  • 4.7 -14.0

 

Tom Hancock

460

 
  • 1.3 -1.1

 

Martie Warin

410

 
  • 1.1 -1.0

 

Majority

14,892

 
  • 41.0 -1.3

 

36,364

 
  • 58.4 +2.3

       
   

Labour hold

-3.6

 
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

21,132

61.0

+2.1

 

6,491

18.7

+14.1

 

Chris Hampsheir

4,478

12.9

-0.8

 

Luke Armstrong

834

2.4

-13.6

 

Susan McDonnell [5]

810

2.3

N/A

 

Martie Warin

733

2.1

N/A

 

Steve Colborn [6]

146

0.4

N/A

 

Majority

14,641

42.3

-0.6

 

34,624

56.1

+1.4

 

Labour hold

-6.0

 
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

20,579

58.9

12.4

             
 

Tara Saville

5,597

 
  • 16.0 +3.1

 

Richard Harrison

4,790

 
  • 13.7 +3.0

 

BNP

Cheryl Dunn

2,317

 
  • 6.6 +3.4

 

Martyn Aiken

1,631

 
  • 4.7 +4.7

 

Majority

14,982

 
  • 42.9 -15.6

 

34,914

 
  • 54.7 +2.8

 

Labour hold

7.7

 

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

 
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

22,733

 
  • 71.4 5.4

 

Christopher Ord

4,097

 
  • 12.9 +2.6

 

Lucille Nicholson

3,400

 
  • 10.7 +0.4

 

BNP

Ian McDonald

1,042

 
  • 3.3 +3.3

 

Dave Robinson

583

 
  • 1.8 0.7

 

Majority

18,636

58.5

 
       
 

31,855

52.1

1.5

 

Labour hold

4.0

 
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

25,360

76.8

3.4

 

Philip F. Lovel

3,411

10.3

+1.8

 

Christopher J. Ord

3,408

10.3

+3.1

 

Dave Robinson

831

2.5

N/A

 

Majority

21,949

66.5

 
 

33,010

53.6

13.4

 

Labour hold

   

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

 
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

33,600

80.2

+7.5

 

Jason D. Hollands

3,588

8.6

8.1

           
   

Jim P. Heppell

3,025

 
  • 7.2 3.4

 

Richard B. Pulfrey

1,179

 
  • 2.8 N/A

 

Steve P. Colborn

503

 
  • 1.2 N/A

 

Majority

30,012

71.6

 
 

41,895

67.0

 
 

Labour hold

+7.8

 
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

34,269

72.7

+4.6

 

William Perry

7,879

16.7

+0.4

 

Peter Freitag

5,001

10.6

5.0

 

Majority

26,390

56.0

+4.2

 

47,149

72.5

0.9

 

Labour hold

+2.1

 
           

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

32,396

68.06

 
 

William Perry

7,757

16.30

 
 

George Howard

7,447

15.64

 
 

Majority

24,639

51.76

 
   

73.39

 
 

Labour hold

   
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

25,912

59.39

 
 

F.E. Patterson

11,120

25.06

 
 

Colin J. Coulson-Thomas

7,342

16.55

 
 

Majority

14,792

33.33

 
   

67.51

 
 

Labour hold

   
           

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

29,537

60.60

 
 

J.S. Smailes

11,981

24.70

 
 

V. Morley

6,979

14.39

 
 

Majority

17,556

36.20

 
   

74.33

 
   

Labour hold

   
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

28,984

65.82

 
 

J.S. Smailes

8,047

18.27

 
 

N.J. Scaggs

7,005

15.91

 
 

Majority

20,937

47.55

 
   

69.01

 
   

Labour hold

   
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

33,637

71.96

 
 

J.S. Smailes

13,107

28.04

 
 

Majority

20,530

43.92

 
   

73.95

 
   

Labour hold

   
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

33,418

79.80

 
 

8,457

20.20

 
 

Majority

24,961

59.61

 
   

69.28

 
   

Labour hold

   

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

32,097

81.37

 
 

7,350

18.63

 
 

Majority

24,747

62.73

 
   

70.54

 
 

Labour hold

   
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

34,028

80.45

 
 

George W Rossiter

8,270

19.55

 
 

Majority

25,758

60.90

 
   

75.22

 
 

Labour hold

   

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

 
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

   

36,552

79.79

 
 

George W Rossiter

9,259

20.21

 
 

Majority

27,293

59.58

 
   

80.81

 
   

Labour hold

   
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

34,352

79.07

 
 

George W Rossiter

9,095

20.93

 
 

Majority

25,257

58.13

 
   

79.36

 
   

Labour hold

   
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

37,899

80.77

 
 

George W Rossiter

9,025

19.23

 
 

Majority

28,874

61.53

 
   

86.74

 
   

Labour hold

   
 
 
 
 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±

 

38,367

81.05

 
 

C.A. Macfarlane

8,972

18.95

 
 

Majority

29,395

62.09

 
   

87.69

 
   

Labour hold

   

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes

References

4.
4.

^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.

4. <a href=^ "Election Data 2015" . Electoral Calculus . Archived fro m the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. " id="pdf-obj-14-15" src="pdf-obj-14-15.jpg">
4. <a href=^ "Election Data 2015" . Electoral Calculus . Archived fro m the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. " id="pdf-obj-14-20" src="pdf-obj-14-20.jpg">

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