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Protecting enterprise data with Veritas NetBackup on HPE StoreOnce Systems Best practices and recommendations using
Protecting enterprise data with Veritas
NetBackup on HPE StoreOnce Systems
Best practices and recommendations using the HPE StoreOnce
Catalyst Plug-in for Veritas NetBackup, VTL, and NAS
Technical white paper

Technical white paper

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Contents

Executivesummary

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Introduction to HPE StoreOnce OST Plug-in for Veritas NetBackup

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Solution components

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Test Environments

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Network

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HPE StoreOnce Systems

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HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup

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Backup throughput performance and deduplication ratios

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Catalyst over Ethernet (CoE) and Catalyst over Fibre Channel (CoFC) backup testing

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Varying Block Size – CoE/CoFC

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Varying Rates of Data Change - CoE/CoFC

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Weekly Full and Daily Incremental Backup Schedule - CoE/CoFC

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Veritas NetBackup OST feature testing

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Optimized Duplication and Whole Image Optimized Duplication

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Auto Image Replication (A.I.R.) and Targeted Auto Image Replication (T.A.I.R.)

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Configuring replication topologies

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Adding replication topologies

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Granular Recovery Technology (GRT) and VMware

To install Services for NFS components:

Optimization options (VMware)

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Enable

file recovery from VM backup

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Instant Recovery VMware (IR_VMware)

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Disaster Recovery with HPE StoreOnce Systems and Catalyst

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NAS backup testing

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Varying Block Size - NAS

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Varying Rates of Data Change - NAS

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Weekly Full with Daily Incremental Backups - NAS

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VTL backup testing

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Varying Block Size - VTL

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Varying Rates of Data Change - VTL

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Weekly Full and Daily Incremental Backup Schedule - VTL

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Disaster Recovery with HPE StoreOnce Systems using NAS/VTL

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NAS Replication Wizard

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VTL Replication Wizard

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NAS Recovery Wizard

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VTL Recovery Wizard

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Summary

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References

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HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for Veritas NetBackup

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Veritas NetBackup

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HPE Data Availability, Protection and Retention Compatibility Matrix

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Executive summary

One of the most common challenges for enterprises is dealing with exponential data growth. With growth comes several data management challenges: meeting stringent backup and recovery service-level agreements (SLAs), keeping up the desired recovery point objectives (RPOs) and recovery time objectives (RTOs), and simplifying and enhancing remote office protection. IT organizations are challenged to do more with limited budgets and fewer IT resources. Meeting these pain points requires a paradigm shift towards optimized data protection. As a leader in storage, Hewlett Packard Enterprise is working with Veritas to deliver innovative solutions that modernize data protection for Veritas NetBackup environments to enable complete protection and delivery of the agreed SLAs.

The IT industry is undergoing a transformation. Data is growing at unprecedented rates and must be retained longer and accessed instantaneously. Traditional backup and recovery methodologies are too slow and often fail to meet the required business SLAs for today’s data center. Adding more data protection devices to manage increasing volumes of data leads to system sprawl and increased management complexities.

Most data protection technologies in use today have limitations, including incompatible technology silos, restricted scale and performance, untenable SLAs and backup failures, and complex management. To address the limitations of current data protection technologies and provide greater protection, Hewlett Packard Enterprise offers StoreOnce Systems built on breakthrough scale-out architecture and federated deduplication technology developed by Hewlett Packard Enterprise Labs. HPE StoreOnce Systems are specifically designed for automated, hands-free backup that consolidates protection of multiple servers to a single HPE StoreOnce System. HPE StoreOnce deduplication provides more backup data storage in the same footprint—with a 10 to 20 times increase, depending on the data being protected and the backup schedule. HPE StoreOnce replication enables cost-effective replication of data to or from remote locations for an additional level of protection.

Target audience

This document is intended for solution architects, database, backup, system or storage operators, and administrators, who are designing, implementing, and maintaining common backup tasks. It describes the different backup and recovery solutions using HPE StoreOnce OST Plug-in and Veritas NetBackup, provides setup and configuration recommendations and best practices on how to run an effective and efficient backup environment, and describes backup performance and recovery best practices. Readers of this Technical White Paper should have a functional understanding of HPE StoreOnce Systems backup concepts and technologies, as well as Veritas NetBackup.

This is not intended to replace any of the existing documentation. For other HPE StoreOnce Systems documentation, refer to https://www.hpe.com/storage.

Introduction to HPE StoreOnce OST Plug-in for Veritas NetBackup

The HPE StoreOnce System has a tight integration with Veritas NetBackup—enabled by the HPE StoreOnce OST Plug-in for Veritas NetBackup. This plug-in allows NetBackup-managed movement of deduplicated data across the enterprise, from one HPE StoreOnce System to another. This high efficiency is enabled by the HPE StoreOnce Catalyst interface, which offers multiple advantages for backup to disk compared to traditional NAS and virtual tape interfaces. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst software was developed to dramatically improve the performance, function, and integration of backup applications such as Veritas NetBackup. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst delivers deduplication on an appliance server, media server, or dedicated appliance. Because it uses the same deduplication algorithm globally, data can be moved between platforms without rehydration. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst allows better utilization of advanced, disk-based storage solutions while increasing efficiency and performance.

HPE StoreOnce OST Plug-in for Veritas NetBackup offers you:

Better performance – Achieve significantly enhanced performance by writing to HPE StoreOnce Catalyst compared to traditional disk backup targets. This is achieved by distributing deduplication processing between NetBackup media servers and the HPE StoreOnce System.

Simplified management – Centrally control data movement by the Veritas NetBackup backup, which allows single console management.

Greater flexibility – Move data from one site to multiple sites and enable replication across low-bandwidth networks with the bandwidth- reducing HPE StoreOnce deduplication.

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Figure 1 shows the data flow using the HPE StoreOnce OST Plug-in and Veritas NetBackup in an example environment.

OST Plug-in and Veritas NetBackup in an example environment. Figure 1. Delivering complete protection from remote

Figure 1. Delivering complete protection from remote office to enterprise data centers

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Solution components

The testing environments exercised different Veritas NetBackup features while implementing the HPE StoreOnce OST Plug-in. Backup and restore throughput and deduplication performance was also tested.

Aspects of the backup and restore throughput performance and deduplication performance are:

Varying block size

Varying rates of data change

Weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule

Disaster Recovery

Veritas NetBackup OST feature testing includes:

Optimized Duplication (Opt_Dup)

Auto Image Replication (A.I.R.) and Targeted Auto Image Replication (T.A.I.R.)

Granular Recovery Technology (GRT)

Granular Recovery Technology VMware (GRT_VMware)

Instant Recovery VMware (IR_VMware)

Test Environments

The backup and restore throughput performance and deduplication performance testing was performed with the following configuration:

HPE ProLiant DL380 G7 Server – Windows Server® 2012 R2

HPE ProLiant DL380 G7 Server – Red Hat® Enterprise Linux ®7.2

HPE StoreOnce 6500 System running software revision 3.16

HPE StoreOnce 4900 System running software revision 3.15

HPE MSA 2040 SAN Storage system running software revision GL105P003

HPE StoreOnce OST Plug-in version 4.0.0.580

Veritas NetBackup version 8

The Veritas NetBackup feature testing was performed with the following configuration:

HPE ProLiant DL380 G8 Server – Windows Server 2012 R2

HPE ProLiant DL380 G7 Server – Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2

HPE StoreOnce 6600 System running software revision 3.16

HPE StoreOnce 2900 System running software revision 3.15

HPE 3PAR StoreServ 7400C Storage System using FW build 3.2.2.390-EMU2

HPE StoreOnce OST Plug-in version 4.0.0.580

vCenter Server 6 running on an HPE BL460c with Windows Server 2012 R2

ESXi6 host – ProLiant DL380 G7

VM – Windows Server 2008 R2

VM – Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6

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Notes

100 GB of non-compressible, non-dedupable data was used as the dataset for these tests. Unless noted otherwise, 1% data change was performed between backups.

For block size testing, 256 KB, 512 KB and 1024 KB blocks were tested. The block size was modified in Veritas NetBackup using the SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS configuration setting. The default setting is 256 KB.

Network

The HPE ProLiant servers and VMs were all connected via a 1 GbE interface for management traffic. For Catalyst over Ethernet and NAS, the 10 GbE interface was used for data traffic to the HPE StoreOnce Systems. For Catalyst over Fibre Channel and VTL, the 8 Gb FC interface was used for data traffic to the HPE StoreOnce Systems.

HPE StoreOnce Systems

The HPE StoreOnce Systems used Low Bandwidth Primary Transfer Policies, also known as source-side deduplication. Low Bandwidth leverages HPE StoreOnce Catalyst source-side deduplication technology. This is the preferred option for copying backups directly to remote HPE StoreOnce Systems, and it achieves the highest level of aggregated backup throughput, both on and off site. Figure 2 shows the Catalyst Store configuration.

off site. Figure 2 shows the Catalyst Store configuration. Figure 2. Low-bandwidth catalyst store configuration HPE

Figure 2. Low-bandwidth catalyst store configuration

HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup

With version 4.0.0 and above, the HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup installation has been enhanced to provide a more user-friendly experience regarding the use of Content Aware Backups and optimization settings for network compression and network checksums. Enabling or disabling these features will have an impact on backup and restore throughput and deduplication performance. For more details about the HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup, visit Hewlett Packard Enterprise at

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The HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup Setup wizard asks whether to enable or disable Content Aware Backups and optimization settings for network compression and network checksums.

In Windows® environments, the installation setup displays questions, as shown in Figure 3 and Figure 4.

Note

The new Content Aware Backups feature is incompatible with existing HPE StoreOnce Catalyst stores.

is incompatible with existing HPE StoreOnce Catalyst stores. Figure 3. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup

Figure 3. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup Setup showing prompt for enabling/disabling Content Aware Backups

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Technical white paper Page 9 Figure 4. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup Setup showing prompt

Figure 4. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup Setup showing prompt for enabling/disabling network compression and network checksums

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In Linux, HP-UX, AIX, and Solaris environments, the installation setup displays questions, as shown in Figure 5 and Figure 6.

displays questions, as shown in Figure 5 and Figure 6 . Figure 5. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst

Figure 5. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup Setup showing prompt for enabling/disabling Content Aware Backups

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Technical white paper Page 11 Figure 6 . HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup Setup showing

Figure 6. HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup Setup showing prompt for enabling/disabling network compression and network checksums

The HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for NetBackup version 4.0.0 also uses a new installation path and new configuration file name for Windows and Linux, HP-UX, AIX, and Solaris operating systems that is different from previous versions of the Plug-in.

For Windows environments:

The new installation path is %ProgramFiles%\Hewlett Packard Enterprise\StoreOnce.

The new configuration file is located in %ProgramFiles%\Hewlett Packard Enterprise\StoreOnce\isvsupport\OST\config.

For Linux, HP-UX, AIX, and Solaris environments:

The new path is /usr/openv/hpe/ost.

The new configuration file is located in /usr/openv/hpe/ost/config.

The new configuration file name is plugin.conf.

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Backup throughput performance and deduplication ratios

Testing was performed to evaluate the backup throughput performance and deduplication ratios with Veritas NetBackup and HPE StoreOnce Systems. The initial backup will typically show a slower speed, which is normal behavior across all target types. This is because the initial data has to be chunked, compressed, and sent to the HPE StoreOnce System.

Notes

Backup and restore performance varies between HPE StoreOnce target types.

All tests used a single stream of backup data to the HPE StoreOnce Catalyst stores.

Catalyst over Ethernet (CoE) and Catalyst over Fibre Channel (CoFC) backup testing

Varying Block Size – CoE/CoFC

When testing backups to Catalyst stores on the HPE StoreOnce System, backup throughput performance was higher for RHEL versus Windows, with 1024 KB CoFC showing the fastest throughput.

Figure 7 and Figure 8 show Windows and RHEL CoE and CoFC backup throughput performance with varying block size settings to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

The legend labels are in this format:

<Block size in KB> <OS> <Target Type> <Backup/Restore>

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MB/s

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256KB Win CoE BckPage 13 MB/s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

512KB Win CoE Bck3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Full backups 256KB Win

1024KB Win CoE Bck11 12 13 14 Full backups 256KB Win CoE Bck 512KB Win CoE Bck 256KB Win

256KB Win CoE Res256KB Win CoE Bck 512KB Win CoE Bck 1024KB Win CoE Bck 512KB Win CoE Res

512KB Win CoE ResBck 512KB Win CoE Bck 1024KB Win CoE Bck 256KB Win CoE Res 1024KB Win CoE

1024KB Win CoE ResBck 1024KB Win CoE Bck 256KB Win CoE Res 512KB Win CoE Res 256KB Win CoFC

256KB Win CoFC BckBck 256KB Win CoE Res 512KB Win CoE Res 1024KB Win CoE Res 512KB Win CoFC

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1024KB Win CoFC BckRes 1024KB Win CoE Res 256KB Win CoFC Bck 512KB Win CoFC Bck 256KB Win CoFC

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512KB Win CoFC Res512KB Win CoFC Bck 1024KB Win CoFC Bck 256KB Win CoFC Res 1024KB Win CoFC Res

1024KB Win CoFC Res1024KB Win CoFC Bck 256KB Win CoFC Res 512KB Win CoFC Res Figure 7. Windows backup

Figure 7. Windows backup throughput performance with varying block size settings

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MB/s

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1024KB RHEL CoE Bck7 9 10 11 12 13 14 256KB RHEL CoE Bck 512KB RHEL CoE Bck 256KB

256KB RHEL CoE Res14 256KB RHEL CoE Bck 512KB RHEL CoE Bck 1024KB RHEL CoE Bck 512KB RHEL CoE

512KB RHEL CoE Res512KB RHEL CoE Bck 1024KB RHEL CoE Bck 256KB RHEL CoE Res 1024KB RHEL CoE Res

1024KB RHEL CoE Res1024KB RHEL CoE Bck 256KB RHEL CoE Res 512KB RHEL CoE Res 256KB RHEL CoFC Bck

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1024KB RHEL CoFC Res1024KB RHEL CoFC Bck 256KB RHEL CoFC Res 512KB RHEL CoFC Res Figure 8. RHEL backup

Figure 8. RHEL backup throughput performance with varying block size settings

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Varying block sizes did not have any significant impact between Windows and RHEL.

Figure 9 and Figure 10 show Windows and RHEL CoE and CoFC deduplication ratios with varying block size settings to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

The legend labels are in this format:

<Block size in KB> <OS> <Target Type>

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256KB Win CoE8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Deduplication ratio Full backups 512KB Win CoE 1024KB Win

512KB Win CoE12 13 14 Deduplication ratio Full backups 256KB Win CoE 1024KB Win CoE 256KB Win CoFC

1024KB Win CoEDeduplication ratio Full backups 256KB Win CoE 512KB Win CoE 256KB Win CoFC 512KB Win CoFC

256KB Win CoFCFull backups 256KB Win CoE 512KB Win CoE 1024KB Win CoE 512KB Win CoFC 1024KB Win

512KB Win CoFC256KB Win CoE 512KB Win CoE 1024KB Win CoE 256KB Win CoFC 1024KB Win CoFC Figure

1024KB Win CoFC512KB Win CoE 1024KB Win CoE 256KB Win CoFC 512KB Win CoFC Figure 9. Windows deduplication

Figure 9. Windows deduplication ratios with varying block size settings

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256KB RHEL CoE8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Deduplication ratio Full backups 512KB RHEL CoE 1024KB RHEL

512KB RHEL CoE12 13 14 Deduplication ratio Full backups 256KB RHEL CoE 1024KB RHEL CoE 256KB RHEL CoFC

1024KB RHEL CoEratio Full backups 256KB RHEL CoE 512KB RHEL CoE 256KB RHEL CoFC 512KB RHEL CoFC 1024KB

256KB RHEL CoFCFull backups 256KB RHEL CoE 512KB RHEL CoE 1024KB RHEL CoE 512KB RHEL CoFC 1024KB RHEL

512KB RHEL CoFCRHEL CoE 512KB RHEL CoE 1024KB RHEL CoE 256KB RHEL CoFC 1024KB RHEL CoFC Figure 10.

1024KB RHEL CoFCRHEL CoE 1024KB RHEL CoE 256KB RHEL CoFC 512KB RHEL CoFC Figure 10. RHEL deduplication ratios

Figure 10. RHEL deduplication ratios with varying block size settings

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Varying Rates of Data Change - CoE/CoFC

When testing backups to Catalyst stores on the HPE StoreOnce System, backup throughput performance was higher for RHEL versus Windows with RHEL 1% CoFC showing the fastest throughput.

Figure 11 and Figure 12 show Windows and RHEL CoE and CoFC backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

The legend labels are in this format:

<OS> <% Data Change> <Target Type> <Backup/Restore>

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Figure 11. Windows backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change

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Full backups

RHEL 1% CoE ResRHEL 1% CoE Bck RHEL 3% CoE Bck RHEL 5% CoE Bck Full backups RHEL 3%

RHEL 3% CoE ResRHEL 3% CoE Bck RHEL 5% CoE Bck Full backups RHEL 1% CoE Res RHEL 5%

RHEL 5% CoE ResRHEL 5% CoE Bck Full backups RHEL 1% CoE Res RHEL 3% CoE Res RHEL 1%

RHEL 1% CoFC BckFull backups RHEL 1% CoE Res RHEL 3% CoE Res RHEL 5% CoE Res RHEL 3%

RHEL 3% CoFC Bck1% CoE Res RHEL 3% CoE Res RHEL 5% CoE Res RHEL 1% CoFC Bck RHEL

RHEL 5% CoFC Bck3% CoE Res RHEL 5% CoE Res RHEL 1% CoFC Bck RHEL 3% CoFC Bck Figure

Figure 12. RHEL backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change

RHEL 1% CoFC ResBck Figure 12. RHEL backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change RHEL 3% CoFC

RHEL 3% CoFC ResBck Figure 12. RHEL backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change RHEL 1% CoFC

RHEL 5% CoFC ResBck Figure 12. RHEL backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change RHEL 1% CoFC

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Varying rates of data change affected the deduplication ratio between Windows and RHEL. The deduplication ratio was higher for 1% rate of data change for both Windows and RHEL, whereas lower for 5% rate of data change.

Figure 13 and Figure 14 show Windows and RHEL CoE and CoFC deduplication ratios with varying rates of data change to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

The legend labels are in this format:

<OS> <% Data Change> <Target Type>

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Figure 13. Windows deduplication ratios with varying rates of data change

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RHEL 1% CoE8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Deduplication ratio Full backups RHEL 3% CoE RHEL 5%

RHEL 3% CoE11 12 13 14 Deduplication ratio Full backups RHEL 1% CoE RHEL 5% CoE RHEL 1%

RHEL 5% CoE14 Deduplication ratio Full backups RHEL 1% CoE RHEL 3% CoE RHEL 1% CoFC RHEL 3%

RHEL 1% CoFCratio Full backups RHEL 1% CoE RHEL 3% CoE RHEL 5% CoE RHEL 3% CoFC RHEL

RHEL 3% CoFCbackups RHEL 1% CoE RHEL 3% CoE RHEL 5% CoE RHEL 1% CoFC RHEL 5% CoFC

RHEL 5% CoFC1% CoE RHEL 3% CoE RHEL 5% CoE RHEL 1% CoFC RHEL 3% CoFC Figure 14.

Figure 14. RHEL deduplication ratios with varying rates of data change

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MB/s

Weekly Full and Daily Incremental Backup Schedule - CoE/CoFC

When testing a weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule to Catalyst stores on the HPE StoreOnce System, backup throughput performance was higher for full backups to Catalyst stores using RHEL versus Catalyst stores using Windows.

Figure 15 and Figure 16 show Windows and RHEL backup throughput performance with a weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 15. Windows weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule throughput performance using Catalyst stores

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Figure 16. RHEL weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule throughput performance using Catalyst stores

Veritas NetBackup OST feature testing

The following NetBackup OST features were tested:

Whole Image Optimized Duplication (WI_Opt_Dup)

Auto Image Replication (A.I.R.) and Targeted Auto Image Replication (T.A.I.R.)

Granular Recovery Technology (GRT)

Granular Recovery Technology VMware (GRT_VMware)

Instant Recovery VMware (IR_VMware)

Optimized Duplication and Whole Image Optimized Duplication

With optimized duplication, backup images on a storage server can be replicated from one HPE StoreOnce System to another HPE StoreOnce System that resides in the same NetBackup domain. The ability to duplicate backups to storage in other locations, often across various geographical sites, helps facilitate data protection and disaster recovery. Optimized Duplication transfers data in 256 KB chunks.

Whole Image Optimized Duplication uses the storage unit's Maximum fragment size to transfer an entire NetBackup image fragment in a single operation.

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Figure 17 shows a Storage Unit’s Maximum fragment size.

Figure 17 shows a Storage Unit’s Maximum fragment size. Figure 17. Maximum fragment size used with

Figure 17. Maximum fragment size used with Whole Image Optimized Duplication

An example bpdm log shows Whole Image Optimized Duplication being invoked and successfully copied.

17:05:15.876 [28872.11168] <4> optdup_start_job_data_timer: begin throughput timer 17:05:15.876 [28872.11168] <4> copy_whole_image: begin copying backup id gzw12a.ebs.net_1476741323 (duplicate-optimized), copy 1, fragment 1 17:05:56.113 [28872.11168] <4> copy_whole_image: successfully copied (duplicate-optimized) backup id gzw12a.ebs.net_1476741323, copy 1, fragment 1, 31588375 Kbytes at 785096.931 Kbytes/sec 17:05:56.113 [28872.11168] <4> optdup_stop_job_data_timer: end throughput timer (31588375 40235 785096)

The following are some benefits of optimized duplication:

Reduced workload on the NetBackup media servers

Faster duplication, which can occur in the background simultaneously with ongoing backup jobs

Reduced bandwidth where the copy process sends only changed blocks

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Optimized Duplication is configured using a Storage Lifecycle Policy (SLP) in NetBackup. The SLP manages both the backup jobs and the duplication jobs. For the backup destination, the Storage Unit of the local or primary HPE StoreOnce System is the target for the backups. For the Duplication destination, the Storage Unit of another HPE StoreOnce System (secondary) is selected. Then the backup policy is configured to use the SLP.

Figure 18 shows the Storage Lifecycle Policy screen where the backup and duplication operations are defined.

Note

The minimum HPE StoreOnce software version for optimized duplication to a CoFC store is 3.16.x.

version for optimized duplication to a CoFC store is 3.16.x. Figure 18. NetBackup Storage Lifecycle Policy

Figure 18. NetBackup Storage Lifecycle Policy screen showing backup and duplication operation settings

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Figure 19 shows a NetBackup job policy with Policy storage configured to use a pre-defined SLP.

with Policy storage configured to use a pre-defined SLP. Figure 19. NetBackup Backup Policy showing Policy

Figure 19. NetBackup Backup Policy showing Policy Storage settings using an SLP

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Auto Image Replication (A.I.R.) and Targeted Auto Image Replication (T.A.I.R.)

The Auto Image Replication (A.I.R.) feature in NetBackup addresses the site-to-site replication challenge by allowing storage lifecycle policies to duplicate selected images between NetBackup Master Domains. The primary purpose of Auto Image Replication is to create off-site copies of critical backups to protect against site loss.

NetBackup A.I.R. relies on tpman, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise proprietary tool, to create replication topologies between logical storage units. The HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in uses this information to initiate automatic replication of data. tpman supports m:n NetBackup Domain replication topologies for A.I.R. operation.

A.I.R. comes in the following configurations:

Untargeted A.I.R.: The HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in broadcasts the images based on the m:n topology and you cannot choose the replication targets.

Targeted A.I.R.: Targeted A.I.R. presents the set of available targets for an A.I.R. operation. You can use the HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in to send data to selective targets rather than a broadcast.

Note

The tpman tool is still necessary to create the replication topology.

Configuring replication topologies Hewlett Packard Enterprise provides a command line tool (tpman) for configuration of replication topologies between logical storage units. This tool provides the capability to add, remove, and show replication topologies between logical storage units and it is installed with the OST Plug-in in the following locations:

Windows: %ProgramFiles%/Hewlett Packard Enterprise/StoreOnce/isvsupport/OST/bin/tpman.exe

Linux, HP-UX, AIX, and Solaris: /usr/openv/hpe/ost/bin/tpman

Adding replication topologies Add a replication topology between the source and the target logical storage units with the following command:

# tpman --add --source <sts>/<lsu> --target <sts>/<lsu> [--client <client_identifier>]

Where:

<sts> is the storage server address (IPv4, IPv6, Catalyst over Fibre Channel identifier, or FQDN).

<lsu> is the logical storage unit. (This is the HPE StoreOnce Catalyst store name.)

<client_identifier> is the required HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Client Identifier when HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Client credentials are enabled. tpman will prompt for the password when the command is executed.

Note

The Catalyst over Fibre Channel identifier can be found on the HPE StoreOnce System GUI under StoreOnce StoreOnce Catalyst Fibre Channel Settings. The logical storage unit or HPE StoreOnce Catalyst store name can be found on the HPE StoreOnce System GUI under StoreOnce StoreOnce Catalyst Stores.

Example:

# tpman --add --source 10.0.0.32/COE-PRIMARY --target 10.0.0.40/COE-SECONDARY --client gzw12a.ebs.net

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Figure 20 shows an example tpman command structure where the source HPE StoreOnce System and target HPE StoreOnce System are defined.

System and target HPE StoreOnce System are defined. Figure 20. tpman example showing the replication topology

Figure 20. tpman example showing the replication topology setup between the source and target logical storage units

Granular Recovery Technology (GRT) and VMware

The OST Plug-in supports Veritas’s NetBackup Granular Recovery Technology (GRT) feature that enables select items from database backups to be restored on clients. NetBackup GRT leverages Network File System, or NFS, to read individual objects from a database backup image or a VM snapshot backup. Specifically, the NetBackup client uses NFS to extract data from the backup image on the NetBackup media server. The NetBackup client uses “Client for NFS” to mount and access a mapped drive that is connected to the NetBackup media server. The NetBackup media server handles the I/O requests from the client through NBFSD.

NBFSD is the NetBackup File System (NBFS) service that runs on the media server. NBFSD mounts the backup image as a file system folder on the NetBackup client over a secure connection.

NetBackup uses GRT and NFS to recover the individual objects that reside within a backup image, such as:

A user account from an Active Directory database backup

Email messages or folders from an Exchange database backup

A document from a SharePoint database backup

An individual file from a VM snapshot backup

To restore individual items from a backup that uses GRT, you must enable Services for Network File System (NFS).

To enable Services for NFS, please see the Microsoft® TechNet article at: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc753928(v=ws.11).aspx.

To install Services for NFS components:

1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Server Manager.

2. In the left pane, click Manage Roles.

3. Click Add Roles. The Add Roles Wizard appears.

4. Click Next. The Select Server Roles options appear.

5. Select the File Server check box, and then click Next.

6. The File Server screen appears. Click Next to view the Role Services options.

7. Select the Services for Network File System (NFS) check box, and then click Next.

8. Confirm your selection and click Install.

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Figure 21 shows the Enable granular recovery option on the Attributes tab of the NetBackup Policy.

option on the Attributes tab of the NetBackup Policy. Figure 21. Enable granular recovery option in

Figure 21. Enable granular recovery option in NetBackup policy screen

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Optimization options (VMware)

Enable file recovery from VM backup This option allows restore of individual files from the backup. With or without this option, you can restore the entire virtual machine. You can also use this option for incremental backups: in the policy schedule, select differential incremental backup or cumulative incremental backup.

To perform a VMware backup to a deduplication storage unit, select the Enable file recovery from VM backup option.

Figure 22 shows the Enable file recovery from VM backup option under the VMware tab in the policy properties.

VM backup option under the VMware tab in the policy properties. Figure 22. Enable file recovery

Figure 22. Enable file recovery from VM backup option

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Instant Recovery VMware (IR_VMware) NetBackup can recover a virtual machine almost instantly, without waiting to transfer the virtual machine's data from the backup. NetBackup starts the virtual machine directly from the backup image and makes it accessible to users on the target ESX host immediately. You can copy files (including vmdk files) without restoring the entire virtual machine.

Access and restore individual files and folders from any type of OS and then delete the virtual machine. (Note for Windows or Linux: Instead of instant recovery, use the Enable file recovery from VM backup option and restore individual files with the NetBackup Backup, Archive, and Restore interface.)

By using the Enable file recovery from VM backup option (see Figure 22 above), individual files can be selected for restore using the NetBackup Backup, Archive and Restore interface.

Figure 23 shows an example of the NetBackup Backup, Archive and Restore interface with a single file selected for restore from a VMware backup.

a single file selected for restore from a VMware backup. Figure 23. NetBackup Backup, Archive, and

Figure 23. NetBackup Backup, Archive, and Restore interface

The virtual machine is started directly from the backup image residing on the HPE StoreOnce Catalyst store and is available in seconds or minutes. The startup time depends on the network speed and storage speed, not on the size of the virtual machine.

The NetBackup CLI command nbrestorevm is used for IR_VMware. This CLI process has been simplified and only requires the use of few options.

To initiate Instant Recovery (activate the virtual machine). Options without brackets are required.

# nbrestorevm -vmw -ir_activate -C vm_client -temp_location temp_location_for_writes

[-S master_server] [-vmpo] [-vmInstanceId] [-vmsn]

[-vmkeephv] [-vmserver vm_server] [-vmproxy vm_proxy]

[-s mm/dd/yyyy [HH:MM:SS]] [-e mm/dd/yyyy [HH:MM:SS]]

[-R absolute_path_to_rename_file]

[-disk_media_server media_server]

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Note

Only -vmw, -ir_activate, -C, and -temp_location are required. If the other options are not specified, NetBackup automatically supplies values for those options from the backup. In most cases, if you do not restore the virtual machine to a different location, you can omit the bracketed options.

Table 1. Options on the nbrestorevm command for Instant Recovery

Option

Description

nbrestorevm

Command to initiate Instant Recovery.

-vmw

Indicates the type of virtual machine to restore (VMware).

-C virtual_machine

The name of the virtual machine as identified in the backup. For example, if the policy backed up the virtual machine by its host name, specify that host name.

Note: If a virtual machine with the same name already exists on the target ESX host, the command fails. You can change the display name of the virtual machine in vCenter. As an alternative, use the -R option on nbrestorevm to change the display name or location

of

the restored virtual machine.

-ir_activate

Starts the restore by mounting the backup image of the virtual machine as an NFS datastore. The datastore becomes accessible to the ESX host where the virtual machine is to be restored.

-temp_location

temporary datastore on the ESX server where all writes occur until the virtual machine is restored. All writes occur on this datastore until Storage vMotion is complete or until you are finished with the virtual machine (such as for troubleshooting).

A

temporary_datastore

Note: This datastore must exist before you run nbrestorevm.

-vmpo

Turns on the virtual machine after the restore.

An example nbrestorevm command:

# nbrestorevm –vmw –ir_activate –C vm001 –temp_location temp_loc5 -vmpo

This command starts the restore by mounting the backup image of the virtual machine host vm001 as an NFS store. The temporary location temp-loc5 is a temporary datastore on the ESX server where all writes occur.

For more details regarding IR_VMware, please see the Veritas NetBackup for VMware Administrator's Guide at:

Disaster Recovery with HPE StoreOnce Systems and Catalyst

HPE StoreOnce Systems have the ability to replicate data to a remote facility for disaster recovery purposes using replication. The combination of Veritas NetBackup and HPE deduplication-enabled Low-Bandwidth Replication (LBR) between HPE StoreOnce Systems offers a solution to protecting servers in remote offices by allowing data to be replicated in a fast, reliable, and automated manner. Data recovery is flexible depending upon the situation or type of failure.

One of the key features that HPE StoreOnce Catalyst stores provide is allowing NetBackup to utilize Low-Bandwidth optimized duplication jobs between Catalyst stores. Replicating backup data between HPE StoreOnce Systems is accomplished by properly configuring a backup policy to contain a set of sequential jobs, one being the backup job and the other being an optimized duplication job (or copy). When a backup job completes, the optimized duplication job is executed to the alternate HPE StoreOnce System.

In a disaster recovery situation, recovering data from an alternate HPE StoreOnce System is achievable in NetBackup after running an optimized duplication job. Because the NetBackup catalog is aware of all copies, recovery of data from a NetBackup OST-optimized duplicate copy is the same as recovery from another duplicate. Through NetBackup's Backup-Archive-Restore GUI, the OST-optimized duplicate copy can be designated as the primary copy, and then a restore can be initiated. The potential time savings over recovery from a non-OST-optimized duplicate could be significant.

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MB/s

NAS backup testing

Notes

NFS was only tested on RHEL.

Hewlett Packard Enterprise recommends that you force synchronous data transfer to avoid out-of-order data transmission. NFS does not ensure in-order packet delivery between source and target devices. The NFS device should be mounted using the following options explicitly to mount the HPE StoreOnce System using NFSv3 and force synchronous transfer:

# mount –t nfs –o nfsvers=3,sync,wsize=<size in bytes>,rsize=<size in bytes> x.x.x.x:/nas/<name of remote share> <local mount point>

Where x.x.x.x is the IP address of the HPE StoreOnce System.

Varying Block Size - NAS

When testing backups to NAS shares on the HPE StoreOnce System, backup throughput performance was higher for NFS shares versus SMB shares. NFS restores exhibited better throughput performance than SMB.

Figure 24 shows SMB and NFS backup throughput performance with varying block size settings to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

The legend labels are in this format: <Block size in KB> <OS> <Backup/Restore>

size in KB> <OS> <Backup/Restore> 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
size in KB> <OS> <Backup/Restore> 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

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256 KB RHEL ResKB Win Bck 256 256 KB Win Res 256 KB RHEL Bck

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512 KB RHEL BckKB Win Bck 512 512 KB Win Res 512 KB RHEL Res

512 KB RHEL ResKB Win Bck 512 512 KB Win Res 512 KB RHEL Bck

1024 KB Win Bck512 KB Win Res 512 KB RHEL Bck 512 KB RHEL Res 1024 KB Win Res

1024 KB Win ResRes 512 KB RHEL Bck 512 KB RHEL Res 1024 KB Win Bck 1024 KB RHEL

1024 KB RHEL BckRHEL Bck 512 KB RHEL Res 1024 KB Win Bck 1024 KB Win Res Figure 24.

Figure 24. Backup throughput performance with varying block size settings

1024 KB RHEL ResKB Win Bck 1024 KB Win Res 1024 KB RHEL Bck Figure 24. Backup throughput performance

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Varying block sizes affected the deduplication ratio very slightly between SMB and NFS. The deduplication ratio was higher for 256 KB block size with NFS, whereas lower for 256 KB block size with SMB.

Figure 25 shows SMB and NFS deduplication ratios with varying block size settings to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 25. Deduplication ratios with varying block size settings

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MB/s

Varying Rates of Data Change - NAS

When testing backups to NAS shares on the HPE StoreOnce System, backup throughput performance was slightly higher for NFS shares versus SMB shares. NFS restores exhibited better throughput performance than SMB.

Figure 26 shows SMB and NFS backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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rates of data change to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System. 0 1 2 3 4 5
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3% Win Res 5% Win Res 1% RHEL Bck 3% RHEL Bck 5% RHEL Bck 1%

3% Win Res 5% Win Res 1% RHEL Bck 3% RHEL Bck 5% RHEL Bck 1%

3% Win Res 5% Win Res 1% RHEL Bck 3% RHEL Bck 5% RHEL Bck 1%

1% RHEL Res 3% RHEL Res 5% RHEL Res

Figure 26. Backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change

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Varying rates of data change did not have any significant impact with deduplication ratio between SMB and NFS. The deduplication figure below shows the characterization of data change on deduplication. Higher rates of data change will lead to lower deduplication ratios.

Figure 27 shows SMB and NFS deduplication ratios with varying rates of data change to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 27. Deduplication ratios with varying rates of data change

Full backups 5% Win 1% RHEL
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3% Win Figure 27. Deduplication ratios with varying rates of data change Full backups 5% Win

5% RHEL

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Weekly Full with Daily Incremental Backups - NAS

When testing a weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule to NAS shares on the HPE StoreOnce System, backup throughput performance was higher for full backups to NFS shares versus SMB shares. NFS restores exhibited better throughput performance than SMB.

Figure 28 shows SMB and NFS backup throughput performance with a weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 28. SMB and NFS weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule throughput performance

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The deduplication ratio varied between SMB and NFS. The deduplication ratio was higher for 1% rate of data change with SMB, whereas lower for 5% rate of data change with NFS.

Figure 29 shows SMB and NFS deduplication ratios with a weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 29. SMB and NFS weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule deduplication ratios

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VTL backup testing

Varying Block Size - VTL

When testing backups to VTL on the HPE StoreOnce System, backup throughput performance was higher for RHEL versus Windows. RHEL restores exhibited better throughput performance than Windows as well.

Figure 30 shows RHEL and Windows backup throughput performance with varying block size settings to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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1024 KB Win Res512 KB RHEL Bck 512 KB RHEL Res MB/s 1024 KB Win Bck 1024 KB RHEL

1024 KB RHEL BckBck 512 KB RHEL Res MB/s 1024 KB Win Bck 1024 KB Win Res Figure 30.

Figure 30. VTL backup throughput performance with varying block size settings

1024 KB RHEL ResKB Win Bck 1024 KB Win Res 1024 KB RHEL Bck Figure 30. VTL backup throughput

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Deduplication ratios between Windows and RHEL with VTL were practically identical.

Figure 31 shows Windows and RHEL deduplication ratios with varying block size settings to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 31. VTL deduplication ratios with varying block size settings

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MB/s

Varying Rates of Data Change - VTL

When testing backups to VTL on the HPE StoreOnce System, backup throughput performance was higher for RHEL versus Windows. RHEL restores exhibited better throughput performance than Windows.

Figure 32 shows Windows and RHEL backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 32. VTL backup throughput performance with varying rates of data change

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Deduplication ratios with VTL were highest for 1% rate of change and lowest for 5% rate of change.

Figure 33 shows Windows and RHEL deduplication ratios with varying rates of data change to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 33. VTL deduplication ratios with varying rates of data change

Full backups 1% RHEL
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1% RHEL

3% Win

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Weekly Full and Daily Incremental Backup Schedule - VTL

When testing a weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule to VTL on the HPE StoreOnce System, backup throughput performance was higher for full backups with RHEL versus Windows. RHEL restores exhibited better throughput performance than Windows.

Figure 34 shows Windows and RHEL backup throughput performance with a weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 34. VTL on Windows and RHEL weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule throughput performance

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Deduplication ratios between Windows and RHEL with VTL were varied. The deduplication ratio was slightly higher for RHEL, whereas lower for Windows.

Figure 35 shows Windows and RHEL deduplication ratios on VTL to an HPE StoreOnce 6500 System.

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Figure 35. VTL on Windows and RHEL weekly full and daily incremental backup schedule throughput performance

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Disaster Recovery with HPE StoreOnce Systems using NAS/VTL

As discussed earlier with Catalyst in Disaster Recovery with HPE StoreOnce Systems and Catalyst, HPE StoreOnce Systems have the ability to replicate data to a remote facility for disaster recovery purposes using replication. In order to setup Replication when using HPE StoreOnce NAS or VTL features, use the Replication and Recovery sections in the StoreOnce GUI.

NAS and VTL are both replicated the same way using the ‘Replication’ options in the HPE StoreOnce GUI. Figure 36 shows the Replication menu item in the HPE StoreOnce navigator menu. Before replication options can be used, the NAS and/or VTL devices must already be created on the HPE StoreOnce System; otherwise, the mappings screens shown in Figure 37 and Figure 38 will not be available.

shown in Figure 37 and Figure 38 will not be available. Figure 36. HPE StoreOnce Replication

Figure 36. HPE StoreOnce Replication

Replication ‘Mappings’ are created to another HPE StoreOnce appliance in the same network. The connections for NAS and VTL replication are supported only over network and not FC. Figure 37 and Figure 38 show the HPE StoreOnce Replication and Recovery Wizards for NAS (Local Share) and VTL (Local Library) mappings screens. From this point, the Replication Wizard or Recovery Wizard can be started for NAS or VTL, respectively.

Recovery Wizard can be started for NAS or VTL, respectively. Figure 37. HPE StoreOnce NAS Replication

Figure 37. HPE StoreOnce NAS Replication and Recovery Wizard

37. HPE StoreOnce NAS Replication and Recovery Wizard Figure 38. HPE StoreOnce VTL Replication and Recovery

Figure 38. HPE StoreOnce VTL Replication and Recovery Wizard

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NAS Replication Wizard

The NAS Replication Wizard provides a guide to setup the target appliance and share. Figure 39 shows the Welcome screen for the NAS Replication Wizard. After finishing the wizard, the new device is created and replication begins automatically.

new device is created and replication begins automatically. Figure 39. HPE StoreOnce NAS Replication Wizard VTL

Figure 39. HPE StoreOnce NAS Replication Wizard

VTL Replication Wizard

The VTL Replication Wizard provides a guide to setup the target appliance and library. Figure 40 shows the Welcome screen for the VTL Replication Wizard. After finishing the wizard, the new device is created and replication begins automatically.

wizard, the new device is created and replication begins automatically. Figure 40. HPE StoreOnce VTL Replication

Figure 40. HPE StoreOnce VTL Replication Wizard

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NAS Recovery Wizard

The NAS Recovery Wizard provides a guide to setup the target appliance and share. Figure 41 shows the Welcome screen for the NAS Recovery Wizard. After finishing the wizard, the new device is created and recovery begins automatically.

Note

If the data needs to be restored from the replication device, the ‘Mapping’ between the devices must first be removed. The old NAS device on the source HPE StoreOnce System should be removed and rebuilt or fully erased.

source HPE StoreOnce System should be removed and rebuilt or fully erased. Figure 41. HPE StoreOnce

Figure 41. HPE StoreOnce NAS Recovery Wizard

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VTL Recovery Wizard

The VTL Recovery Wizard provides a guide to setup the target appliance and library. Figure 42 shows the Welcome screen for the VTL Recovery Wizard. After finishing the wizard, the new device is created and recovery begins automatically.

Note

If the data needs to be restored from the replication device, the ‘Mapping’ between the devices must first be removed. The old VTL device on the source HPE StoreOnce System should be removed and rebuilt or fully erased.

System should be removed and rebuilt or fully erased. Figure 42. HPE StoreOnce VTL Recovery Wizard

Figure 42. HPE StoreOnce VTL Recovery Wizard

Summary

Enterprise customers demand an efficient, reliable, data growth management backup system environment while keeping costs under control. HPE provides a variety of reliable data protection storage solutions that address such requirements. HPE StoreOnce Systems using VTL, NAS, and Catalyst, along with Veritas NetBackup OST, is one such solution. HPE StoreOnce Systems offer high performance and reliability, while addressing data growth through HPE StoreOnce data deduplication technology. In addition, Veritas NetBackup’s data protection solution brings together a full generation of traditional and next-generation data protection from backup to disk, to replication management, to tape—under one platform.

In summary, HPE StoreOnce Systems integrate easily with Veritas NetBackup to protect important data for mission-critical applications.

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References

HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for Veritas NetBackup

The HPE StoreOnce Catalyst Plug-in for Veritas NetBackup, installation guide and user guide can be downloaded from:

Veritas NetBackup

More information regarding Veritas NetBackup software can be found at:

HPE Data Availability, Protection and Retention Compatibility Matrix

More information regarding the HPE DAPR Compatibility Matrix can be found at:

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© Copyright 2017 Hewlett Packard Enterprise Development LP. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for Hewlett Packard Enterprise products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. Hewlett Packard Enterprise shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.

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a00027273en_us, September 2017