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FACULTY: Management, Law and Social Sciences

SCHOOL: Social Sciences

DIVISION: Psychology

Module Handbook
Academic Year 2018/19

PSY6001-B

Forensic Psychology
Contents
1. Your Module Handbook .................................................................................... 3
2. Overview of Module .......................................................................................... 3
2.1. Module Descriptor ......................................................................................... 3
2.2. Contact Hours ................................................................................................ 3
2.3. Availability Periods ........................................................................................ 4
2.4. Module Aims .................................................................................................. 4
2.4.1. Learning Outcomes ................................................................................ 4
2.5. Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy ........................................... 5
2.6. Mode of Assessment ..................................................................................... 5
2.7. Legacy Code .................................................................................................. 5
3. Module Contacts and Communication ............................................................... 6
4. Schedule of Work/Topics .................................................................................... 6
5. Assessment Briefs ............................................................................................... 8
5.1. Assessment 1................................................................................................. 8
5.2. Assessment 2................................................................................................. 8
6. Assessment 1 Marking Criteria ........................................................................... 9
7. Extenuating Circumstances .............................................................................. 10
8. Developing Good Academic Practice ............................................................... 10
8.1. Referencing Style ........................................................................................ 10
8.2. Avoiding Plagiarism .................................................................................... 11
8.3. Study Skills Support .................................................................................... 11
9. Reading and Resources .................................................................................... 11
9.1. Main Text ...................................................................................................... 11
9.2. Other Resources .......................................................................................... 11
10. Quality and Feedback ...................................................................................... 12
10.1. External Examiners ................................................................................... 12
10.2. Providing Feedback ................................................................................... 12
1. Your Module Handbook
This handbook gives you important information about your module, including which
topics you will be studying, how you will be assessed and what learning materials
you will need.

The information provided in this handbook should be used in conjunction with the
information provided in your Programme Handbook and other reference points
available from the University website. Wherever possible, links will be provided to
other relevant reference points.

If you have any questions after reading this handbook or at any point during your
module, please see the 'Module Contacts' section of this handbook for who you can
go to for help.

2. Overview of Module

2.1. Module Descriptor


Module Title Forensic Psychology
Module Code PSY6001-B
Academic Year 2018-19
Credit Rating 20
Subject Area Psychology
FHEQ Level FHEQ Level 6
Module Coordinator Dr Ria Vaportzis
Module Co-leader Prof Catriona Morrison

2.2. Contact Hours


Type Hours
Lectures 24
Laboratory 4
Directed Study 170.5
Examinations 1.5
2.3. Availability Periods
Occurrence Code: BDA
Location: University of Bradford
Period: Semester 2 (Jan-Apr)

2.4. Module Aims

This module enables you to explore the concept of crime, who commits crime,
assessment and treatment of criminal behaviour, legal psychology and psychology
and the courts. The module focuses upon psychological approaches and principles
and it will enable you to critically evaluate how psychology relates to crime, the
criminal justice system and the judicial process.

2.4.1. Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:


1. discuss and critically evaluate the scientific underpinnings of Forensic
Psychology;
2. be knowledgeable about the inherent variability and diversity of psychological
functioning in Forensic Psychology;
3. be knowledgeable and demonstrate a critical understanding of Forensic
Psychology practice;
4. be knowledgeable and appreciate the challenges faced by psychologists
working within the specialised area of Forensic Psychology;
5. demonstrate knowledge and application of ethical issues in Forensic
Psychology;
6. reason scientifically and demonstrate the relationship between theory and
evidence in Forensic Psychology;
7. adopt multiple perspectives with regard to forensic psychological theory and
research;
8. detect meaningful patterns in criminal behavior;
9. communicate ideas and research findings by using written, oral and visual
means;
10. be computer literate to analyse and present ideas and research findings;
11. approach problem solving in a systematic way;
12. participate in and be aware of contextual and interpersonal factors in
groups/teams;
13. undertake self-directed study/project management;
14. assess their own skills and harness them for future learning;
15. recognise their strengths and areas for development with regard to
employability;
16. recognise the value and application of ethical principles in a broader social
context.

2.5. Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy


The lectures will provide overviews of material relating to psychological concepts and
theories of crime, offending, risk assessment, treatment, rehabilitation, the police and
court system (Learning Objectives; LO1-5). Action-based learning sessions allow for
the discussion of any issues arising, engage with real case material arising and will
enable students to comment on progress (LO6-8). They will also consolidate the
theory learnt in the lectures (LO6-16). The Virtual Learning Environment, Canvas,
will be used to maintain discussion and provide resources. The coursework and
exam will assess all learning outcomes.

2.6. Mode of Assessment


Type Method Description Length Weighting

Summative Coursework Group poster + Poster: 1 x A0 50%


Presentation PowerPoint slide

Presentation: 10 minutes

Summative Examination Unseen closed 1.5 hours 50%


book exam

2.7. Legacy Code


SY-6002D
3. Module Contacts and Communication
Details of the online systems and methods of communication used to contact you
about your programme and your life as a student at the University are detailed in
your Programme Handbook.

Your module contacts are as follows:


Role Name Email
Module Leader Dr Ria Vaportzis e.vaportzis@bradford.ac.uk
Module Co-Leader Prof Catriona Morrison c.morrison2@bradford.ac.uk

4. Schedule of Work/Topics
The outline below gives you an indication of which topics you will study and the
timings for these. This information may be subject to change, so please make careful
note of any module announcements regarding changes from your module tutor, from
Canvas or on email.

Week Lecture/Lab Topic Lecturer


Date Time
Location
Week 1 Lecture 1 Introduction to Forensic Dr Ria Vaportzis
22/01/19 10:00-11:30 Psychology
Richmond/JSB Part A. Module overview; introduce
and explain the format of lectures
and assessments.
Part B. What is forensic
psychology and what do forensic
psychologists do? Crime statistics
and sources of crime data, nature
of offences.
Week 2 Lecture 2 Theories of Crime Dr Ria Vaportzis
29/01/19 10:00-11:30 Discuss psychological theories of
Richmond/JSB crime including biological, learning,
psychoanalytic and social theories.
Explain crime using different levels
of analysis (i.e., societal,
community, and group influences,
and individual approaches).
Week 3 Lecture 3 Sexual Offenders Dr Ria Vaportzis
5/02/19 10:00-11:30 Definitions and attitudes towards
Richmond/JSB rape, offender characteristics and
motives, Rape Empathy Scale.
Week 4 Lecture 4 Offender Profiling Dr Ria Vaportzis
12/02/19 10:00-11:30 Discuss different approaches to
Richmond/JSB offender profiling (i.e.., criminal
investigative, statistical and clinical
practitioner approach), and their
positives and negatives.
Week 4 Lab 1 Dr Ria Vaportzis
12/02/19 Group 1:
12:30-2:30
Group 2:
2:30-4:30
Richmond/L24
Week 5 Guest lecture Employability Week Guest lecturer
18/02/19 10:00-11:30 Consultant clinical psychologist
Richmond/JSB Rajsid Skinner will be coming in as
a guest lecturer. There will be
other activities you should attend
during Employability Week.
Week 6 Lecture 5 Violent Offenders Dr Ria Vaportzis
26/02/19 10:00-11:30 Crime statistics of violent offences
Richmond/JSB in England, domestic violence,
stalking, the effect of media
violence on violent behaviour,
homicide theories and risk
assessment tools.
Week 7 Lecture 6 Eye Witness Testimony Prof Catriona
05/03/19 10:00-11:30 The experience of eyewitnesses in Morrison
Richmond/E59 crime situations. The means by
which professionals in forensic
settings, and amateurs in jury
situations, evaluate what
eyewitnesses say.
Week 7 Lab 2 Prof Catriona
05/03/19 Group 1: Morrison
12:30-2:30
Group 2:
2:30-4:30
Richmond/L24
Week 8 Lecture 7 Memory Accuracy Prof Catriona
12/03/19 10:00-11:30 How accurate are autobiographical Morrison
Richmond/E59 memories? Where and how does
memory let us down?

Week 9 Lecture 8 Cognitive Distortions Prof Catriona


19/03/19 10:00-11:30 Memory is subject to distortion, but Morrison
Richmond/E59 so are other aspects of cognition
such as perception. This lecture
will examine the wider ways in
which cognition ‘lets us down’.
Week 10 Lecture 9 Mental Disorders and Crimes Dr Ria Vaportzis
26/03/19 10:00-11:30 Mental health in prisons, security
Richmond/E59 levels in forensic services, the
relationship between mental illness
and violence, risk assessment.

Week 11 Lecture 10 Victims of Crime Dr Ria Vaportzis


02/04/19 10:00-11:30 Post-traumatic stress disorder
Richmond/E59 (PTSD), theories of PTSD, indirect
victims, help for victims, restorative
justice.
Week 12 Review Review of the Module Dr Ria Vaportzis
09/04/19 10:00-11:30
Richmond/E59
Week 12 Assessment Poster Presentations Dr Ria Vaportzis
10/04/19 9:00-12:00
Richmond/E59

5. Assessment Briefs
5.1. Assessment 1
Method Coursework
Type Summative
Weighting 50%
Length 1 x A0 PowerPoint slide poster and 10 minutes
presentation
Outcomes Assessed 1-16
Task Description Group poster and presentation relating to a forensic
psychology topic (e.g., offending, risk assessment,
treatment)
Date of Assessment Presentations will be on Week 12
Feedback and Students will be notified of results on Canvas
Results

5.2. Assessment 2
Method Examination
Type Summative
Weighting 50%
Length 1.5 hours
Outcomes Assessed 1-16
Task Description Unseen closed book examination
Date of Assessment Examination timetable will be available
Feedback and Students will be notified of results on Canvas
Results
6. Assessment 1 Marking Criteria
High First Low First High 2:1 Low 2:1 Third Fail Subs Fail
84-100% 70-83% 60-69% 50-59% 40-49% 30-39% 0-29%
Appearance & Outstanding design Excellent design and Nice design and Adequate design and Design and layout Design and layout Cluttered and/or
Organisation and layout. Neat and layout. Neat and easy layout. Easy to read layout. Easy to read shows structure, but it shows some structure confusing design and
(6 marks) easy to read and to read and and understand the the content is not easy to read but is cluttered, busy layout. Spacing and
understand the understand the content and understand or distracting headings to not
content. Looks content enhance readability
professional
Presentation Presenters have a Presenters have a Excellent eye- Good eye contact, no Inconsistent with eye- Poor eye-contact and Poor eye-contact,
(6 marks) clear presence in the clear presence in the contact, no distracting distracting gestures, contact and enunciation, volume too low or too
room. Kept the room. Excellent eye- gestures, clear and overall presenters enunciation, some distracting gestures. loud, poor
audience interested. contact and posture. consistent have clear and distracting gestures. Over- or under-time enunciation,
Excellent eye-contact On-time enunciation. On-time consistent Over- or under-time distracting and
and posture. On-time enunciation. On-time confusing gestures.
Over- or under-time
Title Describes the topic in Describes the topic in Describes the topic in Describes the topic in Describes the topic in Does not describe the Title missing
(2 marks) full, correctly and full and correctly full but incorrectly part but correctly part and incorrectly topic
succinctly
Introduction Introduces the topic Introduces the topic Introduces the topic Introduces the topic Includes limited Includes no relevant Includes no relevant
(7 marks) and critically and critically and appraises some in part and covers relevant literature but literature and is literature
appraises relevant, appraises some relevant, up-to-date relevant literature but is mostly based on entirely based on
up-to-date literature relevant, up-to-date literature in a mainly outdated or irrelevant outdated or irrelevant
literature descriptive way. sources sources
Includes some
outdated or irrelevant
sources
Aims & Hypotheses Well-developed, Theoretically based Theoretically based Aims stated and Aims and hypotheses Aims missing and Aims and hypotheses
(5 marks) theoretically based clear aims and clear, aims and clear, clear, logical are unclear hypotheses are missing
clear aims and clear, logical hypotheses logical hypotheses hypotheses unclear
logical hypotheses
Methods Thorough, clear and Clear and concise Clear account, with Clear account but Unclear in places and Unclear and Method section
(7 marks) concise account, with account, with no no irrelevant omits important omits important incomplete missing
no irrelevant irrelevant information information information or information
information includes unimportant
information
Results Appropriate analyses Appropriate analyses Appropriate analyses Appropriate analyses Appropriate analyses Inappropriate Results are not
(7 marks) presented in a presented in a presented in a presented but is presented but is analyses presented. reported
thorough, complete, complete, clear and complete and clear incomplete or unclear incomplete, unclear The information is
clear and concise concise way way or includes errors incomplete, unclear
way and includes errors
Conclusion Interprets and Interprets and Interprets and Summarises results Repeats information The conclusion is Conclusion missing
(7 marks) critically evaluates critically evaluates critically evaluates and makes some from the introduction incomplete or
results. Practical results. Practical results. Some attempt comments. Little or with no added includes errors
implications implications to discuss practical no attempt to content or critical
discussed. discussed implications conclude evaluation. Little or
Appropriate directions no attempt to
for future studies conclude
given
References References in text References in text References in text References in text or References in text References are References missing
(3 marks) and in list have no and in list have no and in list have minor in list have errors and in list have errors limited and have
errors and are in line errors and are in line errors major errors in text
with the Harvard or with the Harvard or and in list
Numeric System Numeric System
7. Extenuating Circumstances
In a University context, 'Extenuating Circumstances' means an exceptional situation
which has prevented a student from either:
1. completing, attending and/or submitting required assessments or;
2. performing in assessments at their expected level.

It is important that you notify the University as soon as possible about an exceptional
circumstance that will impact your ability to complete assessments. Wherever
possible, you should submit your Extenuating Circumstances application and
evidence before your assessment is due to take place. If this is impossible due to the
unforeseen nature of your circumstances, you should submit your Extenuating
Circumstances no later than 7 days after your assessment was due to take place (for
example, the assessment submission date or the exam date).

You can submit an Extenuating Circumstances form online from your e:Vision
account (https://evision.brad.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/SIW_LGN) and will be notified of
the outcome via email. For help, advice and support regarding the assessment
process and Extenuating Circumstances, you should speak to your Personal
Academic Tutor or the MyBradford Team, available in your Faculty or at
mybradford@bradford.ac.uk.

For further information about Extenuating Circumstances, visit:


www.bradfordunisu.co.uk/get-help/extenuating-circumstances

8. Developing Good Academic Practice


As a student, you are expected to complete all work independently and honestly,
using an appropriate academic style. This includes consistently and accurately
acknowledging and referencing any sources you use in your work.

8.1. Referencing Style


The referencing style for this module is Harvard or Numeric.
A guide to this referencing style can be found here:
https://www.bradford.ac.uk/library/find-out-about/referencing/
8.2. Avoiding Plagiarism
A broad definition of plagiarism is using other people's words or ideas and passing
them off as your own. Whether intentional or not, it is bad academic practice and can
result in assessment penalties. The Library has information about plagiarism, and
how to avoid it: https://www.bradford.ac.uk/library/help/plagiarism/

8.3. Study Skills Support


Self-help study skills resources can be accessed here:
https://unibradfordac.sharepoint.com/sites/academic-skills-advice-intranet

9. Reading and Resources


The reading list for this module can be accessed via the University's database here:
https://bradford.rl.talis.com/modules/psy6001-b.html

9.1. Main Text


Howitt, D. (2016) Introduction to Forensic and Criminal Psychology. 6th Edition.
Essex: Pearson Education Limited. ISBN13: 978-1292187167

9.2. Other Resources


Adler, J. R. (Ed.) (2010) Forensic Psychology: Concepts, Debates and Practice. 2nd
Edition. Cullompton: Willan Publishing.
Ainsworth, P. B. (2000). Psychology and Crime: Myths and Reality. Harlow:
Longman
Ainsworth, P. B. (2005). Offender Profiling and Crime Analysis. London: Willan.
Brown, J.M. & Campbell, E.A. (2010). The Cambridge Handbook of Forensic
Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Devon: Willan Publishing.
Canter, D. (2010). Forensic Psychology: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford
University Press.
Canter D, (2009). Investigative Psychology: Offender Profiling and the Analysis of
Criminal Action. West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons Limited.
Canter, D. (2008). Criminal Psychology. London: Hodder Education.
10. Quality and Feedback
10.1. External Examiners
External Examiners play a key role in the assurance of academic standards and in
the on-going development and enhancement of programmes and modules.

10.2. Providing Feedback


You can provide feedback on your modules in a number of different ways, for
example:
▪ Completing module evaluation surveys
▪ Talking to the Student Representative for your programme
▪ Submitting items for Staff-Student Liaison Committees
▪ Participating in open staff/student forums