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Introduction

This is a picture-story about some of the kinds of work


being done by the United Nations family of world organ¬
izations. The story it tells, in human terms, is based on
information contained in various books, reports and
other material issued by the United Nations and the
Agencies related to it which have been made available
through the United Nations Office of Public Information.
The publisher, Gilberton Company, Inc., which is
responsible for the selection of material and the way
it is presented, is well-known in many lands for its
“Classics Illustrated” series, published in a variety of
languages.
We welcome this special issue in the series, and hope
it will be of value to its readers in learning something
about the many ways by which nations working together
affect the lives of individual human beings. We hope,
too, that it will stimulate a desire in readers to learn
more about the work and aims of the world peace
organization and its related agencies.

Hernane Tavares de Sa
United Nations Under-Secretary for Public Information

GILBERTON COMPANY, INC.,


THE CLINIC AT SOLO
UNITED FOR PEACE
refugees. What must
help them?

rgates wear earphones to hear


language of their choice.
The Assembly takes many vital actions. The agency obtained funds and equipment
It set up an agency that helped South to rebuild dams and industry, and bring

||
Korea recover after the Korean War. in livestock.

L a-
fifteen n

Mil
THE TROUBLED CONGO
PEACE - THROUGH EDUCATION, SCIENCE, CULTURE

o
FREEDOM FROM HUNGER
The world has three billion people. Almost one-half face permanent hunger; and the
number of people on earth will double to six billion in less than forty years. The hunger-
gap must, and can, be closed.
SPECIAL AGENCIES
Many agencies make up the family of
the United Nations. The International
Telecommunication Union sets up
radio frequencies for different coun-
The United Nations Educational, Scien¬
tific and Cultural Organization helps
countries with school problems. It also
spreads scientific knowledge and urges
nations to understand each other.

The Universal Postal Union makes it


easier to send a letter from one country
to another. It also encourages faster
mail service.

The Food and Agriculture Organization


helps nations increase their farm, fish¬
ing and forestry products. 1
23
THE HEALTH ARMY
25
Jn Iran, spraying parties had a difficult task.
They had to find the wandering tribes of the
Kurdistan district.

J'he tribes migrate with the seasons between


frontiers of Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria.

gometimes the spraying parties had


U
travel hundreds of miles before they
found them. >-
27

The Key
“What is it you would most tration camps, bombed-out build¬
like to have in life?” a refugee ings and unused packing cases
was asked. were all made to serve as shelters
“A key,” answered the refu¬ for millions of families.
gee, “a key to a door behind The refugees had no privacy.
which I could have some privacy Sometimes, two or three large
for myself and my family —a families lived in a single room
place I could really make my at one time. The members took
home.” turns sleeping, for there were
When World War II ended in never enough beds.
1945, there were millions of dis¬ The United Nations organized
placed persons who had no coun¬ several programs after the war
try they could call their own. to reach the refugees and help
They had nowhere to live. Un¬ them. Then, to continue aid to
told numbers of homes had been these refugees and to help new
destroyed during the war. The ones, the General Assembly of the
houses left standing were already United Nations set up the Office
overcrowded with citizens of of the High Commissioner for
the countries the refugees had Refugees in 1951. The High Com¬
come to. missioner’s Office, with the aid
The refugees moved into any of many governments, helps the
dwellings they could find. Empty refugees to find the key to a more
army barracks, former concen¬ decent life.
A NEW LIFE
29
Mears passed. Thousands of refugees Many found work, but even for them
M remained in the camps waiting for the lrilife was difficult.
chance to prove that they could still
be useful.

l\ations all over the


11world contributed
money and goods to help
pay for refugee resettle¬
ment. The people of
Aitutaki in the Cook
Islands of the South
30
The Technical Expert
At this moment throughout asked for a person who could
the world, experts recruited by teach mechanized woodworking,
the United Nations are serving and Peru requested a meteorolo¬
many lands. Perhaps in the South gist to help set up a weather
forecasting station. Israel want¬
ed an expert in office manage¬
ment.
From where do these experts
come?
The United Nations recruits
them through universities, gov¬
American jungle, an expert is ernment departments, industry
traveling by Indian canoe to find and professional associations in
better ways to transport timber many lands.
to the coast. In the South Pa¬ Once they are chosen, experts
cific, an expert may be studying have to pass medical examina¬
the soil of a tiny island and tell¬ tions, for many have to eat
ing the people who live there how unfamiliar foods, risk health
they can always have good crops hazards, and even face physical
so they will never go hungry.
How does the expert come to
serve the United Nations?
In 1949, the United Nations
General Assembly launched what
was called the Expanded Pro¬
gram of Technical Assistance.
Each year, governments, usually
those of less developed countries,
send requests to the United Na¬
tions for experts in many differ¬ dangers when they travel to
ent areas. One year, Ceylon remote places.
But despite the hazards and
hardships, the experts take their
knowledge into foreign lands,
and share it. As a result, a
greater part of the human race
is beginning to benefit from the
progress that well-developed na¬
tions take for granted.
34
A LIGHT IS SET
35
36
"fp^e set up a model boys' school at "rpoday, the center has a printing
press that is busy turning out
have a chance to grow up as educated books and magazines in Braille.

H"Just before I left Egypt, a group


* of blind persons invited me to one
of their weekly gatherings. Their
teacher provided cakes and tea.
"Qne man played his violin. Thus,
these people meet to pass
several agreeable hours together.
Their blindness no longer leaves
them lonely and afraid. For in
their darkness, a light has been
37
A HOME FOR PREMADASA
A United Nations expert from Australia
** once brought hope to a young man in
Ceylon whose name was Premadasa. The
expert's field was low cost housing. This h
Shoes For Francois
Francois looked at his He walked to the one win¬
bare feet, and at the ragged dow in his house and stared
clothes he wore. out. His home was a
“Father,” he said, “I am thatched hut built on the
ashamed to go to school. I sloping side of a mountain
am the only boy in my class in a district of Haiti called
who does not own shoes.” Fermathe. His brown eyes
Frangois’ father patted followed the road that
him on his thin shoulders. trailed down the mountain
“I know, my son,” he said, into Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s
“it is very difficult. But there capital.
is nothing I can do. Our land Francois knew his district
is poor. Perhaps someday was poor. Around his house
you, your sister and mother and into the distance he saw
and I will have shoes. We where trees had been cut
must be patient.” down. The wind and rain
Frangois bit his lower lip. had blown and washed away
42
the soil so in many places Francois turned to tell his
bare rocks broke through. father he was sorry he had
The small almost barren complained about having no
field that huddled close to shoes. But his father was
his house yielded only peas gone. Then Francois heard
and bananas. Francois could the sound of a hoe scraping
not remember ever eating in the rocky garden. He
any other kind of food. And hurried outdoors to help his
each day he and his father father until the sun dipped
had to walk two miles along into the Caribbean Sea, and
narrow mountain paths to it was night.
find water. One day when he came
43
home from school, Francois
found several strange men
talking to his father. They
were men not of his country.
“I believe we can do some¬
thing,” he overheard one of
the men say, “but it will
take time, and it will take
cooperation from all the
farmers of Fermathe.”
“I do not know,” his
father said. “It seems the
land has always been
against us.”
He turned and saw Fran¬
cois.
“Come here, son,” he said.
“These men are from a dis¬
tant land called Belgium.
They were sent here by the
United Nations.”
Francois knew about the
United Nations. Often in
school he and his classmates
had talked about the United
Nations with their teacher.
“They will help us,” Fran¬ potato seeds and planted
cois said. them near the house. He
In the months that fol¬ tended the plants with great
lowed, the men, who were care. He also joined a group
agricultural experts, set up with other farmers. It was
a demonstration center in called a cooperative.
Fermathe. There, they Then his father asked
showed his father and the Francois to help him build a
other farmers how to grow new roof for their house.
many new varieties of vege¬ The roof was made of metal
tables. One day Francois’ given his father by the gov¬
father brought home some ernment. A gutter led from
it to a concrete tank. Now voices of his father and
when the rain fell, the water mother in another room.
was saved and stored in the They were laughing. It had
tank. been a long time since Fran¬
The week after the first gois had heard his parents’
potato harvest, Frangois’ voices so happy.
father went with other He sat up in bed and
members of the cooperative stretched, and then he put
to Port-au-Prince. They his bare feet on the floor.
took many large sacks of Suddenly Frangois trem¬
potatoes with them. Fran¬ bled. For on the chair in his
cois and his mother and room he saw a new pair of
sister stood at the window trousers and a shirt, bought
and watched them wind in Port-au-Prince by his
down the narrow mountain father. And beneath the
road until they were out of chair were a pair of fine and
sight. wonderful and shiny shoes.
Slowly, the sun slipped
into the Carribbean, and it
was dark. At last, Frangois
went to sleep. He did not
hear his father come home.
The bright sun awakened
him the following morning.
Frangois could hear the
47
J
THE ELDERS OF SHEWAKI
Afghanistan is a country surrounded
by mountains. Only in the tost few
years have its people had any contact
with the outside world.
L
53
56
63
The story of the United
Nations does not end here.
It goes on. Each moment
somewhere one of the many
agencies of the United Na¬
tions is helping some person
or some country.
Through technical assist¬
ance, less-developed nations
are learning ways to mod¬
ernize themselves, and
develop their farms and in¬
dustries.
Teams of doctors and
nurses are bringing good
health to people who, only a
Nations are exchanging
their arts, and scientists are
crossing borders to ex¬
change information.
Through the United Na¬
tions’ General Assembly,
countries meet on a com¬
mon ground where they can
discuss world issues.
few years ago, never heard
The United Nations’ Se¬
of vaccines or hospitals.
curity Council works to
Teachers are being
maintain peace. It keeps
trained and schools are
watch on every part of the
being built so children
earth. Where friction devel¬
everywhere can be educated
ops between peoples, the Se¬
— for tomorrow depends
curity Council seeks to
upon the boys and girls of
change angry actions into
today.
wise and peaceful negotia¬
tions.
The story of the United
Nations does not end. For
the need to help people and
to keep peace is constant.
People must be helped, and
the peace must be kept.
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