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Lesson Plan

Lesson Title: The story of The Creation of Turtle Island Grade: 5 Date: N/A
Subject/Strand: Social Studies Unit: Location: Classroom Times: 100 minutes

Lesson Plan Description (What are you teaching? How does it fit into the context of the unit? What are the big ideas/essential/enduring
understandings?)

What are you teaching = Teaching students the Ojibwa story of The Creation of Turtle Island
Big Idea = When examining an issue, it is important for students to understand who the different stakeholders are and to
consider their perspectives

STEP 1 : CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS

Ontario Curricular Overall Expectations (numbers from documents and details)

B2. Inquiry: use the social studies inquiry process to investigate Canadian social and/or environmental
issues from various perspectives, including those of Indigenous peoples as well as of the level (or
levels) of government responsible for addressing the issues (FOCUS ON: Perspective)

Ontario Curricular Specific Expectations and Achievement Chart Categories


(Numbers from documents and details) selected & listed from the Ont. Curriculum, (refined when necessary): realistic number of expectations (1 or 2), connect
to assessment. Indicate category in brackets beside specific expectation :Knowledge and Understanding( K ) Thinking (T); Communication (C);
Application(A)

B2.1 formulate questions to guide investigations into social and/or environmental issues in Canada from various perspectives,
including the perspective of Indigenous peoples and of the level (or levels) of government responsible for addressing the issues
(K) (C) (T)

Learning Goals Discuss with students: What will I be learning today? (Clearly identify what students are expected to know and be able to do, in
language that students can readily understand.)

Today I am learning to express my opinion on environmental issues through poetry, while keeping in mind the perspective of
Indigenous peoples

STEP 2: ASSESSMENT

Purpose of the lesson (indicate purpose for this lesson/assessment) [ ] FOR [ X ] AS [ ] OF

Success Criteria Discuss with students: How will I know I have learned what I need to learn? (Clearly identify the criteria to assess student’s
learning: evidence of learning students will provide to demonstrate their knowledge, skills and thinking, in language that students can readily understand).
Indicate the Achievement Chart criteria.

I can: explore the Ojibwe point of view using The Creation of Turtle Island Story (T)
I can: Create a haiku poem following the 5 7 5 structure, about my own feelings about The Creation of Turtle Island Story (K)
I can: Using learned vocabulary to be respectful in my Haiku poem (C)
Assessment Mode- Written, Assessment Strategy and Task for Students- Assessment Tool - Instrument
Oral, Performance (Write, Say, Do) What are the students doing to show their used to assess; Record Keeping
learning? format
Written. Students will
collaboratively be writing a haiku. Students will listen to the story, and then connect Success Criteria Checklist, with
with it through their own perspective and prior space for anecdotal notes.
knowledge, creating a haiku.

STEP 3: CONSIDERATIONS FOR PLANNING

Prior Learning: Prior to this lesson, students will have


- Knowledge and practice of crafting poems in the language unit.
- Reading other Ojibwe traditional stories (Andek a story about a crow, a coyote story, and the cloud catcher and moon woman)
- About environmental issues (talked about in Science)
- Have practiced respectful talk and knowledge building circles (safe space talk) in the classroom prior

I.E.P. program implications: Accommodations, Modifications

N/A

Differentiation: Content, Process, Product, Environment, Assessment

Process: Students can craft their haiku individually or in partners

Product: Students can choose whether they share their haiku to the classroom or not

Learning Skills/Work Habits: [ ] responsibility, [ ] organization, [ ] independent work, [ x] collaboration, [ ] initiative, [ ] self-regulation
- I am respectful of others’ opinions and perspectives
- I do my share of the work when working with others
- I can work well with anyone in the class
- I stay with my group while working on group work

Vocabulary: (for word wall addition or reference and/or to develop schema for this lesson. To be addressed in lesson)
- Ojibwe
- M’Chigeeng First Nation
- Environment
- Friendship
- Stewardship
- Andek
Resources and Materials /Technology Integration: List ALL items necessary for delivery of the lesson. Include any attachments of student
worksheets used and teacher support material that will support communication of instruction. Include the use of Information Technology (ICT) in your lesson
plan where appropriate.

- The Creation of Turtle Island by Ken Ense


- Powerpoint presentation / Projector
- Pens/pencils
- Sheets for Haiku writing

Three Part Lesson Identify what the students are expected to think about or do.

What Teachers Do: Write the lesson What Students do: Identify what the students are expected to think
description with enough detail that another about or do (in terms of learning processes).
teacher could replicate the lesson without a
personal discussion. Prompts and guiding
questions are required in each section.

Minds on: Motivational Hook/engagement /Introduction (5-15 min)


Establish a positive learning environment, connect to prior learning, set the context for learning, pre-determine key questions to guide lesson.

Time: 10 (Indicate time breakdown of instructional elements)

During the minds on the facilitator will begin by


focusing on scaffolding prior knowledge of Ojibwe
traditional stories. Building upon the following
stories and their meanings. Prior readings to bring Possible answers
to students attention Andek a story about a crow, Andek a story about a crow - meet life head-on and create good
a coyote story, and the cloud catcher and moon connections with those around you and work with spirit of friendship
woman.
a coyote story - to be wise and to hear the warnings from the wise
Start by asking the students to discuss with an
elbow partner what traditional Ojibwe stories we the cloud catcher and moon woman - Listening to wise warnings
have read in class and discuss some
understandings of these traditional stories. (this
should take only a minute)
Possible answers
Afterwards bring the students attention back to the The other stories had warnings in them and something bad happening
group and discuss briefly in the circle some of the because they didn't listen to wise words.
discussions taking place around these traditional
Ojibwe stories. (take about 2 minutes) There are animals in this story just like the others

A brief history of the Ojibwe I felt sad that some of the animals did not believe in the Muskrat and did
The Ojibwe (also Ojibwa, Ojibway and Chippewa) not give him a chance.
are an Indigenous people in Canada and the
United States who are part of a larger cultural It was sad that muskrat died trying to save everyone
group known as the Anishinaabeg. The Ojibwe
are well known for their Birch bark canoes, This story reminds me of Noah's Arc
cultivation of wild rice and maple syrup. In their
traditional homelands in the Eastern Woodlands,
Ojibwe people became integral parts of the early
fur trade economy. Ojibwe culture, language and
activism have persisted despite assimilative
efforts by federal and provincial governments, and
in many cases are representative of the enduring
First Nations presence in Canada. Presently the
Ojibwe are the highest population of First Nations
in the great lakes region of Ontario.

Then it is time to introduce the new reading


resource The creation of turtle Island written and
illustrated by Ken Ense. Take the time to give
some background information on the author. Ken
Ense a resident of M’Chigeeng First Nation,
artist, author, and substitute teacher. Before the
reading begins ask the students the following
questions to think about during this reading.

Guiding Questions
Does this traditional Ojibwe story have any links
or similarities to our previous Ojibwe stories?

What was some of the emotions you may have


felt during the reading?

Have you read or heard any stories that sound


familiar?

Facilitator will read the story pausing to ask


students to make predictions about what might
happen next. (6 minutes)

After the sabout story allow students some time to


discuss and answer the questions with elbow
partners. Bring the students back to discuss as a
whole group some realizations about the the
traditional Ojibwe story.

Direct students to the learning goals and success


criteria before moving on.

Action: During /Working on it (time given for each component, suggested 15-40 min)

Focus is on student interactions with task/peers/teacher. Identify students/groups receiving teacher direction.
Time: 30 (Indicate time breakdown of instructional elements)

Reactivate student knowledge on haiku poems


Students will share what they have learned previously about haiku poems,
that has been previously explored (2 minutes)
they may discuss what they wrote one about in the past

Display the typical structure of a haiku poem (5


syllable, 7 syllable, 5 syllable) on the board with
an example:

Bright rays of sunshine


Shimmer on the pond’s surface
A turtle finds warmth

By John Trent

Explain to students that they will be creating their


own haiku poems today based on their feelings
about The Creation of Turtle Island story.
*Students may wish to pass around story to promote further ideas and
Guide the students through the learning goals and
perspective building
success criterion (2 minutes):

We will be learning to express our opinion on


environmental issues through poetry, while
keeping in mind the perspective of Indigenous
peoples

I can: explore the Ojibwe point of view using The


Creation of Turtle Island Story (T)
I can: Create a haiku poem following the 5 7 5
structure, about my own feelings about The
Creation of Turtle Island Story (K)
I can: Using learned vocabulary to be respectful in
my Haiku poem (C)
Students will begin working - they may choose to work individually or with a
Go over the importance of being respectful in our
partner, students may choose to discuss their poems with their peers or
poetry in regards to the Indigenous community
discuss ideas amongst one another (20 minutes)

Facilitator will walk around while students


work asking the following:
- Can you tell me what your poem is about?
- From your perspective, how did that story
make you feel?

Consolidation & Connection (Reflect and Connect) (5-15 min.)


Help students demonstrate what they have learned, provide opportunities for consolidation and reflection. Close the assessment loop.
Time: 10min (Indicate time breakdown of instructional
elements)

Grade 5’s will have a chance to share learning


that day.

Volunteers will share their haiku poems.


As well as, a quick reflection of what they have
written, and why they wrote it.

Secondly, they will share something they learned


as a result of today’s activity and story telling.

(There will only be time for a about 4-5 volunteers,


this is something that can be continued
throughout the week)

Educator will encourage comments and questions


from classmates.

Possible prompts by the educator:


● What is the most important idea that was
generated in today’s discussion?
Students’ high order thinking will be prompted by the educators questions
● Could you elaborate on that point?
to help them think deeper about what they are doing, why they are doing it
● Can you explain what you mean?
and what it means. It allows them to take responsibility for their own
● How do you know that?
learning by being accountable of the knowledge they acquired and putting
● What do you think about the idea just
it to use in this activity.
presented by your classmate?
● Do you agree or do you see the issue
differently? Explain.

Today I am learning to express my opinion on environmental issues


Did we meet our learning goal? through poetry, while keeping in mind the perspective of Indigenous
peoples

How did we know we were successful in learning


today? I can: explore the Ojibwe point of view using The Creation of Turtle Island
Story (T)
I can: Create a haiku poem following the 5 7 5 structure, about my own
feelings about The Creation of Turtle Island Story (K)
I can: Using learned vocabulary to be respectful in my Haiku poem (C)

Extension Activities/Next Steps (where will this lesson lead to next)

An extension for this lesson would be having students research and look at traditonal woodland style art/artists, and
have them create an artwork piece that captures what they have written down.
Personal Reflection - Choose at least one question from each area that best allows you reflect on this lesson.
Questions should vary over the week and specific plans.

Learner Empowerment
1. How did students show
understanding of expectations?
2. How did my lesson transform
students from “passive listeners” to
“active participants”?
3. Was my behavior management
technique effective? Why?
4. Were students able to transition to
the next activity successfully?
5. How does the lesson provide a
metacognitive opportunity for students to
address their own learning?

Instructional Strategy
1. Was my motivational technique
(hook) effective? Why?
2. What will I do to improve
questions? Was a balance between
teacher and student talk evident?
3. How did the task provide a Rich
Performance opportunity or other way of
actively demonstrating knowledge?
4. How did I provide modeling,
guided &/or independent practice?
5. Was my behavior management
technique effective? Why?
6. Were students able to transition to
the next activity successfully?
Professional Educator
1. What factors may have influenced
the success of this lesson? Did I note
and respond to these elements
appropriately?
2. How might I improve the
effectiveness of my teaching for my next
lesson?
3. What additional proactive
management step(s) should be
considered for subsequent lessons?
Why?
4. What did I learn from this lesson
about my own effectiveness as a teacher
(strengths and areas for future
improvement of communication, planning,
differentiation, implementation and
classroom organization, management,
assessment)?
5. How is my growth as a
professional being demonstrated?

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