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Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

Safety Practices Manual

SAFETY MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. Policy / Roles
1.0 Introduction 1-2
1.1 Revision Request Form 1-3
1.2 Mission Statement 1-4
1.3 Assignment of Responsibilities 1-6
1.4 Zero Tolerance Policy 1-8
1.5 Subcontractor Management Plan(s) 1-12
1.6 Management of Change 1-14

2. Hazard Assessment
2.0 Job Planning 2-2
2.1 Job Hazard Analysis 2-2
2.2 Hazard Assessment Checklist 2-4
2.3 Hazard Assessment Corrective Action 2-5

3. Practices / Procedures
3.1 Operations – Introduction 3-2
3.2 Training and Certification Requirements 3-5
3.3 Housekeeping 3-6
3.4 Office Safety 3-6
3.5 Personal Conduct 3-8
3.6 Noise Exposure and Hearing Protection 3-9
3.7 Personal Protective Equipment 3-10
3.8 Fire Prevention and Extinguisher Operation 3-11
3.9 Use of Propane 3-13
3.10 Vehicles and Driving 3-13
3.11 National Safety Code 3-18
3.12 Chemical Handling (WHMIS) 3-20
3.13 Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) 3-20
3.14 Safe Work Practices – Shop 3-23
3.15 Safe Work Practices – Contractors 3-30
3.16 Safe Job Procedures 3-33
3.17 Safe Job Procedure – Annual Review
3.18 Fall Arrest Policy 3-34
3.19 Lock-out Tag out Policy 3-40
3.20 Modular Trailer Movement Policy 3-44

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4. Rules
4.1 General (Safety Rules) 4-2
4.2 Office (Safety Rules) 4-4
4.3 Drug Free Workplace Policy 4-5
4.4 Post Accident Drug Testing Policy 4-6
4.5 Modified Duty (Return to Work) 4-7

5. Personal Protective Equipment


5.0 General Information 5-2
5.0.1 PPE Responsibilities Management 5-2
5.0.2 PPE Responsibilities Workers 5-2
5.0.3 Determining PPE 5-3
5.0.4 Training PPE 5-3
5.1 Policy
5.1.1 Safety Glasses Policy 5-4
5.1.2 Safety Boot Policy 5-5
5.1.3 Glove Usage Policy 5-6
5.1.4 Hart Hat Policy 5-7
5.1.5 Acknowledgement PPE Policies 5-8
5.2 Information Sheets 5-9

6. Preventative Maintenance
6.1 Preventative Maintenance Policy 6-2
6.2 Responsibilities: Vehicle and Equipment 6-3
6.3 Schedule: Vehicles/Heavy Duty Equipment 6-3
6.4 Schedule: Tools 6-4
6.5 Schedule: Facility/Site Specific 6-4
6.6 Checklists Preventative Maintenance; 6-4
6.6.1 Site Inspection 6-5
6.6.2 Vehicle Inspection 6-8
6.6.3 Forklift Inspection 6-9
6.6.4 D.O.T. Inspection Checklist 6-10

7. Training / Safety Meetings


7.1 Safety Training Policy 7-2
7.2 Responsibilities 7-5
7.3 Personal Protective Equipment 7-6
7.4 Vehicle Safety 7-7
7.5 Personal Conduct 7-10
7.6 Orientation 7-11
7.7 Safety Meetings 7-11
7.8 Tools and Equipment 7-13
7.9 Fire Prevention and Protection 7-13
7.10 Housekeeping 7-14
7.11 Hazardous Goods 7-14

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7.12 Transportation of Dangerous Goods 7-14


7.13 Emergency First Aid 7-16
7.14 Employee & Contractor Acknowledgement Form 7-18
7.15 New Employee Orientation Form 7-19
7.15 Employees/Contractor Handbook EH-1

8. Inspections
8.0 Inspections Policy 8-2
8.1 Objectives 8-3
8.2 Inspections 8-3

9. Accident / Incident Investigations


9.1 Policy 9-2
9.2 Introduction 9-3
9.3 Preservation of Evidence 9-3
9.4 Conducting Investigations 9-3
9.5 Completing the Incident/Accident Form 9-4
9.6 Incident/Accident Report Form 9-6
9.7 Near Miss Report Form 9-12

10. Emergency Preparedness


10.0 Policy 10-2
10.1 First Aid Requirements 10-3
10.2 Emergency Response Plan 10-6
10.3 Evacuation Procedure 10-6
10.4 First Aid Reference 10-7
10.5 Reporting and Emergency Response Procedures 10-10

11. Records / Statistics 11-2


12. Waste Management / Environment 12-2
13. Health and Safety Committees 13-2

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1.0 POLICY / ROLES

1.0 INTRODUCTION
1.1 REVISION REQUEST FORM
1.2 MISSION STATEMENT
1.3 ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES
1.4 ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY

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1.0 INTRODUCTION

Hazards are an inherent part of any work environment, and those hazards present
in the manufacture and leasing of modular products are addressed in this
manual.

The primary purpose of this manual is to organize the information available


regarding occupational health and safety into an easily referenced format.

All employees must be aware of potential hazards involved in production,


placement, transportation and must use due caution in their daily work to prevent
or minimize loss of persons time, property or application. Equipment failures can
and do occur, however proper maintenance, control and employee training can
significantly reduce the consequences of such a failure.

This manual is intended to be continually upgraded to allow for any changes, in


policy, procedure or application and to that end a system of updating and revising
is established.

Should the manual holder see that pertinent information is incorrect, incomplete
or omitted then a "Revision Request Form" should be completed and forwarded
with any attachments to the appropriate manager. These requests will be
reviewed and upon approval the revised sections will be distributed. The master
copy of this document will be retained at the Calgary office. Each page shows a
revision date, when a page or section is revised the recipients should enter the
new information on the "Revision Log Sheet".

Periodic verification of the manual and its contents will be done as required, but
not less than annually.

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1.1 REVISION REQUEST FORM

Section Number _________________________________________________

Page Number _________________________________________________

Description of Revision _______________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

Requested By: ___________________________________________________

Address ___________________________________________________

Manual Number__________________________________________________

Request Acknowledgment Approval Date _____________________

Request Numbered and Logged Revision Date___________________

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1.2 MISSION STATEMENT AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES

1.2.1 Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Safety Policy

The personal safety and health of each employee of Williams Scotsman of


Canada, Inc. is of primary importance.

The company is committed to a strong safety program that protects its staff, its
property, the public and the environment from accidents or incidents.

Employees at every level, including management, are responsible and accountable


for the company’s overall safety initiatives. Complete and active participation by
everyone, every day, in every job is necessary for the safety among all workers on
the job site.

Management supports participation in the program by all employees and provides


proper equipment, training and procedures. Employees are responsible for the
following of procedures, working safely, and whenever possible improving
measures.

An injury and accident free workplace is our goal. Through continuous safety and
loss control effort, this can be accomplished.

The safety information in this policy does not take precedence over O.H.&S.
Regulations. All employees should be familiar with the O.H.& S. Act and
Regulations.

Signed:

____________________________

Alec McDonald

Vice President & General Manager


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

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1.2 MISSION STATEMENT AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES

1.2.2 Guiding Principles


Further to the policy statement on Health, Safety and Environment, Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. fully supports the following guiding principles for
safety which state:

As part of the business community, we at Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.


have a responsibility to protect all workers engaged in our activities from personal
injury and health hazards. To meet this responsibility the following guiding
principles shall be maintained.

1.2.3 Responsibility
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. is responsible for coordination and general
supervision of all activities at the workplace, including activities carried out by
contractors, subcontractors and suppliers. While all parties have a responsibility
to promote worker safety, Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc., recognizes its
leadership role in promoting worker health and safety on the basis that it has the
greatest opportunity to influence work site situations.

1.2.4 Priority
Activities will be conducted on the basis that safety of all personnel is of vital
importance, whether those personnel are employed by Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc., a contractor, a subcontractor or a supplier.

1.2.5 Recognition
The process of selecting contractors, subcontractors or suppliers and the
administration of contracts will include recognition and support of good safety
performance.

1.2.6 Improvement
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. in cooperation with others within the industry
will promote methods and practices that have potential for improving safety
performance.

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1.3 ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES


Responsibilities

As outlined in the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Corporate Policy Statement


the company has a responsibility to provide and be accountable for maintaining a
safe and environmentally secure workplace. The company through active
leadership will strive to achieve that goal, however, the responsibility for a safe
work place is not the company's alone but is shared by senior management,
management, supervisors, employees and contractors. Compliance with
Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, Workers Compensation and any
other government agencies will be strictly adhered to in order to achieve our goal
of being the safest company.

1.3.1. Management Responsibilities


The management role at all levels is to insist on performance and
behaviour that meets the standards of the company's safety program. To
do this the following must be adhered to.

- Encourage employee involvement in safety by demonstrating


management's commitment to safety.
- Ensure company, contractor and sub-contractor operations comply
with government an requirements.
- Provide adequately trained supervision at all work sites.
- Ensure accidents and incidents are reported and investigated and that
corrective actions are taken.
- Provide appropriate safety equipment and adequate training for all
employees as well as ensure all employees are qualified to perform
their work.

1.3.2 Supervisor Responsibility


One of the keys to any successful program is the role of the supervisor or
lead hand in bridging the gap between management and employees. Some
general guidelines will help that function in the health and safety area:

- Know company policies and practices included in this manual and


regularly use them when teaching job methods or when indoctrinating
new employees or contractors to safe job practices.
- Be alert to unsafe conditions and acts and take immediate and
appropriate corrective action should it be necessary.
- Always set a good example in the areas of safety and ensure that his
actions are consistent with company requirements. This consistency
will maintain the worker's interest in safety. This interest shall be
fostered by arranging for regular safety meetings.

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1.3 ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES


- Ensure that legislated requirements and company policies are being
complied with through the use of a regular inspection program.
- Ensure that material data sheets are available to all employees and
contractors.

1.3.3 Employee Responsibilities


Each employee shall be made aware of all the key features of the safety
program through informational sessions and by the immediate supervisor
as they pertain to a particular job function.

The worker shall ensure that a safe workplace is maintained by active


participation in the safety program and through compliance with the safe
practices contained in this manual.

In the area of safety the worker is often called upon to be responsible not
only for his own safety but also for that of his fellow worker, keeping in
mind the nature of the work and the potential hazards goes a long way to
fulfilling that responsibility.

1.3.4 Contractor Responsibility


Contract operators who are directly supervised by a company employee
must be made aware of and comply with the contents of this manual.

Contractors engaged in work on behalf of Williams Scotsman of Canada,


Inc. shall observe all safety practices and procedures contained in this
manual and as requiring by contract and shall:

- Be responsible for the safety of the contract employees.


- Immediately cease unsafe work practices when so directed by an
authorized company representative.
- Report all accidents and near accidents regardless of severity.

1.3.5 Workers Right to Refuse Work


Under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, a worker may refuse to
carry out any work, if, on reasonable and probable grounds the worker
believes that there exists an imminent danger to the health or safety of that
worker, or other workers present at the work site.

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1.3 ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES


1.3.6 Workers Right To Know

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. has the responsibility to inform the employee of the
hazards of the work place. The employee, although knowledgeable in the field that they
have been hired for, has to be informed of the specific hazards that are in the work place and
how they may affect the work to be completed.

1.4 Zero Tolerance Policy/Corrective Action Due to Safety Violations

Williams Scotsman has implemented a “ZERO TOLERANCE” policy based on our


philosophy that the vast majority of on-the-job injuries are preventable. Each supervisor
and employee has accountability for injury prevention through the application of
company and regulatory safety principles and practices.

The safety of all employees is of vital concern and it is our policy to provide and
maintain safe and healthful working conditions at all times. As indicated in Section 1.0 of
the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Safety Manual, safety is “everyone’s
responsibility”. Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. expects all employees to share the
responsibility for safety and adhere to the rules and procedures contained within the
safety manual and applicable safety information provided through regular safety meetings
or periodic policy revisions.

The creation of unsafe conditions and/or violations of safety rules or policies, including
those listed below, will not be tolerated and will result in disciplinary action, up to and
including termination.

Egregious violations (as defined below) and all lost time/modified duty accidents
(LTI/RWC) will be reviewed by the Safety management/Regional Management to ensure
adequate investigation, follow-up, and corrective action has been taken. Serious
violations (as defined below) may also be reviewed by the applicable management as
needed. Corrective action/discipline must not be issued until after the Safety
Management/Regional management has rendered its final decision.

Managers who fail to address unsafe acts (including lack of documentation) or to correct
unsafe conditions (either observed, made aware of by others or as result of
Safety/Regional Management conclusions) are subject to disciplinary actions, up to and
including termination of employment. Service Managers who fail back-to-back Regional
Safety Audits will be subject to corrective action, up to and including termination of
employment with a minimum of a written warning.

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1.41 Egregious Violations

Egregious violations will result in termination of employment,

Operating a vehicle on Company premises or on company time while under the


influence of illegal drugs or alcohol (defined as an impermissible level of alcohol
or illegal drugs in an employee’s system whether established by law or position
requirement) will result in termination of employment.

Other egregious violations are defined as unsafe acts which involve violations of
Company policies, improper use of Company equipment or in which human error
or carelessness could have been a contributing cause and which result in a fatality
or injury either to the individual engaged in the unsafe behavior or to someone
else, such as (but not limited to) the following examples

• Failure to use fall protection when working aloft (e.g., not using fall arrest
equipment or other proper equipment/procedures when working from
elevated positions, etc.)
• Improper use of forklifts, tow motors, translifts, Bobcats™ or other
powered equipment (e.g.., lifting employees with forks, excessive
speeding, use not designed for equipment, etc.)
• Improper use of LO/TO (lockout-tag out) procedures/program (e.g. failure
to LO/TO power cables or mechanical equipment when required, trailer
movement/hitch lock violation, etc.)
• Improper ladder use while working aloft (e.g.., standing on top of ladder
or other inappropriate step, improper placement, etc.)
• Intentional failure by a manager, or other designated reporter, to follow
the stated protocol of reporting on-the-job injuries to the Safety
Management/Regional Management/Risk Management Department.
• Other incidents as determined by the Safety/Regional Management.

1.4.2 Serious Violations

Serious Violations are defined as unsafe acts or behaviors that lead to or could
lead to serious injury and which involve violations of Company policies, improper
use of Company equipment or in which human error or carelessness could have
been a contributing cause. Serious violations will warrant a Written Warning
or other disciplinary action up to and including a Final Warning on the first
offense. Examples are provided below.

• Any of the examples listed under “Egregious Violations” which do not


result in fatality or injury (except Driving under the Influence which will
result in termination even if there is no fatality or injury).
• Failure by an injured employee to immediately report an on-the-job injury,
no matter how minor it may seem.
• Reckless Driving/Endangerment (observation or citation/violation)

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• Improper lifting (e.g.., heavy or large objects that require assistance, etc.)
• Improper use of scaffolds (e.g.., inadequate equipment, inappropriate
height for equipment, etc.)
• Failure to use (or improper use of) personal protective equipment as
required (e.g.., safety glasses, cut-resistant gloves, protective shields while
welding, etc.)
• Failure to follow block/level procedure (e.g.., improper use of metal
stands, improper jacking, etc.)
• Failure to use proper hitch assembly pins while transporting trailers (or
other).
• Failure to follow the WSI Vehicle Operator’s Policy
• Failure to report an incident as required by section 9.1 (Investigation
Policy)
• Other unsafe acts that could lead to serious injury or extensive property
damage (>$1000 or as determined by the Safety/Regional Management).
• Other incidents as determined by the Safety/Regional Management.

1.4.3 Contractor Violations

Contractors observed violating this policy will be dealt with according to


contractual terms or other agreement (termination, loss of contract, etc).
The contracting company must be contacted immediately to correct all
observed deviations to this policy or Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
safety rules or procedures.

Williams Scotsman reserves the right to interpret or make exceptions to this policy
as it deems appropriate in its sole discretion.

1.4.4 Corrective Action Due to Safety Violations Form

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1.4.4 CORRECTIVE ACTION DUE TO SAFETY VIOLATION
You are receiving this written notice because if a violation of a safety-related standard or
procedure (or other covered policy/procedure).
1st Warning 2nd Warning Final Warning Termination Other
EMPLOYEE’S NAME: B R A N C H / D E P A R T M E N T : S U P E R V I S O R S N A M E :

On (date), the following safety rule(s) was/were violated:

Narrative Description of Safety Violation(s) and Consequences that Resulted from Failure to follow
policy(ies):

Previous counselling related to same/similar matter: (date)

Outcome/Results:

Expected Improvement:

If the above violation(s) is/are repeated or if there are additional safety violations, further
corrective action, up to and including termination, will result.
Date: Supervisor’s Signature:

I have read the above Corrective Action.


Date: Employee’s Signature:

At Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc., the commitment to safety begins everyday. Safety violations are harmful to our
employees, costly, time-consuming, and largely avoidable. Please make every effort to work safely.

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1.5 SUBCONTRACTOR MANAGEMENT PLAN(S) POLICY

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. has adopted this policy for Subcontractor
Management Plans from industry standards and best practices. Williams Scotsman’s health
and safety management is assigned the responsibility for ensuring the following procedures,
practices, and rules are implemented and enforced.

1.5.1 Prequalification

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. health and safety management will


ensure that all subcontractors be pre-qualified through the review of their
safety programs, safety training documents, and safety statistics. Proposed
subcontractors will complete and submit a Contractors Prequalification
Form from which a Subcontractor/Supplier rating report will be completed.
The Contractor’s Prequalification Form must be complete and all requested
attachments provided.

1.5.2 Selection

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. will utilize acceptable safety matrixes to


be used as criteria for selecting subcontractors and will be based on several
considerations including but not limited to:

• Prior working relationship


• Quality Rating Report score
• Audits if current work in progress
• Availability of contractors in area
• Workers Compensation Experience Ratings

1.5.3 Mitigation Plan

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. will utilize a health and safety


mitigation plan for any subcontractor considered to be outside of the
acceptable selection method. The mitigation plan will detail the
subcontractors plan to:

• Eliminate risks associated with performing a scope of work.


• Enforce clients and Williams Scotsman training requirements.
• Health and Safety plan to conform within acceptable Williams
Scotsman if Canada, Inc. safety matrixes. Example: reduce
premiums through program/process implementation. The mitigation
plan must detail the completion date of each activity and be
approved by Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. health and safety
management.

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1.5.4 Pre-Job

The selected subcontractor will provide a training matrix with individual


employee names and the areas if completed training for employees. The
subcontractor will also identify Competent Persons and the areas of their
competency. The subcontractor will be included in pre-job meetings of kick-
off meetings, and safety orientations.

1.5.5 On-Site

The subcontractor will notify Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. project


management; within a minimum of 24 hours prior to the arrival of new
employees on-site so that arrangements can be made to provide the required
orientations. Subcontractor employees must meet all the health, safety,
training, orientation, drug and alcohol pre-screening and security
requirements of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.’s clients.

• The subcontractor will be required to meet all hazard analysis


requirements and request the safe work permits as required by this
plan. The subcontractor will be included in the audits and
inspections on-site and are expected to immediately correct any “At
Risk” behaviors or hazards identified that are within the
subcontractor’s scope of work and ability to correct. Employees of
subcontractors have the right to refuse any work they deem to be
hazardous.
• All subcontractors will be included in tailgate safety meetings, job
safety analysis or hazard assessments, and on-the-job safety
inspections.
• The subcontractor will be required to adjust their “Safe Work
Practices” in order to excessive Near Hits and/or Near Misses. If the
subcontractor is unable to perform their scope of work without “At
Risk” behavior or creating hazardous working conditions on the site,
the subcontractor’s working element will be required to leave site
until an abatement plan can be prepared and agreed upon.

1.5.6 Post-Contract

Upon completion of the work, a post-job subcontractor safety performance


review and evaluation will be completed to determine the safety
performance of subcontractor and provide reference for future job
consideration.

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1.6 MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE POLICY

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc and all subcontractors will conduct hazard
assessment when a change occurs in a construction plan or external influences impact
the manner in which the work will be conducted. This includes, but is not limited to:

• Changes to policy or objectives.


• Operating licences and permits, legal, and provincial regulatory
requirements.
• Changes in procedures, practices and rules.
• Changes to controlled documentation.
• Work progress or methods.
• Any change other than exact replacement in kind to equipment. Processes,
hardware, or software.
• Changes to operating boundaries; example operating envelopes.
• Temporary changes that specify the period of time a change will be in
effect.

1.6.1 The management of change process covers all activities including the initial
request, implementation, review, and closure of a change. Proposed changes
will be managed by Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. safety management
and forwarded to the Owner’s management for approval or disapproval. The
following items will be included in the management of change proposal.

• Technical basis for the change.


• Impact of the change on the health and safety of personnel.
• Impact of the change on the supplied tools and equipment.
• Necessary modifications to existing or new operating procedures.
• Methodology used to analyze the impact of the change.

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2.0 HAZARD ASSESSMENT

2.0 JOB PLANNING


2.1 JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS/HAZARD
ASSESSMENT GUIDE
2.1.1 JOB HAZARD ASSESSMENT
2.1.2 JOB HAZARD CONTROLS
2.1.3 JOB HAZARD EMERGENCY CONTROLS
2.1.4 JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS
2.2 HAZARD ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
2.3 HAZARD ASSESSMENT CORRECTIVE
ACTION

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2.0 JOB PLANNING
A pre-job start up meeting is an important opportunity for the people in charge of
a project to sit down and plan procedures, facilities, timelines, etc. Site
orientation of the organizations / company’s health and safety program is essential
to the health and safety of everyone on the worksite.
Job planning and site planning for every new project should establish, in writing,
at least the following things:
1. Hazard assessments.
2. Timing and frequency of on site inspections.
3. Special safety risks due to specialized equipment demands, environmental
conditions (codes of practice requirements).
4. Special safety precautions that must be constructed or installed (guardrails
and hazard awareness).
5. A list of special equipment needed, including PPE for all workers,
inventory, and availability.
6. Emergency response plan.
7. Security measures (fences, material storage, controlled products).
8. Accident / incident, near miss reporting procedures.
9. Safety training and orientation (WHMIS, TDG, etc.).
10. Any other potential hazards to employees, sub trades, visitors, the public,
etc.

Once the hazards are listed for the project or operations a number of critical tasks can be
identified.

2.1 JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS (JSA)/JOB HAZARD ASSESSMENT (JHA)

A JSA/JHA is a careful analysis of the potential hazards associated with a


particular task (such as operating a backhoe or a lathe), or an entire jobsite. The
JSA/JHA breaks down the task into separate steps, examining each of for ways in
which a worker could be hurt and/or property could be damaged.

There shall be a JSA/JHA or worksite hazard assessment for every job that
is part of a construction project. However, that could require an unreasonable
investment of time and energy. In choosing which jobs call for JSA or worksite
hazard assessment use the following priorities:

1. Any job that is associated with frequent accidents / incidents.


2. Any job that has produced injuries leaving anyone disabled.

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3. Any job that has the potential for serious injury.
4. New (or recently changed) jobs.
5. Jobs that are seldom performed (shutdown).

Over time these analyses will be done for every job, since there is usually a lot of
carry-over form one job site to the next.

2.1.1 Job Hazard Assessment


Management and supervision with workers involvement shall complete a
written hazard assessment prior to task or re-assess hazards during a job
task to identify potential hazards according to the following guidelines;

• A written hazard assessment report must be reviewed and dated prior


with all workers prior to a new task.
• A hazard assessment report must be revised/reviewed if new hazard,
condition is identified, or persons are added to perform task.
• Hazard assessments must be reviewed/revised with workers
performing an assessed job at regular intervals to ensure new hazards
are identified as conditions change.
• A new written hazard assessment must be performed by
management/supervision and workers if a hazard condition has caused
a stoppage of a task.
• Hazard assessments must identify the severity of the hazard and the
method which is used to control/correct the hazard.
• All workers involved in a hazard assessment for a job task shall review
and sign the written hazard assessment when created or revised.

2.1.2 Job Hazard Controls


As part of the hazard assessment review or revision process management
and supervision and workers shall use the following controls for identified
hazard(s);

• Eliminate the hazard if possible.


• Control the hazard with engineering control if possible.
• Administrative control to keep the hazard as low as possible.
• Personal protective equipment necessary to perform task with
identified hazard.
• Combination of engineering control, administrative control, and
personal protective equipment to perform task with identified hazard.

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2.1.3 Job Hazard Emergency Control


Management and supervision are responsible as part of a hazard
assessment process to control or eliminate hazards to workers by;

• Ensuring workers performing task with identified hazard are


competent to perform the task.
• Assigning the minimum amount of workers necessary to perform task
with identified hazard.
• Ensuring emergency response plan is available and appropriate with
identified hazard.

2.1.4 Job Safety Analysis


Management and supervision shall create a job safety analysis to minimize
risks associated with performing a given job task. A job safety analysis
will detail the steps to complete a job, the potential hazards, safe job
procedures required, and personal protective equipment needed to
minimize the hazard risks in completing a job task. Review/revision of
job safety analysis shall be done by management/supervision prior to the
start of task, with all involved workers signing and dating the written job
safety analysis.

To perform job safety analysis:

1. Begin by looking carefully at how the equipment is designed. For


example, will there be special problems in very hot or very cold
weather, or tall / short operators?
2. Carefully observe someone doing the job as they normally would. List
each of the basic steps (6 or more) involved in the task.
3. Identify the potential risks or hazards associated with each basic step.
Think about as many aspects of the job as possible; mechanics,
electricity, temperatures, pressures, leaks, explosives, noise, direction
of movement, impacts, pinch points, stability of equipment, etc.
4. For each potential problem, write down what should be done to prevent
or minimize a problem from occurring. Indicate what the worker
should do, things to look for, positions to take, movements to make, as
well as equipment maintenance and repair, or housekeeping. Give
very specific instructions, listing what to do and how to do it, rather
than general statements like “use caution”.
5. Check the list with the workers who have done the task many times, to
be sure that all steps are included and all potential hazards identified.
6. Follow up on the analysis with those involved in the task to see that
corrective actions are taken and to evaluate the effectiveness of the
actions.

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2.2 JOB HAZARD ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST

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2.3 HAZARD ASSESSMENT CORRECTIVE ACTION

Workplace Hazard Assessment Corrective Action

Branch: ____________
Assessment Location: _________________________

Item Number Priority Recommended Action Follow Up Date to


By Complete

• THIS FORM MUST BE FAXED TO SAFETY MANAGER AFTER ALL


CORRECTIVE ACTIONS HAVE BEEN COMPLETED.

Manager’s Signature

Date:

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3.0 SAFE WORK PROCEDURES AND SAFE JOB PRACTICES

3.1- 13 SAFETY PRACTICES - OPERATIONS


3.14 SAFETY PRACTICES - SHOP
3.15 SAFETY PRACTICES - SUBCONTRACTOR
3.16 SAFE JOB PROCEDURES
3.17 SAFE JOB PROCEDURE ANNUAL REVIEW
3.18 FALL ARREST POLICY
3.19 LOCK OUT / TAG OUT POLICY

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3.0 SAFETY PRACTICES

3.1 Operations - Introduction

3.1.1 Safety
Hazards are an inherent part of the production and delivery, placement of
modular products. These hazards are due to the processes, equipment, and
engineering design of equipment.

3.1.2 Hazards
Employees must be aware of the potential hazards involved in each
application process and must exercise due caution in their daily work to
prevent or minimize loss to persons, property and process. Some of the
potential hazards are identified as follows:

- Materials used in, or associated with production may be hazardous and


must be handled properly.
- Moving equipment must be properly guarded when in operation and
must be properly locked out before servicing.
- All electrical equipment must be locked out prior to servicing.
- All mobile equipment must be equipped with back up alarms.
- Management and supervision shall access and control the potential risk
to workers with contact of moving parts of all equipment/machinery or
electrically energized equipment onsite from clothing, hair, jewellery.
- The operator must not start machinery/equipment/tools where it causes
risk/hazard to other operators/workers.

Equipment failures can and do occur. Proper maintenance, control and


training can minimize the hazards and the consequences.

3.1.3 Safe Work Procedures


Safe work procedures vary between job sites depending on the work
activity, but in general workers are responsible for ensuring that the
equipment under their control is operated safely and when maintenance is
required it is handled by a qualified, competent person or by the trained
employee in a safe manner.

It is also the responsibility of the employee to monitor work in or around


equipment under their control and to alert any persons of any hazards due
to changing conditions. Employees should carefully examine equipment
upon work completion, and prior to putting the equipment back into
service.

Each employee must be aware that his personal conduct and work
procedures contribute to a safe and healthy workplace for all employees.

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During all phases of the process his own and his fellow workers well-
being depends largely on the conscientious performance of those duties.

3.1.4 Work Site Specific Procedures


Work site specific procedures should be developed, where required, for
individual work stations based on the safe practices and regulatory
requirements defined in this manual.

Supervisors with assistance from outside agencies are responsible for the
development of these procedures.

3.1.5 Inspection
Competent personnel must regularly inspect fire fighting and personal
protective equipment and any equipment found to be defective will be
immediately removed from service and shall be repaired or replaced.

3.1.6 Working Alone Requirements


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. recognizes the importance of
providing a safe and secure work environment for the employees and
subcontractors. Our company will meet or exceed all regulatory
requirements for employees and subcontractors who work alone. The
intent of the Working Alone Guidelines is to promote worker awareness
and facilitate worker safety when they are working alone. The Supervisor
will ensure that there are safety plans in place for those that work alone
and that these plans adhere to the Regulations. The Working Alone
Guidelines applies when both of the following conditions exist:

1. A worker is working by themselves in an office, vehicle, service


facility, field site, or any area where Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. is conducting work operations.
2. Assistance, in the event of an injury, illness or emergency, is not
readily available to the worker.

3.1.7 Working Alone Safe Work Plans

• Safety Plans must be developed for all workers that must or may work
alone as part of their required duties.
• Include an assessment all work areas for potential health and safety
hazards through a Hazard Assessment.
• Identify how hazards will be eliminated or controlled.
• Identify an effective means of communication available or emergency
contact system for the worker in the event of an emergency.
• Specify procedures and effectively communicate the procedures to all
affected workers.
• Work Plans must review records of past incidents or accidents.

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3.1.8 Working alone is prohibited when the work involves:

• Confined space entry


• An installation, equipment, or conductor operating at a nominal
voltage of 300 volts or more, except while testing equipment or
troubleshooting.
• Electrical systems rated at more than 750 volts.
• Trenches
• A portable ladder that exceeds 6 metres in length and is not securely
fastened or work with a ladder that is likely to be endangered by traffic
• The use of fall arrest equipment and movable scaffolding above 4m (or
three sections)
• Machine and power tools that could cause a critical injury
• Quick-acting acutely toxic material as described by the Material Safety
Data Sheet
• Use of supplied air respiratory equipment or self-contained breathing
apparatus is required
• Risk of drowning
• Use of a vehicle, crane or similar equipment near a live power line
where it is possible for any part or the equipment or its load to make
contact with the live power line
• A vehicle, crane, mobile equipment, or similar material handling
equipment where the operator does not have full view of the intended
path of travel
• Welding operation where a fire watcher is required
• Tasks, which, based on the risk assessment conducted by the
supervisor in consultation with the employee and safety manager are
deemed to require more than one person.

3.1.9 Working Alone (Supervisor Responsibilities):

• Identify risks or hazards associated with the work to be performed


(hazard assessment) or the environment where the work is to be done.
• Conduct and document a (job hazard analysis) hazard assessment for
each different (specific) type of work.
• Communicate the results of the hazard assessment to all affected
workers and others conducting similar work (another hazard
assessment is not required).
• Provide written working alone procedures for employees or
subcontractors working alone, in order to eliminate or minimize
identified risks.
• Develop effective methods of communication for workers who require
emergency assistance (for example: cell phones, radio, pager). When
electronic devices are not feasible, an effective contact system must be
established (for example: check in procedures, periodic site visits,

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requiring worker to check in after the completion of specific tasks) and
the length of time a worker may be out of contact with a supervisor
(the frequency of regular communications) must be based on the result
from the hazard assessment and clearly understood.
• Document when working alone is permitted and or prohibited and
ensure this is effectively communicated to all workers.
• Schedule potentially hazardous work for times when supervisors and
appropriate help will be available.
• Provide adequate staffing (for example: buddy system) for hazardous
tasks performed off-hours or at remote locations.

3.1.10 Working Alone (Worker Responsibilities):

• Participate in the working alone hazard evaluation and risk


management decisions with the supervisor.
• Follow safe work practices outlined in safe work procedures.
• Maintain regular communication as directed by supervisors.

3.1.11 Machinery/Equipment/Tool Safe Guards

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. management and supervision shall


ensure that equipment, machinery and tools have applicable safe guarding
according to the following guidelines;

• Ensure worker is protected from hazardous condition cause by


equipment, machinery, and tools.
• Workers must receive training prior to usage of equipment, machinery,
and tools with safeguards installed.
• Safe guards must meet the requirements for design, installation,
operation and maintenance of CSA standards Z432-04.
• Safe guards must be designed and approved by manufacturer for usage
with equipment, machinery, or tool.
• Be inspected by management/supervision during inspections.
• Be inspected by workers prior to usage.
• Safe guard will not be removed unless approved by management, and
specific procedures written to avoid any hazardous condition occurred
by removal of safe guard.
• Safe guard and signage will be installed on equipment, machinery and
tools that can automatically restart following an interruption of
operation.
• Lock out and tag out energy source of equipment, machinery, and
tools during removal/replacement/adjustment/maintenance/repair and
inspection of safe guards.

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3.2 Training and Certification Requirements
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. is responsible to detail the requirements for
proper training and certification of workers to ensure they are safe and productive
on work sites. The following training and certification requirements are to be
met.

3.2.1 Williams Scotsman of Canada Inc. Personnel


The responsible supervisor for the operations must have the following
qualifications:

- First aid training current.


- Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System training.
- Technical training in the type of operation to be carried out.
- Any other training required by Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

3.2.2 Service Personnel


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. personnel on site must be qualified in
the following areas:

- Certification required by the nature of the work, appropriate trade


certificates for service performed.
- Basic technical training in the operation or service they are there to
perform.

3.2.3 Required Safety Training Courses


Within the modular industry certain training and certification requirements
must be met to ensure that safety is an integral part of all job functions.
Training will be carried out to ensure compliance with mandatory
requirements and other training will take place as determined by the
management.

Management and/or supervisors must ensure that all employees receive


the required minimum training for the job task, additionally a complete
record of all safety training must be retained in a central location.

Changes in regulations and training requirements will be regularly


monitored to ensure that compliance with safety training needs are
maintained.

3.3 Housekeeping
Housekeeping may be the most frequently neglected part of an employee or
contractor's responsibilities, although it is extremely important part of all
operations. There are important safety reasons for an emphasis on good
housekeeping. Liquid spills become slipping or fire hazards. Piles of rags or
solvent soaked cleaning materials are all fire hazards. Loose boards can be a
tripping hazard.

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Another important factor with good housekeeping is that an untidy workplace can
quickly become an unsafe workplace. If the sight of paper, debris and minor
spills around the work site can be accepted as normal, so can other more serious
safety hazards be quickly taken for granted. Good housekeeping can instill a
"Pride of Ownership" feeling for the personnel which soon reflects into a well-
run, efficient, well maintained work site.

General Rules
Some general rules apply to good housekeeping:

1) Clean up after any work has been completed, see that all tools, equipment
and supplies are stored in a safe and tidy manner.
2) Slippery and oily spots should be cleaned up or sanded.

3) Extra care should be taken to ensure that aisles and walkways, exits and
entrances to buildings, access to safety and fire fighting equipment and
access to first aid equipment are kept clear of obstructions and/or tripping
hazards.

3.4 Office Safety


Injuries and accidents in the office are just as painful and costly as those occurring
in the work place. The office should be no less safe than any other area and equal
amount of care must be taken to assure the welfare of the workers. Some simple
rules will eliminate the majority of office hazards.

3.4.1 Filing and Storage Cabinets


Prevent cabinets from tipping over by bolting cabinets together side by
side where possible. Do not overload top shelves. Open drawers one at a
time so as not to unbalance the cabinet. Close all the drawers when they
are not in use. Use the handles to open and close the drawers to prevent
pinched fingers. Do not struggle with firmly stuck drawers, the drawer
may suddenly pull loose and fall on a foot, or could a muscle strain.

3.4.2 Paper Cutters and Shredders


After using the paper cutter make sure that the blade is closed. Be very
careful when using the shredder to avoid catching jewellery, ties, clothing
or long hair in the blades.

3.4.3 Waste Baskets


Never use a wastebasket as an ashtray as this could easily start a fire. If
the basket is being used to dispose of glass, sharp edged cans or other
similar objects, first place these objects in a bag or wrap them in
newspaper and mark the contents clearly. Never leave these items loose in
the container.

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3.4.4 Electrical Cords
To avoid fire hazard ensure that all electrical cords are in good condition
and not overloaded. Any cords that are worn or frayed are to be repaired
or replaced immediately. Do not run electrical or telephone cords across
aisles or walkways. Never remove an electrical cord form the wall socket
by pulling on the cord, always pull the plug head instead.

3.4.5 Floor and Aisles


Slipping and tripping hazards are probably the most common in an office
setting. To avoid these:

- Keep floors and aisles free of all debris and storage boxes.
- Use the aisles and walkways provided to move around the office. Do
not take short cuts.
- Do not obstruct your forward view when walking by carrying objects
that are very large.

3.4.6 Stairs
Never leave or store material on the stairs.
- Pick up debris and wipe up spills on the stairs immediately.
- Report unsafe conditions.
- Hold onto the handrail when using the stairs.

3.4.7 Ladders
Basic rules for ladder use are as follows:

- If using a stepladder, ensure that it is fully open and is on level ground


before starting to climb.
- Never stand on the top two rungs of the ladder.
- Never reach to the side of a ladder, climb down and move the ladder.

3.4.8 Flammable Materials


Never use flammable liquids such as gasoline, naphtha or varsol for
cleaning in the office. Keep any flammable material in approved
containers that are properly labelled. Do not leave the containers
uncapped.

3.4.9 Fans
Use only the fans with a wire mesh guard that completely covers the
blades.

3.4.10 Smoking
Do not smoke while handling computer tapes or other flammable material.

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3.4.11 Fire Precautions
Ensure that all employees know the location of the fire fighting equipment
in the office and also know which type of extinguisher on which class of
fire. Ensure that extinguishers are properly maintained. Ensure that all
personnel are familiar with escape routes to be used in an emergency and
know how to contact the emergency services.

3.5 Personal Conduct

3.5.1 Smoking
"No Smoking" signs must be obeyed, smoking is only permitted in
designated smoking areas. All hazardous areas are designated "No
Smoking." Please consider the feelings of non-smokers.

3.5.2 Liquor and Drugs


No alcoholic beverages or non-prescription drugs will be consumed,
distributed or in any workers possession in the workplace or on site. No
worker is allowed to accept relief from another, if in the opinion of the shift
employee or his manager, the relieving worker is in any way impaired due
to the use of alcohol or drugs. No worker will be allowed in the workplace
or on a work site with 40 milligrams of alcohol in 100 millilitres of blood,
urine or saliva. A supervisor will be made aware of any unsafe side effects
of any prescription or non-prescription drugs.

3.5.3 Horseplay
Practical jokes, fighting or wrestling can result in a serious injury.
Workers therefore shall refrain from indulging in these activities.

3.5.4 Running
Floors can be wet and slippery, therefore workers will watch their footing.
Workers shall not run within the work place with the exception of an
emergency. At that time if prudent the worker may run but must keep in
mind the footing.

3.5.5 Fighting
Fighting is unacceptable at any work site and will not be tolerated. As
indicated in the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Policies, the
consequence of such action will be automatic suspension of all parties
involved. Once the incident has been dealt with the responsible parties are
liable to termination.

3.6 Noise Exposure and Hearing Protection

3.6.1 Noise Level Surveys


All Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. facilities shall have a "baseline"
noise level survey performed and subsequently, on a regular basis, a

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follow up survey using sound level monitoring equipment to determine if
and where noise levels exceed the minimum allowable. Where noise
levels in any location exceed 80 dba all access points to the affected area
must be posted with signs indicating that "Hearing Protection is
Required".

3.6.2 Noise Control


Where high levels are identified, appropriate steps must be taken to
minimize the hazard:

- Engineering controls.(e.g. substituting less noisy equipment, isolation


of the noise and/or operator).
- Administration control. (e.g. worker rotation)
- Personal protective equipment.

3.6.3 Hearing Protection Equipment


Ear plugs and/or muffs are made available by Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. at all facilities. The equipment supplied must have a noise
reduction rating (N.R.R.) of at least 24 dba.

Equipment must not under any circumstances be altered and all personnel
must be informed about the hazards associated with excessive noise
exposure and the reasons for wearing the hearing protection provided.

Supervisory staffs are responsible for ensuring the use of protective


equipment. No person is permitted to enter a designated area without
wearing hearing protection.

3.7 Personal Protective Equipment

Injuries to a worker's health can occur through contact with physical


and/or chemical hazards. Appropriate approved personal protective
equipment suitable for the work performed and the nature of the hazard
must be worn in order to eliminate or reduce the effects of the hazard.

3.7.1 Head Wear


Hard hats must be C.S.A. class B rated, non-conducting high impact
plastic. These devices will be worn when there is a possibility of injury
from overhead work being conducted. The employee will have the option
of the use of this equipment, however the company reserves the right to
enforce the use of the equipment where it is warranted.

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3.7.2 Clothing
All persons entering the work site must be fully clothed. Pants must cover
the legs. Shirts, if long sleeved must be buttoned at the wrist. Clothing
that is loose, ragged or torn, bracelets, necklaces or neckties and watches
must not be worn near rotating or moving equipment or where they can
possible become a hazard.

3.7.3 Mitts and Gloves


When special clothing is required for handling chemicals, it will be
supplied by the company and will be worn by the employee.

3.7.4 Footwear
C.S.A. approved class 1, protective footwear will be worn at all work
sites. Wearing of steel-toed runners may be allowed if they meet class 1
requirements.

3.7.5 Hearing Protection


Whenever noise hazards exist on a work site, levels exceeding 80 dba, all
persons entering the area must be provided with and wear approved
hearing protection.

3.7.6 Eye Protection


C.S.A. approved protective eye wear or face shields must be worn when
the nature of the work is such that it may result in injury to the eyes or
face. The company will supply this special eyewear.

3.8 Fire Prevention and Extinguisher Operation


It is a recognized fact that in order for a fire to start, three components, heat, air
and fuel, must come together. It is the responsibility of the company to take all
reasonable steps to control of the components effects.

One of the most common causes of an unwanted fire is poor housekeeping,


allowing accumulations of trash and other waste materials in locations where
there is a possible ignition source. Some basic rules can help to prevent this from
occurring:

1) Suitable containers shall be provided for waste materials, these containers


regularly emptied and their contents properly disposed of.
2) Paints, thinners, oils, chemicals etc. shall be stored in well-ventilated areas
or properly constructed lockers well away from ignition sources.
Flammable liquids shall be kept in approved containers and only handled in
safe areas.
3) Mops, wiping and cleaning rags shall not be placed near ignition sources.

Should a fire however occur, all employees must be familiar with the operation of
the types of fire suppression equipment that will be found at the work site.

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3.8.1 Classes of Fires
"Class A" Fires:
Usually occur in ordinary combustible material such as wood. paper or
cloth. The most common extinguishing agents for this class are water or
ABC dry chemical. Extinguishing equipment for this type of fire will be
identified with a letter "A" in a green triangle.

"Class B" Fires:


This type of fire is usually associated with the vapour/air combustion over
the surface of a flammable liquid. Extinguishing agents commonly used
for this class are water mist, foam, CO or BC dry chemical. Extinguishing
equipment for this type of fire will be identified with the letter "B" in a red
square.

"Class C" Fires:


This type of fire occurs in electrical equipment and for this reason non-
conducting extinguishing agents must be used. Carbon Dioxide and halon
are the most commonly used agents. Dry chemical agents can be used but
the need for extensive clean up and repair must be borne in mind.
Extinguishing equipment for this type of fire will be identified with the
letter "C" in a blue circle.

"Class D" Fires:


This type of fire occurs in combustible material/metal such as magnesium,
titanium and sodium. Specialized extinguishing agents and special
equipment have been developed and have to be used for this type of fire.
Extinguishing equipment for this type of fire will be identified with the
letter "D" on a yellow star.

Halon:
In accordance with the protocols from the 1988 Montreal Conference on
CFC's, it is Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.’s policy not to discharge
halon fire extinguishers for any other reason than fire fighting in an
emergency situation. Any halon extinguisher so requiring maintenance
shall be returned to the manufacturer for recharging and testing.

3.8.2 Recharge
Extinguishers must be recharged after use and only with the
manufacturer's recommended chemical. Chemicals must never be mixed
as this can damage the extinguisher and create a safety hazard. Trained
personnel must recharge external cartridge type extinguishers.

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3.9 Use of Propane
ALWAYS USE-STORE-AND TRANSPORT CYLINDERS IN AN
UPRIGHT POSITION

In upright position relief valve section of cylinder valve communicates with


vapour space in cylinder, as it is intended to be. Vertically mounted cylinders, the
type that are used for forklifts have the relief valve side mounted to allow the
valve to be in the vapour space.

Propane containers are never charged completely liquid full. A vapour space
must be maintained above the liquid level to allow for liquid expansion that
results from temperature increase.

Do not use, store or transport cylinders in a horizontal position. Cylinders lying


horizontal allow liquid gas to communicate with relief valve and if some were
required to function, due to abnormal pressure, liquid gas would emit from valve.
It would also allow liquid to flow to vapour consuming type appliances. Both
conditions would be unsafe.

Vapour withdrawal type containers are normally used with temporary heaters and
for other applications around construction sites.

3.10 Vehicles and Driving


Any Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Employee to whom a vehicle is issued or
assigned is responsible for the maintenance of the vehicle, pre and post trip
inspections as required by the National Safety Code and this Williams Scotsman
of Canada, Inc. manual and any associated equipment while the vehicle is in their
possession.

- All drivers should be trained and licensed to drive the class of vehicles and any
suspension of these privileges should be reported immediately.

- The drivers of any company vehicles will follow all governing traffic laws and
rules of the road.

- Any driver shall not drive a company vehicle while under the influence of drugs
or alcohol. This includes; blood alcohol level at or above the provincial
governing legal limit, illegal drugs, and prescription medications that cause
drowsiness or other conditions that may cause impairment.

Failure to follow the above listed condition will result in disciplinary action
according to the zero tolerance violation policy.

3.10.1 Passengers
Passengers other than company employees are not allowed, unless
authorized by management.

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3.10.2 First Aid Kit
A first aid kit is required in all Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
vehicles and should meet the legislated needs for the job or task.

3.10.3 Flares and Warning Devices


All company vehicles shall be equipped with flares and/or advance
warning devices such as reflective triangles. These warning devices
should under normal circumstances, be visible at 13A0 meters (3A00
Feet) and should comply with current C.S.A. standards.

3.10.4 Fire extinguishers


Fire extinguishers are required on all company vehicles.

3.10.5 Firearms
Firearms will not be carried in company vehicles or while in the
employment of the company.

3.10.6 Windshields and Headlights


Windshields should be free of cracks in the driver’s line of sight and kept
clear of the build up of contaminants on the inside. Headlights shall be
used whenever the vehicle is in motion. Headlight use during the daylight
hours has been shown to significantly reduce accidents.

3.10.7 Seat Belts


Seat belts shall be worn at all times by the occupants of company vehicles.
It is the responsibility of the driver to ensure that all occupants are secured
by a seat belt prior to the vehicle being in motion. No passenger shall be
allowed to travel in any part of a vehicle (other than a sleeper) that does
not have properly attached seat belts. No tools, materials, or other objects
shall be carried loose in the passenger compartment.

3.10.8 Speed Limits


Observe all posted speed limits. These limits are set for ideal conditions.
Adjust your speed to suit the road and weather conditions. On company
property the speed limit is 10 kph.

3.10.9 Pre and Post Trip Inspections


All commercial vehicles, (which includes truck or truck tractor, licence
G.V.W. exceeding 8200 kg and attached trailer(s)), must be given a pre and
post trip mechanical inspection by the driver on a daily basis. Responsibility
to ensure this is done is shared by the driver and the carrier. The trip
inspection report requirement is designed to protect the driver, alert carriers
to mechanical problems and ensure that no defective equipment is allowed
on the highway. It is a written report that is completed by the driver and
reviewed by the carrier.

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3.10.10 Requirements
The report must contain the following:

1) The licence number and unit number of the vehicle.

2) A checklist containing information on the following:

- Service brakes, including trailer brake connections and brake


adjustments.
- Parking brake.
- Steering mechanism.
- Lighting devices and reflectors.
- Tires.
- Horn.
- Windshield wipers.
- Rear vision mirrors.
- Coupling devices.
- Wheels, rims and wheels nuts and studs.
- Emergency equipment.
- Load securement devices.

3) A statement to the effect that no defect was discovered or came to the


attention of the driver, should that be the case.

4) The date and the signature of the driver.

5) A separate inspection and report must be completed whenever a


vehicle to which these regulations apply is put into service for that
day.

3.10.11 Procedures
1) Prior to each trip the driver shall perform a walk around the vehicle to
ensure; a clear path is available, that there are no defects to the vehicle
prior to usage.
2) The pre trip inspection shall be performed on a daily basis prior to the
first trip of the day.
3) If a trip lasts more than one day, the inspection required shall be
carried out no later than the first stop of any subsequent days of the
trip.
4) The post trip inspection shall be performed at the end of the final trip
of the day, or where the trip lasts more than one day, then on the
second and every subsequent day of the trip at the final rest stop of the
day. The driver shall inspect the vehicle and record and defects
observed as a result of the inspection or while in charge of the vehicle.

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5) Repairs to noted defects must be made prior to movement of the


commercial vehicle according to manufacture’s guidelines.
6) The current day’s pre trip must be carried in the vehicle.
7) The carrier shall keep the original of the pre trip and proof of
repairs or corrections for at least three months from the date that the
report was prepared.
3.10.12 Reports
Defects are to be indicated on pre and post trip inspection reports and a
signed copy turned in to the appropriate location. A service report will
be filled out for each time repairs or servicing is carried out.
3.10.13 Maintenance
All pre and post inspection reports shall be filed at the Calgary office for
a period of not less than 1 month for each unit. All maintenance,
inspection and repair records for each unit shall be filed at the Calgary
office for a period of not less than 3 years. All maintenance shall be
performed according to manufacturer’s guidelines. For any vehicles
retired from service, the maintenance records should be maintained for 6
months from the date of retirement.
3.10.14 Records
Records shall be kept on each unit covering the following information:
1) Identification of Vehicle
- Unit number.
- Serial number.
- Make of vehicle.
- Year of manufacture.
- Size of tires.
2) Records of maintenance.
- Nature of inspection.
- Maintenance, servicing completed (dates, odometer reading).
- Modifications to the vehicle.
- Axles.
- Suspension.
- Notices of defects from the manufacturer.
- Corrective work performed.
3) Driver Records.
- All driver logbook records shall be maintained in the Calgary
office.
- All driver abstracts (current) shall be filed at the Calgary office.
Non-current abstracts shall be kept in personnel files.

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3.10.15 Cargo
All drivers of company vehicles will ensure that any cargo on or in a
motor vehicle is adequately stored and secured to prevent unintentional
movement of the equipment which could cause spillage, damage to
vehicle, or injury to operator.

3.10.16 Client Property (Sites)


All drivers of company vehicles and subcontractors shall ensure all
client rules are followed while driving on client’s property. This includes
but not limited to;

- Parking in designated areas.


- Following client posted signage.
- Client site speed limit.
- Leaving keys in vehicle in process or other designated areas.
- Backing into parking stalls, pulling through parking stalls is possible
so vehicle front is facing forwards.
- Honking horn prior to vehicle backing procedure.
- Yielding right of way to mobile equipment.
- Ensuring a company vehicle is marked with Williams Scotsman or
subcontractor logos.
- Ensuring all tools, equipment and supplies are inventoried prior to site
access. This includes; materials safety data sheets are available for all
hazardous chemicals.
- All vehicle identification available for insurance, provincial vehicle
motor vehicle registration.
- All identification issued by client available.
- Prohibited usage of cellular telephones (including hands free), hand
held radios while driving any motor vehicles on client sites.

3.10.17 Distracted Driving


To reduce the risk of incident all drivers of company vehicles will
eliminate the usage of;

- Electronic devices listed within federal/provincial governing authority


legislation/laws which prohibit such usage.
- Cellular telephones without the usage of hands free devices while
driving company vehicles.
- The usage of electronic personal devices while driving company
vehicles. Includes; computers, personal hand held electronic data
devices.

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3.11 National Safety Code
Introduction
The National Safety Code Regulations outline the procedures required to ensure
Class 1, 3 and 3A Vehicles are driven safely and in such a way as to minimize the
danger to life, health, property and the environment. When a Williams Scotsman
of Canada, Inc. vehicle is being driven, it is the responsibility of the operator to
follow all speed limits, rules and regulations of the road and apply professional
driving procedures at all times.

3.11.1 Drivers
Driver Training
All drivers shall have orientation training prior to starting a driving job,
either as a new or transferred employee. All new drivers will submit a
driver’s abstract prior to driving a Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
vehicle.

Driver Suspensions
If any driver becomes suspended before his abstract review, the driver
shall inform his supervisor immediately. Failure to do so may be
grounds for dismissal. Drivers must provide the company with a copy of
ALL violation tickets, notices and orders and roadside inspection reports
on any vehicle bearing the company’s National Safety Code Number
within 13A days of receiving the notification.

3.11.2 Accident Incident Reporting

Accident reporting
All accidents, regardless of severity, shall be reported immediately to the
appropriate manager. These accidents shall be investigated and
documented for review by the management of the company. The
determination as to whether the accident was preventable or not shall be
based on the premise that a preventable accident is one in which
personnel or property damage results and the driver failed to do
everything reasonably possible to avoid the accident (ANSI Z.16.4 -
1977).

All drivers must complete a company accident/incident report form for


all violation tickets, notices and orders, road side inspection reports,
cargo damage or vehicle damage. The report shall be filled in on the
date of the incident and turned into the manager with the day’s paper
work.

Prevention
All accidents shall be reviewed on a monthly basis with the drivers. The
review shall encourage drivers to operate more safely by actively
involving them in recognizing and correcting unsafe conditions.

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3.11.3 Hours of Service

Procedures
All drivers of vehicles 14,600 Kg or greater are compelled by regulation
to maintain an accurate logbook of their hours of service. The driver
shall be able to produce log sheets for the previous 7 days upon request.
All other logs sheets shall be turned in to the Calgary office, where they
will be stored for 6 months at which time they will be archived for a
period of time to be determined by the management.

All drivers will fill out logbooks in addition to daily time sheets, and
turn the log sheets in at the end of the shift or trip, to management.

The logbooks shall include:

1. Date of the log.


2. Printed name of the driver and the driver’s signature.
3. Odometer reading at the beginning of the day.
4. Total distance driven by the driver during the shift.
5. Truck license number (s) and company unit number (s).
6. Printed name of co-driver.
7. Start of the period covered by the log where it is other than the
beginning of the day.
8. Ensure the company name and address is contained on the sheet.
9. Total hours spent in each duty during the shift. (On duty, sleeper
berth, driving, on duty not driving.).
10. Graph grid filled out accurately recording time in each duty status
by identifying the times in each duty using the appropriate graph
markers and a vertical line to mark status changes.
11. The name of the municipality, province, state or location, highway
etc., where a change in status occurs, as well as marking all on duty
time within the locations, other than driving time.
12. The total of hours in each status period entered to the right of the
graph grid, ensuring that the 24 hours is not exceeded.

Days off may be combined on one logbook page, and must be turned in
with the paper work for the shift or trip immediately following the days
off.

Logbooks will be verified through the use of receipts, inspection forms,


and trip expense receipts.

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3.12 Chemical Handling (WHMIS)
All employees are in actual or potential contact with numerous different
chemicals during the course of a normal workday. For that reason the Federal and
Provincial Governments developed the Workplace Hazardous Materials
Information System (WHMIS), an educational program designed to teach
employees the best methods to deal effectively with chemicals.

The program covers the following topics:

- What the chemicals are.


- The components of the chemicals.
- Associated potential and actual health hazards.
- Protective equipment required.
- First aid measures.
- Spill and leak control.

3.12.1 Training
All employees are required to take part in WHMIS training programs,
which include:

- Introduction.
- Health hazards.
- Site-specific training.
- How to compile an accurate chemicals list.
- Development of a material safety data sheet system.

3.12.2 WHMIS
WHMIS or the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System is a
Canada wide hazard communication system to transmit to the employees
all relevant information about chemicals in the workplace and the
program defines the requirements for labeling, material safety data
sheets and worker education.

The WHMIS system has several key areas briefly described here and in
more detailed government publications or training packages.

i) It requires that Canadian and importing suppliers of hazardous


materials provide hazard information, in the form of labels and
MSDS to their Canadian workplace customers as a condition of
sale.
ii) It requires employers to ensure that all materials included in the
chemical list are adequately labelled at the workplace and that
MSDS's are available for those products.
iii) It requires that employers provide worker education in order that
the workers can apply the information provided to protect their
health and safety.

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iv) It allows valid confidential business information to be with held
from disclosure.

The WHMIS program is trying to solve the problems associated with:

- Having unlabelled chemicals at the work site.


- Inadequate information provided to employers and employees by
the product suppliers in respect to the identity and hazardous
properties of the materials used at the work sites and the precautions
to be used when handling them.
- Lack of awareness by employers and employees about the
chemicals they are using.
- Potential adverse consequences of inconsistent requirements
between Canadian jurisdictions.

3.12.3 Eyewash Stations and Deluge Showers


Eyewash stations and deluge showers, if required, must be placed at or
near high-risk areas, determined at the time of construction or during a
safety or loss audit. It is recommended to place the equipment 3 to 10
meters from the high-risk area in such a location as to protect it from
chemical or heat exposure.

Volumes of Water Required


The safety shower must meet the requirements of ANSI standard
Z33A8.1-1981 and must supply heated water, 13A to 33A degrees C, at
a rate of at least 114 litres per minute and the eyewash station at a rate of
at least 11.4 litres per minute for at least 13A minutes.

Where water systems are not practical, approved potable eyewash


stations are recommended.

3.13 Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG)


The Transportation of Dangerous goods Regulations require that any person who
handles, offers for transport or transport dangerous goods must be trained or under
the direct supervision of a person trained in the regulations.

Handling:
Includes loading, unloading, packing and unpacking dangerous goods in or from any
container, package, or means of transport for the purpose of transporting those
goods, including enroute storage. Handlers include shippers, receivers, loaders, lift
truck operators and warehousemen.

Offering: for transport includes documentation preparation, application of safety


marks and giving instructions to the initial carrier. Offerers include shippers,
dispatchers and clerical personnel who prepare documents.

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Transporting: the actual transfer or movement of goods from a shipper to a
receiver, includes safe handling and protection of goods, enroute document custody
and applying safety marks to transport units.
There are many situations where a person may fill any or all of the above roles and
be responsible for meeting the TDG requirements of each. A driver who picks up a
drum at a warehouse, transports it to a drop off and unloads it has acted as
consignor, carrier and consignee. When demanded by an Inspector a person who is
handling, offering or transporting Dangerous Goods must show a training certificate
under the TDG regulations.
3.13.1 Training
The training shall include:
- Classification, nature and characteristics of Dangerous Goods.
- Packaging requirements.
- Safety mark requirements.
- Documentation requirements.
- Special precautions for handling and reporting.
- Reporting requirements.
- Emergency response.
- Availability and use of handling and transporting equipment.
- Availability and use of safety equipment.
3.13.2 Responsibilities
The TDG regulations specify responsibilities for persons involved in TDG
activities. Some responsibilities are common to all persons; others are
specific to only trained persons.

- Carrier: a person who transports a shipment, the driver.


- Consignee: a person who receives a shipment, the receiver.
- Consignor: a person who offers a shipment for transport, the shipper,
manufacturer or importer.
3.13.3 Common Responsibilities
a) The employer is to ensure that persons involved in the transportation of
dangerous goods are adequately trained or directly supervised by a
trained person.
b) The employer is to issue trained persons with a Certificate of Training.
c) On the request of an inspector a certification of training for TDG must
be produced.
d) An emergency response plan must be filed with the TDG directorate if
required by the legislation.
e) Report dangerous occurrences while in charge, management r control
of the dangerous goods.
f) Take emergency action to correct or control any danger from release of
dangerous goods while in charge, management or control.
g) Retain TDG documentation for two years.

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3.14 SAFETY PRACTICES (SHOP)

3.14.1 Operating Safety

Prior to any Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employee using tools as


identified in the following section, there has to be a regular maintenance done on
that tool or piece of equipment. Each operator as he uses the tool or piece of
equipment is responsible to ensure that the tool is being used or operated as set
out in the manufacturer’s recommended practices. The following is only a
general guideline and the specific practices should be obtained from those trained
in the proper use of the tool or the manufacturers guidelines.

3.14.1.1 Portable Electrical Tools


Before any portable tool is plugged into the receptacle, a check shall be
made for worn or broken cords and lose or damaged plug or receptacle.
Portable electric power tools shall always have a three-wire cord with
the ground wire properly attached. They shall be plugged into an outlet
that is grounded. Extension cords and “J” boxes shall have the same pre
use inspection. Any piece of electrical equipment found to be defective
shall be repaired prior to use. When the equipment is no longer
repairable, the faulty equipment will be turned into the supervisor for
replacement.

- Do not use any portable electrical equipment while standing on a wet


floor or in moisture of any kind.
- Before using a portable grinder, make sure no one is in the area
where the sparks and cuttings may fly towards them.
- Grinders require the use of face shields. Safety glasses alone are not
sufficient with the use of grinding equipment.
- A check shall be made to ensure that a drill or grinder is
disconnected from the power source before changing the drill or the
stone.
- All portable tools shall be equipped with a spring-released switch.
No lock type controls shall be allowed.
- All clothing/hair/jewellery must be fastened or removed where a
potential to contact moving or rotating equipment/tools.

3.14.1.2 Stationary Power Machine and Tools


i) Power machine and tools shall not be used by anyone not
instructed in their use.
ii) If it becomes necessary for anyone not familiar with the use of a
machine to operate it, adequate instruction and safety precautions
shall be furnished by the supervisor or regular operator.
iii) A face shield shall be worn by an operator of a grinding or cutting
machine.

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iv) No chuck key is to be left in the chuck. The key shall be checked
for worn or broken teeth.
v) When operating a pedestal or bench grinder, guards shall be clean
and in place. The grinder stone is to be faced off square with the
corners rounded to prevent chipping. This is to be accomplished
by using a diamond stone dresser at the center of the stone or
slightly below. A grinder which runs unevenly or out of balance
shall not be used. The affected wheel shall be repaired or replaced
at once.
vi) When changing stones on any grinder, be sure the rpm of the stone
and the motor are compatible.
vii) When grinding always cut across the full face of the stone to avoid
undue wear in any one spot. Never grind on the side of the stone
on a pedestal or bench grinder. Have a container of cooling fluid
near the grinder for cooling the parts being ground. Never grind
wood, brass, aluminium or other soft metals. The only exception
to this is hammer handles and then full face shields shall be worn
during the process.
viii) Do not leave a machine running unattended. Do not attempt to
clean away cuttings or other materials while the machine is
running. Always use a brush to clean cuttings, do not use
compressed air. Do not hand brake the rotating parts of a machine.
ix) Eye protection warning signs shall be placed on or near stationary
power machines. When using a drill press, always have work
clamped securely to the table to prevent it from hanging up,
spinning or being thrown.
x) All clothing/hair/jewellery must be fastened or removed where a
potential to contact moving or rotating equipment/tools.

3.14.1.3 Arc Welding Equipment


i) Only authorized, qualified personnel shall use welding equipment.
ii) Helmets shall be used during all arc welding/cutting operations.
Always inspect the welding hood for light leaks. Keep lenses
clean or replace them as necessary.
iii) Eye protection signs shall be placed or posted near all stationary
welding equipment.
iv) All welding cables, electrode holders, ground clamps, receptacle
and other welding equipment shall be checked monthly by the
operator.
v) Before plugging in the machine, inspect the cables, power cord,
plug and receptacle. Be sure the machine is turned off before
plugging it in.
vi) Prior to striking an arc, be sure there is no danger of getting flash
burns. Do not weld where hot slag can drop on other persons or
flammable material.
vii) Protect all finished surfaces near the weld site.

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viii) Welding shall always be done in a well-ventilated area. When
welding coated materials such as zinc or cadmium, be aware that
these fumes are very toxic.
ix) Under no circumstance shall tanks be repaired by Davey Cartage
Co. personnel.

3.14.1.4 Gas Welding Equipment


i) Only authorized qualified personnel shall use welding or cutting
equipment.
ii) Eye protection signs shall be placed on or near all gas welding
equipment.
iii) Do not cut any materials on concrete floor as the heat may cause
the cement to explode.
iv) All hoses, gauges, regulators, flashback arrests, torches and other
equipment shall be checked on a monthly schedule. Always check
hoses and torch before turning on pressure. Do not open valve on
cylinder until pressure diaphragms have backed off.
v) Gas cylinders shall always be kept in an upright position and
securely confined in that position.
vi) Do not use oil on any oxygen equipment.
vii) Always use a friction lighter for flame. Do Not Use hot metals,
cigarettes, matches or cigarette lighters.
viii) Always watch cut off. Do not allow hot or heavy pieces of metal
to fall where damage can be done. Never cut metal where flame or
slag comes into contact with cement.
ix) Cylinders shall be turned off after use and pressure bled off hoses.
Protective caps shall be in place on all cylinders not in use,
including empty cylinders. Keep heat away from gas cylinders.
The fusible plug in acetylene cylinders melts at about 105o C.
x) Always have good ventilation when welding or cutting coated
metals, zinc or cadmium, as these fumes are very toxic.

3.14.1.5 Battery Chargers


i) There shall be regularly scheduled monthly inspections of all
battery chargers.
ii) All chargers shall be equipped with three wire cords with the
ground properly attached only plugged into an outlet that is
grounded. Before the battery charger is plugged into a receptacle,
the cord, plug and receptacle are to be checked for worn, broken or
damaged parts.
iii) The power supply shall be off when connecting or disconnecting
the charger to the battery.
iv) A face shield should be worn when working with a battery.
v) The immediate area (Three-meter radius) around the battery being
charged shall be considered a “No Smoking Area”.

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vi) Battery storage and charging area shall have adequate ventilation
to prevent build up of hydrogen fumes, a by-product of battery
charging. A “No Smoking” sign, fire extinguisher, a hose suitable
for washing away spilled electrolyte and a neutralizer for spilled
acid are required. An eye wash station should be in the immediate
area.

3.14.1.6 Paint and Paint Storage


i) Spray painting shall be done only in a designated area away from
open flames and sources of ignition and shall comply with all
OH&S standards.
ii) Paint storage shall be kept to a minimum. Paint will be stored in a
sealed metal container, well ventilated, and at moderate
temperature.

3.14.1.7 Safety Stands and Jacks


i) Safety stands of the proper capacity will be placed under axles
when the wheels are removed.
ii) The stands shall be maintained under the shop inspection policy.
iii) Each safety stand or jack shall have a minimum load rating
stamped on it.

3.14.1.8 Ladders
Before using any ladder, make sure that it is in good condition and is the
right ladder for the job to be done.
i) When setting up a ladder, secure the base and “walk” the ladder up
in to place.
ii) The ladder should be set at the proper angle of one (1) horizontal
to every four (4) vertical.
iii) When in the open position ready for use, the incline of the front of
the step position shall be one (1) horizontal to six (3A.14) vertical
(stepladders).
iv) Before using a ladder, make sure it is secured against movement.
v) When in position, the ladder should protrude one (1) meter above
the intended landing point.
vi) Workers shall not work from the top two (2) rungs of a ladder.
vii) Don’t overreach while on a ladder. It is easier and safer to climb
down and move the ladder over a few feet to a new position.
viii) Always face the ladder when using it. Grip it firmly and use a
three point contact method when moving up or down.
ix) The minimum overlap on an extension ladder should be one (1)
meter unless the manufacturer specifies the overlap.
x) Keep both metal and wood ladders, away from electrical sources.
xi) Only CSA Standard ladders will be used.

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3.14.1.9 Hand Tools
All persons using hand tools shall be aware of the manufacturers
recommended practices for the particular tool being used. The employee
is particularly responsible for the toll and for identifying the particular
hazard that may be associated with the use of the tool. In particular no
hand tools may be deviated from the original use or modified to fit a
particular job. Should the tool become unserviceable due to a
modification or breakage, the employee is responsible to return the
damage tool, marking it as non-serviceable and having the tool replaced.

3.14.2 Chain Saws


Chains saws are used for many jobs in production areas. Since the tool
was initially designed for use in the lumber industry there are many who
do not realize the potential hazards associated with the use of the saw.
Employees must be trained in the safe use of the saw before any work is
attempted. The training shall include as a minimum the following areas.

1) The proper personal protective equipment is to be worn as set out by the


manufacturers recommended practices and legislation.
2) When carrying or transporting a chain saw, the bar guard must be in
place. The chain bar must be toward the rear and the motor will be shut
off.
3) Ensure that the chain brake is functioning properly and adequately stops
the chain. The hand held chain saw will also be equipped with a kick
back guard to protect the operator. It is also recommended that the hand
held saw be equipped with a nose guard to stop run off.
4) The chain must be sharp, have the correct tension and be adequately
lubricated.
5) The correct methods of starting, holding, carrying or storage and use of
the saw following the manufacturer’s recommended practices shall be
used. Always ensure that the handgrips for the saw are dry and clean to
stop slippage of the hands.
6) The saw shall not be used to cut above shoulder height.
7) Fuelling of the saw must be done in a well-ventilated area and not while
the saw is running. An approved safety container must be used to
contain the fuel used along with a proper spout or funnel for pouring.
8) The use of a fixed chain saw requires the operator to be guarded from
the possibility of the bucked wood entering the control area.
9) No maintenance will be attempted until the fixed saw has cooled to the
point that it no longer poses a hazard to the employee doing the
maintenance.

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3.14.3 Table Saw
Table saws in production ensure that the woods to be used are of suitable size.
Operators of these machines have to be able to work in an atmosphere where they
can be injured but with the proper precautions are able to perform their duties
without endangering themselves or the saws being used. The following
precautions are to assist the operators in working in and around the table saws.

1) No person shall operate a table saw or a shake saw without having first been
trained in the operation and proper procedures to follow. Only persons who
are trained or directly supervising of a person being trained will operate the
machines.
2) Proper protective equipment will be worn while operating the table saws.
The use of safety glasses is a must as the eyes are at risk from flying debris
or dusts.
3) All guards will be in place and will not be altered without first obtaining the
approval of the supervisor. Guards are for the protection of the operator and
will afford the protection designed by the manufacturer or will surpass this
protection.
4) No maintenance will be attempted until the saw has been completely de-
energized. The saw must be in such a state as to be unable to cause damage
to the person conducting the maintenance.
5) No employee will attempt to change the blades of the saw until the machine
has been completely de-energized. Only trained personnel will change the
blades or realign the saw.
6) Should an employee have to push block through the cutting blades of the
saw, there shall be a push block produced to ensure that the employees hands
are at no time near the rotating blade or in such a position as to slip or fall
into the rotating blade.

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3.14.4 Forklifts
Forklifts are integral part of the movement of materials about the work site and in
the setting of modular buildings. The forklift represents a considerable
investment to the company and as such requires specific care and maintenance.
There should be a specified monthly maintenance schedule for the forklift as well
as a daily check list for the pre and post operation of the device. The following
are the basic rules for the operation of the forklift.

1) No employee of the company shall operate the forklift if that person is not
trained in the operation and inspection of the vehicle or unless the operator is
under the direct supervision of a person in the process of training the operator
of the vehicle.
2) The appropriate personal protective equipment will be worn while working
outside of the cab of the vehicle.
3) The initial daily inspection for the vehicle will include but not be limited to:

a) The engine compartment where the fluids for the operation of the
vehicle will be checked and replaced as necessary.
b) The operating controls inside the cab of the vehicle. These will be
checked to ensure the operation of the vehicle.
c) The boom and mast for the forks will be inspected for cracks, visible
wear, and operation when checked. Chains and hydraulics will function
properly and will not be limited, as well the hydraulics will have
minimal visible leaks and will hold a load at the height required for the
job to be performed.
d) All tires will be checked to ensure they are inflated (not low) and that
they are not cracked or chipped to the point of creating a hazard in the
workplace.
e) The back up alarm will be checked and the vehicle not operated if the
alarm is not operational. In some circumstances that alarm is the only
warning those about have that the vehicle is reversing.
f) The forks will be visually checked for cracks, bends etc. to ensure that
they are capable of holding the load they are expected to lift. Although
this is only a visual check, sever problems will be recognized and the
vehicles taken out of service prior to an accident occurring.
g) The brakes of the vehicle will be checked prior to lifting a load, to
appraise the ability of the brakes to function.

Extra caution has to be taken when operating the forklift inside of the shop as
it interacts with the employees in the shop and the lifting of loads inside the
facility puts the employees in an overhead situation. The operation of the lift
inside of the shop should only be done by an experienced, trained operator.

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3.15 SAFETY PRACTICES (CONTRACTORS)

3.15.1 Contractor Requirements


The legislated responsibilities summarized here are the minimum
acceptable standard for a contractor health and safety program. While
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. has a responsibility to ensure, where
possible, the health and safety of all employees at a work site, it shall by
establishing work site requirements in the contract documents obligate
its contractors to implement the required health and safety programs.

The contractor has a responsibility to ensure, where reasonably practical,


the health and safety of its employees, both contracted and permanent.

Sub contractors have a responsibility for the health and safety of their
employees and compliance with relevant work site safety programs and
legislation.

3.15.1.1 Contractor Responsibilities


The contractor shall take all reasonable steps to protect the health and
safety of all workers, employees and third parties from injuries or illness
as a result of the work contracted. All equipment provided by the
contractor shall be maintained in good condition and shall meet all
standards, regulations and legislation requirements.

All work procedures shall be in accordance with Williams Scotsman of


Canada, Inc. requirements, legislated requirements and only competent
personnel shall be allowed to work on the job site.

The contractor shall cease all work in the area of a defined health or
safety hazard until it is resolved. The contractor shall immediately
remove from the work site any contractor or employees who fails to
comply with the safety requirements.

3.15.1.2 Contractor Health and Safety Program


The Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. contractor’s health and safety
requirements shall be included as part of the bid documents and the
contractor shall comply with all requirements or with the requirements
of another mutually acceptable health and safety program. The
contractor shall designate competent work site personnel to be
responsible for compliance with the program and all legislated
requirements.

3.15.1.3 Subcontractors
The contractor shall include all provisions of this contract relating to
health and safety in any other agreement with a sub contractor.

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3.15.1.4 W.C.B.
The contractor shall provide documentary evidence of an account in
good standing with the applicable Worker Compensation Board
provincial jurisdiction prior to the beginning
of the work and shall maintain this account in good standing throughout
the duration of the contract. The contractor is additionally responsible to
ensure that all subcontractors comply with the WCB legislation.

Company Rights
The company may perform all site inspections and audits as necessary to
satisfy that all health and safety requirements are being met. At no
additional cost to the company, the company may require immediate
removal or repair of any unsafe or defective equipment used in the
performance of the work. The company may also require the removal
from the work site of any persons failing to comply with health and
safety requirements.

3.15.1.5 Delays
If the contractor is responsible for a delay in the progress of the work
due to an infraction of legislated company health and safety
requirements the contractor shall, without additional cost to the
company, work such overtime and acquire and use for the execution of
the work such additional labour and equipment that may be necessary in
the opinion of the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. representative, to
avoid delay in the final completion of the work or any operations
thereof.

3.15.1.6 Reporting Requirements


The contractor shall promptly report to Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. and all applicable legislated authorities having jurisdiction, any
accident or occurrence resulting in injury, death or illness to any of its
employees, subcontractors or any other person at the work site, arising
from the contractor’s execution of the work. The contractor shall
investigate such accidents or occurrences, prepare a written report and
furnish such to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. within five (5)
working days. The contractor shall furthermore assist in any
investigation of accidents or injuries related thereto.

3.15.1.3A.15 Incident Investigations


All near miss incidents shall be recorded by the contractor and reported
to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

3.15.1.8 Designated Safety Representative


The contractor shall identify to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. the
supervisory person who shall be responsible for health and safety
programs at the work site.

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3.15.1.9 Safety Meetings


All contractors and their employees shall attend the daily safety
meetings as well as a representative from Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. The contractor shall attend if necessary a pre-job meeting where the
specific health and safety requirements for the job shall be discussed.
The contractor shall hold pre-job safety meetings prior to the
commencement of any new, non-routine or potentially hazardous tasks.

3.15.1.10 First Aid


All contractors are required to have Standard first aid and CPR trained
individuals on location with the minimum of a No. 3 First Aid Kit.

3.15.1.11 Inspections
All contractors shall carry out regular safety inspections, daily, while
under contract to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Physical condition
inspections will be routinely conducted in local operating areas by
employees familiar with production operations or by an assigned
inspector. The inspection should identify all substandard acts or
conditions and all job factors that could harm personnel, damage
property or cause application loss. These reports are generated quarterly
each year and forwarded to management for resolution.

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3.16 SAFE JOB PROCEDURES

A job procedure is a written, specific step-by-step description of how to complete a job


safely and efficiently from start to finish. The purpose is to increase the awareness of job
hazards and provides a way of integrating accepted health and safety principles and
practices into a particular operation.

It is the policy of Williams Scotsman to thoroughly review any Safe Job Procedure
whenever and incident or accident should occur to ensure that no important steps are
missing.

Job Safe Procedures include, but are not limited to the following.

3.1 Service Centers

 Electrical hook ups


 Commissioning and testing of gas fire appliances
 Working at heights
 Fire Extinguishers
 Transportation

3. 2 Field Installation

 Electrical hook ups.


 Commissioning and testing of gas fire appliances
 Working at heights
 Fire extinguishers
 Complex setting
 Blocking and levelling

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3.18 FALL ARREST POLICY (WORKING AT HEIGHTS)

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. shall, whenever feasible, eliminate the need for
work at elevations that present fall hazards and/or shall implement engineering
solutions to create safe work environments for employees and contractors.

• Fall protection strategies (e.g. enclosures, barriers and guardrail systems, protective
coverings, travel restraint systems or fall arrests systems) shall be adopted by
supervisors and employees and contractors wherever there is a fall- from-height risk
that cannot be mitigated.
• Employees shall be trained on the selection, use, care, inspection and proper storage
of fall protection components and systems and shall be instructed about those
circumstances (e.g. falls exceeding 0.6 meters) where equipment shall be removed
from service, inspected by the manufacturer, and/or destroyed.
• Training records shall be maintained in accordance with applicable provincial
governing regulations.
• Contractors shall follow all fall protection strategies of Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. whenever the work site presents fall-from-height hazards.
• All fall arrest system components and travel restraint system components shall be
CSA approved.
• Fall arrest systems shall be used by employees and contractors whenever a fall-from-
height risk cannot be eliminated.
• Fall arrest system components and travel restraint system components shall be
inspected by a competent worker before and after each use. Defective components
shall be taken out of service immediately.
• Temporary anchorage points for travel restraint and fall arrest shall be selected with
professional engineering assistance. Permanent anchors shall be installed according to
the Building Code and shall be conspicuously labelled for the purpose and with load
capacity information.
• In accordance with provincial governing regulations, a written rescue plan for fallen
workers shall be provided by the workplace supervisor in advance of all work
requiring a fall arrest system. Rescue training shall be provided.
• Buddy systems shall be used, where appropriate, whenever fall arrest systems are
necessary for employee protection. (Spotters watch workers performing duties near a
fall hazard and would activate emergency rescue plans.)
• Written fall protection strategies, administrative controls, and job safety meetings
prior to work, and warnings shall be used by managers and supervisors to alert
employees and contractors about fall hazards. Written fall protection strategies will
be done in the form of safe work instructions for areas that area accessed on a
frequent basis where fall arrest would be required.

Sept 15, 2009


Signature: _____________________________ Date: _____________________

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3.18.1 Personal Fall Arrest Systems

• The use of a body belt for fall protection is prohibited.


• All personal fall arrest systems shall be inspected by the user prior to each use.
The inspection shall include examination for wear, damage and other
deterioration. If during the inspection the user discovers defects or damage, the
user shall immediately remove the component from service.
• Dee-rings and snap-hooks shall have a minimum tensile strength of 5,000 pounds
without cracking, breaking or suffering permanent deformation. Snap hooks shall
be sized to be compatible with the member to which they will be connected, or
shall be of a locking configuration.
• Snap hooks that are not of the locking type shall not be engaged directly to:
1. Webbing, rope or wire rope;
2. To each other;
3. To a Dee-ring to which another snap hook or other connector is attached;
4. To a horizontal lifeline; or
5. To any object incompatible in shape or dimension relative to the snap hook,
thereby causing the connected object to depress the snap hook keeper and
release unintentionally.
• A hook is considered to be compatible when the diameter of the Dee-ring is
greater than the inside length of the snap hook when measured from the bottom
(hinged-end) of the snap hook keeper to the inside curve of the top of the snap
hook. Thus, no matter how the Dee-ring is positioned or moved with the snap
hook attached, the Dee-ring cannot touch the outside of the keeper, thus
depressing it open. The use of non-locking Dee-rings is prohibited.
• On suspended scaffolds or similar work platforms with horizontal lifelines that
may become vertical lifelines, the devices used to connect to a horizontal lifeline
shall be capable of locking in both directions on the lifeline.
• Horizontal lifelines shall be designed, installed and used under the supervision of
a qualified person, as part of a complete fall arrest system that maintains a safety
factor of at least two. Lifelines shall be protected against being cut or abraded.
• Self-retracting lifelines and lanyards that automatically limit free fall distance to
two feet or less shall be capable of sustaining a minimum tensile load of 3,000
pounds applied to the device with the lifeline or lanyard in the fully extended
position.
• Self-retracting lifelines and lanyards that do not limit free fall distance to two feet
or less, rip stitch lanyards, and tearing and deforming lanyards shall be capable of
sustaining a minimum tensile load of 5,000 pounds applied to the device with the
lifeline or lanyard in the fully extended position.
• Ropes and straps used in lanyards, lifelines and strength components of body
belts and body harnesses shall be made of synthetic fibers.

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3.18.1 Personal Fall Arrest Systems (Continued)

• Anchorage shall be designed, installed and used under the supervision of a


qualified person. Anchorage used to attach personal fall arrest systems shall be
independent of any anchorage being used to support or suspend platforms and
shall be capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds per person attached.
• Lanyard and vertical lifelines shall have a minimum breaking strength of 5,000
pounds.
• Body harness systems shall be set up so that a worker can free fall no more than
two feet. All belts or harnesses shall be secured to an anchorage capable of
supporting at least twice the potential impact load of an employee's fall or 3,000
pounds, whichever is greater.

3.18.2 Obligation to use fall protection

1. Unless otherwise provided for in this policy, Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.;
must ensure that all employees and contractors use a fall protection system when
work is being done at a place
• From which a fall of 3 meters (10 feet) or more may occur, or
• Where a fall from a lesser height involves an unusual risk of injury.
• At all times when working from a scissor lift or fork lift man cage.
2. Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.; must ensure that guardrails meeting the
requirements or other similar means of fall restraint are used where practicable.
3. If the use of guardrails or similar means of fall restraint is not practicable, Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all subcontractors; must ensure that another fall
restraint system is used.
4. If the use of a fall restraint system is not practicable, Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. and all subcontractors; must ensure that a fall arrest system is used.
5. If the use of a fall arrest system is not practicable or will result in a hazard greater
than if the system was not used, Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all
subcontractors; must ensure that a control zone is used or a safety monitor system
with a control zone is used in accordance with provincial governing legislation.

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3.18.3 Fall protection plan requirements

1. Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all subcontractors; will have a written fall
protection plan for work areas that are accessed on a frequent basis. For all other
work areas where maintenance or inspection work is performed, fall protection
equipment will be used in accordance to the principles laid out in this policy and
procedure.
Safe Work Instruction will be drafted for:
Installation of fall protection equipment, roof work.
2. The plan must specify,
• the fall hazard expected in each work area.
• the fall protection system or systems to be used in each work area.
• the procedure to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall
protection system or systems, and
• the procedure for rescue of a worker who has fallen and is suspended by a
personal fall protection system but is unable to effect self rescue.

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3.18.4 FALL PROTECTION PLAN: Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Safety Program
(Revised: 09/03/09)
COMPANY NAME: WORK SITE:

DATE: ADDRESS/LOCATION:

WRITTEN BY NAME (PLEASE PRINT): WRITTEN BY (SIGNATURE);

FALL PROTECTION SYSTEM TO BE USED: (Identify the fall protection systems to be used at the work site to protect workers from the fall hazard. (i.e. travel
restraint, personal fall arrest system, control zone, etc.)

ANCHORS TO BE USED DURING THE WORK: (Identify the anchors, both engineered and improvised, that the workers are to use)

CLEARANCE DISTANCE(S) TO BE CONFIRMED: (Clearance distances must be sufficient to prevent a worker from striking the ground, an object, or level
below the area)

PROCEDURES: (Identify detailed procedures to assemble, inspect, use, maintain & dismantle the fall protection systems identified above)

RESCUE PLAN: (Describe the procedures that will be followed if a worker falls and needs to be rescued)

WORKERS: (All workers must acknowledge the above fall protection plan)

DATE PRINT NAME SIGNATURE Trained in the use of fall protection


equipment?
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO

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3.18.5 Instruction of workers
Before a worker is allowed into an area where a risk of falling exists, Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all subcontractors; must ensure the worker is instructed
in the fall protection for the area and the procedures to be followed.
3.18.6 Training
All Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees and subcontracted employees that
are exposed to fall hazards shall be trained in the recognition and minimization of
such hazards. The employees and subcontracted employees shall be trained in the
following areas:
• Nature of fall hazards in the work area;
• The correct procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling and inspecting fall
protection systems;
• The use and operation of controlled access zones and guardrail, personal fall arrest
and warning lines;
• The limitations on the use of mechanical equipment during the performance of
roofing work on low-slope roofs;
• The employee's role in fall protection plans.

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3.19 Lock-Out Tag-Out Policy

All machinery, equipment and electrical sources must be isolated, de-energized or


disengaged and locked out during cleaning, servicing, adjusting or set-up
operations. Verify all equipment as isolated or de-energized with a volt meter or
equivalent prior to beginning any work process.

We have to control energy in our line of work, but we have to do it in a fashion that is full
proof. We’re going to isolate or de-energize a piece of equipment, a power line, a gas
line, a hydraulic line, etc., but we have to do certain things to ensure that that energy is
positively placed out of service until the worker completes his cleaning, or servicing, or
adjusting, or set up operations.
Adhering to the guidelines in this policy will get the job done safely, but only if it is done
right. The following are the procedures that we have to put in place so that we can
complete the job in a safe manner.
All equipment control valve handles must be provided with a means for locking out. The
lock-out procedure requires that stored energy (i.e., mechanical, hydraulic, air, etc.) be
released or blocked before equipment is locked out for repairs.
Properly trained employees/subcontractors should be provided with individually keyed
personal safety locks. Employees must check the safety of the lockout by attempting a
start-up after verifying the system is de-energized (volt meter or equivalent voltage
detection device) and no one is exposed.
The only way a Lock-Out/Tag-Out program can be completely safe is for the person who
puts the lock on the energy source to have the only key to this lock in his pocket. There
should never be a second key accessible by the employees.
But what if the electrician or service tech goes home and forgets to unlock the locked
lock or the key has been lost? A spare key can be kept on location locked away and
separate from the work area. The second key can only be used if the first key has been
lost or taken home. In this situation, the lock can only be unlocked by a Service Manager
or Lead Service Tech after assuring it is safe to do so.

With all of these factors in place, we have a true, workable and safe Lock-Out/Tag-Out
system.

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3.19 Lock-Out Tag-Out Policy (Continued)
Can there be more than one lock on a power circuit? Yes, because there may be more
than one worker working on different portions of the circuitry (repairs being made at
separate locations). In this situation the rule remains one key to one lock.

Below are some reminders on how to set up, implement, and carry out a safe Lock-
Out/Tag-Out Program:
• One key, one lock
• Always apply a lock to lockout energy such as steam/electricity/water/gas/etc.
• Have a written control program.
• Keep extra locks on each jobsite (one key accessible, to each lock).
• Drain Residual Energy (Hydraulic Pressure/Hydrostatic Pressure/etc. and
verify the system as de-energized)
All panel boxes are to be marked with numbering to identify each electrical plug/pigtail.

Finally, remember the key elements of a Lock-out/Tag-out program:


• Identify the correct panel box to be locked out for the corresponding pigtail.
• De-energize the equipment. Verify with volt meter or equivalent.
• Lock-out all disconnect switches.
• Never lock a panel box in the ON position.

3.19.1 Job Safety Analysis requirement Lock-out/Tag-out


A written job safety analysis shall be developed for new task(s) that will require lock-out
tag-out. (Example: Electrical Hook ups, Gas Hook ups, Renovation or repair of
Electricity/Gas, Equipment repair, Etc.)

3.19.2 Safe Job Procedure requirement Lock-out/Tag-out


A written safe job procedure shall be developed for new task(s) that will require lock-out
tag-out. (Example: Electrical Hook ups, Gas Hook ups, Renovation or repair of
Electricity/Gas, Equipment repair, Etc.)

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3.19.3 Equipment/Machine Specific Lock-out/Tag-out
The list of machine-specific procedures below addresses equipment found at
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. branches.
• Breaker Panels
If a breaker needs to be shut-off in order to perform a service, repair,
modification (electrical), multi-task lockout device needs to be installed (which
could be a 2, 4, 6 position multi-task lockout device). Then a lockout device
(w/lock) and tag is put into place. The key is kept by the individual
implementing the LO/TO procedure and the spare key is locked in a lock box in
the supervisor’s office, which is the only person who has access. Use a voltage
detection device to ensure all downstream systems, tools, & equipment are de-
energized. DO NOT perform any downstream work until this process is
completed.
• Panel Saws
In order to lockout this piece of equipment it needs to first be unplugged. Then
place a lockout device (w/lock… if applicable) on the end of the cord, and place
the proper tag with a zip tie (wire tire) and fasten the cord and tag to the saw’s
handle so it is clearly visible to all that the machine is out of service. The key is
kept by the individual implementing the LO/TO procedure and the spare key is
locked in a lock box in the supervisor’s office, which is the only person who has
access. Use a voltage detection device to ensure this tool is de-energized. DO
NOT perform any downstream work until this process is complete.
• Power Supply for Trailers
Electrical Breakers/Disconnects can be shut off to isolate an electrical feed.
Then install a circuit breaker lockout and multi-task lockout device (w/lock).
The key is kept by the individual implementing the LO/TO procedure and the
spare key is locked in a lock box in the supervisor’s office, which is the only
person who has access. Use a voltage detection device to ensure all downstream
systems, tools, & equipment are de-energized. DO NOT perform any
downstream work until this process is complete.
• Air Compressors
Air compressors must be shutdown prior to any maintenance or other service
work (follow manufacturer recommended shut down and normal LO/TO
procedures). In order to lockout this piece of equipment it needs to first be
unplugged. Ensure any and all stored air (pressure) is released using the air
release check valve prior to starting work. Ensure pressure gauge reads less than
40 p.s.i. prior to draining the air tank. Make sure the pressure gauge reads
“zero” prior to servicing the valve unit. DO NOT perform any downstream
work until this process is complete.

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3.19.3 Equipment/Machine Specific Lock-out/Tag-out (Continued)

• Furnaces and HVAC Units


After trouble-shooting and identifying the problem, furnaces and HVAC units
must be shut down and worked on by HVAC competent/trained personnel only.
Normal LO/TO procedures must be followed. Also ensure any stored energy is
de-energized using proper manufacturer procedures prior to making repairs.
• Power/Air Tools
Power or air tools shall be locked out / tagged out prior to changing blades or
repairs. All power tool repairs shall be completed according to manufactures
guidelines. All power/air tools which require repair shall be locked out with
LO/TO signage.

3.19.4 Restating Equipment/Machine


Before any system or piece of equipment is re-started following a LO/TO shutdown
procedure, you must ensure all other employees are a safely away from the unit.

3.19.5 Lock-out/Tag-out Program Evaluation


At least annually and/or any time a new machine or power source is added to the service
shop, the LO/TO procedure(s) must be assessed to ensure proper energy control
procedures are in place and to ensure employees have been made aware of any changes
and/or new procedures to use to safely work on the equipment. Any deviations or
inadequacies must be corrected during the program evaluation. All employees must also
be made aware of their responsibilities for using the LO/TO program. This program
evaluation must be documented along with any necessary employee training.

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3.20 Modular Trailer Movement Policy

All units capable of movement with mobile equipment must have the hitch locked out to
prevent movement during cleaning, servicing or repairing the mobile building. All
employees and/or contractors must exit the unit and stand clear prior to any movement.
This policy also applies to any site work that would involve the truck attempting to attach
to the skid/hitch prior to the completion of removal work (such as skirting or deck
removal).

3.20.1 Lock-Out Tag-Out Hitch Lock Procedure

Immediately after a mobile building is parked/or placed, a “HITCH LOCK” will be


properly placed on the hitch to immobilize the mobile building. The person
placing/parking the mobile building shall install the hitch lock. If more than one
employee is performing work on the mobile building a multi-hasp lock out will be
installed with all other employees required to install separate lock. Prior to performing
maintenance, service or cleaning, refurb or other work, employees shall ensure that a
hitch lock is properly installed. A hitch lock must also be on the mobile building anytime
power is connected. (Not applicable to mobile buildings in storage or after setup are
completed at a customer location.)

3.20.2 Hitch Lock Removal Procedure Drivers

The driver will be the only person allowed to perform any tasks around the mobile
building while it is attached to the mobile equipment. Once the mobile equipment is
attached to the mobile building, the truck/mobile equipment should be shut off,
parking/air brake set and the ignition key removed and placed in the driver’s pocket to
prevent accidental movement of the mobile building. The driver will be allowed to make
final preparations to the mobile buildings such as the following: attaching over wide
signs, light bars, checking the lights and the underside for hanging debris; securing the
doors of the unit, and attaching the breakaway box.

3.20.3 Hitch Lock Removal Procedure Pre-Trip Inspection

The pre-trip inspection is to be completed as required by the “Transport


Canada/Provincial Transport Governing Authority/Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. Safety Regulations” by the driver before the mobile building is to be moved.

3.20.4 Hitch Lock Requirement(s) Mobile Buildings

If it is determined that additional work must be completed prior to delivery, the mobile
building must be detached from the mobile equipment. The hitch lock must be installed
before any work begins in or on the unit. If more than one employee is performing work
on the mobile building a multi-hasp lock out will be installed with all other employees
required to install separate lock. The unit will not be attached to any mobile equipment
before all the work has been completed.

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3.20.5 Administrative Lock-Out Mobile Buildings

An administrative Lock-Out can be performed only if the modular building cannot be


locked out with a mechanical hitch lock device. (Ex. Skid type modular
building/frameless modular building/sea can.)

The acceptable administrative lock shall be;

• Placement of red/orange cones on applicable ends of modular building.


• Parking vehicle in front of building to prevent movement of modular building.
Including removal of vehicle keys by person performing administrative Lock-Out
procedure.

3.20.6 Disciplinary Actions

For Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees, any violations to this policy will
result in disciplinary action up to and including discharge. For Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. subcontractors and their employees, any violations of this policy may result
in cessation of the subcontractor’s services.

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3.20.7 Modular Trailer Movement Policy Acknowledgement

I have read the Modular Trailer Movement Policy, understand it and agree that
failure to abide by it will result in disciplinary action, up to and including discharge.

____________________________________ ________________________
Employee Signature Date

____________________________________ ________________________
Employee’s Printed Name Location (Branch or Dept.)

Subcontractor Signature
I have read the Modular Trailer Movement Policy, understand it and agree to abide
by it.

____________________________________ ________________________
Subcontractor Signature Date

____________________________________ ________________________
Subcontractor Printed Name Location

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4.0 RULES

4.1 GENERAL
4.2 OFFICE
4.3 Drug Free Work Place Policy
4.4 Post Injury Drug and Alcohol Testing Policy
4.5 Modified Duty (Return to Work)

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4.1 GENERAL SAFETY RULES

At Williams Scotsman all employees have a responsibility to themselves and their co-workers for
safety. These general safety rules apply to all employees and all sub-contractors.

1 Report all unsafe conditions or any unsafe acts to your Supervisor immediately.
2 Report all injuries to your Supervisor immediately regardless of how minor.
3 Fighting, unsafe practical jokes and horseplay on the job is strictly prohibited and is subject to disciplinary
action up to and including termination.
4 All prescribed personal protection equipment shall be worn at all times when performing a task that
requires any such safety equipment. Any employee within close proximity shall also wear the same
protective equipment.
5 Safety glasses shall be worn whenever you are in the shop area, in the yard or on a construction site.

6 Do not use any defective or unsafe tools or equipment. All damaged or unsafe tools and equipment shall be
reported to your Supervisor immediately.
7 Only trained and authorized employees are permitted to operate power equipment or powered mobile
equipment. Mobile powered equipment should be operated only after the completion of the necessary
safety inspections.
8 Never give anyone a ride on your forklift (unless the unit is designed specifically for two people), and you
have authorization from your supervisor.
9 Smoking is not permitted when working in and around areas in which paint or flammable liquids are in
use or stored.
10 Smoking shall be permitted in designated areas only.
11 All machine guarding must be kept in place and maintained in good working order.
12 No employees shall work under any suspended loads.
13 All propane gas, oxygen, fuel, and compressed gas bottles shall be secured when in use. Storage of gas
bottles is only permitted in areas designated as such. Bottles in storage must be secured with caps in place.
14 Proper lifting techniques shall be applied when lifting any objects, and ask for assistance if needed.
15 No open fires shall be permitted at any time.
16 The use of alcohol during work hours is strictly prohibited unless it is for a company-sponsored event (e.g.,
summer picnic). The possession of alcohol on company property is prohibited.
17 The speed limit within the branch shall be fifteen kilometers miles per hour.
18 Pressurized lines such as compressed air, water or gas must be used with extreme caution. Under no
circumstances shall an employee direct the discharge of pressurized lines at themselves or others.
19 Discharged fire extinguishers shall be reported to your supervisor immediately.
20 Finger rings and loose jewellery is not permitted when working in the shop or yard area.
21 Long hair, shoulder length or longer, must be contained in a hair net, ponytail, or under a hat when
working in the shop, yard, or around equipment.
22 No firearms or weapons are permitted on company property at any time.
23 Housekeeping shall be maintained at all times. All trash and discarded materials must be placed in the
proper containers.
24 Hard hats must be worn at all times in the yard and shop areas.

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4.2 OFFICE SAFETY RULES

Accidents and injuries can occur in the office as easily as on the construction site or in
the workshop. A lot of office personnel don’t think anything can happen inside the office.
That is as far from the truth as it can get. Some simple rules will eliminate the majority of
office hazards.

1 Keep floors and aisles free of all debris, storage, and file boxes.
2 Use aisles and walkways provided to move around the office. Don’t take short cuts.
3 Always watch where you are walking.
4 No running will be permitted at anytime.
5 Never leave or store materials on the stairs.
6 Report all unsafe conditions.
7 Use handrails when using the stairs.
8 Do not overload top shelves of filing and storage cabinets.
9 Open drawers one at a time so as not to unbalance the cabinet. Keep all drawers closed when not
in use.
10 Use handles to open and close the drawers to prevent pinched fingers.

11 Make sure the paper cutter blade is closed after using. Be very careful when using the shredder
to avoid catching clothing.
12 Electrical cords should be in good condition and not over loaded. Do not run electrical or
telephone cords across aisles or walkways.
13 Make sure exits are never blocked with desk or chairs.

14 All employees should be aware of the closest exit.


15 Any fans should have a wire mesh guard that completely covers the blades.
16 Always use proper lifting techniques when lifting any objects.
17 Practical jokes, fighting, or any kind of horseplay will not be permitted at any time.
18 No alcoholic beverages or non-prescription drugs are permitted in the workplace.
19 All prescribed personal protection equipment shall be worn at all times when entering a shop, yard area.
(Ex. Safety boots, safety glasses, hard hat)

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4.3 DRUG FREE WORKPLACE POLICY

Williams Scotsman is concerned about the growing problems with alcohol and drug
abuse in the workplace and the toll it takes on the Company and its personnel. Williams
Scotsman has an obligation to its employees, customers, and the public at large, to take
reasonable and appropriate steps to prevent drug/alcohol abuse and/or misuse by its
employees in or affecting the workplace. This policy is based in substantial part on the
Company’s concern for the safety, health and welfare of its employees, their families, its
customers, and the community.

Consistent with this commitment, the following behaviours are strictly prohibited and
grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal:

1. Being at work or performing duties for Williams Scotsman, whether on or off


company premises, while under the influence of alcohol;
2. Being at work or performing duties for Williams Scotsman, whether on or off
company premises, while under the influence of illegal substances, in any amount,
during business hours;
3. The manufacture, possession, use, sale, distribution, dispensation, receipt or
transportation of any controlled substance or illegal drugs, either on Company
premises or while conducting Company business;
4. The use of Company property, including Company vehicles and telephones, or an
employee’s position within the Company, to manufacture, possess, use, sell,
distribute, dispense, receive or transport illegal drugs or controlled substances of any
kind.
5. Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. will comply with site specific Drug And Alcohol
policy of clients.

An employee, who is taking medication or drugs of any kind that may affect the
employee’s ability to perform his or her job in a safe manner, must report such use to his
or her supervisor. Supervisors, in conjunction with Human Resources, will determine if
the employee should remain at work, be restricted in his or her duties, or be sent home.
Employees must notify Williams Scotsman’s Human Resources Department, in writing,
of any criminal drug statute conviction (including a guilty plea, a plea of nolo contendre
or any court-supervised program or court-imposed sentence) for a violation occurring in
the workplace no later than five (5) days after such conviction. Upon such notification,
the employer will take appropriate personnel action against the offender up to and
including termination or requiring the employee to satisfactorily participate in a drug
abuse assistance or rehabilitation program.

With respect to this policy, the Company has the right to:

1. Terminate employees for violation of this policy;


2. Discipline employees, up to and including termination, for felony convictions
resulting from illegal use, possession or trafficking of drug, regardless of when or
where the criminal conduct took place;

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3. Require employees who violate this policy to successfully complete drug or
alcohol abuse counselling or rehabilitation, as necessary, if they are not
discharged;
4. Require employees to undergo appropriate tests to detect the presence of alcohol
or drugs where there is reason to believe an employee may be under the influence
of or impaired by alcohol or drugs;
5. Search and test, based on reason to believe this policy is being violated. Refusal to
submit to such test or search may result in disciplinary action, up to and including
termination;
6. Suspend employees pending the outcome of an investigation regarding violation
of this policy;
7. Notify law enforcement agencies regarding violations of this policy as the
Company deems appropriate and/or necessary.

4.4 POST-ACCIDENT DRUG TESTING POLICY

This policy will apply to all Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees including
temporary employees hired directly by Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Temporary
employees hired through temporary agencies will be referred to their agency for
appropriate handling.

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. is concerned about the cost to society and our
business from illegal drug use. Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. believes that it is the
right of every employee to work in a safe environment that is free from the illegal use,
possession, distribution, or manufacture of controlled substances. In addition, federal
legislation requires federal contractors to certify that their workplace is "drug-free."
We believe that it is in the Company’s interest to safeguard our employees’ health and
safety. Therefore, in furtherance of our existing Drug Free Workplace Policy, Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. will begin mandatory post-accident/injury drug testing. The
circumstances under which post-accident/injury drug testing will take place are outlined
below.

Testing will be done at licensed testing facilities selected by the company.


Confidentiality will be maintained. Only appropriate Human Resources personnel and
those in the supervisory chain of command having a “need to know” will be involved in
this process.

Post-accident drug testing will occur as follows:

Drug testing will occur after a work-related injury/accident if:

1. An employee caused or contributed to an on-the-job injury resulting in possible loss of


work time; OR

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2. A supervisor reasonably suspects that an employee injured in a work-related accident
is under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Employees who are asked to submit to a test under this policy and refuse to do so will be
terminated. In addition, employees should be aware that in many states, refusal to test
results in disqualification for workers compensation benefits as well as possible
disqualification for benefits under the medical plan.

With respect to this policy, Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. has the right to and will
take the following steps:

1. Terminate employees who test positive for illegal substances;


2. At our sole discretion, discipline employees who test positive for illegal substances
rather than terminate;
3. At our sole discretion, require employees who test positive for illegal substances to
successfully complete drug or alcohol abuse counseling or rehabilitation, as
necessary, if they are not discharged;
4. Suspend employees pending the outcome of an investigation regarding this policy;
5. Notify law enforcement agencies regarding positive test results, as the Company
deems appropriate and/or necessary.

4.4.1 DRUG AND ALCOHOL (POST VIOLATION)

1. Return to Duty - Post Violation: In those situations where employment is continued after a
policy violation, individuals will be required to pass a return to duty test and may be subject to
unannounced testing for a minimum of two (2) years as a condition of continued employment.
2. Return to Duty - Post Treatment: Any employee assuming duties after primary
treatment for an alcohol or drug problem which resulted from a performance related
incident will be required to pass a return to duty test. In addition, they may be subject to
unannounced testing with a case-specific program designed to support their ongoing recovery.
3. Rehire: All employees in violation of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.’s Drug and Alcohol
policy will be subject to a (2) year waiting period before rehiring

4.5 MODIFIED DUTY (RETURN TO WORK)

This policy applies to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees who have sustained work-
related injuries. It is our policy to make every attempt to prevent accidents that result in lost time
from work. We can accomplish this by creating a safe work environment, and as business needs
can accommodate, allow an early return to work for injured employees. Because employees are
our most valuable resource, Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. return-to-work program attempts
to provide an opportunity to gradually return injured workers to regular work and allows time for
reconditioning to the demands of the job. Employees may be offered modified or alternative
work, either in their regular department/work area or a different department work/area, whenever
possible. There is no guarantee that modified duty can be provided in every situation. The
Company, in its sole discretion, reserves the right to determine when and if modified duty
can be provided.

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4.5.1 MEDICAL CARE AND PHYSICIAN COMMUNICATION

When an injury occurs, the incident should be reported immediately to the employee’s supervisor.
All employees are encouraged to treat with the company's designated medical providers. These
providers have been selected to supply prompt and appropriate medical treatment. They have
been approved by the company to provide care, and usually have detailed knowledge of the work
being performed at the work site.

4.5.2 ELIGIBILITY
Eligibility for modified duty will be considered for employees that sustained work related injuries
with impairments that temporarily affect the ability to perform regular job duties. In addition to
the circumstances described above, modified duty will not be offered if it is anticipated that it
may cause significant disruption to business operations.
Employees who have sustained a work-related injury can return to work only when Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. receives a written medical release authorizing their return. The
attending physician may be contacted to clarify the specific demands of the employee’s job. If
the employee is unable to return to his/her pre-injury work, the worker may be offered modified
work.
When employees provide Branch/Dept Managers with restricted return to work notices, managers
must contact the Safety Manager. A determination will be made as to whether or not the
restriction(s) can be accommodated. If the restrictions can be accommodated, a description of the
restricted duties will be prepared. See the Modified Duty Job Description below for examples of
the types of work that can be offered if a service employee (e.g., delivery, setup, service tech) is
released to return to work with restrictions.
An offer of temporary modified work within the worker’s restrictions should be considered in the
same manner as any other offer of employment. Failure to accept an appropriate position or
duties could affect the payment of compensation benefits. In addition, disciplinary action may be
taken, up to and including termination.
4.5.3 PROGRAM GUIDELINES
A temporary modified duty assignment will be limited to a maximum of 90 days. At that point, if
the employee needs additional time under the modified duty program, the work assignment can
be extended in limited increments. This will occur only if:
• The employee’s physical condition is improving, and
• The employing work site or location continues to be able to use the employee’s services,
and
• The work site or location continues to be able to accommodate the injured employee both
in terms of available work and business demands.
Only in exceptional circumstances will transitional work extend beyond 90 days. Extended
transitional duty beyond 90 days requires the written approval by Branch Manager, Safety
Manager, and in consultation with Human Resources.
In no circumstances will an employee be permitted to remain in a modified duty assignment for
more than 180 days. Employees who are unable to return to their regular, full-duty positions
within 180 days return to a lost time claim status with workers provincial workers compensation.

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4.54 SUPERVISION AND COMPENSATION
The Supervisor will supervise the modified duty employee within his or her medical capabilities
and following Company work rules. When modified duty has resulted in a change in location or
area, the temporary Supervisor will supervise and coordinate work performance with the
employee’s originating location.
Temporary modified duty work may be available in a different job classification with or without
any change in pay in accordance with provincial workers compensation and governing
legislation.

4.55 RETURN TO WORK STATUS

All modified duty cases and changes in work status must be reported immediately to the regional
Safety Manager.
It is the responsibility of any employee losing time, due to a work related injury to, continually
provide verification from the health care provider regarding the need to be off of work. Written
verification must be provided following each appointment with the treating physician. This
information must be communicated to the regional Safety Manager.
Whenever possible, physical therapy and medical appointments should be scheduled to cause the
least disruption to the productivity goals and work hours of the employing. Any reduction in
work time which results from a modified work schedule or from physical therapy will be
considered lost time and will be handled as part of the claim. Time away from work for medical
appointments will not be compensated as regular pay unless specifically required by provincial
law. Employees can use accrued sick time to cover any such absences.

In some instances a medical case manager will be assigned by the insurance carrier to assist
employees in the rehabilitation and return-to-work process.

4.5.6 MODIFIED DUTY JOB DESCRIPTION


1. General clean ups in the mobile offices, around the shop, and service yard.
2. Picking up and delivering supplies and hand tools.
3. Updating files, sorting and delivering mail.
4. Hand trimming with the weed eater around the branch.
5. General painting around the shop and office.
6. Taking inventory.
7. Assisting the Dispatcher with phone calls as directed.
8. Conducting follow-up service calls.
9. Contacting customers to confirm site preparation

Light duty assignments must be with in the restrictions and guidelines specified by the
treating physician.

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5.0 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT POLICY

5.0 General Information


5.0.1 PPE Responsibilities Management
5.0.2 PPE Responsibilities Workers
5.0.3 Determining PPE
5.0.4 Training PPE
5.1 Policy
5.1.1 Safety Glasses Policy
5.1.2 Safety Boot Policy
5.1.3 Glove Usage Policy
5.2 Information Sheets

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5.0 PPE GENERAL INFORMATION

 Office staffs are not subject to any PPE requirements while at the office.
However, any Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employee visiting a customer
site must follow the rules and regulations pertaining to the site and as determined
by the prime contractor responsible. All required PPE must be worn and be of a
nature outlined in the PPE information sheets in this section.
 The mandatory PPE policies apply to all Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
employees visiting any manufacturing plants and any construction site requiring
protective equipment.
 There are currently no policies for PPE in and around storage yards and similar
facilities.
 While there is no policy for mandatory hard hats at this time, we are often at sites
requiring their use. As such, an information sheet for hard hats has been included
in the “Information Sheet “ section.
For additional information on PPE, please read the sections “PPE Policy” and
“PPE Information Sheets”.

5.0.1 PPE RESPONSIBILITIES MANAGEMENT


Management and supervision as well as subcontractors have the responsibility to
ensure personal protective equipment is appropriate to the hazardous job tasks
being performed. Onsite supervision shall monitor employees and subcontractors
to ensure the personal protective equipment required onsite by clients/job safety
analysis (hazard assessment)/or Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. policies are
being met by employees or subcontractors performing job tasks.

5.0.2 PPE RESPONSIBILITIES WORKERS


Workers or subcontractors while performing any task for will wear recommended
personal protective equipment required by clients, Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. policy or specific job safety analysis (hazard assessment) onsite. It is the
responsibility of workers to monitor other persons involved in a job task to ensure
the required personal protective equipment is being worn. In the case of
person(s) not wearing personal protective equipment required employees will stop
the job task and notify onsite supervision to avoid conflict.

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5.0.3 DETERMINING PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Management and supervision shall determine the personal protective equipment


required to perform as job task by policy or the following criteria;

• Client specific onsite requirement(s).


• If hazardous chemicals are used the appropriate personal protective
equipment as outlined by the materials safety data sheet for the chemical.
• Design of the personal protective equipment is adequate and appropriate to
protect the worker for the job task hazard.
• Job Safety Analysis (New/Review/Revision) prior to task.
• Hazard Assessment prior to task.
• If a specific hazard cannot be completely eliminated by an engineered or
administrative control method.
• Ensure that the personal protective worn by the worker does not itself
endanger the worker.
• If a worker is exposed to flash fire or equipment flashover the appropriate
flame resistant outerwear is worn according to local governing regulations.
The clothing worn underneath flame resistant outerwear being made of
flame resistant, natural fibres or clothing that will not melt.

TRAINING PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Management and supervision as well as subcontractors are responsible for


training workers for usage of any personal protective equipment used to perform a
job task(s). The following training is required of all workers for personal
protective equipment;

• Inspection of personal equipment according to manufactures guidelines.


• Care/cleaning/usage of personal protective equipment according to the
manufacturer’s guidelines.
• Usage of the personal protective equipment for the purpose it was
designed for according to the manufacturers guidelines.
• Review of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. personal protective
policies.
• Removal and replacement of damaged or worn personal protective
equipment according to the manufacturers guidelines.
• Personal protective equipment which requires certified training as
legislated by local governing regulations. (Example: Fall protection
equipment/breathing equipment)

5.1 GENERAL PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT POLICY(S)

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5.1.1 Mandatory Safety Glasses Policy

It only makes sense to protect your eyes while you’re working. In an effort to increase
safety and reduce injuries, Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. has adopted a mandatory
safety glasses policy.

This policy applies to all Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees regardless of
their positions. This includes temporary employees hired by Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. and through placement agencies. It also applies to all contractors and
vendors while on Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. property.

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. will make CSA/OSHA-approved safety glasses


available for all regular employees, temporary employees, contractors and vendors.
Regular employees who present a receipt for prescription safety glasses will be
reimbursed up to $75 a year.

CSA/OSHA-approved Safety Glasses must be worn in all of the following circumstances:

♦ Whenever you are in the branch shop, yard area.


♦ Whenever a client or customer site requires safety glasses to be worn.
♦ Whenever a employee or sub-contractor is on a client or customer site and performing
the following tasks or are in the vicinity of them:

♦ Use of any and all power tools including saws, nail guns and the like
♦ Use of any hand tools including hammers, wrenches and the like
♦ Doing any kind of repair work including repairs to doors, windows, general
maintenance, HVAC, and the like
♦ Doing any kind of set up work including blocking and levelling
♦ Doing any kind of knock down work

Please note, managers, sales representatives, administrative employees and any others
who do not ordinarily work in the shop or on the yard are required to use safety glasses
whenever they are in the yard or shop area and the above circumstances while on client
sites.

Failure to follow this policy is a serious offense. Eye injuries are almost always
preventable. Disregard for this policy endangers our employees, costs money and slows
productivity.

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5.1.2 Safety Boot Policy

This policy applies to all Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees that are involved
in service, set up, and delivery. This also includes temporary employees, sub-contractors,
and vendors who perform work on Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. property.

This policy specifies the minimum requirements for the safety boots to be worn.
Customer sites may have additional requirements and must be complied with while we
are providing service at their locations.

The minimum requirements for the safety boots will be:

 Minimum height of the boot will be 6” and must be a lace up type boot.

 The boot must have a puncture resistant sole meeting the requirements of CSA.

 Each pair must be identified as follows:

 Green Triangle indicating CSA approval

 CSA STANDARD (CAN/CSA-Z195-M92 (2000))

 CSA STANDARD (Z195-02)

Service type personnel hired after March 1st 2003, will be required to have safety boots
meeting the minimum requirements of this policy before they can begin work for
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

As with all personal protective equipment, safety boots must be worn properly and
maintained in good condition to provide proper foot protection.

Any service personnel not having the proper safety boots will not be allowed to perform
any services for Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. until the proper footwear has been
obtained.

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5.1.3 Glove Usage Policy

At Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc., hand injuries continue to be our number one
injury. In an effort to increase safety and reduce injuries, Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. has adopted a mandatory glove policy effective August 1, 2002.

This applies to all Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees. This also includes
temporary employees, sub-contractors, and vendors who perform work on Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. property.

The type of glove to be used will be determined by the type of material, and or equipment
being handled at that time; however, the minimum requirement for a glove is to include
Kevlar for cut resistance.

• Door and window removal and replacement.

• Wood sheathing removal and installation.

• Aluminium siding removal and installation. (Cut Resistant Gloves)

• Any type of sheet metal work, shaping, forming, and fitting. (Cut Resistant Gloves)

• Removal and installation of roofing material.

• Panel removal.

• Assembly and disassembly of steps and platforms.

• Handling of cinder blocks and blocking materials.

• Working with anchor straps and tie-downs.

• Installation and removal of skirting.

• Removal and installation of HVAC and wall mounted AC units.

• Removal and replacing axle.

• Welding, burning, and or cutting with a torch.

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5.1.4 Hard Hat Policy

It only makes sense to protect your head while you’re working. In an effort to increase
safety and reduce injuries, Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. has adopted a mandatory
hard hat policy as of March 15, 2011.

This policy applies to all Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees that are involved
in service, set up, and delivery. This also includes temporary employees, sub-contractors,
and vendors who perform work on Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. property.

This applies to all Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees. This also includes
temporary employees, sub-contractors, salespersons, visitors and vendors on Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. yard and shop locations, as well as any client sites.

The minimum requirements for the hard hats will be;

• The hard hat must be CSA approved. (CAN/CSA-Z94.1-05)

The maintenance and usage requirements for hard hats will be;

• Inspected prior to usage.

• Will be worn with the brim facing forward, adjusted to fit properly.

• If the hard hats are damaged during use or sustain a blow, they should be discarded
and a new one obtained. The shell or suspension of the hard hat should not be
altered or modified.

• It is the employee’s responsibility to insure the safekeeping, maintenance, and


cleanliness of hard hats. Cleansing should be done with a mild soap solution and
water.

• Have employee or subcontractor name and company identification markings.

The hard hat colors to identify Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. employees shall be;

• White for supervision and management.

• Green for all service employees.

• Yellow for all visitors, non-service employees.

• Grey for all new service employees until they have worked a full 3 month period.

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5.1.5 Mandatory Personal Protective Equipment Policy(s) Acknowledgement

All personal protective equipment policies are implemented and designed to reduce the
risk of injury for employees, subcontractors, and temporary employees while working for
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc including client or customer sites.

The enforcement of the personal protective policies, for Mandatory Safety Glasses,
Safety Boots, Glove Usage, Hard Hats polices will apply to Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc., regular, temporary employees, subcontractors and violations will be
considered a Zero Tolerance Violation with written warning issued.

Temporary agencies that provide temporary employees to Williams Scotsman of Canada,


Inc. will be contacted if the temporary employee violates our policy.

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. may refuse to do business with subcontractors and
vendors who violate our policy.

Acknowledgment of Receipt of the Personal Protective Equipment Policies for;

• Mandatory Safety Glasses Policy 5.1.1


• Safety Boot Policy 5.1.2
• Glove Usage Policy 5.1.3
• Hard Hat Policy 5.1.4

I have received a copy of the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. above listed Personal
Protective Equipment Polices. I have read each policy, understand it and agree to abide
by them.

___________________________ __________________
Signature Dated

___________________________
Employee’s Printed Name

___________________________ __________________
Signature Trainer/Supervisor Dated

___________________________
Branch/Location

NOTE: Ensure Employee/Subcontractor/Safety Department Receives Copy.

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5.2 INFORMATION SHEETS

5.2.1 Eye and Face Protection

This PPE is designed to protect the worker from such hazards as:

• Flying objects and particles.


• Molten metals
• Splashing liquids
• Ultraviolet, infrared and visible radiation (welding)

There are two types of PPE:

1. “Basic eye protection” includes:


• Eyecup goggles
• Monoframe goggles and spectacles with or without side shields

2. “Face Protection” includes:


• Metal mesh face shields for radiant heat or hot and humid conditions
• Chemical and impact resistant (plastic) face shield
• Welders shields or helmets with specified cover
• Filter plates and lenses

Hardened glass prescription lens and sport glasses and sport glasses are not
acceptable substitute for proper, required industrial safety eye protection.

Comfort and fit are very important in the selection of safety eyewear. Lens coatings,
venting or fittings may be needed to prevent fogging.

Contact lenses should NOT be worn at the work site. Contact lenses may trap or absorb
particles or gases causing eye irritation or blindness. Hard contact lenses may injure the
eye when hit.

Basic eye protection should be worn with face shields. Face shields alone often are not
enough to fully protect the eyes from work hazards. When eye and face protection is
required, advice from specialists, information on material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for
various chemicals, or your supplier will help you select such protection.

For more information refer to:

• Provincial Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations

• Standards for “Industrial Eye and Face Protectors “ CAN/CSA-Z94.3-92

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5.2.2 Eye and Face Protection

Do:

• Ensure your eye protection fits properly (close to the face)


• Clean safety glasses daily, more often if need;
• Store safety glasses in a safe, clean, dry place when not in use
• Replace pitted, scratched, bent or poorly fitted PPE. (Damaged Face/eye
protection interferes with vision and will not provide the protection it is designed
to deliver).
Do Not:

• Modify eye/ face protection


• Use eye/face protection, which does not have proper certification. (Various
marking or safety stamp for safety glasses are usually on the frame inside the
temple near the hinges of the glasses).

Eye Protection for Welders


Welders and welders’ helpers should also wear the prescribed equipment. Anyone else
working in the area should also wear eye protection where there is a chance they could be
exposed to a flash.

For further information refer to:


• Provincial Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations
• ACSA Toolbox Brochures # 90-102 and 92-131.

5.2.3 Head Protection

General Information
Safety headwear is designed to protect the head from impact from falling objects, bumps,
splashes from chemicals or harmful substances, and contact with energized objects and
equipment.

In construction, the recommended type of protective headwear is a hard hat, which has
the required “dielectric strength”. There are many designs, but they all must meet CSA
requirements for Class G (General Usage) and Class E (Electrical trades).

Most head protection is made up of two parts:

• The shell (light and rigid to deflect blows)

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• The suspension (to absorb and distribute the energy of the blow)

Both parts of the headwear must be compatible and maintained according to


manufacturer instructions.
If attachments are used with headwear, they must be designed specifically for use with
the specific headwear used. Bump caps or laceration hats are not considered safety
helmets. In Alberta they can only be used when the only hazard is that a worker might
strike his/her head against a stationary object.

Inspection and Maintenance


Proper care is required for headgear to perform efficiently. Its service life is affected by
many factors including temperature, chemicals, sunlight and ultraviolet radiation
(welding). The usual maintenance for headgear is simply washing with a mild detergent
and rinsing thoroughly.

Do:
• Replace headgear that is pitted, holed, cracked or brittle.
• Replace headgear that has been subjected to a blow even though damage cannot
be seen.
• Remove from service any headgear if its serviceability is in doubt.
• Replace headgear and components according to manufacturers instructions
• Consult regulations or your supplier for information on headgear.

Do Not:
• Drill, remove peaks, alter the shell or suspension in any way
• Use solvents or paints on the shell (makes shell break down)
• Put chin straps over the brims or certain classes of headgear
• Use any liner that contains metal or conductive materials
• Carry anything in the hard hat while wearing the hard hat.

For further information refer to:


• Provincial Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations
• ACSA Toolbox Brochures 92-131.

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6.0 PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE PROGRAM

6.1 POLICY
6.2 RESPONSIBLITIES: VEHICLE
OR EQUIPMENT CHECKLISTS
6.3 SCHEDULE: Preventative Maintenance of
Vehicles/Heavy Duty Equipment
6.4 SCHEDULE: Preventative Maintenance
Tools
6.5 RESPONSIBILITY: Preventative
Maintenance Facility/Site Specific
6.6.1 SITE SAFETY INSPECTION
6.6.2 VEHICLE INSPECTION FORM
6.6.3 MOBILE EQUIPMENT INSPECTION
FORM
6.6.4 D.O.T. INSPECTION CHECKLIST

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6.1 Preventative Maintenance Program Policy

It is the policy of this company to maintain all tools, vehicles and equipment in a
condition that will maximize the safety of all personnel.

To accomplish this, a Preventative Maintenance Program shall be maintained and shall


include the following components:

 Adherence to applicable regulations, standards and manufacturers specifications.

 Services of appropriately qualified maintenance personnel.

 Scheduling and documentation of all maintenance work.

The supervisor shall be responsible for the application of the program in his / her area of
responsibility.

* The safety information in this policy does not take precedence over government
OH&S Regulations. All employees should be familiar with these regulations.

March 1, 2007
Signed: ______________________________ Date: ________________________

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6.2 RESPONSIBLITIES: VEHICLE OR EQUIPMENT CHECKLISTS:

1. Safety Inspection Checklists will be filled out for all vehicles/equipment/site/facility


used or owned by Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
2. Scheduled maintenance Checklists will be done for all repairs to any vehicles or
equipment.
3. All vehicles or equipment that are deemed unsafe will be locked out and not operated
until corrective actions are implemented.
4. The Onsite Manager will maintain all records for scheduled maintenance and
inspections of service vehicles owned by Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
5. The Onsite Manager will be responsible for reviewing all vehicle/equipment/site
checklists completed.
6. Corrective actions to any vehicle or equipment will be reviewed by
Operations/Branch Manager and ensure corrective action are completed in a timely
manner in compliance with manufactured standards.
7. The documentation for any repairs done by subcontractor s to equipment or vehicles
will be kept on file for a minimum of three years.
8. All repairs to equipment must be done by qualified and trained personal.
9. Log books for each Loader or Forklift will be done daily. Log books for Loaders or
Forklifts will be stored in each piece of equipment.
10. Modifications of any equipment will not be done unless authorized by Regional
Manager/Regional Safety Manager.

6.3 SCHEDULE: Preventative Maintenance of Vehicles/Heavy Duty Equipment

1. All equipment and vehicles must have scheduled maintenance according to


manufactured standards.
2. All Loaders and Forklifts must be inspected prior to use and keep a daily log of
scheduled maintenance.
3. A log book must be in Loaders and Forklifts at all times.
4. A Daily Logs of Forklift must be forwarded to Onsite/Operations Manager to review
on a monthly basis as well as anytime a corrective action is identified.
5. Onsite Managers must sign off any corrective actions needing repair.
6. Each company vehicle must have monthly checklist done by operator.
7. A detailed list of all equipment and vehicles will be kept.
8. A detailing repair and service(s) list will detail all repairs to vehicles or equipment.

6.3.1 Tire and Wheel Assembly Inspection and Servicing


Management and supervision shall ensure that competent workers will
perform inspection, removal or reassembly tires or tire and wheel assemblies
in accordance with manufactures specifications. All repairs to wheel
assemblies will be done by qualified workers. The following procedures will
be used onsite by workers performing tasks associated with tires or wheel
assemblies;
• The manufacturer’s service manual for tire or wheel assembly is reviewed
by worker and available onsite prior to task.

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• Trained competent works only inflate split rim or locking ring wheel tire
assemblies. A tire being inflated with a split rim or locking ring wheel
assembly will only be inflated in a cage or similar enclosure system to
avoid locking ring failure or tire rupture.
• If a clamp type connector is used to inflate tires, management and
supervision will ensure that a in line pressure gauge and positive pressure
control is mounted prior to any tire inflations.
• Workers must stand aside from tire inflation point while using any tire
inflation equipment. Workers must be in a safe position away from
inflation point to avoid hazard with clamp type inflation devices.
• All wheel assemblies inspected must be checked for tightness and proper
torque according to manufacturer’s guidelines.
• All tires inspected will be checked for wear or visible damage.
• All tires inspected will be checked for proper tire pressure according to
manufacturer’s guidelines.
• All wheel assemblies are inspected for proper working condition
according to manufactures guidelines.

6.4 Schedule: Preventative Maintenance Tools:


1. Prior to use of any tool the employee or subcontractor will inspect tool for any
damage or unsafe condition.
2. Any tool with an unsafe condition will be tagged-out and not used till tool is repaired
by qualified technician.
3. No tool that has been locked out can be used, without the consent of original person
who tagged out the tool or equipment or Branch Manager/Supervisor.
4. No tool will be altered beyond manufactured standards.
5. Tools shall be used only for manufactured use.
6. No manufactured safety guards will be removed off any tool.
7. A list of all tools will be kept for all tools detailing repair(s) done for any tool used by
any employee or subcontractor.

6.5 Schedule: Preventative Maintenance Facility/Site Specific:


1. All Branch Managers, Supervisors, Contractors, and employees will ensure regular
Inspections of site facility are done according to the Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. Inspection Policy.
2. All equipment/vehicles/tools/facility/site shall have a minimum of one inspection
per month.
3. All equipment/vehicles/tools/facility/site will be inspected to identify preventative
Measures to eliminate hazards and ensure corrective actions are taken.
4. Any items identified unsafe will be tagged-out until corrective actions are completed.

6.6 Vehicles/Forklift/Site/D.O.T Vehicle Checklist(s);

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6.61 Safety Inspection Check List: Yard/Office/Shop


Date: Inspector(s): /
Location: Job Titles(s): /
Branch: Signature(s):
Supervisor:

Monthly Quarterly Audit


Section A: Emergency Systems YES=ACCEPTABLE / NO=NOT ACCEPTABLE
Item YES NO Item YES NO
1. Emergency Evacuation Procedures. (The 2. Fire Extinguishers. (Do all fire extinguishers have
current emergency evacuation procedures must be posted by a current inspection tag?) (Are fire extinguishers mounted
building exit locations.) (Has a drill been conducted within the last properly and accessible?) (Are the extinguishers in useable
12 months?) condition?)

3. First Aid Kits. (Are all first aid kits properly stocked 4. Exits/Signs. (Are exit signs mounted to indicate exit
with all supplies according to OHS?) (Are first aid kits location?) (Are all exits marked with a sign?) (Are exits
accessible?) (Are any first aid items expired?) blocked and accessible?)
Section B: Personal Protective Equipment
5. Personal Protective Equipment. (Have the 6. P.P.E. Usage. (Are safety glasses (& or goggles),
approved eye protection, gloves, hearing protection, protective safety boots, knee pads, protective clothing, and hard hats
clothing, safety boots, knee pads, hard hats provided and available being worn as required?) (Is hearing protection used when
as required?) (Are personal protective equipment logs. Tracked?) worker is exposed to more than 85 decibels?)

7. Hand/Gloves. (Are gloves available according to hazard 8. Protective Clothing. (Are employees wearing
assessment/MSDS Sheet?) (Are gloves being worn according to proper clothing for task being performed?) (Example: Fire
policy?) (Cut resistant gloves available?) rated coveralls for lighting furnaces, coveralls for daily tasks)

9. Eye Wash Stations. (Are eyewash stations accessible?) 10. Ventilation. (Is there adequate ventilation is shop
(Have bottles been changed according to manufactures area?) (Are employees using adequate ventilation when using
guidelines?) (Are the eyewash stations clean and ready to use and chemicals?) (Are employee's using ventilation when
accessible?) performing job task procedures?)

Section C: Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)


11. Hazardous Chemical List. (Are all materials 12. MSDS. (Is a MSDS Sheet available for all
safety data sheets listed on the hazardous chemical list?) chemicals/products onsite?) (Are the MSDS sheets current
within three years?)

13. Proper Labeling. (Do all containers have proper 14. Hazardous Waste. (Is hazardous waste disposed
labeling according to WHIMS?) (Temporary decanting of of properly according to MSDS sheets?)
chemicals must have a product label!)

15. Spill Kits. (Are applicable materials available and 16. WHMIS Training. (Has each worker been
procedures in place to address minor spills (Spill kits, granular trained by certified WHMIS training agency?)
absorbents, ect?)

Section D: Hand & Portable Tools


17. Hand Tools/Shop Tools. (Are hand tools/shop 18. Powered Tools. (Are all power tools cords
tools in operable condition and properly guarded?) (Example: no properly grounded) (Is cord in good condition and plug
damage/applicable to task being performed) properly grounded as per. Manufacturer?)

19. Tools Maintenance. (Are all hand and powered tools 20. Tool Tracking. (Are all hand and power been
maintained according to the manufacturer guidelines?) inventoried including tracking of repairs/lock
out/damaged/destroyed?)

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6.61 Safety Inspection Check List: Yard/Office/Shop (Cont.)


Section E: Flammable & Combustible Material YES=ACCEPTABLE / NO=NOT ACCEPTABLE
Item YES NO Item YES NO
21. Pressure Cylinders. (Are all pressure cylinders in 22. Containers. (Are approved containers and portable
use or stored properly secured?) (Is there any damage to tanks or tanks used for storage and handling of flammable and
valves?) combustible liquids?) (Are the containers marked indicating
contents?)
23. Chemical/Flammable Storage. (Are 24. Flammable Product Usage. (Are flammable
materials/chemicals stored in a approved cabinet?) (Is the cabinet materials stored post usage or end of shift/project by
marked chemical/flammable with signs?) (Is the cabinet vents workers?)
unblocked?) (Are materials stored on top of cabinet?)

Section F: Housekeeping & Walking - Working Surfaces


25. Housekeeping. (Is housekeeping being maintained all 26. Aisles/Walkways/Stairs. (Are all walking
yards, service areas, storage rooms, and unoccupied areas kept areas clear and accessible?) (Example: No blocking of aisles
clean and orderly?) (Is garbage being disposed of post task?) or walking areas/uneven ground or potholes/clear of ice or
snow) (Are walking areas properly illuminated?)

27. Floors. (Are open-sided floors or platforms above 2 Feet 28. Stairs. (Do stairs have anti-slip treads?) (Are railings
above adjacent floor or ground level properly guarded to prevent installed on stairs or elevated floors above 2 feet?) (Is there
falls?) (Is there damage to railings?) damage to stairs or railings?)

Section F: Fall Protection


29. Fall Protection Equipment. (Are fall protection 30. Fall Protection System Usage. (Are fall
devices, lanyards and body harness available and in good protection devices in use at all times when required?)
condition and properly maintained?) (Have the Fall protection
systems been inspected yearly?)

Section G: Ladder Safety


31. Ladders. (Are ladders in good condition and inspected by 32. Ladder Usage. (Are the proper ladders used for
a competent person prior to usage?) (Are defective ladders the job (EX: aluminum ladders cannot be used while engaging
removed from service?) in electrical work) (Are ladders setup and used properly
without exceeding load rating?)

Section H: Electrical
33. Electrical Cords. (Are all electrical cords (including 34. Electrical Outlets. (Are all electrical outlets in
power cable pigtails) in good condition and free from cuts good condition, panel boxes closed and accessible (within 3
exposing conducting wire, splices and taped repairs; undamaged Feet); junction boxes covered; electrical cords appropriately
ground prongs and undamaged cord connectors, GFCI and/or protected from mobile traffic and water hazards?)
shock shield (for

Section I: Lockout/Tagout
35. Lockout/Tagout. (Is there a functional 36. Lockout/Tagout Usage. (Are workers using
Lockout/Tagout program in place; individuals provided locks, safe job procedure and voltage test devices when required and
tags, or other hardware provided for isolating, securing or blocking properly isolating power during connection to include gang
of machines or equipment for energy source; and are all junction hasps for multiple employees? (Have lockouts/tagouts been
boxes for pigtail tracked and recorded?)

37. Annual Control Inspection. (Have annual 38. Hitch Locks. (Are hitch locks available to
inspections of energy control procedures been conducted to ensure manually lock out movement of wheeled modular building?)
the requirements of the program are being followed?) (Are the hitch locks or a cone system being used to isolate
mobile trailer movement during work processes?)

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6.61 Safety Inspection Check List: Yard/Office/Shop (Cont.)


Section H: Compressed Gases YES=ACCEPTABLE / NO=NOT ACCEPTABLE
Item YES NO Item YES NO
39. Tank Labels. (Are all tanks properly labeled 40. Tank Storage. (Are all fuel-gas cylinders and/or
(FLAMMABLE GAS, reflective tape, etc.) and stored/secured so combustible materials stored at least 20 feet from oxygen
as to prevent damage; with applicable protector caps/plugs in place cylinders; other applicable tanks stored separated as
and hand tight?) required?)

41. Liquid Propane. (Are liquid propane tanks stored in 42. Gas Cylinder Movement. (Do workers
their proper position with regulators removed and out of transport gas cylinders in the upright position; properly tied
(overhead) direct sunlight exposure?) down?)

Section I: Mobile Powered Equipment


43. Mobile Equipment. (Are all forklifts, loaders, and 44. Mobile Equipment Attachments. (Are
other powered equipment in overall good condition without portable tow bar attachments in good repair (no broken welds,
broken/missing parts or non-functional devices; including cracks, bent hardware, damaged chains, or defective parts?)
Operator's manual and are daily inspections being performed as
required with documen

45. Mobile Equipment Usage. (Are seat belts being 46. Man Lifts. (Are certified/approved man lift devices
worn, is three point contact being used when entering/exiting being used when elevating personnel?)
compartment, is proper operation including proper speed and fork
maneuvering being performed, and are operators not leaving it
running while un

Section J: Employee Training Documentation


47. Employee Orientations. (Are all new employees 48. Subcontractor Training. (Have all
trained on first day of hire?) (Have all employees signed policies subcontractors received W/S orientation, and signed the WS
for; orientation, safety glasses, etc.?) safety manual acknowledgement?)

49. Operation of Mobile Equipment. (Have the 50. First Aid Training. (Have designated first aider
employees been trained formally on operation of mobile equipment onsite been formally trained?) (Does the first aider know the
if required to operate equipment?) reporting system?)

51. Specialized Training. (Have employees received 52. Safe Job Procedure Training. (Have all
specialized training for applicable job task(s)) (Ex. Fall workers been trained in all applicable safe job procedures?)
protection/specialized tool training)

Section K: Misc. (Other Non-Specific)


53. Manual Lifting. (Are proper lifting techniques being 54. Blocking/Jack Stands. (Are mobile trailers
used when required? Ex. 2 person lifts, no twisting while lifting, properly blocked while cleaning, maintenance, refurb, or get-
bending at knees and not back while lifting.) ready is being performed?)

55. Vehicle Condition. (Are all service vehicles in good 56. Vehicle Inspection. (Are all drivers properly
condition and properly maintained? Ex. Housekeeping, safety conducting pre-trip/post trip inspections including all
equipment, on board tools, maintenance records, etc.) applicable items? Ex. Load securement, brakes, lights, and
other?) (Have all service vehicle been inspected monthly?)

57. Management Participation. (Has branch 58. Inspection Follow-up. (Have all items
management, senior management participated in the inspection unacceptable been corrected including submission to safety
process in the last 6 months?) department following previous inspection?)

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6.61 Safety Inspection Check List: Corrective Actions


Corrective Action(s)
ITEM # UNACCEPTABLE CONDITION CORRECTED BY CORRECTIVE ACTION DATE

NOTE: CORRECTIVE ACTIONS SHOULD BY CORRECTED IMMEDIATELY/OR AN


ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROL PUT IN PLACE TO MITIGATE THE UNACCEPTABLE
CONDITION(S).
NOTE: ALL CORRECTIVE ACTIONS WILL BY CORRECTED WITHIN 5 DAYS OF AN AUDIT
INSPECTION.
REVIEWED BY MANAGER: DATE:

COMMENTS FROM MANAGER:

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LOCATION:
6.6.2 VEHICLE
INSPECTION FORM
VEHICLE: DATE:
CURRENT
UNIT# KMS:
INSPECTED
DRIVER BY:
NOT CORRECTIVE
WEEKLY VEHICLE CHECKLIST ACCEPTABLE ACCEPTABLE ACTION CORRECTED BY/DATE
TIRES  
TIRE PRES  
DOORS  
ELEC.  
WINDOWS  
LOCKS  
SIGNALS  
BODY  
BRAKES  
 
 
 
PREVENTATIVE MAINT. SCHEDULE COMPLETED BY: DATE:
NEXT OIL
Quarterly CHANGE
NEXT
Yearly SERVICE
COMMENTS

MANAGEMENT REVIEWED: DATE:

* ALL CORRECTIVE ACTIONS MUST BE SIGNED OFF

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LOCATION:
6.6.3
FORKLIFT/LOADER
INSPECTION FORM
VEHICLE: DATE:
UNIT# CURRENT KMS:
DRIVER INSPECTED BY:

WEEKLY VEHICLE CHECKLIST ACCEPTABLE NOT ACCEPTABLE CORRECTIVE ACTION CORRECTED BY/DATE

All Fluid Levels are adequate  


Tires/Air Pressure Correct  
Hoses/Belts/Cables  
Mast/Forks  
Chains  
Fuel/Battery Level  
Safety Equipment/Fire
Extinguisher  
Gauges/Controls  
Horns/Alarms  
Steering  
Brakes  
Leaks  
PREVENTATIVE MAINT.
SCHEDULE COMPLETED BY: DATE:
NEXT
OIL
Quarterly CHANGE
NEXT
Yearly SERVICE
COMMENTS

MANAGEMENT
REVIEWED: DATE:

* ALL CORRECTIVE ACTIONS MUST BE SIGNED OFF

Revision Date Feb 15, 2011 6-10


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6.6.4 Driver’s Vehicle Inspection Report


As required by the D.O.T. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations

DATE:___________________________
TIME:_______________A.M._______________P.M.

TRACTOR/TRUCK NO.__________________ODOMETER
READING_______________

Check any defective item and give details under “remarks”


□ Air Compressor □ Horn □ Suspension System
□ Air Lines □ Lights □ Starter
□ Battery Head – Stop □ Steering
□ Body Tail – Dash □ Tachograph
□ Brake Accessories Turn Indicators □ Tires
□ Brakes, Parking □ Mirrors □ Tire Chains
□ Brakes, Service □ Muffler □ Transmission
□ Clutch □ Oil Pressure □ Wheels and Rims
□ Coupling Devices □ Radiator □ Windows
□ Defroster/Heater □ Rear End □ Windshield Wipers
□ Drive Line □ Reflectors □ Other
□ Engine □ Safety Equipment
□ Exhaust Fire Extinguisher
□ Fifth Wheel Reflective Triangles
□ Frame and Assembly Flags – Glares – Fuses
□ Front Axle Spare Bulbs and Fuses
□ Fuel Tanks Spare Seal Beam
□ Generator

TRAILER(S) NO.(S) _________________________


□ Brake Connections □ Hitch □ Tarpaulin
□ Brakes □ Landing Gear □ Tires
□ Coupling Devices □ Lights – All □ Wheels and Rims
□ Coupling (King) Pin □ Roof □ Other
□ Doors □ Suspension System
Remarks:
________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

□ CONDITION OF THE ABOVE VEHICLE IS SATISFACTORY

Driver’s
Signature:________________________________________________________

Revision Date Feb 15, 2011 6-11


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□ ABOVE DEFECTS CORRECTED


□ ABOVE DEFECTS NEED NOT BE CORRECTED FOR SAFE OPERATION OF
VEHICLE

Mechanic’s
Signature:_____________________________________Date:________________

Driver’s
Signature:________________________________________Date:_____________

Revision Date Feb 15, 2011 6-12


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7.0 TRAINING / SAFETY MEETINGS

7.1 SAFETY TRAINING POLICY

7.2 RESPONSIBILITES
7.3 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
7.4 VEHICLE SAFETY
7.5 PERSONAL CONDUCT
7.6 ORIENTATION
7.7 SAFETY MEETIGS
7.8 TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
7.9 FIRE PREVENTION AND PROTECTION
7.10 HOUSEKEEPING
7.11 HAZARDOUS GOODS
7.12 TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS
GOODS
7.13 EMERGENCY FIRST AID
7.14 EMPLOYEE & CONTRACTOR
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM
7.15 NEW EMPLOYEE ORIENTATION

Revision Date Feb 15, 2011 7-1


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7.1 SAFETY TRAINING POLICY

Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to ensure that all employees receive adequate safety
training.

Policy

The company will provide and ensure that all employees participate in the following
safety training:

 Orientation for all newly hired staff

 Job specific training as required

 Refresher and update training

 Management/Supervisor Training

March 1, 2007
Signature: Date:

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Preamble

This Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Safety handbook provides employees with the
basic safety guidelines and rules to be used in their daily activities. The handbook is
designed to identify existing local, provincial and federal regulations and Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. standard safety practices.

No handbook of this type can, nor is it, represented to be, all-inclusive and is not a substitute
for common sense and formal training. The appropriate legislation shall be consulted if a
doubt is raised by the information in this handbook.

Any questions concerning safe work practices or suggestions for a safer workplace are
encouraged and should be submitted to an immediate supervisor.

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SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT

VISION

Protection of the health and safety of our employees, customers and the environment is, and
shall continue to be, of the utmost importance to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

MISSION

Williams Scotsman of Canada Inc., through its employees at every level, shall be
responsible and accountable for consistently maintaining safe and environmentally secure
workplace within a quality management system.

Employees and all personnel engaged by Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. shall work in a
manner that upholds safety standards for themselves, their fellow workers, Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc customers, the public and the environment.

VALUES

This shall be accomplished by complying with all applicable regulations. In the absence of
regulatory requirements, compliance with Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. standards
shall be applied to protect the environment and ensure employee, customer and public
safety.

Through personal commitment, active participation and effective training in equipment


operation, chemical handling and operating procedures, the maintenance of a safe and
environmentally secure workplace for employees and customers can be realised.

____________________________________

Alec McDonald

Vice President & General Manager


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

Revision Date Feb 15, 2011 7-4


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7.2 RESPONSIBILITIES

The Occupational Health and Safety Act has outlined certain responsibilities for
both the employer and the employees. These responsibilities are briefly described as
follows:

7.2.1 Company Responsibilities


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. is required to do everything reasonably
possible to protect the safety of its employees, anyone on the work site and
the public.

7.2.2 Employee Responsibilities


Every employee or contractor employee shall do everything reasonably
possible to protect the safety of himself/herself, all fellow workers and the
public.

7.2.3 Reporting
It is everyone's responsibility to promptly report any hazardous
conditions. All necessary steps shall be taken to reduce or
eliminate the hazard or to place warning signs or
barricades to keep people away from the hazard.
Williams Scotsman of Canada Inc.
Daytime Emergency Number: 1-800-782-1500

It is everyone's responsibility to promptly report any incidents that result in


serious injury, property or equipment damage, production loss, damage to
the environment or any near miss that could have resulted in any of the
above losses.

The main aim of this responsibility is not to apportion blame but to allow a
thorough investigation, which may prevent a future occurrence of a similar
incident. If it is necessary to report an incident to a government agency, it
may require the incident scene to be secured in order to preserve evidence.

7.2.4 The Workers Right to Refuse


No worker is required to perform any task or job that would put that worker
or any other worker in imminent danger. Imminent danger is one that is not
normal for the workers occupation.

If a worker refuses to do a job, it is that worker's responsibility to


immediately contact his/her supervisor and explain the circumstances of the
refusal.

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7.2 RESPONSIBILITIES

7.2.5 Right to Know


It is the company's and the contractor's responsibility to ensure that the
worker is adequately trained for the job performed and that any potential
hazards associated with the job have been explained to the worker, thus
assuring the " Right to Know " of the worker is not compromised.

7.2.6 Workers Compensation Act


Before any contractor can commence work for Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. he/she shall furnish proof of being fully covered and in good
standing with the applicable W.C.B. jurisdiction.

7.2.7 Treatment of the Injured


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. shall provide first aid at the workplace
for minor injuries to any worker in accordance with the applicable Provincial
Occupational Health and Safety or Workers Compensation Board
regulations.

7.2.8 Modified Work Program


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all employees will participate in a
modified work program in accordance with provincial governing standards.
When an injury does occur, management will make every reasonable effort
to assist ill and injured employees in returning to the workplace.

7.3 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

7.3.1 Hard Hats


Hard hats must be C.S.A. class B rated, non-conducting high impact plastic
and will be worn on all work sites in accordance with the clients safety
programs. The shop area will demand the use of hard hats when there is
lifting or equipment being worked on which could result in the falling or
dropping of tools or other materials from an over head height. Bump caps
may be substituted with the approval of management.

7.3.2 Clothing
All persons entering a work site must wear the appropriate clothing. Pants
will be long legged. Shirts will be long sleeved must be buttoned at the wrist.
No muscle shirts shall be allowed. Clothing that is loose, ragged or torn,
bracelets, necklaces, or neckties must not be worn near rotating or moving
equipment. All persons entering a customers work site will wear clean fire
retardant work wear. Any personal clothing furnished by employees must be
safe and proper for the job. Company furnished protective equipment must
not be altered in any manner that impairs its original features. i.e. cutting off
sleeves.

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7.3.3 Foot Protection
C.S.A., class one approved safety footwear shall be worn on all work sites.
Steel-toed boots must be worn in the shop when there is lifting or equipment
being worked on which could result in the falling or dropping of tools or
other materials from an overhead height.

7.3 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

7.3.4 Eye Protection


C.S.A. approved protective eyewear or face shields must be worn by all
employees when the nature of the work is such that it may result in an injury
to the eye or face.

7.3.5 Hearing Protection


Whenever noise hazards exist ( Levels exceeding 80 dba.) all persons shall
wear provided approved hearing protection.

7.4 VEHICLE SAFETY

Vehicles represent a considerable investment to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.


Observance of a few basic rules can reduce motor vehicle accidents and "save time,
money and lives".

7.4.1 Speed Limits


Observe all posted speed limits. These limits are set for ideal conditions.
You should adjust your speed to suit the road and weather conditions.

7.4.2 Seat Belts and Passengers


All occupants of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. shall wear seat belts
while in company vehicles. It is the responsibility of the driver to ensure that
all occupants are secured by seat belts before the vehicle is in motion.

7.4.3 Windshields and Lights


Windshields shall be free of cracks in the drivers’ line of sight and should be
kept free from build up of contaminants on the inside that may affect
visibility. Headlights shall be used at all times when the vehicle is in motion.
Use of headlights during daylight hours has been shown to reduce accidents.

Remember, when driving a company vehicle you represent to the public,


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Drive defensively and courteously at all
times.

7.44 Other Vehicle Safety Items


Tools or other objects shall not be carried in the same compartment as the
driver or passenger.

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7.4.5 Vehicles Fuelling


Fuel tanks on motorised equipment must not be filled while the engine is
running. The vehicle must be attended during the filling operation.
Adjacent equipment should shut down and the "No Smoking" rule observed.

7.4.6 Driver's Responsibility


It is the driver's responsibility to anticipate and avoid at all times those
situations that are dangerous to him and to the company equipment in his
charge. To do this requires that he drive and operate the equipment in a safe
manner, that he inspect the vehicle and auxiliary equipment to assure it will
operate safely, that he keep alert in all situations whereby he might be
unduly exposed to personal injury from any cause.

7.4.7 In Case of Accident


All automotive accidents must be reported immediately.
1. Stop as close to the scene as possible without obstructing traffic.
2. Give first aid to injured persons, if necessary or requested. Obtain
medical assistance.
3. Get the names and addresses of as many witnesses as possible.
4. As quickly as possible, notify your supervisor.
5. Make no statements to anyone except an officer or the law, a company
representative or a Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. insurance
representative.
6. Do not attempt to settle an accident yourself. This admits responsibility
and involves Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Do not admit personal
responsibility for either the cost of repairs or the cost of medical
treatment.
7. If the accident involves an unattended vehicle, take reasonable steps to
locate the owner. If the owner cannot be found, leave a note (in a
conspicuous place on the vehicle or object) listing your name and
address, company name and address, and a brief description of the
accident.

7.4.8 NATIONAL SAFETY CODE


The National Safety Code Regulations outline the procedures required to
ensure Class 1, 3 and 5 vehicles are driven safely and in such a way as to
minimize the danger to life, health, property and the environment. When a
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. vehicle is being driven, it is the
responsibility of the operator to follow all speed limits, rules and
regulations of the road and apply professional driving procedures at all
times.

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Driver Training
All drivers shall have orientation training prior to starting a driving job,
either as a new or as a transferred employee. All drivers should have
P.D.I.C. or D.D.C. training. New drivers have to be qualified by a
professional driver within 90 days of hire.

Driver Qualifications
Each driver should have the proper license qualifications required by
legislation to operate a particular unit before he is entitled to operate it.
New hires should not have more than 6 demerits on their license and no
impaired convictions within the previous 3 years. Drivers’ abstracts
should be produced before employment. A driver medical should be
produced before commencement of employment and at required intervals
established by the Motor Vehicles Branch.

Driver Suspensions
If any driver becomes suspended before his abstract review, the driver
shall inform his supervisor immediately. Failure to do so may be grounds
for discipline.

Pre and Post Trip Inspections


All drivers shall do a pre and post trip inspection for all Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. vehicles covering the following items:

- Engine coolant and system.


- Engine oil.
- Service brakes, connections and adjustments.
- Brake fluid level or air brake pre-trip.
- Lights and reflectors.
- Horn.
- Rear vision mirrors.
- Windshield condition, wipers and washer operation.
- Parking brakes.
- Steering mechanism.
- Tire condition, pressure and spare.
- Wheels and rims.
- Coupling devices.

Reports
Defects are to be indicated on pre and post trip inspection reports and
turned in to the coordinator. A service report is filled out for each time
repairs or servicing is carded out.

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Maintenance
All pre and post trip inspection reports shall be filed at the Maintenance
Center, for a period of not lest than 3 months for each unit. All
maintenance, inspection and repair records for each unit shall be filed at
the Maintenance Center, for a period of not less than 5 years. For any
vehicles retired from service, the maintenance records should be retained
for 6 months from the date of retirement.

7.4.9 HOURS OF SERVICE


Policy
All Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. driver of vehicles 18,000Kg or
greater are compelled by regulation to maintain an accurate logbook of
their hours of service. The driver shall be able to produce log sheets for
the previous seven (7) days upon request. All other log sheets shall be
turned in to the appropriate office, which will send them to the Calgary
office, to be stored for 6 months.

7.4.10 Traffic Control

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all subcontractors will provide


traffic control protection at worksites to clearly identify potential vehicle
or equipment hazards to workers on foot. The following shall be
implemented for traffic control onsite;

• Potential risk to workers from vehicles or equipment prior to job


operations.
• Potential risk to workers from movement of equipment with
vehicles.
• Workers on foot exposed to risk from traffic or equipment will
wear reflective/highly visible clothing.
• Workers designated to control traffic from vehicles or equipment
wear reflective clothing applicable for time of day used.
• Workers designated to control traffic from vehicles or equipment
wear clothing that identifies worker as a traffic controller.
• Workers designated to control traffic from vehicles or equipment
use handheld signals or lights if it is dark or poor visibility.
• If risk of traffic is to workers on a public highway use of manual
traffic control devices shall be used; such as (warning signs,
barriers, lane control devices, flashing lights, flares, marked pilot
vehicle(s), automatic or remote controlled traffic control systems,
designated persons directing traffic).

7.5 PERSONAL CONDUCT

7.5.1 Smoking
Smoking will only be allowed in designated areas.

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7.5.2 Liquor and Drugs


No alcoholic beverages or non-prescription drugs will be consumed,
distributed or possessed on any work site. Any use of prescription or "over
the counter" drugs that may affect your ability to work or drive shall be
avoided and any potential unsafe side effects reported to the appropriate
supervisor.

No employee will report to work with 40 milligrams of alcohol in 100


millilitres of blood, urine or saliva or with any detectable levels of any drug
in their body.

7.5.3 Horseplay
Practical jokes, fighting and wrestling can result in a serious injury. Workers
shall refrain from indulging in these activities. Workers shall not run except
in the case of an emergency.

7.5.4 Responsibility of Worker


It is the responsibility of the employee to do everything reasonably possible
to protect the safety of himself/herself and all fellow workers. This
responsibility extends to all work places and shops where the employees
conduct Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. business.

7.5.5 How to Lift


Many injuries in the industry, are caused by poor lifting practices. Back
injuries can be eliminated by following these simple rules:

1. Lift with your legs not your back.


2. Size up the load before you lift it. Get help if necessary.
3. Avoid lifting in an awkward or off-balance position.
4. Secure a good hold on the object before lifting.
5. Use teamwork when lifting with others. Lift or lower the object
together.

7.6 ORIENTATION

7.6.1 Employee Orientation


A detailed safety orientation shall be given to all new or transferred
employees. The orientation shall include but should not be limited to the
following:

1. Supervisory organisation of the work area.


2. Review of the safety handbook.
3. Restricted and hazardous area review.
4. Smoking area and fire protection.

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5. Injury/incident reporting procedures.
6. Emergency signals, plans and escape routes.

7.6.2 Supervisory Orientation


A detailed safety orientation will be given to all new or promoted
supervisors. The orientation shall include but should not be limited to the
following: Supervisory training will be conducted and include all contents
of employee orientation in addition to the following:

1. Supervisory training course.


2. Review of the safety manual.
3. Review and location of current provincial legislation.
4. Review of due diligence requirements for; provincial and regional
legislation for employees and supervisors.
5. Reporting procedures and company reporting requirements.
6. Review of client reporting procedures if applicable.

7.6.3 Emergencies
In the event of an emergency, equipment must be shut down and if possible
removed from the emergency site. Evacuate all personnel from the site.
Attempt to control the emergency. If out of control initiate the emergency
response plan.

7.7 REGULAR AND PRE-JOB SAFETY MEETINGS


Safety meetings are to be held on a bi-monthly basis to discuss procedures,
hazardous conditions and encourage discussions on safety topics. Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc employees are expected to attend and participate in all
scheduled safety meetings at which their suggestions and concerns will be
addressed.

7.7.1 Pre-Job Safety Meetings


Pre-job meetings will be conducted before the start of all unusual jobs. The
contents of this meeting shall include but not be limited to:

1. Method of performing the task.


2. General safety requirements.
3. Hazards likely to be encountered.
4. Procedures to control hazards.
5. Contents of work permit.
6. Rescue procedures.
7. Communication requirements
8. Safety equipment.

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7.7.2 Minutes of Meetings


Minutes of all safety meetings shall be taken and kept on file at the Calgary
office. Pre-job meetings will be noted on the job ticket.

7.8 TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

7.8.1 Use of Tools and Equipment


No worker shall use any tool, equipment or appliance without the proper
training in its use, unless a worker competent in the use of the tool supervises
the worker. Management, supervision, competent workers shall ensure all
tools and equipment is in good working order and is suitable for the job
being performed. Any equipment that is defective should be tagged "Do Not
Use" and not used until repaired or replaced.

No worker shall use any tool, equipment, material, appliance or product


without following the manufacturer’s or local governing regulation
recommendations for safe use, unless other guidelines for its use afford an
equivalent or greater level of safety.

7.8.2 Training Tools and Equipment Safe Job Procedures


Workers shall be trained in Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. developed
safe job procedures for the usage of tools and equipment. Management and
supervision shall ensure that workers are able to perform tasks according to
the companies written safe job procedures while using tools or equipment.
Management and supervision will make employees aware of hazards
associated with the operation of any tools or equipment prior to tasks.

7.8.3 Training for Powered Mobile Equipment


All workers using shall be trained by a certified training agency approved by
local governing authority in the usage of each type of powered mobile
equipment. A certificate shall be available for all employees onsite for each
type of powered mobile equipment at all times. Management and
supervision will review the pre-equipment inspection procedures with
employee prior to usage of powered mobile equipment.

7.9 FIRE PREVENTION AND PROTECTION

7.9.1 Fire Prevention


Combustible materials such as oil soaked rags and waste shall not be allowed
to accumulate and shall be put into properly identified refuse containers with
lids.

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7.9.2 Fire Protection


All workers must be familiar with the location of fire fighting equipment and
be adequately trained in the maintenance, inspection and use of the
equipment. All fire fighting equipment must be inspected on a monthly
basis.

7.9.3 Protective Equipment and Clothing


Everyone without exception must wear face shields when working with all
chemicals. Signs will designate face shield areas within the
workplace. Any person who wears contact lenses is required to wear
a face shield as minimum eye protection. Approval for a person to
wear contact lenses on the job must be given in writing in each case
by management. Face shields must be worn when using a grinder.
Safety glasses alone are not permissible for protection.

7.9.4 Visitors
The host for any visitor, contractor, or vendor will be primarily responsible
for those people wearing required protection while on site. The host may
escort the visitor without protective equipment if the visitor is not allowed
into areas that can cause concerns.

7.10 HOUSEKEEPING

7.10.1 General Rules


Some general rules that apply to good housekeeping are:

1. Clean up after yourself, see that all tools, equipment and supplies are put
away and stored in a safe, tidy manner.
2. Slippery and oily spots are to be cleaned up and sanded.
3. Ensure all aisles, walkways, exits, entrances, access to safety and fire
fighting equipment and access to first aid equipment are kept clear of
obstructions or tripping hazards.

7.11 HAZARDOUS GOODS

7.11.1 Material Safety Data Sheets (M.S.D.S.)


All controlled products or chemicals used in Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. operations shall have a material safety data sheet available and have
either supplied, workplace labels or placards attached in accordance with the
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System.(WHMIS)

The M.S.D.S. shall outline the following information:

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- production information and use.
- hazardous ingredients.
- physical data.
- fire and explosion data.
- reactivity data.
- toxicological properties.
- preventative measures.
- first aid measures.
- preparation date of the MSDS.
- classification.

7.11.2 Unfamiliar Chemicals


Before handling any unfamiliar controlled products or chemicals review the
material safety data sheet for that product.

7.12 TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS (T.D.G.)

7.12.1 Regulations
T.D.G. regulations outline the procedures required to ensure dangerous
goods are handled and transported safely and in such a wax to minimize
the danger to life, health, property and the environment.

- A label shall be attached and displayed on each container of dangerous


goods.
- A bill of lading shall accompany each shipment of dangerous goods
(exemptions negate this area if the specified rules in the regulations are
adhered to).

7.12.2 Responsibilities
(1) Shipper
The person who generates or sends the load of dangerous goods:
shall supply the bill of lading: identify the dangerous goods label the
container: supply the proper placards if the load is in bulk: retain a
copy of the bill of lading.

(2) Carrier
The person who transports the dangerous goods: shall load the goods
properly and in accordance with their physical properties: ensure the
supplied placards are on the load: carry the bill of lading and/or
exemption: retain a copy of the bill of lading.

(3) Receiver (Consignee)


The person(s) to whom the goods are sent to or who receives the
goods: shall ensure the goods are in proper order and condition:
retain a copy of the bill of lading.

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Bill of Lading
Bills of Lading require the following information:

1) Date (should be numbered)


2) Name and address of consignor (shipper)
3) Name and address of consignee (receiver)
4) Name of the initial carrier
Description of the goods in the following order:
i) Shipping name.
ii) Primary classification.
iii) Compatibility group (explosives only).
iv) Subsidiary classification.
v) Product Identification Number (P.I.N..)
vi) Letter B or I from column 111, list 11, schedule 11.
vii) Packing group except packing group, ”X”.
5) Total mass or volume on each package (number and size of
containers)
6) 24 hour emergency number.

7.12.3 Training
All persons who may ship, transport or receive dangerous goods shall be
trained in the basic rules of T.D.G. and shall be able to use the act and
regulations consolidation that shall be available in the work place.

7.13 FIRST AID

7.13.1 Mouth to Mouth


Step 1 Establish responsiveness - shake the shoulders and shout "Are
You Okay?" If no response call for help and open airway using
the head tilt chin lift methods.
Step 2 Establish breathlessness - look, listen, and feel for breathing.
Kneel over the casualty with your cheek near the mouth, watch
for chest movement. If none, start rescue breathing.
Step 3 Give two full breaths, allowing deflation of the chest between the
breaths.
Step 4 Check the pulse by feeling for the carotid (neck) pulse. Instruct a
bystander to call an ambulance. If you are alone, complete
approximately one minute of mouth-to-mouth, and then if
possible call an ambulance yourself. If no pulse is felt, switch to
C.P.R. techniques. If a pulse is present continue with mouth to
mouth.
Step 5 Continue with mouth to mouth at a rate of 12 times a minute (1
breath every 5 seconds).

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7.13.2 Control of Bleeding


The body has natural defences against bleeding which reduces the loss of
blood and closes the wound. When a blood vessel is severed the damaged
end constricts to reduce the flow of blood. As bleeding continues the blood
pressure reduces, decreasing the flow to the wound, blood will begin to clot
thus controlling the bleeding. The first aider can help this natural process by:

- Placing the casualty at rest to reduce their pulse rate; the preferred resting
position being lying down with the head low, unless the wound is to the
head.
- Elevate the injured limb, to allow gravity to reduce the blood flow, the
limb should be elevated above the of the heart, as much as the injury and
comfort will allow.
- Apply direct pressure to the wound to stop the blood flow and allow clots
to form. Pressure can be applied with a hand over a dressing (If available)
until bleeding stops. Never remove a blood soaked dressing, apply
another dressing over top.

7.13 FIRST AID

THE STEPS OF FIRST AID


- handle the casualty gently.
- keep the casualty warm, but DO NOT OVERHEAT.
- reassure the casualty.
- position the conscious casualty lying down, with the feet elevated 15 - 30
cm (shock position), if injuries allow.
- unconscious casualties shall be placed in the recovery position.

Changes in the level of consciousness should be observed and noted. These


are helpful in monitoring the casualties condition and should be described to
the medical attendants when the casualty is handed over.

- give nothing by mouth.


- get medical aid.

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7.13a Employee Branch Safety Training Matrix

The below list details basic training requirements of branch level employees to conform
with Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. health and safety training requirements at each
branch. Additional training requirements may be added depending on the provincial
governing occupational health and safety authority.

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7.14 EMPLOYEE AND CONTRACTOR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM

I, ___________________________________________________________
( Print the name of the employee)

of ___________________________________________________________
( Name of the Company)

_____________________________________________________________
( Address)

hereby acknowledge that I have received and read Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. employee/contractor Safety Handbook. I fully understand that it is my
responsibility to ensure that these guidelines as well as all appropriate government
regulations are followed during all operations conducted on behalf of Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

It is understood that these guidelines are the minimum requirements and are to be
exceeded where the hazard warrants it. It is further understood that the contractor
will administer their own safety program and that all safety meetings, inspections
and accident reports are open to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

I agree to disclose any information regarding an accident while working for


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. The medical information regarding an accident
will be kept confidential as per. Governing standards. Information collected will be
used in cooperation with management and injured worker to implement a modified
work program outlined in the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. safety manual.

__________________________ _____________________________
( Signed ) ( Witnessed )

This ___________ day of _________________, 20_____

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Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
7.15 NEWEMPLOYEE SAFETY ORIENTATION

EMPLOYEE: HIRE DATE:


POSITION: SUPERVISOR:
ORIENTATION DATE:

TOPICS COVERED

COMPANY SAFETY POLICY


EMPLOYEE'S RESPONSIBILITY FOR SAFETY
MODIFIED WORK POLICY
MODULAR TRAILER MOVEMENT POLICY

SAFE WORK PRACTICES SAFE JOB PROCEDURES

HOUSEKEEPING FIRE EXTINGUISHERS


OFFICE SAFETY PRE-TRANSPORTATION
PERSONAL CONDUCT COMPLEX SETTING
PPE BLOCKING AND LEVELING
FIRE PREVENTION
WHMIS
TDG
WORKING ALONE

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

PPE POLICY
HARD HATS
SAFETY BOOTS
SAFETY GLOVES
SAFETY GLASSES

GENERAL SAFETY RULES EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING

TOOL BOX MEETINGS

REPORTING ACCIDENTS / INCIDENTS

FIRST AID

EMERGENCY NUMBERS

TRAINER / SUPERVISOR: EMPLOYEE:

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WILLIAMS SCOTSMAN OF CANADA, INC.

EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK

SECTION 7.15
ADDENDUM

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Preamble
This Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Safety handbook provides employees with the
basic safety guidelines and rules to be used in their daily activities. The handbook is
designed to identify existing local, provincial and federal regulations and Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. standard safety practices.

No handbook of this type can, nor is it, represented to be, all-inclusive and is not a substitute
for common sense and formal training. The appropriate legislation shall be consulted if a
doubt is raised by the information in this handbook.

Any questions concerning safe work practices or suggestions for a safer workplace are
encouraged and should be submitted to an immediate supervisor.

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SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT

VISION

Protection of the health and safety of our employees, customers and the environment is, and
shall continue to be, of the utmost importance to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

MISSION

Williams Scotsman of Canada Inc., through its employees at every level, shall be
responsible and accountable for consistently maintaining safe and environmentally secure
workplace within a quality management system.

Employees and all personnel engaged by Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. shall work in a
manner that upholds safety standards for themselves, their fellow workers, Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc customers, the public and the environment.

VALUES

This shall be accomplished by complying with all applicable regulations. In the absence of
regulatory requirements, compliance with Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. standards
shall be applied to protect the environment and ensure employee, customer and public
safety.

Through personal commitment, active participation and effective training in equipment


operation, chemical handling and operating procedures, the maintenance of a safe and
environmentally secure workplace for employees and customers can be realised.

____________________________________

Alec McDonald

Vice President & General Manager


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE

1.0 Responsibilities
1.1 Company Responsibilities 6
1.2 Employee Responsibilities 6
1.3 Reporting 6
1.4 The workers Right to Refuse 6
1.5 The Workers Right to Know 7
1.6 The Workers Compensation Act 7
1.7 Treatment of the Injured 7
1.8 Modified Work Program 7

2.0 Personal Protective Equipment


2.1 Hard Hats 7
2.2 Clothing 7
2.3 Foot Protection 8
2.4 Eye Protection 8
2.5 Hearing Protection 8

3.0 Vehicle Safety


3.1 Speed Limits 8
3.2 Seat Belts and Passengers 8
3.3 Wind shields and Lights 8
3.4 Other vehicle safety Items 8
3.5 Vehicles and Fuelling 9
3.6 Drivers Responsibility 9
3.7 In Case of Accident 9
3.8 National Safety Code 9
3.9 Hours of Service 11

4.0 Personal Conduct


4.1 Smoking 11
4.2 Liquor and Drugs 11
4.3 Horseplay 11
4.4 Responsibility of the Worker 11
4.5 How to Lift 11

5.0 Orientation
5.1 Orientation 12
5.2 Emergencies 12

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE - EH

6.0 Safety Meetings


6.1 Pre-job Safety Meeting 12
6.2 Minutes of Meetings 13

7.0 Tools and Equipment


7.1 Use of Tools and Equipment 13

8.0 Fire Prevention and Protection


8.1 Fire Prevention 13
8.2 Fire Protection 13
8.3 Protective Equipment and Clothing 13
8.4 Visitors 13

9.0 Housekeeping
9.1 General rules 14

10.0 Hazardous Goods


10.1 Material Safety Data Sheets 14
10.2 Unfamiliar Chemicals 14

11.0 Transportation of Dangerous Goods


11.1 Regulations 14
11.2 Responsibilities 15
1 Shipper
2 Carrier
3 Receiver
11.3 Training 16

12.0 Emergency First Aid


12.1 Mouth to Mouth Resuscitation 16
12.2 Control of Bleeding 16

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1.0 Responsibilities
The Occupational Health and Safety Act has outlined certain responsibilities for
both the employer and the employees. These responsibilities are briefly described as
follows:

1.1 Company Responsibilities


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. is required to do everything reasonably
possible to protect the safety of its employees, anyone on the work site and
the public.

1.2 Employee Responsibilities


Every employee or contractor employee shall do everything reasonably
possible to protect the safety of himself/herself, all fellow workers and the
public.

1.3 Reporting
It is everyone's responsibility to promptly report any hazardous conditions.
All necessary steps shall be taken to reduce or eliminate the hazard or to
place warning signs or barricades to keep people away from the hazard.

Williams Scotsman of Canada Inc.


Daytime Emergency Number: 1-800-782-1500

It is everyone's responsibility to promptly report any incidents that result in


serious injury, property or equipment damage, production loss, damage to
the environment or any near miss that could have resulted in any of the
above losses.

The main aim of this responsibility is not to apportion blame but to allow a
thorough investigation, which may prevent a future occurrence of a similar
incident. If it is necessary to report an incident to a government agency, it
may require the incident scene to be secured in order to preserve evidence.

1.4 The Workers Right to Refuse


No worker is required to perform any task or job that would put that worker
or any other worker in imminent danger. Imminent danger is one that is not
normal for the workers occupation.

If a worker refuses to do a job, it is that worker's responsibility to


immediately contact his/her supervisor and explain the circumstances of the
refusal.

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1.5 Right to Know
It is the company's and the contractor's responsibility to ensure that the
worker is adequately trained for the job performed and that any potential
hazards associated with the job have been explained to the worker, thus
assuring the " Right to Know " of the worker is not compromised.

1.6 Workers Compensation Act


Before any contractor can commence work for Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. he/she shall furnish proof of being fully covered and in good
standing with the applicable W.C.B. jurisdiction.

1.7 Treatment of the Injured


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. shall provide first aid at the workplace
for minor injuries to any worker in accordance with the applicable Provincial
Occupational Health and Safety or Workers Compensation Board
regulations.

1.8 Modified Work Program


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all employees will participate in a
modified work program in accordance with provincial governing standards.
When an injury does occur, management will make every reasonable effort
to assist ill and injured employees in returning to the workplace.

2.0 Personal Protective Equipment

2.1 Hard Hats


Hard hats or bump caps must be C.S.A. class B rated, non-conducting high
impact plastic and will be worn on all work sites in accordance with the
client’s safety programs. Employees and subcontractors will be required to
wear hard hats while in shop and yard area.

2.2 Clothing
All persons entering a work site must wear the appropriate clothing. Pants
will be long legged. Shirts will be long sleeved must be buttoned at the wrist.
No muscle shirts shall be allowed. Clothing that is loose, ragged or torn,
bracelets, necklaces, or neckties must not be worn near rotating or moving
equipment. All persons entering a customer’s work site will wear clean fire
retardant work wear. Any personal clothing furnished by employees must be
safe and proper for the job. Company furnished protective equipment must
not be altered in any manner that impairs its original features. i.e.cutting off
sleeves.

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2.3 Foot Protection
C.S.A., class one approved safety footwear shall be worn on all work sites.
Steel-toed boots must be worn in the shop when there is lifting or equipment
being worked on which could result in the falling or dropping of tools or
other materials from an overhead height.

2.4 Eye Protection


C.S.A. approved protective eyewear or face shields must be worn by all
employees when the nature of the work is such that it may result in an injury
to the eye or face.

2.5 Hearing Protection


Whenever noise hazards exist (Levels exceeding 85 db.) all persons shall
wear provided approved hearing protection.

3.0 Vehicle Safety


Vehicles represent a considerable investment to Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
Observance of a few basic rules can reduce motor vehicle accidents and "save time,
money and lives".

3.1 Speed Limits


Observe all posted speed limits. These limits are set for ideal conditions.
You should adjust your speed to suit the road and weather conditions.

3.2 Seat Belts and Passengers


All occupants of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. shall wear seat belts
while in company vehicles. It is the responsibility of the driver to ensure that
all occupants are secured by seat belts before the vehicle is in motion.

3.3 Wind shields and Lights


Windshields shall be free of cracks in the drivers’ line of sight and should be
kept free from build up of contaminants on the inside that may affect
visibility. Headlights shall be used at all times when the vehicle is in motion.
Use of headlights during daylight hours has been shown to reduce accidents.

Remember, when driving a company vehicle you represent to the public,


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Drive defensively and courteously at all
times.

3.4 Other Vehicle Safety Items


Tools or other objects shall not be carried in the same compartment as the
driver or passenger.

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3.5 Vehicles Fuelling
Fuel tanks on motorised equipment must not be filled while the engine is
running. The vehicle must be attended during the filling operation.
Adjacent equipment should shut down and the "No Smoking" rule observed.

3.6 Driver's Responsibility


It is the driver's responsibility to anticipate and avoid at all times those
situations that are dangerous to him and to the company equipment in his
charge. To do this requires that he drive and operate the equipment in a safe
manner, that he inspect the vehicle and auxiliary equipment to assure it will
operate safely, that he keep alert in all situations whereby he might be
unduly exposed to personal injury from any cause.

3.7 In Case of Accident


All automotive accidents must be reported immediately.
1. Stop as close to the scene as possible without obstructing traffic.
2. Give first aid to injured persons, if necessary or requested. Obtain
medical assistance.
3. Get the names and addresses of as many witnesses as possible.
4. As quickly as possible, notify your supervisor.
5. Make no statements to anyone except an officer or the law, a company
representative or a Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. insurance
representative.
6. Do not attempt to settle an accident yourself. This admits responsibility
and involves Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Do not admit personal
responsibility for either the cost of repairs or the cost of medical
treatment.
7. If the accident involves an unattended vehicle, take reasonable steps to
locate the owner. If the owner cannot be found, leave a note (in a
conspicuous place on the vehicle or object) listing your name and
address, company name and address, and a brief description of the
accident.

3.8 NATIONAL SAFETY CODE


The National Safety Code Regulations outline the procedures required to
ensure Class 1, 3 and 5 vehicles are driven safely and in such a way as to
minimize the danger to life, health, property and the environment. When a
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. vehicle is being driven, it is the
responsibility of the operator to follow all speed limits, rules and
regulations of the road and apply professional driving procedures at all
times.

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Driver Training
All drivers shall have orientation training prior to starting a driving job,
either as a new or as a transferred employee. All drivers should have
P.D.I.C. or D.D.C. training. New drivers have to be qualified by a
professional driver within 90 days of hire.
Driver Qualifications
Each driver should have the proper license qualifications required by
legislation to operate a particular unit before he is entitled to operate it.
New hires should not have more than 6 demerits on their license and no
impaired convictions within the previous 3 years. Drivers’ abstracts
should be produced before employment. A driver medical should be
produced before commencement of employment and at required intervals
established by the Motor Vehicles Branch.

Driver Suspensions
If any driver becomes suspended before his abstract review, the driver
shall inform his supervisor immediately. Failure to do so may be grounds
for discipline.

Pre and Post Trip Inspections


All drivers shall do a pre and post trip inspection for all Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. vehicles covering the following items:

- Engine coolant and system.


- Engine oil.
- Service brakes, connections and adjustments.
- Brake fluid level or air brake pre-trip.
- Lights and reflectors.
- Horn.
- Rear vision mirrors.
- Windshield condition, wipers and washer operation.
- Parking brakes.
- Steering mechanism.
- Tire condition, pressure and spare.
- Wheels and rims.
- Coupling devices.

Reports
Defects are to be indicated on pre and post trip inspection reports and
turned in to the coordinator. A service report is filled out for each time
repairs or servicing is carded out.

Maintenance
All pre and post trip inspection reports shall be filed at the Maintenance
Center, for a period of not lest than 3 months for each unit. All
maintenance, inspection and repair records for each unit shall be filed at

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the Maintenance Center, for a period of not less than 5 years. For any
vehicles retired from service, the maintenance records should be retained
for 6 months from the date of retirement.

3.9 HOURS OF SERVICE


Policy
All Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. driver of vehicles 18,000Kg or
greater are compelled by regulation to maintain an accurate logbook of
their hours of service. The driver shall be able to produce log sheets for
the previous seven (7) days upon request. All other log sheets shall be
turned in to the appropriate office, which will send them to the Calgary
office, to be stored for 6 months.

4.0 Personal Conduct

4.1 Smoking
Smoking will only be allowed in designated areas.

4.2 Liquor and Drugs


No alcoholic beverages or non-prescription drugs will be consumed,
distributed or possessed on any work site. Any use of prescription or "over
the counter" drugs that may affect your ability to work or drive shall be
avoided and any potential unsafe side effects reported to the appropriate
supervisor.

No employee will report to work with 40 milligrams of alcohol in 100


millilitres of blood, urine or saliva or with any detectable levels of any drug
in their body.

4.3 Horseplay
Practical jokes, fighting and wrestling can result in a serious injury. Workers
shall refrain from indulging in these activities. Workers shall not run except
in the case of an emergency.

4.4 Responsibility of Worker


It is the responsibility of the employee to do everything reasonably possible
to protect the safety of himself/herself and all fellow workers. This
responsibility extends to all work places and shops where the employees
conduct Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. business.

4.5 How to Lift


Many injuries in the industry, are caused by poor lifting practices. Back
injuries can be eliminated by following these simple rules:

1. Lift with your legs not your back.


2. Size up the load before you lift it. Get help if necessary.

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3. Avoid lifting in an awkward or off-balance position.
4. Secure a good hold on the object before lifting.
5. Use teamwork when lifting with others. Lift or lower the object
together.

5.0 Orientation

5.1 Employee Orientation


A detailed safety orientation shall be given to all new or transferred
employees. The orientation shall include but should not be limited to the
following:

1. Supervisory organisation of the work area.


2. Review of the safety handbook.
3. Restricted and hazardous area review.
4. Smoking area and fire protection.
5. Injury/incident reporting procedures.
6. Emergency signals, plans and escape routes.

5.2 Emergencies
In the event of an emergency, equipment must be shut down and if possible
removed from the emergency site. Evacuate all personnel from the site.
Attempt to control the emergency. If out of control initiate the emergency
response plan.

6.0 Regular and Pre-Job Safety Meetings


Safety meetings are to be held on a monthly basis to discuss procedures, hazardous
conditions and encourage discussions on safety topics. Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc employees are expected to attend and participate in all scheduled safety
meetings at which their suggestions and concerns will be addressed.

6.1 Pre-Job Safety Meetings


Pre-job meetings will be conducted before the start of all unusual jobs. The
contents of this meeting shall include but not be limited to:

1. Method of performing the task.


2. General safety requirements.
3. Hazards likely to be encountered.
4. Procedures to control hazards.
5. Contents of work permit.
6. Rescue procedures.
7. Communication requirements
8. Safety equipment.

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6.2 Minutes of Meetings
Minutes of all safety meetings shall be taken and kept on file at the Calgary
office. Pre-job meetings will be noted on the job ticket.

7.0 Tools and Equipment

7.1 Use of Tools and Equipment


No worker shall use any tool, equipment or appliance without the proper
training in its use, unless a worker competent in the use of the tool supervises
the worker. Workers shall ensure all tools and equipment are in good
working order and are suitable for the job. Any equipment that is defective
should be tagged "Do Not Use" and not used until repaired or replaced.

No worker shall use any tool, equipment, material, appliance or product


without following the manufacturers recommendations for safe use, unless
other guidelines for its use afford an equivalent or greater level of safety.

8.0 Fire Prevention and Protection

8.1 Fire Prevention


Combustible materials such as oil soaked rags and waste shall not be allowed
to accumulate and shall be put into properly identified refuse containers with
lids.

8.2 Fire Protection


All workers must be familiar with the location of fire fighting equipment and
be adequately trained in the maintenance, inspection and use of the
equipment. All fire fighting equipment must be inspected on a monthly
basis.

8.3 Protective Equipment and Clothing


Everyone without exception must wear face shields when working with all
chemicals. Signs will designate face shield areas within the workplace. Any
person who wears contact lenses is required to wear a face shield as
minimum eye protection. Approval for a person to wear contact lenses on
the job must be given in writing in each case by management. Face shields
must be worn when using a grinder. Safety glasses alone are not permissible
for protection.

8.4 Visitors
The host for any visitor, contractor, or vendor will be primarily responsible
for those people wearing required protection while on site. The host may
escort the visitor without protective equipment if the visitor is not allowed
into areas that can cause concerns.

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9.0 Housekeeping

9.1 General Rules


Some general rules that apply to good housekeeping are:

1. Clean up after yourself, see that all tools, equipment and supplies are put
away and stored in a safe, tidy manner.
2. Slippery and oily spots are to be cleaned up and sanded.
3. Ensure all aisles, walkways, exits, entrances, access to safety and fire
fighting equipment and access to first aid equipment are kept clear of
obstructions or tripping hazards.

10.0 Hazardous Goods

10.1 Material Safety Data Sheets (M.S.D.S.)


All controlled products or chemicals used in Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. operations shall have a material safety data sheet available and have
either supplied, workplace labels or placards attached in accordance with the
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System.(WHMIS)

The M.S.D.S. shall outline the following information:

- production information and use.


- hazardous ingredients.
- physical data.
- fire and explosion data.
- reactivity data.
- toxicological properties.
- preventative measures.
- first aid measures.
- preparation date of the MSDS.
- classification.

10.2 Unfamiliar Chemicals


Before handling any unfamiliar controlled products or chemicals review the
material safety data sheet for that product.

11.0 TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS (T.D.G.)

11.1 Regulations
T.D.G. regulations outline the procedures required to ensure dangerous
goods are handled and transported safely and in such a wax to minimize
the danger to life, health, property and the environment.

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- A label shall be attached and displayed on each container of dangerous


goods.
- A bill of lading shall accompany each shipment of dangerous goods
(exemptions negate this area if the specified rules in the regulations are
adhered to).

11.2 Responsibilities
(1) Shipper
The person who generates or sends the load of dangerous goods:
shall supply the bill of lading: identify the dangerous goods label the
container: supply the proper placards if the load is in bulk: retain a
copy of the bill of lading.

(2) Carrier
The person who transports the dangerous goods: shall load the goods
properly and in accordance with their physical properties: ensure the
supplied placards are on the load: carry the bill of lading and/or
exemption: retain a copy of the bill of lading.

(3) Receiver (Consignee)


The person(s) to whom the goods are sent to or who receives the
goods: shall ensure the goods are in proper order and condition:
retain a copy of the bill of lading.

Bill of Lading
Bills of Lading require the following information:

1) Date (should be numbered)


2) Name and address of consignor (shipper)
3) Name and address of consignee (receiver)
4) Name of the initial carrier
Description of the goods in the following order:
i) Shipping name.
ii) Primary classification.
iii) Compatibility group (explosives only).
iv) Subsidiary classification.
v) Product Identification Number (P.I.N..)
vi) Letter B or I from column 111, list 11, schedule 11.
vii) Packing group except packing group, ”X”.
5) Total mass or volume on each package (number and size of
containers)
6) 24 hour emergency number.

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11.3 Training
All persons who may ship, transport or receive dangerous goods shall be
trained in the basic rules of T.D.G. and shall be able to use the act and
regulations consolidation that shall be available in the work place.

12.0 First Aid

12.1 Mouth to Mouth


Step 1 Establish responsiveness - shake the shoulders and shout "Are
You Okay?" If no response call for help and open airway using
the head tilt chin lift methods.
Step 2 Establish breathlessness - look, listen, and feel for breathing.
Kneel over the casualty with your cheek near the mouth, watch
for chest movement. If none, start rescue breathing.
Step 3 Give two full breaths, allowing deflation of the chest between the
breaths.
Step 4 Check the pulse by feeling for the carotid (neck) pulse. Instruct a
bystander to call an ambulance. If you are alone, complete
approximately one minute of mouth-to-mouth, and then if
possible call an ambulance yourself. If no pulse is felt, switch to
C.P.R. techniques. If a pulse is present continue with mouth to
mouth.
Step 5 Continue with mouth to mouth at a rate of 12 times a minute (1
breath every 5 seconds).

12.2 Control of Bleeding


The body has natural defences against bleeding which reduces the loss of
blood and closes the wound. When a blood vessel is severed the damaged
end constricts to reduce the flow of blood. As bleeding continues the blood
pressure reduces, decreasing the flow to the wound, blood will begin to clot
thus controlling the bleeding. The first aider can help this natural process by:

- Placing the casualty at rest to reduce their pulse rate; the preferred resting
position being lying down with the head low, unless the wound is to the
head.
- Elevate the injured limb, to allow gravity to reduce the blood flow, the
limb should be elevated above the of the heart, as much as the injury and
comfort will allow.
- Apply direct pressure to the wound to stop the blood flow and allow clots
to form. Pressure can be applied with a hand over a dressing (If available)
until bleeding stops. Never remove a blood soaked dressing, apply
another dressing over top.

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THE STEPS OF FIRST AID


- handle the casualty gently.
- keep the casualty warm, but DO NOT OVERHEAT.
- reassure the casualty.
- position the conscious casualty lying down, with the feet elevated 15 - 30
cm (shock position), if injuries allow.
- unconscious casualties shall be placed in the recovery position.

Changes in the level of consciousness should be observed and noted. These


are helpful in monitoring the casualties condition and should be described to
the medical attendants when the casualty is handed over.

- give nothing by mouth.


- get medical aid.

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8.0 INSPECTION POLICY

8.1 OBJECTIVES
8.2 INSPECTIONS

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8.0 INSPECTION POLICY

Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to control the losses of human and material resources by
identifying and correcting unsafe acts and conditions

Policy
This company will maintain a comprehensive program of safety inspections at all
facilities.

Responsibilities
The manager is responsible for the overall operation of the program.

Superintendents are responsible for directing formal inspections on job sites that they
control and are involving workers in such inspections.

Supervisors are responsible for conducting ongoing informal inspections of areas where
their crews are working.

Workers are responsible for participating in and contributing to the inspection program.

March 1, 2007
Signature: Date:

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8.1 OBJECTIVES

The participant will be able to:

 Plan and carry out site inspections.


 Evaluate and rank hazards and risks.
 Evaluate data obtained during an inspection to make reasonable recommendations
for corrective action.
 Sell recommendations for corrective action based on cost, benefits, legislative
requirements, and morality/ethics.
 Resist pressure to compromise.
 Monitor and follow up on corrective action.

8.2 INSPECTIONS

This portion of the Leadership for Safety Excellence course is intended to help you
conduct effective site inspections. You will learn what to look for, how to interpret what
you see, and how to document the conditions you find.

This material will help you develop appropriate recommendations for correcting
hazardous conditions. It will also help you think about how to defend those
recommendations and how to resist pressures to compromise your safety standards.

8.2.1 What is a safety inspection?

The Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations require the employer to
identify and tell workers about any known health and safety hazard which exists on the
worksite that cannot be readily controlled or eliminated and that has the potential to cause
serious injury. As a supervisor, you are the person responsible for carrying out that
obligation. To do so, you need to conduct inspections on a regular basis.

A safety inspection is an observational tour of the workplace to check for compliance


with regulations, established safe work practices, procedures, and safety rules. It should
identify any situation that has the potential to cause personal injury or property damage,
including substandard conditions on the worksite and substandard practices on the part of
the workers. The majority of accidents are caused by substandard practices, frequently
combined with substandard condition, that have been allowed to exist uncorrected.

8.2.2 Inspection Purposes

An inspection should achieve several purposes:

 Identify existing and potential hazards.


 Identify safety code violations
 Determine underlying causes of hazards
 Monitor hazard controls

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 Determine corrective action to minimize or eliminate hazards
 Reinforce and promote safe work practices

A good inspection program is essential to maintaining safety on the worksite. However,


it should be seen (by you and especially by your workers) as a fact finding rather than a
faultfinding exercise. It should be designed as a regular part of supervision and
maintenance, with proper records being kept.

8.2.3 Types of Inspections

There are two types:

 Ongoing (informal) inspections


 Planned (formal) inspections

Ongoing Inspections

Safety problems do not wait for scheduled reviews – the supervisor must be constantly
watching for acts and conditions. In fact, workers should be involved in ongoing
inspections. Ongoing inspections are essential to keep small problems from developing
into major ones. Often problems can be corrected simply with a brief instruction to a
worker. Other situations require additional action, which the supervisor should arrange
for and follow-up on (e.g., unplanned toolbox talks, corrective action, meeting with
senior management, or stopping the use of some equipment).

Workers should be encouraged to notify their supervisor of any hazardous situations


whenever they see them. Their supervisor should take prompt corrective action in
response to these concerns.

8.2.4 Types of Inspections

Planned Inspections

Informal inspections, however, are not enough. Formal (planned) inspections should be
conducted on a regular basis to provide a complete record of conditions on the worksite.
The frequency of inspections depends on:

 The number and size of work operations.


 The number of shifts and the activity level on each shift
 The degree of hazard involved in equipment and work processes.
 The past history of equipment or system failures.

There are several forms of planned inspections:


 Periodic inspections – conducted at regular, scheduled intervals. The greater the
accident / incident severity potential, the more often these inspections should be
conducted.

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 Intermittent inspections – conducted at irregular intervals. It is important that you


don’t just inspect at planned intervals. People have a tendency to clean up their
act or their worksite if they know an inspection is coming.

 General inspections conducted in places (not included in periodic inspections)


such as no-work areas that are assumed to be non-hazardous. Sometimes the
supposed non-hazardous area can be like the proverbial unloaded gun. Too many
“unloaded” guns have killed people – we can’t afford to take things for granted.

To be effective, inspections need to be carefully planned, conducted properly and


followed-up with appropriate corrective action or a “pat on the back” for having a good
worksite.

8.2.4.1 Service Facility Planned Inspection Frequency

Planned inspections at Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. service facilities will be


conducted at minimum of (1) formal inspections per month. Each formal planned
inspection will be conducted by the site manager/supervisor and be reviewed by their
reporting manager. All corrective actions following a planned inspection must be
completed with an administrative control at minimum. Planned inspections must be
available onsite for period of (3) years.

8.2.4.2 Field Operations Planned Inspection Frequency

A planned inspection of clients sites must be conducted by subcontractors prior to start of


new job. Clients and Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. will be notified by
subcontractors any unacceptable conditions, and corrective actions taken to mitigate
hazards. Copies of formal inspections will be kept on site during the duration of the job.

8.2.5 Pre Inspection Preparation

Set up a team consisting of workers and supervisors. Review previous inspection reports
for recommended corrective action to follow up on. Plan your route carefully, and be
sure to schedule enough time to allow for a thorough examination.

Notify the individuals in charge of the areas to be inspected; they may have information
relevant to the inspection, such as equipment that is down or other existing known
hazards. Where appropriate, arrange for specialists such as maintenance personnel,
industrial hygienists, or engineers to be available.

It cannot be emphasized enough that an unplanned inspection is not to “catch people off
guard”, but rather to correct substandard acts and substandard conditions.

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8.2.5 Pre Inspection Preparation

Wear or be equipped with the appropriate PPE for the area(s) you will be inspecting. If
the prescribed PPE is not available, note it on the inspection report and do not enter that
area.

8.2.6 Conducting the Inspection

Things to consider

Your inspection should examine all aspects of the workplace – people, physical,
environmental, equipment, materials being used, and the actions taking place.

Look for:

 Potential hazards
 Existing hazards
 Violations of safety regulations
 The causes behind the problems

Give the inspection your full attention, and continually ask seven questions: who? What?
When? Where? Why? How? What if?

8.2.7 Principles to Observe

The Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety recommends following these
principles:

1. Warn workers of immediate danger to life or health


2. Shut down and lockout / tagout any machinery that will remain hazardous until it
is repaired.
3. Do not operate equipment yourself.
4. If you do not have enough knowledge of the situation to make an accurate safety
judgment, consult with someone who does.
5. Look at things from every angle.
6. Where appropriate, measure the levels of chemicals, noise, radiation, and / or
biological agents in the atmosphere. (Note: always ear the necessary PPE)
7. Clearly describe each hazard and its location in your notes.
8. Try to make your observations without disrupting normal work activities.
9. Examine equipment both when it is stopped (static) and when it is running
(dynamic).
10. Photograph hard to describe situations or problems.

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9.0 ACCIDENT / INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS


9.1 INVESTIGATION POLICY
9.2 INTODUCTION
9.3 PRESERVATION OF EVIDENCE
9.4 CONDUCTING INVESTIGATIONS
9.5 COMPLETING THE INCIDENT/
ACCIDENT REPORT
9.6 INCIDENT/ACCIDENT
REPORT FORM
9.7 NEAR MISS REPORT FORM

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9.1 INVESTIGATION POLICY

Purpose

To investigate incidents so that causes can be determined and corrective actions can be
implemented to prevent recurrence.

Policy

In this company, and any contractor or subcontractor will investigate the following types
of incidents;

1. All accidents shall be reported, investigated and recommendations put forth in a formal
corrective action plan.
2. Any incidents that, by regulation, must be reported to O.H. & S, WCB, or other
regulatory agencies. Including but not limited to: An injury that results in death, Fire or
explosion, Failure or Collapse of hoisting machinery, An injury or accident that results in
hospitalization for more than 2 days, Collapse or failure of a supporting structure(s).
3. All near misses shall be reviewed and an action plan shall be developed to address any
shortcoming in the Health and Safety program of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
4. All accidents, incidents and near miss investigations shall be reviewed by safety manager,
senior management. Copies of all corrective action plans shall be forwarded to all
management, and supervision to ensure compliance and enforcement of policy and
procedure of the company Health and Safety Program.
5. All subcontractors, contractors will report all accidents and incidents to site
superintendent as well as company safety manager.

Responsibilities

1. All employees shall report all incidents to their immediate superior. All subcontractors
shall report all incidents to the site Superintendent.
2. Subcontractors shall conduct initial investigations and submit their reports to the
Regional Manager or Health & Safety Manager. Subcontractors shall submit a report to
their site Superintendent.
3. The Regional Manager or Health and Safety Manager and subcontractors shall determine
the need for and, if necessary, direct detailed investigation. They shall also determine
causes, recommend corrective action, and report to the H & S Manager and Regional
Manager.
4. The H & S Manager and Regional Manager shall review all site superintendent and
subcontractors reports, determine corrective action to be taken, and ensure that such
action is implemented.

March 1, 2007
Signed:__________________________ Date:_______________________
Alec McDonald
Vice President & General Manager
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.

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9.2 INTRODUCTION

An incident is any unplanned and unwanted event which results in damage or injury or
which could have resulted in damage or injury. Almost every incident is the result of a
combination of causes. The primary purpose of investigation is to identify these causes
so that corrective action can be taken to prevent a recurrence of the incident.
Additionally, information collected will be valuable in meeting the WCB, O.H. & S., or
governing authorities reporting requirements.

Investigations should be conducted by the superintendent in charge of the area and/or


personnel involved. H & S Manager may assist in the investigations and must review
every incident report to ensure that appropriate corrective actions take place, as well as
notifications of government agencies as required by provincial Occupational Health &
Safety, Workers Compensation, governing authorities.

9.3 PRESERVATION OF EVIDENCE

Where practicable, the scene of any accident should be left untouched, except for activity
necessitated by rescue work or to prevent further failures or injuries, until the accident
has been investigated. When an accident occurs or has potential for causing serious
injury refer to the designation of serious injury and accident regulation under the A.
O.H.& S. Act., governing authority. A summary is hereby provided.

9.4 CONDUCTING INVESTIGATIONS

The person(s) conducting investigations should proceed as follows:

1. Take control of the scene (preserve evidence)


2. Ensure the injured are cared for
3. Ensure no further injury or damage occurred
4. Find out what happened
5. Examine equipment and materials involved
6. Collect/protect physical evidence
7. Take photographs of the scene
8. Interview personnel or witnesses and take statements if necessary
9. Analyze the information to determine causes
10. Implement corrective actions to prevent recurrence
11. Complete report(s)

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9.5 COMPLETING THE INCIDENT/ACCIDENT REPORT

When finding out what happened, use the 6 key questions to help you get all the
facts. WHO? WHAT? WHEN? WHERE? WHY? And HOW?

WHO?
• Who saw the accident?
• Who was working with employee?
• Who was injured?
• Who had instructed/assigned the employee?
• Who else was involved?
• Who assigned the work? Supervisor?
• Who else can help prevent recurrences?
• Who were the witnesses?

WHAT?
• What was the accident/incident?
• What was the injury?
• What injured employee?
• What was employee doing?
• What had employee been told to do?
• What tools was employee using?
• What machine/equipment was involved?
• What operation was employee performing?
• What instructions had employee been given?
• What specific precautions were necessary in FSM/FSH/Manufacture’s
operation manual?
• What specific precautions was employee given by supervisor?
• What protective equipment was employee issued by supervisor?
• What protective equipment should have been used?
• What protective equipment was the employee using?
• What training had the employee been given to use the protective
equipment correctly?
• What were the environmental conditions? (hot/dry, wind/rain, ice, snow,
etc.)
• What training had the employee received to perform the assignment?
• What were the initial precautions given to the employee in the Job Hazard
Analysis?
• What additional precautions had employee received in tailgate safety
session?
• What was employee’s tour of duty?
• What tour had employee actually been working?
• What communication did the employee have?
• What communication equipment was required for the job?

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WHEN?
• When did the accident occur?
• When did employee begin that job?
• When was the employee assigned on that job?
• When were the hazards pointed out to the employee?
• When had employee’s supervisor last checked on job progress?
• When did employee first sense something was wrong?
• When were employee’s last work/rest days?
• When was employee tested/certified/carded to operate the
equipment/machinery?
• When did employee last check in?

WHERE?
• Where did the accident occur?
• Where was the employee at the time?
• Where was the supervisor at the time?
• Where were co-workers working at the time?
• Where were other people who were involved at the time?
• Where were witnesses when accident occurs?

WHY?
• Why was employee injured?
• Why did employee do what he/she did?
• Why was protective equipment not used?
• Why were specific instructions not given to employees?
• Why was employee in the position he/she was in?
• Why was employee working beyond scheduled tour of duty?
• Why did employee not check with immediate supervisor when employee
noted that things were not as they should be?
• Why was the employee using the tools or machinery he/she was using?
• Why was employee not trained/certified to perform the job/operate the
equipment?
• Why did the employee continue, under the circumstances?
• Why was supervisor not there at the time?
• Why was employee working alone?

HOW?
• How was employee injured? (Based on facts only)
• How did accident occur? (Based only on facts)

9.6 INCIDENT/ACCIDENT REPORT FORM

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Date of Incident Time

Location Project

Operations Office Supervisor

INVOLVED EMPLOYEE
Employee Name Job Title

Hire Date Age How Long Employed in this Occupation___

Nature of Injury (s)

Description of Damages

Was First Aid Given By Whom

Was Injured Transported to Medical Aid By Whom

Where To

Incident Reported By Reported To

Date Reported Time Reported

Conditions At Time of Incident (weather, housekeeping, status of job, demobilizing, etc)

Description of Incident(What equipment, tools, etc. were involved? What job was being done? What
happened?)

Identify All Deficiencies That Contributed to the Inci (Unsafe behaviors? PPE worn? Employee trained in
how to do the task? Was the supervisor enforcing safety rules? Was Job Safety Analysis/Checklist
performed?)

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SUPERVISOR

Name Regularly Assigned Office

How Long Supervising Jobs How Long Supervising This Job

SUPERVISION AND TRAINING


At the time of the Incident:

Was a supervisor present at the scene & directing the work

Was an absent supervisor periodically checking the work

Prior to the Incident:


Was training/instruction provided for the specific tasks to be performed

Had safe work procedures been reviewed

Were written procedures required Provided

Was another party directly involved in the Incident, were there any witnesses:

Persons Involved:

Name/Occupation Company Name and Address Phone Number

Witnesses:

Name/Occupation Company Name and Address Phone Number

How were the other persons involved

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DIAGRAM OF ACCIDENT SCENE

Personal Injury/Property Damage Accident:

Auto Accident:

SYMBOLS:
A. Number
vehicles.

CH-MQS is vehicle
number 1.

Other
vehicles
are
numbers
2, 3, 4, etc.
B. Point vehicles in

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Incident Investigation Check List:
Nature of Injury
Abrasion Contusion Foreign body Puncture wound
Amputation Cut/laceration Fracture Strain
Bruise Conjunctivitis Hernia Sprain
Burn Dermatitis Irritation Other

Part of Body
Head and Neck Upper Extremities Body Lower Extremities
Ears Arms (upper) Abdomen Ankle
Eye Elbow Back (upper) Foot
Face Fingers, thumb Back (lower) Hip
Mouth, teeth Forearm Back (left) Knee
Neck Hand Back (right) Leg (lower)
Scalp Shoulder Chest Thigh, hamstring
Skull Wrist Groin Toe

Type
General Duty Clause Falls Exposures Routes of Entry
Caught in/between Fall, same level Contact against Absorption
Overexertion Fall, upper level Contact, electrical Ingestion
Struck by Fall from slip Contact, hot surface Inhalation
Struck against Fall from trip Contact with Injection

Hazardous Condition
Housekeeping Equipment Environmental PPE Deficiencies
Cable clutter Defective parts Heat Eyewear
Congestion Grounding Lighting Fall protection
Debris Guarding Ventilation Head protection
Slick surface Unsafe design Weather Respiratory

Agency of Incident
Auto Office Shop Site
Car Cabinet Chemicals Chemicals
Cargo Drawer Crane Electrical apparatus
Gen-set Ergonomic design Floor surface Elevators
Trailer Floor surface Hoist Hoists
Truck Electrical wiring Machinery Ladders
Van Paper Tools Scaffolding

Unsafe Act
Auto Office Shop Site
Driver inattention Improper posture Improper use of . . . Disregard of rules
Driving too fast Leaving drawers open Improper lifting Improper lifting
Following too close Items in walkway Not wearing PPE Not tying off
Improper trailering Reading while walking Use of defective . . . Not wearing PPE
Other Running Other Other

Contributing Factors

Lack of Training Lack of Equipment Lack of Supervision Other

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ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS

Break job down into steps and insert deficiencies that were identified on page one of this report where they
belong in regards to the steps needed to perform the job safely.

Example: hired new employee, did not perform Motor Vehicle Report, employee instructed to deliver consumables to job site,
employee rear ended vehicle on way to job site. Incident investigation revealed that the employee had four speeding tickets in the past
two years. Deficiencies would include: management failed to screen applicant by not performing Motor Vehicle Report review.
Corrective action plan would include: screen applicants before hire.

CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN

What has been done to prevent recurrence of a similar accident.

What will be done to assure that the deficiencies that were the cause of the accident will not recur. Do
other locations need to be advised of the deficiencies that caused the accident? If yes, what action was
taken?

What date will corrective action be completed by, if for several items, list items and dates to be completed.

Item #1. Date

Item #2. Date

Item #3. Date

Reviewing Managers Signature Date

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NOTES
List and describe all other information and activities that may be relevant to this accident, e.g., Police
Report ordered, date, copy sent to the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc Safety Manager; employee
returned to work at light duty on / / , claims personnel notified on / / ; telephone calls were made
to. . . , on / / ; documents attached to this report include. . . claims report, etc. Attach documents as
needed.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

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9.7 NEAR MISS REPORT FORM

Williams Scotsman of Canada Inc.

Near Miss
Investigation Report Date/Time

Contractor/Subcontractor/Employee

What Happened?

When (date)? Time

Where? Reported to Safety Manager (Yes, No)


What was the immediate cause?

What were the underlying causes?

What training, instruction, orientations and cautions were given before the incident?

How can similar incidents be prevented in the future?

Recommendation for further action:

Recommendations completed by whom? Date/Time

Person in Charge:

Reviewed by senior management (initials) Date/Time

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10.0 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

10.0 EMERGENCY POLICY


10.1 FIRST AID REQUIREMENTS
10.2 EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN
10.3 EVACUATION PROCEDURE
10.4 FIRST AID REFERENCE
10.5 REPORTING EMERGENCY REPSONSE
PROCEDURES

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10.0 EMERGENCY POLICY

Emergency Policy

One each job site the manager and or superintendent will gather information such as the
location of the nearest hospital, fire station and first aid station so as to help minimize
travel time to treatment for all employees.

The information is to prevent confusion during emergency situations; for both


supervisors and managers will be aware of the various procedures to follow on each job
site should an accident occur.

All employees are to be aware of the action required but should follow the instructions
set by their supervisor.

March 1, 2007
Signature: _____________________________ Date: _____________________

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10.0.1 Emergency Response Plan Requirements

Management and supervision shall review local governing legislation or building


codes to create and maintain a site specific emergency response plan prior to start
of work operations at each Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. location. A review
of emergency response plans will be done on an annual basis or as conditions
change onsite. Management and supervision will consult with employees during
creation, revision, newly hired employees, or review of the emergency response
plan. Emergency response plans will include an updated map with all location
emergency response equipment, fire extinguishers, first aid kits, emergency
meeting point (muster point) indicated.

10.0.2 Emergency Response Training Requirements

Management and supervision has the responsibility to review the site specific
emergency response plan/procedures with all employees involved in a work site.
Emergency response training will be completed with workers during initial site
orientation or as the plan is revised. Workers shall be trained in the operation of
fire extinguisher, and any other specialized emergency response equipment
required onsite.

10.1 FIRST AID REQUIREMENTS

10.1.0 Responsibility Company Site First Aid Services

A designated employee(s) shall be assigned by management to each site location


to ensure first aid services are provided as needed. Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. will provide training for all employee(s) designated by management
to provide first aid services.

10.1.1 Responsibility Subcontractor Site First Aid Services

A designated subcontractor employee(s) shall be assigned to each site location


to ensure first aid services are provided as needed. Subcontractors while
performing work for Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. will ensure a trained
employee(s) is designated and available by management to provide first aid
services.

10.1.2 Determining Site First Aid Service Requirements

Management will review to current provincial governing legislative


requirements to determine the first aid services and supplies/equipment needed
at each site. The following criteria will be used by management for each site;

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• The amount of employee(s) that is required to provide first aid services at
all times during working hours.
• The specific level of training needed to provide first aid services required
of employee(s) that is assigned to provide first aid services.
• The distance the worksite is from the nearest emergency medical facility.
• The availability of employee to communicate and provide first aid as
needed.
• Assessment of all first aid service requirements annually.
• First aid equipment and supplies to be available onsite.

10.1.3 First Aid Training Certificate

All employees designated to provide first aid services must have the following;

• Completion of first aid training course as provided by certified first aid


training agency approved by provincial governing authority.
• Valid first aid training certificate.
• First aid training certificates available onsite for all designated employees
providing first aid services onsite.
• All first aid training certificates must be forwarded to the safety
department.
• All employees providing first aid services onsite must be listed on the site
emergency response plan including certificate number, qualifications, and
contact telephone number.

10.1.4 Specific Training First Aid Designated Employee

All employees designated to perform first aid services for Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. shall be trained in the following by management;

• The written reporting requirements of recording first aid cases in log book.
• The reporting requirement to management and the safety department of
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
• The reporting requirement to clients of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
while working on client sites.
• The confidentiality of persons which have been provided first aid services.

10.1.5 First Aid Kit/Equipment Requirements On Site

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all subcontractors shall provide a first
aid kit/equipment on each site location. Each first aid kit will contain the
required first aid supplies as outlined by provincial governing regulations. The
following requirements shall be maintained with all first aid kits/equipment on
worksites;

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• An inventory of supplies contained within the first aid kit/equipment
checked with a formal inspection on a monthly basis.
• Be accessible to all employees at all times.
• Restocking of kit must be done after each first aid case.
• First aid kits must be kept in a dry and clean area.
• A sign must indicate clearly the location of the first aid kit.

10.1.6 Transportation of Injured Workers


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all subcontractors will make available a
communication method to local emergency services for the transportation of
injured employees at each worksite before commencing work operations. A
vehicle will be available at all times during work operations at each work
location to transport injured employees if necessary to an emergency medical
facility.

10.1.7 First Aid Log Book


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and all subcontractors’ management must
maintain a log book of all first aid cases within a three year period. All records
contained in the first aid log book will be kept confidential within all applicable
governing legislation. Access to first aid log book records will be limited to
management and the safety department. A copy of first aid record will be given
to affected worker upon request.

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10.1.11 FIRST AID FORM

FIRST AID RECORD


Date of injury or illness: Time: AM / PM

Date injury or illness reported: Time: AM / PM


Full name of injured or ill worker:

Description of the injury or illness:

Description of where the injury or illness occurred/began:

Cause if injury or illness:

First aid provided? Yes (if yes, complete the rest of this page) No

Name of first aider:

First aider qualifications:

Emergency First Aider Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic


Standard First Aider Emergency Medical Technician-Ambulance
Advanced First Aider Emergency Medical Technician
Nurse Emergency Medical Responder

First aid provided:

KEEP THIS RECORD FOR AT LEAST 3 YEARS FROM THE DATE OF INJURY OR ILLNESS.

• ALL FIRST AIDS MUST BE REPORTED TO SUPERVISOR/MANAGER AND SAFETY MANAGER.


• ALL FIRST AIDS MUST BE FOLLOWED BY AN INCIDENT INVESTIGATION (NEAR MISS REPORT),
PLEASE ATTACH COPY OF INVESTIGATION TO THIS REPORT.

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10.2 EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN – SERVICE CENTER(S)

Depending upon the nature of the emergency, the following emergency numbers should
be used to contact the appropriate authorities.

1. Emergency 9-911
2. Ambulance 9-911
3. Fire department 9-911
4. Police 9-911
5. OH&S Appropriate Number for Area

6. Gas utility Appropriate Number for Area

7. Poison control 9-1-800-332-1414


8. Electrical Appropriate Number for Area

9. Closest Medical Facility Nearest Medical Facility Name

10. Medical Facility Address Nearest Medical Facility Address

11. First Aider First Aider Name/Phone#/Qualifications

12. First Aider First Aider Name/Phone#/Qualifications

All emergencies must then be reported to Service Manager, Operations Manager/Health


and Safety Manager and Regional Manager.

REGIONAL MANAGERS CONTACT INFORMATION

EASTERN CANADA REGION; ........................................... TOM BRUYEA (416) 936-7159


PRAIRIE PROVINCES AREA; ................................STEVE PROVENCHER (403) 863-2404
PRAIRIE PROVINCES AREA; (OPERATIONS MANAGER) ................ KEITH LOIK (780) 203-6141
BRITISH COLUMBIA AREA; ............................... STEVE REINTENBACH (604) 813-4969
HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGER (CANADIAN REGION) ....TIM SEDLACEK (403) 370-2120

10.3 EVACUATION PROCEDURE

Evacuation procedures serve as guidance for employees and visitors to escape from
buildings or facilities should an emergency arrive.

Procedure (When alerted to evacuate the facility, employees should):

1. Sound Alarm (Air Horn) if possible.


2. Proceed to the nearest exit and assemble at the mustering point (outside main
service yard gate, south main gate). MARKED MUSTER POINT. (see site map.)
3. Look for clearly marked exit routes throughout the office.
4. Remain in the designated area until instructions are provided.

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Emergency escape procedures and the emergency response plan will be reviewed with all
employees annually.
Emergency response plan for offsite projects is site specific and will be addressed
separately.
10.4 FIRST AID REFERNCE

BLEEDING
Before providing care, put on protective gloves or use a barrier between you and the
victim, to reduce the chance of disease transmission while assisting the injured person.
Cleanse your hands thoroughly with soap and water when finished.
Basic first aid treatment:
• CALL 911 for medical assistance.
• Keep victim lying down.
• Apply direct pressure using a clean cloth or sterile dressing directly on the
wound.
• DO NOT take out any object that is lodged in a wound; see a doctor for help in
removal.

If there are no signs of a fracture in the injured area, carefully elevate the wound above
the victim's heart.

• Once bleeding is controlled, keep victim warm by covering with a blanket,


continuing to monitor for shock.

EYE INJURIES

• If an object is impaled in the eye, CALL 911 and DO NOT remove the object.
• Cover both eyes with sterile dressings or eye cups to immobilize.
• Covering both eyes will minimize the movement of the injured eye.
• DO NOT rub or apply pressure, ice, or raw meat to the injured eye.
• If the injury is a black eye, you may apply ice to cheek and area around eye, but
not directly on the eyeball itself.

How to flush the eyes: If chemical is in only one eye, flush by positioning the victim's
head with the contaminated eye down. . . to prevent flushing the chemical from one eye
to another. Flush with cool or room temperature water for 15 minutes or more. Remove
contact lenses after flushing.

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BURNS

First Degree Burn: Skin will appear red and may be swollen or painful. Generally does
not require medical attention.

Second Degree Burn: Skin will appear red, blistered and swollen. May require medical
attention.

Third Degree Burn: Skin will be visibly charred and may be white. Usually very painful.
REQUIRES MEDICAL ATTENTION.

Basic first aid treatment for 1st degree & some 2nd degree burns:
Submerge burn area immediately in cool water until pain stops. If affected area is large,
cover with cool wet cloths. Do not break blisters if they are present. If pain persists but
no medical assistance is needed, apply medicated first aid cream or gel and cover with
sterile dressing. If medical attention is needed, do not apply any cream. Just cover with
a dry, sterile dressing and seek medical help immediately. basic first aid treatment for 3rd
degree & some 2nd degree burns: CALL 911!! Third degree burns MUST RECEIVE
MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY! DO NOT try to remove any clothing stuck to the
burned area. Cover with sterile dressing or clean sheet. DO NOT apply any creams or
gels.

UNCONSCIOUSNESS
• Do not leave an unconscious victim alone except to call 911 for medical help.
• Assess victim’s state of awareness by asking if they are OK.
• Check the victim’s Airway, Breathing, and Circulation (ABC’s).
• If the victim’s ABC’s are not present, perform CPR. IMPORTANT: only a trained &
qualified person
should administer CPR.
• If ABC’s are present and spinal injury is not suspected, place victim on their side
with their chin toward the ground to allow for secretion drainage.
• Cover the victim with blanket to keep warm and prevent shock. If victim
communicates feeling warm, remove blanket.

CHOKING
• Ask the victim, "Are you OK?"
• Do not interfere or give first aid if the victim can speak, breathe, or cough.

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• If the victim cannot speak, breathe, or cough, ask for someone to call 911 and then
perform the Heimlich manoeuvre (abdominal thrust).
• How to perform the Heimlich manoeuvre: Position yourself behind the victim with
your arms around victim’s stomach. Place the thumb-side of your fist above the
victim’s navel and below the lower end of the breastbone. Take hold of your fist with
your free hand and pull fist upward and in, quickly and firmly. Continue with thrusts
until the object is dislodged or airway is clear.

POISON
• Call your local Poison Control Center or 911 for immediate medical attention.
• Antidotes on labels may be wrong!! Do not follow them unless instructed by a
physician.
• Never give anything by mouth (milk, water, Ipecac, etc.) until you have consulted
with a medical professional.
• Keep a one-ounce bottle of Ipecac on hand at all times in case of an emergency, and
give only when instructed by a physician.
• If the poison is on the skin, flush skin with water for 15 minutes, then wash and
rinse with soap and water.
• If poison is in the eye, flush with lukewarm water for 15 minutes. Adults can stand
under the shower with eyes open. Always consult medical professionals after any
eye injury has occurred.

ANIMAL BITES
• Control any bleeding by applying direct pressure or with elevation. To avoid risk of
infection, do not close wound.
• Rinse the bite thoroughly, holding it under running water. Cleanse with soap and
water and hold under water again for five minutes.
• Do not put ointments or medicines on wound. Cover with dry sterile bandage or
gauze.
• Seek medical assistance immediately.
• Note: report animal and human bites to local police and/or health authorities.

BEE STING
• If possible, remove stinger by scraping it off with a blunt edge (e.g. credit card).
• Clean wound and apply cold compress to reduce swelling.
• Remove tight clothing and jewellery from areas near the bite in case swelling occurs.
• Watch for signs of shock or allergic reaction. Signs include swelling or itching at the

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wound site, dizziness, nausea or difficulty breathing. Seek medical attention
immediately if any of these signs occur.
• Continue monitoring victim for shock until medical help arrives.
• Check victim’s Airway, Breathing, and Circulation (ABC’s). If ABC’s are impaired then
call 911 and begin CPR. IMPORTANT: only a trained & qualified person should
administer CPR.

10.5 REPORTING AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES

10.51 Reporting Procedures


It is the goal of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. to eliminate all accidents.
However, should an accident or incident occur, the following will provide
guidelines for actions to be taken by any employee present at, witness to or
informed of any incident involving Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. personnel,
property or process or any persons doing work for Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc.

10.51.1 Procedure
Although some authority for health and safety can be delegated to contract
personnel, the responsibility for health and safety, of all persons working
on behalf of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc., cannot be delegated. For
that reason all incidents on or involving Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. property must be reported, particularly where such incidents result in
or may have resulted in:

- Damage to Company property or injury to personnel.


- Damage caused by Company property or personnel.
- Damage or injury to a contractor, third party property or person.

10.51.2 Serious Injury


Regardless of the time of day any employee, contractor or consultant who
is involved in or witness to a serious event or situation which has the
potential to cause serious injury or damage to Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. personnel or property must report immediately to a Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. manager.

If the manager believes immediate action is required to minimize loss of


life or property damage he should initiate the Emergency Response Plan.

When an incident occurs the employees must:


- Attempt to prevent further loss or injury.
- Report immediately to the appropriate manager.
- Record all pertinent data for inclusion in the accident report.

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All incidents require a preliminary written report within 24 hours. The
report must be forwarded to the Calgary office.

10.51.3 Medical Aid and Lost Time Incidents


It is the responsibility of all employees to report accidents or incidents
promptly to the appropriate manager and to provide the information
required to complete the accident / incident report form. This form
provides for a short written description of all incidents including "near
misses" and when completed must be signed by the manager responsible
for any investigation or incident review. Requirements for reporting
accidents and investigations by outside agencies is defined in the Alberta
Occupational Health and Safety Act.

10.51.4 W.C.B. Forms


A medical aid or lost time injury requires Workers Compensation Board
form to be completed. One form is to be completed by the employee and
one is to be completed by the employer. These forms are to be completed
in addition to the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. accident / incident
reports.

10.51.5 Log Book


Injuries requiring first aid treatment must be recorded in the first aid
logbook at the work site. This includes even minor injuries requiring only
a bandage for example; the injury does not have to be serious to be
recorded. Recording of this information is in place to protect the worker
should complications due to the injury arise at a later date. The
information in the first aid logbook shall contain the circumstances of the
incident, the name of the employee and the first aid required to allow the
employee to return to work. The information in the logbook is for analysis
purposes only and is not to be used to identify or allot blame.

10.51.6 Outside Agencies


Notification of outside agencies should be done as required by the level of
the emergency and shall be done under the direction of the appropriate
manager who will determine the level of the notification.

Under no circumstances shall any statements regarding cause or liabilities


be made during these contacts.

10.52 General Emergency Response Procedures


The following information is prepared to assist senior Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. Representative at an emergency scene and the appropriate manager
in evaluating and managing emergencies.
10.52.1 Procedure
An emergency is defined as any event that calls for immediate special

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action to prevent or minimize danger to life, property or the environment.
Levels of the emergency have been categorized as follows:

Level 1
No danger exists outside of the Company property, and the situation can
be handled by the site personnel.

Level 2
There is no immediate danger outside of the work site, but the potential
exists for the situation to extend beyond the site. Local support services
must be alerted (fire, ambulance, police and other emergency groups) and
kept informed of the situation. This level includes spills of hazardous
materials in recordable quantities if an immediate hazard exists.

Level 3
Safe operating control has been lost, resulting in or potentially resulting in
fatalities, or serious injury to employees, contractors or the public or
serious damage to the environment and/or communities in the surrounding
areas. Any situation involving a fatality or severe injury even though safe
operating control was not lost or was re-established must be considered a
level 3 emergency.

Typical level 3 emergencies would be:


- Release of chemicals.
- Large fire at a work site.
- Large fire in an office building.
- Death or serious injury to any person involved in Company operation.

NOTE: If any doubt exists as to whether or not an emergency exists, the


response plan should be initiated.

10.52.2 Definitions
The first Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. manager at the scene of the
emergency shall assume the responsibility of the on scene manager.

The On-Scene Manager will be responsible for initiating all subsequent


steps of the emergency response plan after contacting and obtaining
direction from the manager or head office. The on-
scene manager will have the authority to act on behalf of the manager until
contacted, however, will have to justify the decisions made.

The manager is responsible for the following:

- Implementation of the Emergency Response Plan and mobilization of


the members of the support group if necessary.
- Provide a focal point for communications, decision-making and

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support services available through head office.
- To advise the senior management as to the status of the emergency.
- To advise the switchboard/ answering service as to the routing of the
calls.

The role of the manager is to gather and distribute information pertinent to


the emergency and to coordinate the activities of personnel and the head
office support group. The decision to have any additional personnel travel
to the emergency will be made by the manager.

10.52.3 Investigation & Work Resumption


In the event of a level 3 incident occurring, a Company manager must
proceed, promptly upon notice, to the scene to conduct a full investigation,
as outlined in Section 3.4 of this manual.

Incidents involving fatalities, serious injuries or the potential for either


may be investigated by Government agencies and the local police
providing they present valid credentials indicating them as such, in which
case they shall be afforded the fullest cooperation. Also, particular care
shall be taken to ensure that all evidence is secured, and preserved in its
original state.

Work at the scene of a fatality or serious injury may NOT resume until
authorized by the Coroner, Police or other Government investigator, along
with the appropriate Company authority, unless resumption of work on a
restricted basis is required in order to prevent further loss of life or
property.

Where loss of Company property or loss of revenue has occurred,


evidence should not be disturbed until permitted by the Company
insurance adjusters.

10.52.4 Evacuation
The On-Scene Manager is responsible to ensure that evacuation is initiated
either personally or through delegation. This may take two forms; first,
evacuation of only critical affected areas of the site or secondly, a full
scale evacuation of the entire area. Please refer to section 10.55 of this
manual for specific evacuation procedures.

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10.52.5 Notification of Next of Kin

The next of kin of a seriously injured employee must be notified as soon


as possible. An appropriate authority, such as the police or a senior
representative of Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc., must make the
notification.

In the case of a serious accident the contact should be made as follows:

(Verify contact) "This is (identify caller), a serious accident has occurred


at the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. work site at (location) and your
(relationship), (Casualties name) has been injured and taken to (name)
hospital for treatment.

We will be sure to keep you informed of further details as we receive


them. Should you need any assistance please Contact the company
manager (name) at the ( phone number and location)."

In the case of a fatality, certification of death by a doctor or the police


must precede notification. Where possible notification will be made in
person and if possible in the presence of an employee known to the family,
and/or the police.

If the next of kin does not reside in the area, arrangements should be made
through the Company Manager for appropriate notification.

Should the injury occur to a contractor it is essential that the contractor’s


office be notified to ensure that the appropriate people are notified of the
accident and the location of the casualty. Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc. personnel are to be subsequently advised of the accident to stop any
speculation and to assist in the management of the media.

10.53 Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Emergency Contact List


When reporting please contact your immediate manager. If unable to contact ask
for the manager through the answering service.

24-Hour Emergency Number: 1-800-782-1500

Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Emergency Contact List:

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Calgary Alberta Office (Head Office): Edmonton Alberta Office:
2700-350-7th Avenue S.W. 11755-231 Street N.W.
Calgary, Alberta T2P 3N9 Edmonton, Alberta T5S 2C5
Phone: (403) 510-3270 Phone: (780) 554-6141
Attention: Alec McDonald Attention: Chris Ryan
Mississauga Office: Gormley Ontario Office:
Suite 200, 9525 Airport Road 13932 Woodbine Avenue
Mississauga, Ontario L4V 1W1 PO Box 89, Gormley, Ontario L0H 1G0
Phone: (416) 936-7159 Phone: (416) 936-7110
Attention: Tom Bruyea Attention: Jeremy Smith

Ottawa, Ontario Office: Sarnia, Ontario Office:


3455 Hawthorne Road 276 McGregor Road South.
Ottawa, Ontario K1G 4G2 Sarnia, Ontario N7T 7H5
Phone: (613) 913-1061 Phone (519) 384-2024
Attention: Neil Presner Attention: Sean Pink

Fort McMurray Office: Montreal Quebec Office:


Ruth Lake Yard 1505 Rue Brossard
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 5N3 St. Catherine, Quebec J5C 1C1
Phone: (780) 554-6141 Phone (450) 633-1612
Attention: Chris Ryan Attention: Gavin White

Calgary Branch Office: Abbotsford Branch Office:


285221 Frontier Road 30796 South Fraser Way
Rockyview, Alberta T1X 0K1 Abbotsford, British Columbia V2T 6L4
Phone: (403) 990-6092 Phone: (604) 868-2870
Attention: Ed Beesbrook Attention: Steve Reitenbach

Vancouver Branch Office: Saskatoon Branch Office:


200-4170 Still Creek Drive 12 Highway / 87 Street (Cory Road)
Vancouver, British Columbia V5C 6C6 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 3J7
Phone: (604) 868-2870 Phone: (306) 381-8111
Attention: Steve Reitenbach Attention: Dave Melnychuk

Health and Safety Manager Canadian Region:


285221 Frontier Road
Rockyview, Alberta T1X 0K1
Phone: (403) 370-2120
Attention: Tim Sedlacek

10.5.4 Investigation Following Incident/Accident/First Aid


It is the responsibility of management or supervision to investigate all cases of first aid,
incidents, or accidents onsite. A written report must be submitted to upper
management/and safety department. Management and supervision shall follow section
9.0 of the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. health and safety practices manual.

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10.5.5 Evacuation (General Requirements)
The general procedure is designed to provide an outline of evacuation procedures
for the basis of a site specific procedure established for each work site.

10.55.1 Evacuation Routes


Each operating area has to be assigned a primary and a secondary
evacuation route. It is the responsibility of each employee to familiarize
themselves with these routes. Should both routes become impassable,
avoid the area of the emergency and have the employees make their way
to the muster pint to allow the head count.

The managers are responsible to ensure that any equipment that must be
shut down in an emergency has been neutralized prior to final evacuation.

Each area must be searched completely by a manager to ensure that all


employees are clear of the area. Once outside at the muster point (to be
determined for each site), it is the responsibility of the manager to ensure
that a head count is completed. Visitor and absentee lists must be
provided to the manager to determine an accurate head count.

10.55.2 Emergency Response Coordinator


It is the responsibility of the manager to gather all of the information and
head counts, so that the emergency crews can have one central information
source. The manager must meet the emergency crews upon arrival at the
scene in order to relay the information.

10.55.3 All Clear


No employee is to re-enter the site until advised by the manager that the
area is safe. The manager will conduct a return to work inspection to
ensure that all equipment is functional and can be safely operated.

10.55.4 Drills
The evacuation procedure will be tested in its entirety at least once per
year. The alarm will be tested on a monthly basis at a pre-established
time. The efficiency of these drills will be determined and changes made
to the procedures to eliminate any weak areas.

10.55.5 Rescue
If a worker or employee is unable to move or has been trapped due to an
injury or accident the following procedures shall be followed;

• All persons performing a rescue will initiate the emergency response


plan prior to performing a rescue. Prior to any rescue attempt the
onsite management or supervision, as well as the designated first aid
person will be notified.
• An injured/or trapped person shall not be moved or rescued if it causes

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additional injury to the injured person.
• A rescue of injured/trapped person shall not be performed if a potential
exists that could injure the rescuer. In this situation professional
rescue training is required/and an emergency service called according
the site emergency response plan.

10.56 Media Relations


The following information is to assist Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
management personnel in managing media contact.

10.56.1 Procedures
Media relations forms an integral part of the Emergency Response Plan.
The Company spokes-persons must be well prepared and have enough
information on the event in order that even bad news is accurately
reported. When bad news has to be reported it is the Company spokes-
person's responsibility to ensure that the incident is told in a balanced and
accurate manner.

Recognize that emergency situations can be expected to arouse:


- The concern of the public and the government.
- The aggressive interest of the media.
- Speculation when the facts are not given.
- The possibility for future liability for Williams Scotsman of Canada,
Inc.

No individual is to make any statement to the media, these shall come


from Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Head Office or the designated
spokes-person.

It is the responsibility of all employees to direct any media inquiries to the


Manager who shall then route the inquiry to the appropriate spokes-
person.

If there is a major incident, a person designated by Head Office will travel


to the location to assume media relations. It is critically important to have
consistency in Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. response to inquiries,
therefore wherever practical one spokes-person should be designated.

Although news media personnel have no more rights than a private citizen
to enter Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. property, they must be
handled tactfully, always accompanied while on the property and for their
own safety denied access to dangerous areas.

REMEMBER; DO NOT SPECULATE ON WHAT HAPPENED.

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This checklist shall guide the designated spokes-person in an emergency:

i) Remain calm and reasoned, no matter what.


ii) Be aware of the implications, social, political, legal and financial.
iii) Be available to the media, respond to calls promptly.
iv) Be informed and accurate about the event, personnel and locations,
provide short, factual answers.
v) Don't venture an opinion, don't speculate, don't lay blame and only
speak for yourself.
vi) Avoid jargon, use clear everyday language.
vii) Don't be surprised if the media pick up on rumors and hearsay.
viii) If the spokes-person becomes aware of a gross inaccuracy in the
media reporting, immediately inform the manager and the media
outlet.
ix) Ensure employees are kept informed, they should not have to rely on
the media for information.
x) Ensure that all contact with the media is through the designated
spokes-person.

10.56.2 Reporter's Questions


Prior to arrival and on the basis of the best available information prepare
answers to potential questions. Upon arrival correct any misinformation
already in circulation. It will be made clear to the reporters by the
designated spokes-person that their questions will be answered when the
full information is available.

If it is possible, upon arrival, make a short statement. It shall be made by


the Company representative. If that is not possible then say no and set up
a time when this can be done. " I am unable to answer right now because
(give reason) but, I will be able to give you some information in (xx)
minutes". Then make an exit, get the facts and prepare for the
announcement. If possible ensure that the journalists are provided with
shelter, and power. Once the facts are determined and the statement
prepared, read it to the reporters and then answer any questions. To
ensure the greatest accuracy, try if possible to provide the reporters a copy
or the statement.

Don't be caught off guard - The first few minutes of media contact can
be critical.

When to say "No": Recognize that there will be times when you will
have to refuse to respond to a question. When declining comment
NEVER use the bold phrase " No Comment", it alienates the reporter and
the audience and it is often regarded as being self-convicting.

When you must decline comment do so with courtesy, firmness and a

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supportable reason. Use some variation of: "I cannot comment on that
subject at this time because.............".

10.57 Violence in the Workplace


Violence in the workplace means the attempted or actual exercise by a person,
other than a worker, of any physical force so as to cause injury to a worker, and
includes any threatening statement or behaviour which gives the worker
reasonable cause to believe that they are at risk of injury.

If a risk of injury to workers from violence is identified by an assessment, the


employer must:

1. Establish procedures, policies and work environment arrangements to


eliminate the risk to workers from violence.
2. If elimination of the risk to workers is not possible, establish procedures,
policies and work environment arrangements to minimize the risk to workers.
3. Establish procedures for reporting, investigating and documenting incidents
of violence as required.

An employer must inform workers who may be exposed to the risk of violence of
the nature and extent of the risk.

The duty to inform workers as stated above includes a duty to provide information
related to the risk of violence from who have a history of violent behaviour and
whom workers are likely to encounter in the course of their work.

The employer must instruct workers who may be exposed to the risk of violence
in:

1. The means for recognition of the potential for violence.


2. the procedures, policies and work environment arrangements which have
been developed to minimize or effectively control the risk to workers from
violence.
3. The appropriate response to incidents of violence, including how to obtain
assistance.
4. Procedures for reporting, investigating and documenting incidents of
violence.
5. The worker or workers affected by violence are advised to consult a health
professional of the worker(s) choice for treatment or referral.

10.57.1 Responsibilities

Employer
Every employer must ensure the adequate direction and instruction of
workers in the safe performance of their duties.

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Supervisor
Every supervisor is responsible for the proper instruction of workers under
the supervisor’s direction and control, and for ensuring their work is
performed without undue risk.

Employee
An employee must not engage in any improper activity or behaviour at a
work place that might create or constitute a hazard to themselves or to any
other person.

10.57.2 PROCEDURE
This area of the violence in the workplace is to address the common areas
of violence that will be encountered in the retail and service aspects of the
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. business being conducted. The
general and immediately recognized encounters are addressed. Should
further incidents of violence be addressed a policy will be drafted and
added to the section.

I) Robbery
When faced with the decision to react to a person who is threatening
violence to further their gain, i.e. request for money or other articles,
the employee will and in this case there is no choice, the employee
will comply with the request of the person threatening the violence.
Give what ever is requested and at no time attempt to interfere with
the person, as they are totally unpredictable and heroism is not an
option. The employee will pay strict attention to the person and gain
as much detail as possible for the assistance of the authorities. Once
the person has vacated the facility immediately notify manager and
the authorities. At this time the business will be closed to the public
in order to preserve as much evidence as possible until the arrival of
the authorities and their authority to reopen the business has been
given.

An incident report will be required by Williams Scotsman of


Canada, Inc. to allow for investigation into the incident to identify
any need for change in policy or manner in which the incident is
handled.

II) The Irate Customer


a) Internal:
The satisfaction of the customer is of prime importance to the
company as a dissatisfied customer is the worst type of
advertisement. The main thrust of this type of interaction is to
resolve the problem causing the dissatisfaction. The
requirements of the customer to alleviate the problem have to be
found and the ability to authorize the adjustment has to be

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attained. Should the employee be able to meet the needs of the
customer in a case such as this, the means of adjustment has to
be immediately forwarded to the manager for his information.
Should the employee be unable to correct the situation he shall
immediately inform the manager who will then deal with the
customer. The manager is the final resource available to assist
the customer. The prime question at this point to be considered
is “What will it take to satisfy the customer?”

A point could be reached when the customer becomes violent


towards the company and he will physically attempt to express
himself. The immediate reaction of any person is to protect
themselves by becoming physical with the customers. Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc. will require the employees to restrain
themselves and immediately notify the manager. The act of
violence will then be dealt with through management and the
appropriate authorities to the satisfaction of the employee, the
manager and the customer.

b) External:
In the course of business external factors come into play that may
affect the mental state of the customer. For example the use of
credit cards can cause problems. The customer presents a card for
the payment of an invoice. In pre approving the purchase the card
company asks the Williams Scotsman of Canada Inc. employee to
destroy the card. As a retailer there is a responsibility to the card
company to act on the request and destroy the card. To assist the
customer it is suggested that the customer be allowed to talk
directly to the card company and have them explain the problem
with the card and respond to the request of the store. Should this
problem expand then it is up to the employee to request assistance
from the manager who will deal with the customer in accordance
to the policies of the company.

III) Bomb Threat


The reception of a bomb threat will result in the evacuation of all
employees to the identified muster area for that work site. The
muster area will be sufficiently away from the area, that should an
explosion occur there will be no danger to the employees. The
manager will notify the local authorities who will set in motion an
emergency response plan to deal with the threat. At some point the
area will have to be searched with the assistance of the local
authorities. The decision to

Search the area will be made by the authorities who will ask for
assistance from the manager. At no time will an employee re enter

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the site until it has been declared safe by the authorities. No
employee can be requested to re enter the area without knowing that
they do have the right to refuse imminent danger under the
regulations of the province in which they reside.

IV) Natural Disasters


In any natural occurrence it is important for the employees of the
company to be aware of the muster points, as this is the only location
where there will be a head count conducted. The head count informs
the management of who is missing and at that point inquiries will be
made as to where they were working and give the authorities a start
point in locating the missing persons. The only time an employee
will not go to the muster point is in a case where the muster point
itself will afford a hazard to the employee. If at all possible all
personnel will gather at the muster point to be of assistance to the
authorities and to allow the conducting of the count.

V) Assaults
Assaults can of an internal or external nature.

a) Internal:
Internal assaults occur when two or more employees conduct
themselves contrary to the Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
Code of Conduct and result in physical abuse between
employees. This will be dealt with internally and both parties
will be suspended pending the results of an internal
investigation into the matter. The discipline for such an
occurrence will follow the disciplinary code and can result in
action up to and including termination of employment. This
area will be initially dealt with internally but can involve the
appropriate authorities, which can be requested by either the
management or the employees.

b) External:
External assaults can be either customer based which was dealt
with under the irate customer section of this procedure. The
other external assault that has to be addressed is the assault by a
person who has no relationship with Williams Scotsman of
Canada, Inc. whether or not they are known to the employee.
This type of assault will be reported to the manager who will be
in contact with the appropriate authorities and the matter
handled as a criminal assault.

VI) Thefts
Thefts can be both internal and external and can result in violence,
especially when the culprit is confronted with the act.

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a) Internal:
Either the manager or the appropriate authorities can handle
internal thefts. The manager has the opportunity to identify the
type and causes for the theft and the manager has the authority
to deal with this incident using the disciplinary code.

b) External:
Any person removing goods or product from the shop can and
should be challenged by any employee. In observing this action
the employee must inform the manager as soon as possible or
the highest person of authority in the site at the time of the
occurrence. In challenging the person do not be enticed into a
position where the hazard of violence can be effected. With the
threat of violence the employee will back away from the person
and report the occurrence immediately to a supervisor. The
employee should pay attention to the person who is invoking the
violence to assist the authorities in identification of the culprit.

VII) Working Alone


The legislation introduced states that employees who perform
hazardous work alone, without routine interaction with other
employees and the public, may not be able to get immediate
assistance in the event of an incident. Employees are considered to
be working alone if they are in a remote location. In the event that
an employee is working alone the employer must do everything
reasonable to protect the health and safety of the employee. This
means that the employer must set up safe work practices at the
worksite and make sure the safe work practices are followed.

The employee is required by the Act to work safely and cooperate


with the employer by following the health and safety rules. The
employee is considered to be working alone if the employee works
alone at a worksite in circumstances where assistance is not readily
available when needed.

The employer must conduct a hazard assessment of the site,


eliminate or reduce the risks, establish an effective means of
communication, and ensure that the employees are trained and
educated. Employees must be made aware of the hazards of working
alone and the preventative steps that can be taken to reduce or
eliminate potential risks.

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10.58 Stop Work Orders and Warnings


In the course of working complacency and short cuts are attempted, however, this
practice is not condoned by Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. Should a Labour
Officer observe an employee or sub contractor in such, a stop work order or a
warning of the order may be issued. This order is extremely detrimental to
Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc. and has to be addressed immediately. All
employees, contractors and sub contractors while in the employment of Williams
Scotsman of Canada, Inc will adhere to the following policy.

10.58.1 Issuance of a Stop Work Order


Once a stop work order has been issued, the receiving worker and crew
will immediately stop all work and meet with the officer to clarify the
requests from the order. Once completed, the appropriate manager has to
be contacted and informed of the order. If the crew supervisor is able to
rectify the breach described in the order, then the crew supervisor, with the
aid of the officer, will correct the infraction and resume work. The
manager must still be notified of the order and the correction made to have
the order lifted.

The manager when notified of a stop work order has to contact the safety
representative for the company and the management of the company to
inform them of the order and why it has been issued. The manager may
wish to have the safety representative assist or to have the management
representative assist in dealing with the Labour Officer.

10.58.2 Follow Up
Once the order has been issued and rectified, then course of action taken to
remediate the order will be documented. The report will be submitted to
the appropriate manager for his signature and to be circulated among the
management of the company.

Should an order be such that it can not be rectified at the scene, the
appropriate manager and whom ever he requires to assist in meeting the
order will meet with the inspector and a mutually satisfactory remedy for
the order be achieved. This also will be documented and circulated among
the management for information purposes.

All stop work orders will be filed in the appropriate job folder, with a copy
of the stop work order placed into the employee’s, contractor’s or sub-
contractor’s file.

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11.0 RECORDS / STATISTICS

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11.0 RECORDS / STATISTICS

Records / Statistics for each branch will include, but not be limited to, the following:

 Safety orientation records for every employee (part or full time)


 All site inspections reports for sites where Williams Scotsman has full time
employees working for a period greater than one week.
 All accident / incident investigation reports.
 All medical reports stemming from accidents and incidents.
 Orientation acknowledgement forms.
 Annual reviews.
 Hazard assessment checklist
 Maintenance records
 Training summaries
 Worksite safety inspection reports

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12.0 WASTE MANAGEMENT / ENVIROMENT

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12.0 POLICY FOR WASTE MANAGEMENT AND THE ENVIRONMENT

 The proper safeguard of our environment is important to our organization.

 While doing our work we shall consider the appropriate protection of humans,
animals, plant life, air water and soil.

 We expect all persons to do their best to prevent harm to the environment.

 Our goals on the job can be met without risking harm to the environment.

 We shall use, store and dispose of products in such a manner that will provide
appropriate protection to the environment.

 Management will develop and enforce good environmental standards in


accordance with relevant legislation.

 Workers will be kept informed on how to do their jobs in such a manner as to


cause minimum environmental harm and waste of materials.

 Where possible, we shall recycle and promote the use of recycled products.

March 1, 2007
Signature:____________________________ Date:_______________________

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13.0 H & S COMMITTEES / MISCELLANEOUS

13.1 JOINT WORKSITE HEALTH & SAFETY


COMMITTEE

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13.1 JOINT WORKSITE HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE

What is a Health and Safety Committee?


A joint work site health and safety committee is a group of worker and employer
representatives working together to identify and solve health and safety problems at the
work site.

Communications Link
The committee is a very important communication link between the workers and
management. Getting the employees actively involved can create and maintain interest in
health and safety, as well as establish positive attitude throughout the work force. An
effective Joint Worksite Health and Safety Committee can assist to reduce losses
resulting from accidents and occupational illness.

Cooperation
To be successful, the committee has to operate in an atmosphere of cooperation, avoiding
the adversary system. The members should bear in mind that their committee is not a
policy-making body and that the normal divisions of authority at the work site are not to
be violated. Recommendations and suggestions are expected form the committee, and
management must give each concern careful consideration.

Concerns Resolved
Many health and safety concerns can be resolved immediately in the course of daily
work. Those that are not resolved should be dealt with by the Joint Worksite Health and
Safety Committee. Through posting the minutes of each meeting at the work site, the
committee can ensure every problem is brought into view, and kept in view until a
satisfactory solution has been found.

Requirements to Organize a Committee


Some organizations are required to organize and maintain “Joint Worksite Health and
Safety Committees” by designation under government safety regulations. Specific
guidelines for the formation and the operations of such committees are usually available
from Government Occupational Health and Safety departments, Safety Associations and
other similar organizations.
Many companies voluntary organize and maintain safety committee because it can cerate
positive and far-reaching results in accident prevention and related cost savings. For this
reason, Safety Associations encourage the formation and operations of such committees.

13.1.1 Responsibilities of a Joint Worksite Health and Safety Committee


No worker, supervisor, manager or employer can hold the Committee responsible for
unsafe or unhealthy situations. The Committee is responsible for recommending solutions
to health and safety problems, not carrying out the necessary changes. The latter is a
management responsibility.
A frequent problem for Joint Worksite Health and Safety Committees is that others tend
to shift responsibility for health and safety on to the shoulder of the Committee members.

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This must not be done. Under the law, every worker is held personally responsible to
work with regard for the health and safety of him/herself and others. Every supervisor
and manager is obligated to take reasonable steps to ensure the health and safety of their
workers. Every employer must do the same.

13.1 JOINT WORKSITE HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE

While management has the ultimate responsibility for occupational health and safety at
the work site, it may delegate authority to the Joint Worksite Health and Safety
Committee, but at no time should the Committee take action on its own.
The responsibilities of a Joint Worksite Health and Safety Committee are to:
 Identify unhealthy or unsafe situations, acts or conditions by conducting Hazard
Assessments and inspections at the work site;
 Carry out preventative measures from recommendations made in Hazard
Assessments, Inspections and accident investigations.
 Ensure that health and safety education programs are established and maintained
on the work site.
 Promote safety awareness
 Recommend and promote Safe Work Practices, Job Procedures and safety
policies
 Respond to safety concerns raised by employees
 Promote compliance with regulations
 Assist in creating a safe workplace by setting a good example

13.1.2 Ways of Identify Hazards


To elaborate on responsibilities of committees, the following areas need to be reviewed in
greater length.

Health Hazards – Because health hazards seldom result in immediate injury, they are
frequently overlooked by worker and employer alike. Committee members must make a
special effort to learn how health is being affected by working conditions and continually
be on the lookout for toxic materials, vapors, noises and work practices causing
unnecessary stress.

Daily Concerns – Committee members should respond to any health or safety concerns
raised by a worker in the course of daily work. Members should then advise the workers
what steps are being taken, and continue to keep the worker informed of actual progress.

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Health and safety is the responsibility of every person at a site, but not all hazards will be
recognized unless every worker becomes involved and is encouraged to report what
he/she sees. Workers should know who the committee members are.

Regular Inspections – Committee members should inspect the work site regularly. This
also provides an opportunity to talk to supervisors and workers in order to gain their help
in identifying concerns that might otherwise be overlooked.

13.1 JOINT WORKSITE HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE

Not all identifiable hazards will be reported in the course of daily work. People on the
job may be too familiar with their immediate surroundings, and see no danger in
equipment and work practices that are in fact hazardous. Committee members need to
inspect the work site regularly because they can be more skilled in recognizing what is
wrong. This is partly because the eye is sharper in unfamiliar surroundings, and partly
because members have more knowledge about what is safe.

Another reason a worker or supervisor may not report a hazard is that he/she is not sure it
is serious. These hidden concerns will usually come out if members make a point of
talking to workers and supervisors during regular inspections.

Accident Reports – As many accidents reports as possible should be reviewed by the


Committee. The causes of accidents frequently reveal health and safety problems. These
problems should then be dealt with in the same way as any other concern identified by
the Committee.

A careful study following any accident will reveal one more weaknesses in the work
process at the time of accident, such as defective equipment, dangerous work practices, or
missing protective clothing or guards. These defects may be thought of as the direct
causes of the accident and the direct cause of the injury.

The Committee is interested in more than eliminating direct causes. Indirect causes may
be more important. If a guard was missing, it has probably already been replaced, so the
committee must consider why it was missing. Analyzing the deeper causes of accidents
in this way is not easy.

13.1.3 Committee Structure

The Committee should be composed of no fewer than four regular members. Provision is
made for selecting membership according to regulations and the needs of the
organization. Committee members should ensure that all workers in the operation are
represented. However, every Safety Committee must have both worker and employer
representation. The worker representation may be based on trades, work areas, or other

Revision Date Feb 15, 2011 13-4


Williams Scotsman of Canada, Inc.
Safety Practices Manual
suitable criteria. Employer representation may include the manager and the supervisors,
as well a staff such as safety or first aid personnel.

The size of the Committee can influence its effectiveness. Larger Committees are not as
efficient as a small group or a series of groups.

The following factors should be considered when deciding on the Committee size:

 The number of employees in the organization


 The number of job sites or departments
 The different shifts
 The hazards in the workplace

Revision Date Feb 15, 2011 13-5