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Republic of the Philippines

Department of Education
Region VII, Central Visayas
DIVISION OF LAPU-LAPU CITY
B.M. Dimataga St., Lapu-Lapu City

LESSON PLAN IN SCIENCE

Section and Time: Date:

Learning Investigate the relationship between the amount of force applied and the mass Level 8
Competency of the object to the amount of change in the object’s motion.
(S8FE-1a-15) Quarter 1st
Learning Knowledge: Explain that there are different types of forces that can act on an
Objectives object and affect the motion of an object. Week No. 1
Skills: Identify what are the different types of forces that can act on an object
and illustrate these forces through a free-body diagram.
Attitudes: Practice critical thinking skill in identifying the different types of Day 1
forces that can act on an object.
Topic Types of Forces Acting on an Object Duration:
60 minutes
Resources Needed Pictures of Filipino recreations (kite flying, laro ng lahi, etc.) showing different types
of forces that can act on an object.
Info sheet on the different types of forces.

PROCEDURE:
Element of
Suggested Activities
the Plan
Awareness In the lower grades, you learned that an object can be moved by pushing or pulling.
As you push or pull an object, what do you apply to the object? (answer: FORCE)
Forces are all around us and there are different types of forces that can act on an object.
Are you familiar with these forces?
Let’s get to know more of them today.
Activity Picture Analysis
Identify the different types of forces that can act on an object and make a free-body
diagram to describe what forces can do to an object. Refer to info sheet for your guide.
Analysis Identify the different types of forces that can act on an object and make a free-body diagram
out of it to describe what forces can to an object.
Abstraction Force is defined as a push or a pull acting on an object by another object. It can be described
as a vector quantity since it has both a magnitude and direction. Force cannot be seen but its
effect is noticeable.
The two types of forces are contact and non-contact forces. Contact forces are forces which
needs physical contact and these include, air resistance, applied force, normal force, frictional
force and tension force. Non-contact forces are forces which do not need physical contact and
these include electrical force, magnetic force and gravitational force.
Application Cite one situation you do every day that describes contact and noncontact force and explain
the effect of these forces to the motion of the object.
Assessment What are the different types of forces that can act on an object and affect the motion of an
object?
Identify what are the different types of forces that can act on an object and illustrate these
forces through a free-body diagram.
Assignment Read about balance and unbalanced forces on pages 4-9 in your Science module and give an
example of a scenario showing balance and unbalanced forces.

Remarks
ACTIVITY
CONTACT AND NON-CONTACT FORCE
Name: Section: Date: Score:
Concept:
Force is defined as a push or a pull acting on an object by another object. It can be described as a vector
quantity since it has both a magnitude and direction. Force cannot be seen but its effect is noticeable. There are
two types of forces: CONTACT FORCE and NON-CONTACT FORCE. Contact forces are forces which needs
physical contact and these include, air resistance, applied force, normal force, frictional force and tension force.
Non-contact forces are forces which do not need physical contact, such as electrical force, magnetic force and
gravitational force.
The relative magnitude and direction of all forces acting upon an object in a given situation can be shown
through a free-body diagram.
I. Objectives:
Knowledge: Explain that there are different types of forces that can act on an object and affect the motion
of an object.
Skills: Distinguish pictures that describe contact and non-contact force and illustrate a free-body diagram.
Attitudes: Practice critical thinking skill to accomplish the activity.
II. Materials
Printed pictures and Info sheet
III. Procedure
A. Awareness
In the lower grades, you learned that an object can be moved by pushing or pulling.
As you push or pull an object, what do you apply to the object? (answer: FORCE)
Forces are all around us and there are different types of forces that can act on an object.
Are you familiar with these forces?
Let’s get to know more of them today.
B. Activity Proper: Picture Analysis
Analyze the pictures and identify what type of force is shown in each picture. Distinguish which picture
describe contact and non-contact force and illustrate the free-body diagram of each picture.

1. 3.
Type of Force: Type of Force:

2. 4.
Type of Force: Type of Force:

Type of Force:

5.
Info sheet 1.1
TYPES OF FORCES
A force is a push or pull acting upon an object as a result of its interaction with another object. Force
may result from the contact or non-contact of the two interacting objects.
The two types of forces are CONTACT FORCE and NON-CONTACT FORCE. Contact forces are
forces which needs physical contact and these include, air resistance, applied force, normal force, frictional force
and tension force. Non-contact forces are forces which do not need physical contact, such as electrical force,
magnetic force and gravitational force.
Type of Force
Description of Force
(and Symbol)
An applied force is a force that is applied to an object by a person or another
object. If a person is pushing a desk across the room, then there is an applied
Applied Force
force acting upon the object. The applied force is the force exerted on the desk
by the person.
Fapp

The force of gravity is the force with which the earth, moon, or other massively
large object attracts another object towards itself. By definition, this is the weight
of the object. All objects upon earth experience a force of gravity that is directed
Gravity Force
"downward" towards the center of the earth. The force of gravity on earth is
always equal to the weight of the object as found by the equation:
(also known as Weight)
Fgrav = mg
where g = 9.8 N/kg (on Earth)
Fgrav
and m = mass (in kg)
Caution: do not confuse weight with mass.
The normal force is the support force exerted upon an object that is in contact
Normal Force
with another stable object. For example, if a book is resting upon a surface, then
the surface is exerting an upward force upon the book in order to support the
Fnorm
weight of the book.
The friction force is the force exerted by a surface as an object moves across it
or makes an effort to move across it. Friction force often opposes the motion of
an object. For example, if a book slides across the surface of a desk, then the
Friction Force
desk exerts a friction force in the opposite direction of its motion. Friction results
from the two surfaces being pressed together closely, causing intermolecular
Ffrict
attractive forces between molecules of different surfaces. As such, friction
depends upon the nature of the two surfaces and upon the degree to which they
are pressed together.
The air resistance is a special type of frictional force that acts upon objects as
Air Resistance Force they travel through the air. The force of air resistance is often observed to oppose
the motion of an object. This force will frequently be neglected due to its
Fair negligible magnitude (and due to the fact that it is mathematically difficult to
predict its value).
The tension force is the force that is transmitted through a string, rope, cable or
Tension Force
wire when it is pulled tight by forces acting from opposite ends. The tension
force is directed along the length of the wire and pulls equally on the objects on
Ftens
the opposite ends of the wire.
The spring force is the force exerted by a compressed or stretched spring upon
Spring Force
any object that is attached to it. An object that compresses or stretches a spring
is always acted upon by a force that restores the object to its rest or equilibrium
Fspring
position.

FREE-BODY DIAGRAM
A Free-body diagram is used to show the relative magnitude and direction of all forces acting upon an
object in a given situation.
The size of the arrow in a free-body diagram reflects the magnitude of the force. The
direction of the arrow shows the direction that the force is acting. Each force (arrow) in the
diagram is labeled to indicate the exact type of force. It is generally customary in a free-body
diagram to represent the object by a box and to draw the force arrow from the center of the
box outward in the direction that the force is acting.
The only rule for drawing free-body diagrams is to depict all the forces that exist for
that object in the given situation.