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Issue #769 Harrisburg, PA March 25, 2019

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PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates


Funding Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years

The Funding Workgroup of the ​PA Chesapeake Bay


Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee
estimated an annual funding gap of $244.5 million over
at least the next 6 years totaling $1.467 billion to
implement practices needed to meet Pennsylvania’s Bay
cleanup obligations .
If Pennsylvania continued with its existing
programs and resources, it would ​miss the 2025
nitrogen reduction goal by at least 19 years (2044)​.
In contrast, with existing programs,
Pennsylvania should meet its phosphorus reduction goal
by 2025.
The Chesapeake Bay Program and DEP presented estimates it would ​cost about $459.6
million annually for the next 6 years to achieve​ the nitrogen and phosphorus reductions
recommended by the Agriculture ($313.1 million), Stormwater ($78.5 million) and Forestry
($67.7 million) workgroups considering capital, maintenance and operating costs over the life of
the best management practices recommended.
The Funding Workground said agency implementation of the Bay Watershed Plan for the
state and counties will result in needing an additional 188 people at an annual cost of $14.1
million.
Between implementing the Workgroup recommendations and the personnel needed, the
Funding Workgroup said there was a need for $473.5 million annually for at least the next 6
years. Existing resources equal $229.1 million a year, so there is a gap of $244.5 million a year
for the next 6 years.
Among the list of options included in the Funding Workgroup Report to close the gap
were--
-- Expand funding for TreeVitalize, Growing Greener and Abandoned Mine Reclamation
-- Use PennVEST funds to create county revolving loan funds

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-- Leveraging the existing Farmland Preservation Program to promote conservation
-- Provide agriculture integrator incentives and industry pressure
-- Adopt the Restore Pennsylvania funding initiative, PA Farm Bill
-- Expand the REAP Farm Conservation Tax Credit Program
-- Use pay for performance mechanisms to attract private capital
-- Eliminate the Sales Tax Exemption for bottled water
-- Adopt a water use fee
The presentations given at the meeting are included in these handouts--
-- ​Handout #1 – Scenario Results for the Draft WIP​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout #2 – Pennsylvania Snapshot (Bay Goals)​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout #3 – Pennsylvania Snapshot (Local Waterways Goals)​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout #4 – County Planning Progress​ (PDF)
-- ​Handout #5 – Funding Workgroup Recommendations
The next meeting of the Steering Committee has been scheduled for April 3, 2nd Floor
Auditorium, Rachel Carson Building starting at 9:00 a.m. to review the draft of the Watershed
Implementation Plan. ​Click Here to join the meeting via Skype​. Participants may also need to
call in +1 (267) 332-8737. CONFERENCE ID: 75588007.
For more information and copies of available handouts, visit the ​PA Chesapeake Bay
Watershed Implementation Plan Steering Committee​ webpage.
Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Issues Call To Action To Make New Investments In Restoring The
Environment, Oppose Backsliding
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
Growing Greener Coalition Urges New Investment In Restoring The Environment, Preventing
Flooding, No Backsliding On Existing Commitments
DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees Along
Streams
Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation Funding In
DC
All Major PA Hunting, Angler, Wildlife Groups Oppose Using Environmental Fund Project
Money To Pay Agency Operating Expenses
Bay Journal: Exelon, Maryland Spar Over Who Is Responsible For Nutrients Passing Over
Conowingo Dam
Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
NewsClips:
Op-Ed: Article Misrepresents PA Farm Bureau’s Role In Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Innovative Green Stormwater Project Improves Water Infrastructure in Pittsburgh
Stormwater Fee Headaches Persist In Luzerne County
You Didn’t Pay Your Stormwater Fee In Luzerne? What Now?
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees

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Chesapeake Bay Foundation Accepting Submissions For Photo Contest
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

Growing Greener Coalition Urges New Investment In Restoring The Environment,


Preventing Flooding, No Backsliding On Existing Funding

On March 20, the ​Growing Greener Coalition​ wrote to


members of the Senate, House and to Gov. Wolf​ urging
them to make new investments in restoring the
environment and preventing flooding and not to back
away from funding commitments they have already
made.
The ​Coalition also issued a call to action​ to urge the
General Assembly and Gov. Wolf to support new
investments and no backsliding.
"Pennsylvanians want to reduce destructive flooding,
restore waterways to productive life, and protect our
drinking water. We need to do this to protect public
safety and health.
"We need to do this as a moral imperative and constitutional responsibility. And we need
to do this because the investments made to restore and protect our waters produce long-term cost
savings and economic returns that more than pay for the initial investments.
“The organizations and people of the Growing Greener Coalition urge the General
Assembly and Governor Wolf to greatly boost the state’s investments in reducing flooding,
restoring waterways, protecting drinking water, and providing other conservation benefits:
-- The Coalition reiterates that ​Pennsylvania can’t afford to backslide​ in its community and
conservation investments. Every dollar flowing into the Keystone Recreation, Park and
Conservation Fund and the Environmental Stewardship Fund needs to be invested in projects
that protect and restore Pennsylvania’s environmental assets, not diverted to pay for government
operations.
-- The Coalition applauds the Governor’s attention to conservation investment needs in his
Restore Pennsylvania​ proposal and encourages legislators to work with the Administration to
make these investments happen.
“In building on past successes and boosting the state’s conservation investments, the
General Assembly and Governor can achieve many lasting and diverse benefits for
Pennsylvanians, including:
-- Major reductions in property damage and loss of human life caused by flooding
-- Progress for local governments in meeting MS4 [stormwater] requirements
-- State progress in meeting mandatory Chesapeake Bay [nutrient reduction] requirements
-- Safer drinking water and lower water treatment costs
-- More miles of streams restored for recreation and economic use
-- Federal investments leveraged that otherwise would not come to Pennsylvania

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-- Boosts to the agricultural and outdoor recreation industries
-- Restoring parks for communities across the Commonwealth
-- And much more
“The public’s enthusiasm for these investments continues to be overwhelming. For
example, 75 percent of Republican voters, 82 percent of Democrats, and 87 percent of
independents actually support spending more on conservation, even if it would mean taxing
themselves more to do it. (​See survey results.​ )
“Thank you for your attention. For more information, please don’t hesitate to reach out to
the people and organizations of the Coalition including:
-- Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA, Harry Campbell, PA Executive Director
-- Conservation Voters of PA, Joshua McNeil, Executive Director
-- Foundation for Pennsylvania Watersheds, R. John Dawes, Executive Director
-- Lancaster Farmland Trust, Jeffrey Swinehart, Chief Operating Officer
-- Natural Lands, Oliver P. Bass, President
-- PennFuture (Citizens for Pennsylvania’s Future), Jacquelyn Bonomo, President & CEO
-- Pennsylvania Environmental Council, John Walliser, Senior Vice President
-- Pennsylvania Land Trust Association, Andrew M. Loza, Executive Director
-- Pennsylvania Park and Forest Foundation, Marci Mowery, President
-- Pennsylvania Recreation and Park Society, Tim Herd, CEO
-- Rails-To-Trails Conservancy, Tom Sexton, Director, Northeast Regional Office
-- Sierra Club PA Chapter, Joanne Kilgour, Chapter Director
-- The Conservation Fund, Kyle D. Shenk, PA State Director
-- The Nature Conservancy, PA Chapter, Ronald L. Ramsey, Senior Policy Advisor
-- Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, Cynthia Carrow, Vice President”
Click Here for a copy of the letter.​ ​Click Here to tell your legislator to act​.
Questions should be directed to Andy Loza, Executive Director, PA Land Trust
Association by calling 717-230-8560 or send email to: ​aloza@conserveland.org​.
For more information, visit the ​Growing Greener Coalition​ website.
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
Growing Greener Coalition Issues Call To Action To Make New Investments In Restoring The
Environment, Oppose Backsliding
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees Along
Streams
Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation Funding In
DC
PA Receives $53.8 Million In 2019 Federal Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Funds,
Reclamation Fee Due To Expire
All Major PA Hunting, Angler, Wildlife Groups Oppose Using Environmental Fund Project
Money To Pay Agency Operating Expenses
Environmental Rights Amendment Challenge To Unconstitutional Use Of Oil & Gas Funds Now
Includes Recent Proposed Fund Transfers

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PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Eastern PA Coalition For Abandoned Mine Reclamation Opposes Transfer Of Environmental
Stewardship, Keystone Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs
Bill Authorizing Fish & Boat Commission To Set Own Fees To Be Considered By House
Committee On March 25
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership: Call Your House Member To Support Bill To
Allow Fish & Boat Commission To Adopt Its Own Fees
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
NewsClips:
As Levee Costs Grow In Williamsport, Next Stage Includes State Funding
Huntingdon County: Restore PA Aims To Avoid Local Disasters
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf Pushes Restore PA To Eliminate Lead From Philly School At A Cost Of $100 Million
Gov. Wolf Confident He Has Votes For Severance Tax, But Republicans Beg To Differ
Republicans, Gas Industry Oppose Severance Tax To Fund Wolf’s Restore PA Infrastructure
Plan
AP: Wolf Says $4.5B Restore PA Could Help Schools Cleanup Lead Paint
Sen. Yudichak: Growth Wll Fuel PA’s Future - Restore PA
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
Op-Ed: Pass A Natural Gas Severance Tax to Fund Infrastructure In PA​ - Gov. Wolf
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
Editorial: Funding For Lower Mon Project Arrives Just In Time
AP: Federal Black Lung Fund In Danger Of Drying Up
Editorial: Coal Miners Continue To Suffer With Black Lung
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

Growing Greener Coalition Issues Call To Action To Make New Investments In Restoring
The Environment, Oppose Backsliding

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On March 22, the ​Growing Greener Coalition​ issued
a ​call to action to the public​ to urge members of the
Senate and House and Gov. Wolf to make new
investments in restoring the environment and
preventing flooding and not to back away from
funding commitments they have already made.
Please call your state Senator and Representative and
urge them to greatly boost the state’s investments in
protecting water, conserving land, and improving
communities (​find your legislator here​)--
-- Tell them to leave the ​Keystone Recreation, Park
and Conservation Fund​ and the ​Environmental
Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund​ untouched in
this year’s budget. Pennsylvania can’t afford to
backslide in its community and conservation investments. ​Learn more​.
-- The Governor calls for substantial conservation investments in his ​Restore Pennsylvania
proposal (which addresses a variety of infrastructure projects). Ask your legislators to work with
the Administration to make these conservation investments.
Read the Growing Greener Coalition’s letter​ to members of the General Assembly and
Governor Wolf on this subject.
You can also post on social media by tagging your legislators and using the hashtag
#RestorePA. ​Here is a set of social media graphics​ highlighting the need for boosted investments
in protecting water, conserving land, and improving communities.
Click Here to learn more and take action​.
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
Growing Greener Coalition Urges New Investment In Restoring The Environment, Preventing
Flooding, No Backsliding On Existing Commitments
DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees Along
Streams
Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation Funding In
DC
All Major PA Hunting, Angler, Wildlife Groups Oppose Using Environmental Fund Project
Money To Pay Agency Operating Expenses
Environmental Rights Amendment Challenge To Unconstitutional Use Of Oil & Gas Funds Now
Includes Recent Proposed Fund Transfers
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
WPCAMR Abandoned Mine Post: Growing Greener May Lose From Governor's Proposed
Budget
Eastern PA Coalition For Abandoned Mine Reclamation Opposes Transfer Of Environmental

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Stewardship, Keystone Funds To Pay Agency Operating Costs
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Urges Support For INCREASED Funding For
Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund
CBF-PA Sees 2019-20 State Budget As Key To Meeting Pennsylvania's Clean Water
Commitments
DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council Urges Gov. Wolf to Rebalance DEP’s Legal Mandates And
Fiscal Resources
Gov. Wolf Proposes To Shift $75.7 Million From Environmental Funds To Pay Operating Costs
Instead of Funding Community-Based Projects
Gov. Wolf Proposes A $4.5 Billion, 4-Year Restore Pennsylvania Community & Environmental
Infrastructure Investment Program
NewsClips:
As Levee Costs Grow In Williamsport, Next Stage Includes State Funding
Huntingdon County: Restore PA Aims To Avoid Local Disasters
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf Pushes Restore PA To Eliminate Lead From Philly School At A Cost Of $100 Million
Gov. Wolf Confident He Has Votes For Severance Tax, But Republicans Beg To Differ
Republicans, Gas Industry Oppose Severance Tax To Fund Wolf’s Restore PA Infrastructure
Plan
AP: Wolf Says $4.5B Restore PA Could Help Schools Cleanup Lead Paint
Sen. Yudichak: Growth Wll Fuel PA’s Future - Restore PA
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
Op-Ed: Pass A Natural Gas Severance Tax to Fund Infrastructure In PA​ - Gov. Wolf
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
Editorial: Funding For Lower Mon Project Arrives Just In Time
AP: Federal Black Lung Fund In Danger Of Drying Up
Editorial: Coal Miners Continue To Suffer With Black Lung
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

House Committee To Consider Bills To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If


DRBC Adopts Fracking Ban, Change Well Pad Permitting March 26

The ​House Environmental Resources and Energy


Committee​ is scheduled to meet on March 26 to
consider a bill requiring compensation to landowners
for their drilling rights if the Delaware River Basin
Commission adopts a ban on fracking and 2 other
bills--
-- ​House Bill 827​ (Fritz-R-Wayne) which requiring
compensation for oil and gas rights owners in

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Delaware River Watershed if the Delaware River Basin Commission adopts a permanent ban on
fracking (​sponsor summary​). (​Click Here​ for more background on compensating landowners
and a companion bill in the Senate-- Senate Bill 305.​ )
-- ​House Bill 828​ (Fritz-R-Wayne) authorizes DEP to issue one permit for multiple gas wells on
a single pad instead of individual well permits, extends the term of well permits from 1 to 3 years
and allows well locations to vary within 50 feet of specific locations identified on the well permit
(​sponsor summary​). These reforms were included in a ​DEP white paper Gov. Wolf released in
January of 2018​.
--​House Bill 829​ (Fritz-R- Wayne) prohibiting the Delaware River Basin Commission from
regulating onlot septic systems (​sponsor summary​).
The ​Committee held a hearing on issues​ involving House Bill 827 and 929 on March 20.
The meeting will be held in Room B-31 of the Main Capitol Building starting at 10:00.
Click Here to watch the meeting online​.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1707 or sending email to:
dmetcalf@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7647 or sending email to: ​gvitali@pahouse.net​.
Related Stories:
Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For Drilling
Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
House Environmental Committee Holds Info Meeting March 27 On Debunking Modern Myths
Surrounding Climate Change
March 27 DEP Meeting On Proposed Drilling Permits At U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson Plant,
Allegheny County
Op-Ed: Will Our Dirt Roads Again Be Used As Dumping Sites For Oil & Gas Well Wastewater
PUC Pipeline Safety Investigation Underway Involving Possible Sunoco Gasoline Pipeline Leak
In Berks County On March 17
Dueling Press Conferences Pit Opponents Of Mariner East Pipeline Against Those Supporting
Pipeline Development
NewsClips:
PaEN: PA Projects Receive Over $1.7 Million In Federal Delaware River Watershed Restoration
Grants
25 Delaware River-Area Water Quality Projects Get $4.1M In Federal Funds
NFWF Accepting Applications For Delaware Watershed Restoration Grants
Recap Of March 13 Delaware River Basin Commission Meeting
March 22 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

House Environmental Committee Holds Info Meeting March 27 On Debunking Modern


Myths Surrounding Climate Change

The ​House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee


will hold an information meeting March 27 to hear a
presentation on “factually debunking some of the modern myths
surrounding the “climate change” discussion.”

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The Committee will hear from ​Gregory Wrightstone from the Heartland Institute​ and
author of the newly published book ​Inconvenient Facts: The Science That Al Gore Doesn’t Want
You to Know​.
The book’s contrarian position on climate reveals that, contrary to the “consensus
opinion,” the Earth and humanity are flourishing and goes on to challenge the predicted
apocalyptic forecasts of pending climate doom.
Wrightstone is a geologist who has been investigating the Earth’s processes for more than
35 years. He received a bachelor's in geology from Waynesburg University and a masters
degrees in geology from West Virginia University.
He has written and presented extensively on many aspects of geology including how
paleogeography and paleoclimate control geologic processes. His findings have allowed him to
speak at many venues around the world including Ireland, England, China and most recently
India.
The meeting will be held in Room G-50 Irvis Building starting at 8:30. ​Click Here to
watch the meeting online​.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1707 or sending email to:
dmetcalf@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7647 or sending email to: ​gvitali@pahouse.net​.
(​Photo:​ Gregory Wrightstone.)
Related Stories:
House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If DRBC
Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
Presenters Urge House Committee To Support bill Compensating Landowners For Drilling
Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
PJM: Reliability, Fuel Supply Strong In PJM During 2018-19 Winter
Community Solar Legislative Forum April 3 In Wilkes-Barre
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation & Carbon
Dividend Act
Op-Ed: Science, Panic And Politics Of Climate Change
NewsClips:
Mennonite Church In Lancaster Constructs EV Charging Station
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Penn Aims To Be Carbon Neutral By 2042
Editorial: Listen To, Support Students Speaking Out On Climate Change
AP: Report: Great Lakes Feeling Effects Of Rapid Climate Warming
Lessons Learned After Puerto Rican Hurricane Evacuees Came To Philly
Olson: Casey: Green New Deal Worthy Of Review
Olson: Cong. Wild Talks Green New Deal, Trump Investigations, More
U.S. Court Halts Drilling On Federal Land In Wyoming Over Climate Change
AP: EPA Argues For Shifting Focus From Climate Change To Water
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation & Carbon
Dividend Act

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By Chris Wood, President & CEO Of ​Trout Unlimited

PA Council of Trout Unlimited​: “Climate change is a problem that we’re going to have to solve
together. It’s a sportsmen’s issue we’re going to have to solve if we want future generations to
have the same opportunities to fish for our native brook trout and wild trout.” The Council
recommended reading this article​ by Chris Wood--

Someone recently said to me, “Trout Unlimited should get out of political issues such as climate
change and focus instead on what it does best—fixing streams!”
Here is a secret… everything we do at Trout Unlimited helps our rivers, streams and
fisheries withstand the harmful effects of climate change.
When we protect the highest quality sources of cold and clean water; reconnect those
areas downstream; and restore streams we are helping to recover nature’s resilience to the more
intense floods, more frequent and damaging fires, and prolonged drought brought on by climate
change.
TU scientists and collaborators ​predict a 47 percent decline in total suitable habitat​ for
trout in the interior west by 2080 because of the changing climate.
Native cutthroat trout are estimated to lose 58 percent more habitat due to thermal stress
and negative interactions with non-native trout.
These ​predictions are affirmed by recent research​ published in the journal, Restoration
Ecology, that predicts brown trout could competitively displace brook trout from key thermal
refuge habitats.
Thus, it will be more difficult for brook trout to withstand increasing temperatures,
especially when they share their waters with non-native brown trout.
Salmon will not fare better.
For example, scientists from the Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station predict
that sockeye salmon returning to spawn will face a 5–16 percent increase in “thermal exposure.”
That means that while there will certainly be suitable habitat for migratory salmon in most rivers,
some reaches will prove lethally warm for these iconic fish.
Trout and salmon anglers should be the strongest advocates for our efforts to help salmon
and steelhead adapt to climate change.
That alone, however, is not enough.
Just as we learned in the 1990s that we had to move from the stream to the watershed
scale to recover trout and salmon, we must reduce carbon emissions to slow climate change.
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For this reason, Trout Unlimited is supporting passage of common sense legislation such
as the ​Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act​. The bill would put a fee on fossil fuels such
as coal, oil, and gas. The fee starts low and would grow over time.
This will drive down carbon pollution because energy companies, leading industries, and
American consumers will move toward cleaner, cheaper options.
The collected fees will not sit in Treasury. Every American taxpayer will receive a share
of the amount collected. Most important, it would yield a 40 percent reduction in carbon
emissions over the next 12 years.
Make no mistake, we will double down on making communities and landscapes more
resilient to the effects of climate change​, and do so in a way that benefits wild and native
coldwater fisheries and their watersheds.
At the same time, we will work very hard with our many partners and members and
supporters to pass federal legislation that slows the causes of climate change.
A generation ago, acid rain causing sulfur dioxide emissions threatened the health of our
fisheries. Trout Unlimited volunteers, scientists and staff advocated for a market-based
legislative solution.
The result was the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. The legislation’s cap and trade
approach contributed to dramatic reductions for acid rain causing sulfur dioxide emissions.
Some were skeptical of cap and trade in 1990. Some will be skeptical of new legislation
to control carbon emissions now.
Just as with the amendments to the Clean Air Act in 1990, we are at the start of a long
legislative process—a process that we must begin and finish.
The time for band-aids is past. Nothing less than the future of trout and salmon; the future
of fishing—the future for our children is at stake.

Chris Wood​ ​is President and CEO of Trout Unlimited.


(Reprinted from the ​Trout Unlimited Blog.​ )
Related Stories:
House Environmental Committee Holds Info Meeting March 27 On Debunking Modern Myths
Surrounding Climate Change
Community Solar Legislative Forum April 3 In Wilkes-Barre
PJM: Reliability, Fuel Supply Strong In PJM During 2018-19 Winter
Op-Ed: Science, Panic And Politics Of Climate Change
NewsClips:
Mennonite Church In Lancaster Constructs EV Charging Station
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Penn Aims To Be Carbon Neutral By 2042
Editorial: Listen To, Support Students Speaking Out On Climate Change
AP: Report: Great Lakes Feeling Effects Of Rapid Climate Warming
Lessons Learned After Puerto Rican Hurricane Evacuees Came To Philly
Olson: Casey: Green New Deal Worthy Of Review
Olson: Cong. Wild Talks Green New Deal, Trump Investigations, More
U.S. Court Halts Drilling On Federal Land In Wyoming Over Climate Change
AP: EPA Argues For Shifting Focus From Climate Change To Water
[Posted: March 23, 2019]

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Op-Ed: Science, Panic And Politics Of Climate Change

By Dr. Richard Kaplan

Over the last several months, there have been a


spate of Commonwealth, national and
international Reports that describes the data
showing the reality of climate change and the
consequences of this change.
The press has been following this. Such items are
exemplified by the February 17 opinions in the
Philadelphia Inquirer--“​The Real
Emergencies​”--and in the New York
Times—“​Time to Panic​.”
These editorials add their voices to the continuing
stream of scientific studies and reports of the rising danger of climate change, impacts of which
we are already seeing here in Pennsylvania.
For example, the “​Pennsylvania Climate Impact Assessment Update​” for 2015 says: “the
overall warming trend will increase heat-related deaths. . . . By 2100, the number of excessive
heat days is expected to increase by a factor of 10 in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia.“
The ​Institute for Public Policy Research​ (UK) calls the global environmental breakdown
a “crisis.”
Major reports integrating hundreds of studies by the international consortium of countries
known as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (their latest report in 2018, “​Global
Warming of 1.5° C​”) and by 13 US Government agencies (the ​National Climate Assessment
(2017, 2018​)—all state that climate change is having destructive effects which will accelerate.
These are not isolated reports; there are 195 countries that are members of the IPCC;
thousands of scientists have worked on and authored the IPCC reports. And there are many
more reports from reputable organizations.
For example, the World Economic Forum’s 2019 “Report on Global Risks” has lack of
climate change mitigation as its second highest “impact” risk bested only by weapons of mass
destruction and as its second highest with regard to likelihood.
Such changes that have been studied include rising sea levels, increasing temperatures,
increasing carbon dioxide and methane in the atmosphere, increased severe storms and heavy
rain downpours, flooding and droughts, and even anomalies in the polar vortex.
These studies generally predict worsening conditions with some dire consequences that
could affect world food supply, population centers, mass migrations, and increased conflict.
Scientists generally work alone or in small groups in individual laboratories and/or
facilities. They are competitive and debate--consensus is not easy for such a population of
individuals.
Studies are not considered really valid unless they have gone through peer-review and
editorial review and then can be published in quality journals. The studies that are performed are
often complex requiring an in-depth knowledge of the requisite subject matter.
I think that the complexity of the sciences involved in the analyses of the climate and its

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changes is daunting and therefore quite abstract for a lot of the public.
Models that evaluate how climate works can comprise hundreds of pages of code using
complex and difficult mathematical formulas. But models’ predictions are run against real data
over time; a number of these models, which predict greater and greater climate disruptions, have
been validated by actual data.
There are a number of individuals, including some scientists, who do not ascribe to the
findings noted above, but they constitute a small minority.
A number of studies published in reputable journals demonstrate that approximately 97
percent or so of climatologists support the findings in these reports, and their researches show it.
And these are an international group of scientists, not just located in the USA.
Regarding this gathering storm of dire consequences, we must ask what our current
Administration in Washington is doing.
The latest disregard for the studies and findings of a number of sciences, such as
climatology, etc. by the current Administration is to create an ad hoc Federal advisory council of
those who oppose the well-established link of carbon dioxide emissions causing climate change,
according to the Washington Post.
The Administration is spending taxpayer dollars to attempt to refute the well-established
science of climate change.
Instead of taking heed of government agencies’ risk assessments and the reports noted
above as a basis for making plans to ameliorate these risks, the Administration has rolled back
EPA programs and ignored international climate agreements, such the Paris Accord.
The voting public should not tolerate such a waste of taxpayers’ money and the displays
of willful ignorance.
It is a very provocative question to ask as to why the Administration and others believe a
small number of individuals but discount the findings of such a large majority of scientists.
When we vote in this country, the majority rules, but that is not really the point.
There are a number of possibilities as to why the great majority of scientists and their
works are ignored or even denigrated.
Some are economics—the power and profits of the fossil fuel industries, the economic
well-being and jobs these companies provide; some are philosophical—the largesse of the
federal government and its regulatory powers, the infringement of freedoms; some are rooted in
a distrust of science.
As much has been written about the economic and philosophical reasons for doubting
science, I shall only speak to science distrust briefly.
Before the Industrial Revolution, travel was by horse or by foot, medicine was by herbs
and poisons, water for drinking and bathing was often the same as for waste disposal, the list can
go on and on.
The scientific revolution started in the 1700s and continuing today has changed all of
this. Consider how medicine has changed.
Until about the 1930s, many bacterial infections were eventually lethal, often with
horrendous symptoms. Once science developed antibiotics, many of these infections disappear
after days of treatment. Science has been a boon to human civilization and life.
But one can’t cherry pick which sciences to choose and which to ignore as all of
them—biomedical sciences, chemistry, biology, and, yes, climatology all proceed by the same
processes and evaluations.

13
As has been said many times, would you go to an auto mechanic who has a new theory
about cancer? Or would you go to a surgeon specializing in cancer? I choose the expert
climatologists every time.

Dr. Richard Kaplan​ ​is an Adjunct Professor at Arcadia University in Glenside, PA, a volunteer
for PennEnvironment and a retired pharmaceutical environmental executive; from Fort
Washington, he can be contacted by email at ​rnmnk@aol.com​.
Related Stories:
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House Environmental Committee Holds Info Meeting March 27 On Debunking Modern Myths
Surrounding Climate Change
Community Solar Legislative Forum April 3 In Wilkes-Barre
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation & Carbon
Dividend Act
NewsClips:
Mennonite Church In Lancaster Constructs EV Charging Station
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Penn Aims To Be Carbon Neutral By 2042
Editorial: Listen To, Support Students Speaking Out On Climate Change
AP: Report: Great Lakes Feeling Effects Of Rapid Climate Warming
Lessons Learned After Puerto Rican Hurricane Evacuees Came To Philly
Olson: Casey: Green New Deal Worthy Of Review
Olson: Cong. Wild Talks Green New Deal, Trump Investigations, More
U.S. Court Halts Drilling On Federal Land In Wyoming Over Climate Change
AP: EPA Argues For Shifting Focus From Climate Change To Water
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

Phipps' Center For Sustainable Landscapes In Pittsburgh First Project In World To Be


Awarded SITES Platinum Certification

On March 21, the ​Phipps Conservatory and


Botanical Gardens​ announced the ​Center for
Sustainable Landscapes​ (CSL) is the first
project in the world to be certified at the
Platinum level under the ​Sustainable SITES
Initiative​ (SITES) v2 Rating System.
Owned and administered by Green Business
Certification Inc. (GBCI), SITES is the most
comprehensive program for designing,
developing and maintaining sustainable
landscapes.
When it opened in 2012, the CSL was the
first and only project to receive SITES 2009 Pilot Four Star certification. It continues to set new
records as the first project to be certified as SITES Platinum.
In order to achieve SITES v2 certification, the CSL needed to meet the new requirements

14
of the SITES v2 Rating System, which builds on the prior SITES 2009 pilot rating system.
The CSL is one of the greenest projects in the world, developed as an education, research
and administrative building which was built over a previously documented brownfield.
Dedicated to restoring this site, it has successfully reintroduced 100 native plant species
to the surrounding area.
The CSL is net-zero energy and net-zero water, generating its own energy through
photovoltaic solar panels and a wind turbine, and capturing and treating all water onsite for
reuse.
The SITES rating system is based on the understanding that land is a crucial part of our
built environment and by fostering its resiliency, we elevate its economic, environmental and
social benefits.
SITES provides best practices and benchmarks projects against performance criteria,
enabling the market to be rewarded for their leadership in sustainability.
Used by landscape architects, engineers, architects, developers, policy makers and others,
SITES creates regenerative systems and fosters resiliency; ensures future resource supply and
mitigates climate change; transforms the market through design, development and maintenance
practices; and enhances human wellbeing and strengthens the community.
SITES-certified projects are better able to withstand and recover from floods, droughts,
wildfires and other catastrophic events. Projects can help reduce water and energy demand,
improve air quality and promote human health and wellbeing.
SITES was originally developed through a collaborative, interdisciplinary effort of the
American Society of Landscape Architects, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the
University of Texas at Austin, and the United States Botanic Garden.
The rating system can be applied to development projects located on sites with or without
buildings and draws on the experience gained from a two-year pilot program involving more
than 100 projects.
Projects that have achieved certification include corporate headquarters, national and city
parks, academic campuses and streetscapes. For more information, visit the ​Sustainable SITES
Initiative​ website.
The ​Center for Sustainable Landscapes​ is open for the public to tour, free with the cost of
Phipps admission.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Phipps
Conservatory and Botanical Gardens​ website.
Founded in 1893, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Pittsburgh is a globally
recognized green leader with a mission to inspire and educate all with the beauty and importance
of plants; to advance sustainability and promote human and environmental well-being through
action and research; and to celebrate its historic glasshouse.
Encompassing 15 acres including a historic 14-room glasshouse, 23 distinct indoor and
outdoor gardens and industry-leading sustainable architecture and operations, Phipps attracts
nearly half a million visitors annually from around the world.
Related Stories:
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Award-Winning Master Watershed Steward Projects Across Pennsylvania
Ted Evgeniadis, Lower Susquehanna RiverKeeper, Recognized By York County Master
Watershed Stewards

15
Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County, Watershed Steward
NewsClips:
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Lehigh Valley Leaders Discuss Efforts To Go Green
First Ever Eco-Innovation District Brings Sustainable Redevelopment To Uptown, West
Oakland
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

Sustainable Pittsburgh Announces Winners Of Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge

On March 21, ​Sustainable Pittsburgh


revealed the winners of the 2018-2019
Sustainable Pittsburgh (SP) Challenge
during a celebration at PNC Park on the
North Shore.
A 13-month friendly competition,
the SP Challenge enables businesses,
nonprofits, municipalities, universities, and
K-12 schools to track sustainability
performance and receive positive
recognition for their achievements.
More than 100 employers from
throughout southwestern Pennsylvania
demonstrated their commitments to sustainability and completed the competition.
Combined, these organizations took 2,209 sustainable actions, each of which earned them
points in the challenge.
Examples of actions include: reducing energy and water usage, monitoring indoor air
quality, implementing policies on supplier diversity and supplier code of conduct, creating a
workplace sustainability team, and encouraging carpooling and other alternative forms of
transportation.
The actions fall within seven sustainability focus areas: Air Quality, Materials
Management, Social Equity, Engagement, Energy, Water, and Transportation.
Among this year’s achievements is the collective energy savings achieved. Energy usage
includes more than just electricity; it also includes natural gas and district steam.
The aggregated savings by this year’s participants are enough to power a whopping 7,978
average Pittsburgh single-family homes for one year. This translates to more than 80 million
kWh of energy and $6,274,423 in cost savings!
Participants also saved enough water to fill more than 30 Olympic-size swimming
pools—or PNC Park to a depth of 28.1 feet (as high as a three-story building)! Water savings
totaled more than 20 million gallons.
Based on pre and post transportation surveys, participating organizations also avoided an
average of 200 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions annually, per person.

16
The winners of the Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge, in each of their divisions, are as
follows:
-- Micro Business: ​3R Building Sustainability​ (A first time participant for the competition)
Small Business: Pashek + MTR (Pashek Associates, prior to becoming Pashek + MTR, won its
division in the 2014-2015 competition)
-- Medium Business: ​Tetra Tech​ (A first time participant for the competition)
-- Large Business: ​Highmark Health​ (Winner for a third consecutive competition)
-- Micro Nonprofit: ​Millvale Community Library​ (A come-from-behind winner to clinch the
top spot for a second consecutive competition)
-- Small Nonprofit: ​Conservation Consultants, Inc​.​ (Winner for a second consecutive
competition)
-- Medium Nonprofit: ​Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank​ (Also a People’s Choice
Nominee)
-- Large Nonprofit: ​Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh​ (Winner from 2014-15 competition)
-- Micro Municipality: ​Etna Borough​ (Past participant; mentored by long time participant
Allegheny County. Etna is also in the process of obtaining ​EcoDistrict Certification​, a
complementary program.)
-- Small Municipality: ​Borough of Monaca​ (Winner from 2014-15 competition)
-- ​Medium Municipality: ​Moon Township​ (Three-time participant, first-time winner)
-- ​Large Municipality: ​Allegheny County​ (Participated in all five competitions and won each
year in its division) University Category: University of Pittsburgh (Participated in four
competitions and won its division in each year)
-- ​K-12 Schools: ​Environmental Charter School
K-12 Schools
Sustainable Pittsburgh also hosted an abbreviated, 18-week challenge for K-12 Schools,
designed specifically for teachers and students to easily participate in sustainability actions. This
is different from the K-12 Schools category for the 13-month competition listed above.
The winner of the K-12 School Classroom Challenge is ​Central Catholic High School​.
“More than 300 unique organizations have participated in the Challenge since 2011,” said
Autumn Secrest, Sustainable Business Program Manager for Sustainable Pittsburgh. “Their
participation has shaped the program as much as the program has shaped their work. For every
Challenge, organizations bring innovative ideas and solutions that we later incorporate into the
program.
“This is why we say, ‘Every Action Makes a Difference’ – because even small ideas,
multiplied by hundreds of employees across multiple sectors, can result in great impact across
the region.”
Top Savers
Sustainable Pittsburgh also presented Top Energy Saver, Top Water Saver, and Top
Waste Saver Awards.
The ​Top Energy Saver Award​ is presented to the organization that achieved the highest
percentage of measured reduction in workspace energy consumption from this competition year
compared to the prior year, as measured using the US EPA’s Energy Star Portfolio Manager.
Sustainable Pittsburgh presented the ​Borough of Etna​ with the Top Energy Saver Award.
Etna reduced energy usage by an impressive 25 percent over the course of the year.
Similarly, the ​Top Water Saver Award​ is presented to the organization that achieved

17
the highest percentage of measured reduction in workspace water consumption from this
competition year compared to the prior year, also measured using EPA’s Energy Star Portfolio
Manager.
Conservation Consultants, Inc​. received the Top Water Saver Award, having reduced
water usage 31 percent.
Conservation Consultants, Inc​. also earned the ​Top Waste Saver Award​, reducing its
overall waste by a third and achieving a consistent diversion rate of 74 percent or more as
measured in Portfolio Manager.
A recent waste audit performed by the ​Pennsylvania Resources Council​ determined a 95
percent diversion rate.
Transportation Impact
Sustainable Pittsburgh announced ​Transportation Impact Saver:​ ​Pashek + MTR​, which
reduced average weekly commuter emissions by 73.72 percent. They achieved this remarkable
reduction by leveraging a work-from-home policy.
People’s Choice
The inaugural ​People’s Choice Award ​recognizes one organization for its innovative or
inspiring sustainability solutions, initiatives, or actions. Each organization that participated in the
SP Challenge was eligible to cast a vote for their nominee of choice.
Of the four nominees — Allegheny County, Allegheny County Airport Authority,
Borough of Etna, and Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank — the ​Borough of Etna​ ​won
the People’s Choice Award ​with 46 percent of the votes.
All winners received special awards made from ​Rivanna Natural Designs​, a certified B
Corp offering planet-friendly alternatives to traditional trophies and plaques.
The ​Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge​ is an initiative of ​Sustainable Pittsburgh’s
Champions for Sustainability​ business network. The Pittsburgh Business Times and
NEXTpittsburgh are Media Sponsors.
For more information on the program, visit the ​Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge​ website
or contact Autumn Secrest by sending email to: ​asecrest@sustainablepittsburgh.org​.
Visit the ​Sustainable Pittsburgh​ website for more information on its programs, initiatives
and upcoming events.
NewsClips:
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Lehigh Valley Leaders Discuss Efforts To Go Green
First Ever Eco-Innovation District Brings Sustainable Redevelopment To Uptown, West
Oakland
Related Stories:
Phipps' Center For Sustainable Landscapes In Pittsburgh First Project In World To Be Awarded
SITES Platinum Certification
Award-Winning Master Watershed Steward Projects Across Pennsylvania
Ted Evgeniadis, Lower Susquehanna RiverKeeper, Recognized By York County Master
Watershed Stewards
Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County, Watershed Steward

18
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor's Environmental Excellence


Award

The ​Westmoreland Conservation District​ has been


selected as one of ​18 statewide recipients of the 2019
Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence​ in
Pennsylvania.
The District is receiving the award for a two-part
educational video it produced about stormwater basins.
Stormwater basins are one of the unsung heroes of our
communities. They preventing problems such as
erosion and flooding by collecting water runoff from
residential housing plans, commercial sites, and other
developments, and then slowly releasing it.
Almost all communities have built stormwater basins over the years and many now face
the challenges of how to maintain them and/or how to manage the increased runoff that comes
with more development.
The videos describe how to assess how well a basin is functioning, and how to retrofit it
if necessary to handle additional runoff and/or to meet new standards for water quality (basins
also capture sediment and debris, keeping it out of streams and rivers).
The videos were shown at several District education events in 2018 and are now available
for viewing on the ​Westmoreland Conservation District’s website​.
Each year, the Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence highlights those projects
that promote innovative technological advances, partnerships, public service and environmental
outreach as well as encourage pollution prevention, demonstrate economic impact or employ
innovative technology.
The District previously won this award in 2005 for its innovative barn headquarters,
which features many recycled materials, and energy-efficient and water-saving features.
Awards Dinner
Click Here​ for more information on the April 16 dinner for winners of the Governor’s
Award for Environmental Excellence.
For more information on this awards program and for past winners, visit the ​2019
Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence​ webpage.
Related Stories:
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Game Commission Manager Lauren Ferreri Recognized For Conservation Achievements
Phipps' Center For Sustainable Landscapes In Pittsburgh First Project In World To Be Awarded
SITES Platinum Certification
Sustainable Pittsburgh Announces Winners Of Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge
Award-Winning Master Watershed Steward Projects Across Pennsylvania
Ted Evgeniadis, Lower Susquehanna RiverKeeper, Recognized By York County Master
Watershed Stewards
Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award

19
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County, Watershed Steward
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

Award-Winning Master Watershed Steward Projects Across Pennsylvania

The Penn State Extension ​Master Watershed


Steward Program​ partnered with the ​PA
Environmental Council​ to host the Statewide
Watershed Conference in February.
At the conference, the Master Watershed
Steward Program presented its first Search
for Excellence Awards to acknowledge
outstanding projects across the state in four
categories: Youth Programs, Restoration
Projects, Innovative Projects and Monitoring
and Research projects.
The ​Lehigh and Northampton County
program​ won the Youth Program award for their Junior Master Watershed Steward program.
This project was led by Master Watershed Steward Charlie Kopcho.
This pilot program was completed in partnership with the Watershed Coalition of the
Lehigh Valley, the Northampton County 4-H program and the Northampton County
Conservation District.
Charlie and the partners worked with 46 youth at Saucon Valley High School. Students
were taught about the physical, biological, and chemical properties of water and water’s
importance in local ecology.
Students planted a streamside pollinator garden as a buffer and will continue to monitor
the parameters of Polk Valley Run on the school’s property.
The ​York County program​ won the Restoration Project award for their work on a
bioswale in Windsor Township.
Carol McDonald, Diane Oleson, Scott Runkle, and Mark Spangenberg worked with
Windsor Township to convert an existing drainage swale into a bioswale in Freysville Park.
The turf grass was removed and replaced with rocks to decrease erosion at the inlet pipe.
They installed three check dams to slow the movement of water, and planted approximately
2,000 native grasses and perennials plugs to improve water quality. The bioswale is about 2,500
square feet.
The Stewards plan to monitor the site and incorporate educational signage.
The ​Lackawanna/Luzerne/Wyoming county program​ won the Innovative Project
award for the Greater Hazleton Rails to Trails Remote Dog Fountain.
Master Watershed Steward Gary Leander worked with the Pennsylvania Association of
Realtors, students from a local Job Corps Center, and employees from American Eagle to install
a drinking water site for dogs along an isolated section of the Greater Hazleton Rail trail.
They did this by building a pavilion, capturing, and filtering rain into a rain barrel. This
project serves as a demonstration for rain barrels and by utilizing a first flush system and gravity

20
filters, the system filters out bacteria and protozoa.
The ​Bucks County program​ won the Monitoring/Research award for their stream bank
erosion monitoring program.
Ed Hawkley, Susan Hothman, Phyllis McCabe, Scott Sinclair, Jim Walter partnered with
the Bucks County Conservation District to monitor stream bank erosion along 18 monitoring
sites on three streams: Poquessing Creek, Neshaminy Creek and Cooks Creek.
Prior to this study, no data was available on the rate of erosion of stream banks in Bucks
county. This data, collected by recording measurements on re-bar hammered into the banks, will
help municipalities target areas that require mitigation.
The Master Watershed Steward Program also recognized ​Carol Armstrong​, the first
Master Watershed Steward in the state to reach 1,000 hours of volunteer service.
Carol participates in the ​Delaware/Chester County program​ and spends her volunteer
time installing rain gardens and native habitats, monitoring three EnviroDIY sites with ​Stroud
Water Research Center​ and their partners, supporting development of a stream monitoring
training program, providing various outreach to the public through presentations and festivals,
and much more.
Congratulations to all of these worthy awardees for their contributions to watershed
education across the state!!
For more information on watershed stewards, visit the Penn State Extension ​Master
Watershed Steward Program​ webpage.
(Reprinted from the ​March 21 Penn State Extension Watershed Winds​ newsletter.)
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Watershed Stewards
Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County, Watershed Steward
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

Ted Evgeniadis, Lower Susquehanna RiverKeeper, Recognized By York County Master


Watershed Stewards

The Penn State ​Master Watershed Stewards in


York County​ presented Ted Evgeniadis, the ​Lower
Susquehanna Riverkeeper,​ with the 2018
Outstanding Partner Award at their MWS Winter
Celebration in February.
Partnerships are the keystone to building a
successful Master Watershed Steward Program.

21
By working together with other conservation agencies and organizations, watershed associations
and municipalities, we can stretch limited conservation funds and leverage resources to increase
watershed restoration and awareness efforts.
Even though we are two very different agencies, our collaboration and partnership with
the Lower Susquehanna Riverkeeper Association in York County has been a great success.
The Lower Susquehanna Riverkeeper Association is dedicated to the improvement and
preservation of the ecology and aesthetic qualities of the Lower Susquehanna and Juniata
watersheds.
The Lower Susquehanna Riverkeeper works not only as an alliance builder, diplomat,
and educator, but also as an unrelenting defender and advocate of our right and the river’s right
to be healthy and prosperous.
The LSR utilizes education, chemical and biological monitoring, pollution patrols,
partnership building, public events, research and legal action to improve the health of the
Susquehanna’s waterways.
Looking back over 2018, the Master Watershed Stewards partnered with the Lower
Susquehanna Riverkeeper on several projects, including the Mayfly Festival, the Street 2 Creek
Storm Drain Art Project, the Youth and Family Fishing and Conservation Day, stream
monitoring, stream clean ups, restoration projects and more.
At the end of 2018, Master Watershed Stewards teamed up with the Lower Susquehanna
Riverkeeper Association and ALLARM (​Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring​) out of
Dickinson College to implement a larger water quality monitoring program in York County.
Findings through the monitoring program can help York County make more informed
watershed management decisions. We look forward to partnering on this endeavor in 2019 and
beyond.
We also plan to work together to expand the Street 2 Creek Project and offer another
Youth and Family Fishing and Conservation Day in the City of York.
It’s been a pleasure to work with Ted, and we look forward to a continued partnership.
Together, we can continue to protect our water resources quality in York County.
More information about the Master Watershed Steward Program can be found on the
York County Extension​ page.
For more information on watershed stewards, visit the Penn State Extension ​Master
Watershed Steward Program​ webpage.
(​Photo: ​Ted Evgeniadis – Lower Susquehanna Riverkeeper, Jodi Sulpizio - MWS Coordinator,
York County Extension, Donna Scherer – Penn State Extension Client Relations Manager, and
Doug Hoke - York County Commissioner.)
(Reprinted from the ​March 21 Penn State Extension Watershed Winds​ newsletter.)
Related Stories:
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Sustainable Pittsburgh Announces Winners Of Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge
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Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County, Watershed Steward

22
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County Watershed Steward

Jodi Sulpizio’s love of nature and the environment began as a


child, roaming around the surrounding forests, fields, and streams
of her grandparent’s farm
After college, she worked at the ​Nixon Park Nature Center
for York County Parks, where she furthered her passion for
conservation. The opportunity helped her see how all things are
connected in fragile ecosystems, and that our natural resources
aren’t infinite and must be protected.
Now, as natural resource educator for Penn State Extension
York County and head of its ​Master Watershed Stewards Program​,
she shares that passion through an inspiring show of stewardship
and education of others about stream health and water quality.
Jodi is constantly out and about in York County with her
stewards and trainees, designing and planting rain gardens, doing stream restoration work and
health monitoring, working at water quality exhibits during public events, and so on.
In her role, Jodi stays informed about the scientific research on stormwater runoff
pollution and best methods to protect drinking water and watersheds, and makes that knowledge
understandable to just about any resident of the county.
She develops materials and attends opportunities to educate everyone from elementary
school students, to homeowners, to government officials about the importance of stream health
and water quality.
A large part of her responsibility is providing others with the knowledge and skills to
carry out projects to improve stream health through the ​Penn State Extension Master Watershed
Steward Program​.
Volunteers complete 40 hours of training on watersheds, groundwater, stream ecology,
invasive species, stormwater management, and more.
They then volunteer by offering educational programming and completing stream
restoration projects in their communities. The program is established in 13 counties and will start
in five more counties in 2019.
York County launched the program in 2016 in partnership with the ​York County
Conservation District ​and the ​Watershed Alliance of York​.
There are now 53 trained Master Watershed Stewards in York County, and 21 new
volunteers in training this spring. The volunteers work on projects such as:
-- Designing and planting rain gardens
-- Planting trees on streambanks (riparian buffers)
-- Invasive species control
-- Stream monitoring and cleanups
Jodi also works with the Penn State Extension’s ​Forest Steward​ and ​Master Well Owner
Network​ programs, as well as with DCNR as a county coordinator for the ​Gypsy Moth Program​.

23
“Everyone plays a part, and everyone can make a difference,” says Jodi. “Any volunteer
or work experience you can acquire, the better,” she says.
Know of a good natured Pennsylvanian who is passionate about outdoor recreation and/or
conservation that we should feature? Contact DCNR by sending email to: ​ra-resource@pa.gov​ to
nominate someone.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.

(Reprinted from the March 20 DCNR Resource newsletter. ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own
copy.)
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
Phipps' Center For Sustainable Landscapes In Pittsburgh First Project In World To Be Awarded
SITES Platinum Certification
Sustainable Pittsburgh Announces Winners Of Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge
Award-Winning Master Watershed Steward Projects Across Pennsylvania
Ted Evgeniadis, Lower Susquehanna RiverKeeper, Recognized By York County Master
Watershed Stewards
Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal
For Conservation

Peter Livengood, a 12th grade student from Fayette


County, was recently notified he has been awarded the
Boy Scouts of America William T. Hornaday Silver
Medal for Conservation for completing 4 major
conservation projects in and around his community.
The ​William T. Hornaday Silver Medal​ is one of the
most prestigious awards in the Boy Scouting program
and is often described as an Olympic Medal for
conservation work by a Boy Scout. An average of only 3
Medals have been given out annually since 1975.
“I am thankful for the many donors, volunteers, and
natural resource professionals who contributed to these
projects. I certainly could not have completed the
projects without their help,” said Livengood.

24
Livengood is a homeschooled student from near Ohiopyle and​ ​has been a Boy Scout
since 2013 in Troop #687 in Farmington and lives on a small family farm.
He has been a certified ​Conservation Ambassador​ by the PA Wildlife Leadership
Academy since 2015, attended the ​Penn State Conservation Leadership School​ ​in 2016 and
2017, is a member of the ​Allegheny Plateau Audubon Society​ and was appointed to the
Governor's Youth Advisory Council on Hunting, Fishing and Conservation​.
He was also ​recognized for is work in and around Ohiopyle State Park​ in Fayette County
by DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn.
4 Conservation Projects
To win the Medal, Livengood completed 4 major conservation projects. Here’s how he
describes them--
-- Project #1. Restoring the Bioswales in Ohiopyle, PA:​ Bioswales are street-side green
landscape elements that collect and purify stormwater runoff. There are 30 bioswales in the
Ohiopyle borough, comprising nearly 4,000 square feet of biofilter area. The Ohiopyle
Bioswales had not been properly maintained for ten years, which left them non-functioning. My
renovation project involved a total of 1,977 total man-hours, including 586 hours of my own
time. The monetary value of my project was approximately $25,000 dollars, which I completely
funded through material and monetary donations. I developed a detailed Maintenance Manual
and assisted the Borough with hiring a bioswale maintenance official, who is currently employed
with the funding I raised. I helped the Borough develop several ongoing fundraising ideas,
including a GoFundMe page, ​www.gf.me/u/katnks​ ​Click Here for more.​
-- Project #2: Researching Raptors on Chestnut Ridge in southwestern PA:​ I discovered a
previously undocumented bird of prey migration flyway on Chestnut Ridge in the western
Allegheny Mountains of Pennsylvania. I founded the Summit Mountain Hawkwatch on this
flyway, ​https://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=802​ which is now the farthest west ridge
hawkwatch in Pennsylvania, with spring and fall migration to be conducted each year. Even
though the project ended last summer, I am still working to set up a long-term hawkwatch site
with consistent official counters. The project took 926 hours, 388 of which were my own. ​Click
Here for more.​
-- Project #3: Saving Cranberry Glade Lake – A Research Assessment:​ I performed baseline
research on Cranberry Glade Lake in Somerset County, PA to assist the PA Fish & Boat
Commission with managing overgrown aquatic vegetation. I specifically considered the
feasibility and sustainability of introducing Triploid Grass Carp to control weeds. I led 571 hours
of research, 240 of which were my own, assessing depth and temperature profile, plant species
presence and prevalence, nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate levels, and more. ​Click Here for more​.
-- Project #4: Restoring the Forest Understory: ​This project took place in the Ohiopyle State
Park Kentuck Campground. The forest understory in the Campground area had been seriously
depleted. I worked with the Park Manager and completed vegetation assessments of the native
plants in the surrounding areas and created an Understory Restoration Plan. I led 545 hours of
research on this project, 204 hours of which were my own. We also determined the causes of the
understory depletion (absence of tent pads, signage, or defined parking) and looked at ways to
mitigate these causes. The Ohiopyle State Park Manager will use my Understory Restoration
Plan in future years to rehabilitate the Campground area. ​Click Here for more.​
Livengood will be presented with the Hornaday Silver Medal and the Eagle Scout Rank
at a Court of Honor Ceremony in the near future.

25
He can be contacted by sending email to: ​PeterE.Livengood@gmail.com​.
(​Photo:​ Livengood accepting the Conservation Award from DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams
Dunn.)
Related Stories:
DCNR Recognizes Boy Scout Peter Livengood With Conservation Award For Projects In And
Near Ohiopyle State Park
Restoring Blooming Bioswales For A Better Youghiogheny River In Ohiopyle Borough
Restoring The Understory At Ohiopyle State Park’s Kentuck Campground
Setting Up A Raptor Observation Area On Chestnut Ridge Near Uniontown
Saving Cranberry Glade Lake
Times-Tribune: Teen Girl Scout Earns Silver Award With Trail Project In Lackawanna County
Related Stories This Week:
Phipps' Center For Sustainable Landscapes In Pittsburgh First Project In World To Be Awarded
SITES Platinum Certification
Sustainable Pittsburgh Announces Winners Of Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge
Award-Winning Master Watershed Steward Projects Across Pennsylvania
Ted Evgeniadis, Lower Susquehanna RiverKeeper, Recognized By York County Master
Watershed Stewards
Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award
DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County, Watershed Steward
CBF-PA: Media Invited To Paddle Along As Students Explore Local PA Waterways
PA Green Colleges Hold Conference On Sustainable Development Goals And Higher Education
April 9 In State College
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

Op-Ed: Will Our Dirt Roads Again Be Used As Dumping Sites For Oil & Gas Well
Wastewater

By Siri Lawson, Farmington Township, Warren County

The oil and gas industry in Pennsylvania produces


hundreds of millions of gallons of unusable
wastewater and production fluids annually. This
figure may be low.
Recently released findings from ​Duke
University state water usage​ [nationwide] per
drilled well may have been underestimated by 770
percent. Correspondingly, unusable brine fluids
may have been underestimated by 1,440 percent.
Duke University states if drilling picks up,
these numbers could multiply 50 times over.
Pennsylvania’s oil and gas industry used the state’s dirt roads as a dump site for their
wastewater until 2018. Dirt roads were being inundated with brine.
My township was among those that had allowed catastrophic over-brining. In 2017, it
became necessary to ​pursue legal action to get it stopped​.

26
The PaDEP [Department of Environmental Protection] initiated a surprise, but welcome
statewide ban on the road spreading of oil and gas wastewater about halfway through legal action
(​Environmental Hearing Board 2017-051-B)​.
That allowed the Pennsylvania Legislature to step into the gap and introduce ​House Bill
2154​ [Causer-R-Cameron] and ​Senate Bill 1088​ [Hutchinson-R-Venango] to benefit the oil and
gas industry. These bill would have reinstated the use of Commonwealth dirt roads as dump
sites for oil and gas wastewater.
2018 passed without the PaDEP brining ban being lifted either legislatively or by
regulation. 2019 awaits a resolution.
Real scientific, legal, environmental and health questions complete against what has
become a monetarily convenient and shockingly short-sighted disposal give-away to the energy
production industry.
I have been called a “fear-monger” and believer in “fake” science for my opposition to
dirt road brining.
My township is all about hills and water. Expert reports prepared for my lawsuit showed
the guidelines the DEP uses to allow dirt road brine spreading are monumentally disconnected
from real-time hydrological and topographical field conditions in Farmington Township.
Hydrologically, it is impossible to avoid massive collateral contamination from road
spreading of brine. Topographically, percent-grade analysis maps proved neither the DEP nor
the township knew how steep township roads were.
Brine haulers have been required to obtain yearly plan approvals from the DEP in order
to road-spread brine fluids. One mandate, which is impossible to enforce, is that all wastwaters
come from shallower “conventional” hydrocarbon producing formations and not the deeper
“unconventional” shale layers.
Another unenforced mandate is the required submission of a very limited chemical
analysis on the brine.
My lawsuit compared the test results submitted by haulers authorized to spread in
Farmington Township to the known parameters of Marcellus Shale. The two were then graphed.
Farmington Township results labeled “conventional” dramatically exceeded results
coming from “unconventional” shale wastewater test samples.
Chlorides spread on the roads in my township routinely extended upwards of 73,000
mg/l. That figure is 317 times greater than the concentration the DEP states is toxic to aquatic
life. (“A Hydrologic Case Study of PA Brine Spreading Practice,” 2018 Hydroquest)
In 2018, ​Penn State noted salt concentrations in brine​ can be so high they require 1600
dilutions just to reach drinking water standards.
Dirt road residents are told oil and gas wastewater is beneficial to the dirt roads. We are
told if brine is spread on our roads, dust will be suppressed and the road will be stabilized.
A noted soil scientist took an in-depth and now published review of what happens to a
dirt road when it is brined.
Soil science refutes the claim that brine suppresses dust. The physical and chemical
properties of oil and gas wastewater cause the particles and layers of a dirt road to destabilize.
Widespread road degradation results.
Immediately after brining, the road’s travel surface becomes slippery and sloppy. Wet
weather makes brined roads nearly impassable. The roads fill with surface washing and
potholes.

27
Dry weather causes brined roads to develop a concrete-like surface veneer that friates
into choking clouds of toxically enriched fine particulate dust. In fact, “... it is very likely the
dust produced from just a single application of brine would exceed action levels or cleanup
standards set by the EPA or DEP…” (“​Oil and Gas Well Brines For Dust Control- Part 1:
Ineffectiveness​” Dr. Bryce Payne, ESJ 2018)
We have learned oil and gas wastewater is radioactive. Surface waters and stream
sediments below waste treatment plants designated competent to treat brine for disposal have
been found to be 650 times more radioactive than those above the facility. Some exceed the
radioactivity levels that required disposal at federally designated waste disposal sites. (2018,
Nicholas School of Environment, Duke University “​Radioactivity Persists in Pennsylvania
Stream Sediments.​”)
Research projects from Penn State give pause to dirt road disposal of oil and gas
wastewater. Penn State found brine carries significant radioactivity. They found oil and gas
wastewater readily migrates from the road surface it is applied to.
Their research documented long term bioaccumulation in aquatic life such as fresh water
mussels and water fleas. Penn State also raised the alarm that that exposure to oil and gas brine
could have a negative impact on human health.
Semantics, or word-play, has become the lifeblood of the official dog-chased-tail debate
over disposal of oil and gas wastewater on dirt roads.
In late summer of 2018, several roads in Northwest Pennsylvania appeared to be heavily
brined. That fact was confirmed by PaDEP.
In recent years, entrepreneurs have begun extracting and marketing brine fluids from
hydrocarbon wells no longer capable of oil and gas production.
Promotional claims state, “this brine does not contain any harmful chemicals or oil often
found in gas well brine…” (​LS-25 Fact Sheet​, Seneca Mineral Company)
Calling these brine fluids “naturally occurring” “...that is pumped from the ground to our
storage tanks and then delivered directly to our customers.” (​LS-25 Fact Sheet​, Seneca Mineral
Company)
Word-play has allowed these wastewaters to be re-labeled as a “product.” Designation as
a “product” allows these particular brines to escape PaDEP regulation and avoid being affected
by the 2018 statewide brine ban. (​2019 Minutes DEP Citizens Advisory Council)​.
Traditional oil and gas producers are also hoping that deflection and semantics will allow
their wastewaters to change their physical and chemical nature. Product, co-product, co-product
definitions, co-product determinations, commodity, processed, similarity, stakeholder, benign
ancient sea water.
Northwest Pennsylvania is littered with hydrocarbon wells that are “watered out,” no
longer capable of fossil fuel production. “Under solid waste management regulation, if a waste
product mimics an intentionally produced product that does not otherwise present harm to the
environment, that waste product can be deemed a co-product and used in the same manner.”
(​2019 DEP Citizens Advisory Council minutes​).
This is a loophole and opportunity that oil and gas operators are evaluating. (​2019 DEP
Citizens Advisory Council​ minutes).
Most ominously, it is stated in ​these same minutes​, that “The Department has not noted
any environmental impact from the use of brine as a dust suppressant.”
On December 8, 2018, the oil and gas industry placed a full page ad in the Pittsburgh

28
Post Gazette. The ad was titled, “The Power Of Partners.”
Twenty-six energy companies formed a partnership in 2017 with the stated goal of
improving their environmental footprint. A year later there were 52 “partners” with names
recognizable to all Western Pennsylvanians.
In print, these companies committed to taking action to using “best practices” to
responsibly develop essential oil and gas resources. Implied was the oil and gas industry would
use their great ability to innovate to avoid great destruction.
I would say collectively to the above Energy Partners, the rest of the oil and gas industry,
politicians, township supervisors and the PaDEP: by allowing Pennsylvania’s dirt roads to
become a disposal location for oil and gas wastewater, you have dug a very deep hole.
That you continue to fight to do so is beyond comprehension. Great innovation should
bring with it great responsibility.
The oil and gas industry has the money, the power and this ability to enact positive
change. Disposing of oil and gas wastewater without compounding harm would be a terrific
place to start.
[​Note:​ Scott Perry, DEP Deputy Secretary for Oil and Gas Management, ​told DEP’s
Citizens Advisory Council on January 22​ DEP currently has no plans to develop a regulation or
permit to authorize the use of brine as a dust suppressant and have not issued any new
authorizations since the appeal to the Environmental Hearing Board case was dismissed after
DEP agreed to implement a ban on new authorizations. He said DEP has not noted any
environmental impact from the use of brine as a dust suppressant. He added there continues to be
significant public interest in those areas that have historically used brine for dust suppressant to
continue to use it. While there has no official action by DEP, discussions are ongoing with the
Crude Oil Development Advisory Council ​on the issue.
[However, Perry said brine from ​Seneca Mineral​ [in Erie] is still being used for de-icing
and dust suppression purposes because the brine the company produces from its wells is
considered a product-- LS 25-- under the beneficial use provisions of the state Solid Waste
Management Act. He said DEP does not require an application for the use but can request the
product determination materials and evaluate whether the material metts a product definition. He
added conventional well operators are evaluating that opportunity. ​From CAC January 22
meeting minutes.​
[On March 21, DEP told the members of the ​Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ that
they plan to included updated requirements covering the spreading of brine on roads in the next
draft of the Chapter 78 oil and gas regulations on conventional drilling operations.]
(​Photos:​ L- Brine in a roadside ditch which ran into a stream about 1,000 feet from where this
photo was taken, R- Old Slate Road was heavily brined the day before (Sept. 26, 2017), by Siri
Lawson.)
(Comments on this article can be sent to: ​PaEnviroDigest@gmail.com.​ )
Related Story:
Op-Ed: The Story Behind Stopping Conventional Oil & Gas Brine Spreading On Dirt Roads
Related Stories This Week:
March 27 DEP Meeting On Proposed Drilling Permits At U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson Plant,
Allegheny County
PUC Pipeline Safety Investigation Underway Involving Possible Sunoco Gasoline Pipeline Leak
In Berks County On March 17

29
Dueling Press Conferences Pit Opponents Of Mariner East Pipeline Against Those Supporting
Pipeline Development
House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If DRBC
Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For Drilling
Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

Senate/House Bills Moving Last Week

The following bills of interest saw action last week in the House and Senate--

House

Farmland Preservation-Wind Energy:​ ​House Bill 441​ (Sonney-R-Erie) amending the


Agricultural Area Security Law to allow wind energy facilities on preserved land (​House Fiscal
Note​ and summary). The bill now goes to the Senate for action.

Farmland Preservation:​ ​House Bill 370​ (Klunk-R-York) amending the Agricultural Area
Security Law to provide for the voluntary relinquishment of the right to construct a residence to
further reduce the value of the property (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was reported from the
House Appropriations Committee and passed by the House. The bill now goes to the Senate for
action.

Tree Of Heaven:​ ​House Bill 404​ (Lawrence-R-Chester) designating the tree of heaven,
preferred home for the spotted lanternfly (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was reported from
the House Appropriations Committee and passed by the House. The bill now goes to the Senate
for action.

Removing Game Lands Purchase Cap: ​House Bill 752​ (Turzai-R-Allegheny) removing the
purchase price cap on state game lands (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was passed by the
House and now goes to the Senate for action.

Water System Valuation: ​House Bill 751​ (Roae-R-Crawford) further providing for the
valuation of wastewater and water systems for ratemaking purposes, revising the definition of
service line (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary) was passed by the House and now goes to the
Senate for action.

Flood Insurance​: ​House Bill 328​ (Warren-D- Bucks) establishing a Flood Insurance Premium
Assistance Task Force (​sponsor summary​) was amended and reported out of the House Insurance
Committee and Tabled.

PennDOT-Native Vegetation:​ ​House Bill 447​ (B.Miller-R-Lancaster) require PennDOT to


plant native vegetation along state highways (​sponsor summary​) was reported out of the House
Transportation Committee and Tabled.
30
Cross Unit Drilling/Pooling:​ ​House Bill 247​ (Oberlander-R-Clarion) to allow cross unit
unconventional drilling and authorizes voluntary pooling was amended and reported out of the
House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee and is now on the House Calendar for
action..

Senate

Nominations:​ the nominations Of McDonnell At DEP, Dunn at DCNR were referred to the
Senate Environmental Committee and Redding At Agriculture to the Senate Agriculture
Committee for consideration.

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (March 25): ​House Bill 247​ (Oberlander-R-Clarion) to allow cross unit unconventional
drilling and authorizes voluntary pooling ; ​House Bill 374 ​(Everett-R- Lycoming) establishing
the Keystone Tree Fund to support tree planting programs by the Department of Conservation
and Natural Resources (​sponsor summary​)​ ​ <> ​Click Here​ for full House Bill Calendar.

Senate (March 25): ​Senate Bill 147​ (Laughlin-R-Erie) authorizing the Game Commission to
allow Sunday hunting. ​Click Here​ for full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meetings This Week

House:​ the ​Game and Fisheries Committee​ meets to consider ​House Bill 808​ (Mehaffie-R-
Dauphin) authorizing the Fish and Boat Commission to set its own fees for 3 years (​sponsor
summary​); the ​Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ holds 2 meetings, first to
consider​ ​House Bill 827​ (Fritz-R-Wayne) which requiring compensation for oil and gas rights
owners in Delaware River Watershed if the Delaware River Basin Commission adopts a
permanent ban on fracking (​sponsor summary​). (​Click Here​ for more background on
compensating landowners and a companion bill in the Senate-- Senate Bill 305.​ ); ​House Bill 828
(Fritz-R-Wayne) authorizes DEP to issue one permit for multiple gas wells on a single pad
instead of individual well permits, extends the term of well permits from 1 to 3 years and allows
well locations to vary within 50 feet of specific locations identified on the well permit (​sponsor
summary​); --​House Bill 829​ (Fritz-R- Wayne) prohibiting the Delaware River Basin
Commission from regulating onlot septic systems (​sponsor summary​) and an informational
meeting on “factually debunking some of the modern myths surrounding the ‘climate change’
discussion.” <> ​Click Here​ for full House Committee Schedule.

Senate:​ <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Committee Schedule.


31
Other:​ the ​Joint Legislative Budget & Finance Committee​ meets to release performance audit of
the Fish and Boat Commission

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

House and Senate Co-Sponsorship Memos

House: ​Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos

Senate: ​Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
March 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

House
March 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

House Committee Reports Out Bill Creating Flood Insurance Premium Assistance Task
Force

On March 18, the ​House Insurance Committee


amended and reported out ​House Bill 328
(Warren-D- Bucks) establishing a Flood Insurance
32
Premium Assistance Task Force (​sponsor summary​).
Rep. Perry Warren (D-Bucks) said on introducing the bill, “Within recent years, the
Federal Emergency Management Agency has revised its flood maps to require many more
properties in Pennsylvania to hold flood insurance.
“While flood insurance is meant to mitigate the financial harm and help lessen the
emotional devastation caused by floods, more and more Pennsylvanians require assistance with
paying for their flood insurance due to rising premiums.
“This increases the overall annual cost of owning a house in a floodplain, thereby making
properties in these areas less attractive to potential buyers. Many communities along
Pennsylvania's rivers and creeks are at risk of reduced property sales and values due to rising
flood insurance premiums.
“To better identify and address this issue, my bill would establish the Flood Insurance
Premium Assistance Task Force. The task force would issue recommendations regarding
potential programs that provide premium discounts, programs that incentivize local governments
to support flood mitigation efforts and the implementation of any necessary changes to state
statute or policy regarding the administration of flood insurance.”
The amendment was technical in nature. The bill now goes to the full House for action.
Rep. Tina Pickett (R-Tioga) serves as Majority Chair and can be contacted by calling
717-783-8238 or sending email to: ​tpickett@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Anthony DeLuca
(D-Allegheny) serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1011 or
sending email to: ​tdeluca@pahouse.net​.
For more information on flood maps, visit DCED’s ​Pennsylvania Flood Maps​ webpage.
(​Photo: ​Flood map of Harrisburg.)
Related Stories:
71% Increase In Very Heavy Precipitation In Last 54 Years, 831,000 Pennsylvanians Living At
Risk On Floodplains
Penn State Water Insights Seminar March 26: Seeking Opportunities To Reduce The Impact Of
Flood Events
Growing Greener Coalition Issues Call To Action To Make New Investments In Restoring The
Environment, Oppose Backsliding
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
NewsClips:
Twp.. Supervisors, Farmers Discuss Flooding Issues With DEP
Flooding Closes Central PA Roads, Swamps Yards After Heavy Rain
Updates To Flood Insurance Policy Could Cost Homeowners More
Mansfield Council, DEP To Collaborate On Flooding Issue In Borough
As Levee Costs Grow In Williamsport, Next Stage Includes State Funding
Williamsport Authority Reorganizes To Tackle Costs Of Levee Recertification
Grafius Run Flood Damage At $5 Million In Lycoming County
Editorial: Recertifying Levee In Williamsport: Runaway Costs, Hazy Payment Plan
Luzerne County Involvement In Wyoming Valley Levee System Debated
Luzerne Flood Authority Hres Solicitor, Debates Ties To Luzerne County
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements

33
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Huntingdon County: Restore PA Aims To Avoid Local Disasters
NOAA Forecasters Say Midwest’s Flooding Could Preview Unprecedented Spring
Flooding - National
Nebraska Floods: 74 Cities, 65 Counties Declare State Of Emergency
Missouri River Floods Causing Many To Evacuate
Rescues, Evacuations As Floodwaters Breach Levees In Midwest
Lessons Learned After Puerto Rican Hurricane Evacuees Came To Philly
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

House Environmental Committee Reports Out Bill Allowing Cross Unit Drilling Under
Several Properties, Voluntary Pooling

On March 19, the ​House Environmental Resources and


Energy Committee​ amended and reported out ​House Bill
247​ (Oberlander-R-Clarion) to allow cross unit
unconventional drilling.
“The legislation will provide for a process and
accounting mechanism to allow well bores to cross
multiple units provided the operator has the right to drill
wells on the units via leases with all landowners/members
of the units,” said Rep. Donna Oberlander, prime sponsor
of the bill. “The operator is then required to reasonably and
proportionately allocate the production across the various members of the units. The legislation
does not impair any current contracts or leases, does not allow for any production from unleased
land, and would not apply in cases where this practice would be contractually prohibited.”
One amendment includes a ​voluntary pooling provision​ and eliminates forced pooling
and a second addressed landowner concerns on production allocation and technical issues with
the bill.
The bill now goes to the full House for consideration.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1707 or sending email to:
dmetcalf@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7647 or sending email to: ​gvitali@pahouse.net​.
Related Stories:
Op-Ed: Will Our Dirt Roads Again Be Used As Dumping Sites For Oil & Gas Well Wastewater?
House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If DRBC
Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For Drilling
Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
March 27 DEP Meeting On Proposed Drilling Permits At U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson Plant,
Allegheny County
PUC Pipeline Safety Investigation Underway Involving Possible Sunoco Gasoline Pipeline Leak
In Berks County On March 17

34
Dueling Press Conferences Pit Opponents Of Mariner East Pipeline Against Those Supporting
Pipeline Development
[Posted: March 19, 2019]

PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The
Golden Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose

On March 19, ​PA Parks and Forests Foundation​ President Marci


Mowery reviewed the details of the Foundation’s ​new report on the
more than $1 billion in infrastructure maintenance needs​ at state
parks and forests at a meeting of the ​House Tourism and
Recreational Development Committee​.
“State parks and forests are our golden egg, but right now we are
starving the goose,” said Mowery in her introductory remarks, noting
parks and forests contribute significantly to the local economy.
For every dollar invested in state parks, she said, $12.41 of income is
returned to the local and state economy.
In describing the maintenance needs, Mowery said DCNR
manages an area twice the size of the state of Delaware that has over
40 million visitors a year.
One recently appointed state park manager said a park is like managing a city with roads,
bridges, dams, pavilions, cabins and other buildings, often with wastewater and drinking water
plants, docks, marinas, pools, ski areas and golf courses and other recreation infrastructure that
needs to be kept up and safe for visitors so they can fully enjoy the parks.
Mowery said, however, many of the buildings used by those visitors were built during the
1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps or during the “Goddard Era” of development in the
1970s and are often decades beyond their original design life.
DCNR also owns and operates 131 dams, including 47 that are considered high hazard, as
well as 860 vehicular bridges and hundreds of pedestrian bridges. The average age of a bridge in
a state park is 62 years, when the design life is 50 years.
She also noted staffing levels at DCNR are at the same level they were in 1970 when
state parks and forests had half the number of visitors and many fewer parks to manage.
In response to questions, Mowery ​expressed concerns about the proposal to take money
out of​ the ​Keystone Recreation, Parks and Conservation​ and ​Environmental Stewardship
(Growing Greener)​ funds to pay DCNR and DEP operating expenses.
She said these funds, which have wide public support, help build local recreation projects
and fund projects in state parks and forests. Changing the way projects are funded would mean
money may not be there when the projects are being built creating uncertainty and less
predictability.
Also in response to a question, Mowery said the Foundation has been opposed to a
entrance fee to state parks and forests not only because of the potential staff and other costs for
implementing a fee system at parks designed with multiple entrances and access points, but
because it may discourage park use.
On the issue of getting more private-public partnerships and vendors to invest money in
operating portions of state parks and forests, Mowery said the parks already have many vendors

35
operating pool, boating and other recreation opportunities and additional arrangements would
have to be looked in terms of their impact on long term maintenance costs.
Mowery said PPFF is recommending an investment of $100 million a year to address the
backlog in state parks and forest maintenance.
Mowery said she looked forward to discussing funding options with members of the
General Assembly since they are the experts on funding.
A copy of the ​The Legacy of Pennsylvania Parks and Forests: The Future is in Our Hands
report is available online.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Parks &
Forests Foundation​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Foundation,
Like them on Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to become a member of the
Foundation.
Click Here​ to watch a video of the hearing (when posted).
Rep. David Millard (R-Columbia) serves as Majority Chair of the Committee and can be
contacted by calling 717-783-1102 or send email to: ​dmillard@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Mark
Longietti (D-Mercer) serves as Minority Chair of the Committee and can be contacted by calling
717-772-4035 or send email to: ​mlongiet@pahouse.net​.
Related Stories:
Pennsylvanians Urged To Help Preserve The Legacy Of PA’s State Parks & Forests
Growing Greener Coalition Issues Call To Action To Make New Investments In Restoring The
Environment, Oppose Backsliding
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Forthcoming Report: Conserving The Legacy: The Future Is In
Our Hands
Growing Greener Coalition Opposes Using Community Environmental Project Funds For
Agency Operating Costs; Issues Call To Action
Related Stories This Week:
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council Meets March 27 To Discuss
Update To PA Outdoor Recreation Plan
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
William Penn Foundation Announced Creative Communities Grant Awards Totaling $2.6
Million
Joint Conservation Committee Meeting Highlights Initiatives To Boost Bicycle Tourism Along
PA Route 6
Pike County Outdoors Guide For Sportsmen, Outdoor Enthusiasts Now Available
PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern
Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated By Congress
March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
NewsClips:
As Levee Costs Grow In Williamsport, Next Stage Includes State Funding
Huntingdon County: Restore PA Aims To Avoid Local Disasters
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure

36
Wolf Pushes Restore PA To Eliminate Lead From Philly School At A Cost Of $100 Million
Gov. Wolf Confident He Has Votes For Severance Tax, But Republicans Beg To Differ
Republicans, Gas Industry Oppose Severance Tax To Fund Wolf’s Restore PA Infrastructure
Plan
AP: Wolf Says $4.5B Restore PA Could Help Schools Cleanup Lead Paint
Sen. Yudichak: Growth Wll Fuel PA’s Future - Restore PA
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
Op-Ed: Pass A Natural Gas Severance Tax to Fund Infrastructure In PA​ - Gov. Wolf
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
Editorial: Funding For Lower Mon Project Arrives Just In Time
AP: Federal Black Lung Fund In Danger Of Drying Up
Editorial: Coal Miners Continue To Suffer With Black Lung
[Posted: March 19, 2019]

Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For


Drilling Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban

On March 20, the ​House Environmental Resources and


Energy Committee​ heard from witnesses in support of
legislation to allow for the compensation of
landowners for drilling rights they are prevented from
exercising by the ​proposed fracking ban​ being
considered by the ​Delaware River Basin Commission​.
Thomas Shepstone​, Shepstone Management
Company, offered comments supporting ​House Bill
827​ (Fritz-R-Wayne) which requiring compensation
for oil and gas rights owners in Delaware River
Watershed if the Delaware River Basin Commission
adopts a permanent ban on fracking (​sponsor summary​). (​Click Here​ for more background on
compensating landowners and a companion bill in the Senate-- Senate Bill 305.​ )
Shepstone called the proposed ban on fracking a theft of property rights, while other
areas of the state are allowed to develop their natural gas rights. He said drilling rights owners in
Wayne County are the only ones in Pennsylvania not allowed to develop their drilling rights.
His comments were ​similar to those he offered at a June 2018​ House State Government
Committee.
Christopher Nestor​, Overstreet & Nestor, LLC, who represents clients not allowed to
develop their drilling rights, said DRBC has stripped property owners of their rights in contrast
with drilling in the Susquehanna River Watershed which is being done safely.
He said these actions are being taken by representatives of Delaware, New Jersey and
New York which have their own bans on natural gas development and only affecting property
owners in Pennsylvania. He noted the fracking ban in the Delaware Watershed is support by the

37
Wolf Administration.
Nestor said ​legal action has been taken against DRBC​ on its moratorium on drilling
adopted in 2010, but that process has been very slow.
He said if DRBC is denying property owners from exercising their property rights, they
should pay for those rights and said he supported House Bill 827.
He said he is also concerned DRBC will use its authority to regulate all types of land use
in the watershed, not just drilling for natural gas.
Ned Lang​, ​PA Septage Management Association​, said DRBC has exceeded its authority
on the proposed fracking ban, overriding the Department of Environmental Protection and
Pennsylvania law.
Lang said he is concerned DRBC will use its authority to regulate onlot septic systems
and related services like land application of biosolids and supports ​House Bill 829​ (Fritz-R-
Wayne) prohibiting the Delaware River Basin Commission from regulating onlot septic systems
(​sponsor summary​).
He said DEP and Pennsylvania already has laws and regulations covering onlot septic
systems.
Written comments on these issues were also provided to the Committee by ​Wayne
Campbell, President, State Grange​.
Click Here to watch a video​ of the hearing (when posted).
Next Meeting
The Committee has scheduled a meeting for March 26 to consider House Bill 827 and
829 mentioned at this meeting as well as ​House Bill 828​ (Fritz-R-Wayne) authorizes DEP to
issue one permit for multiple gas wells on a single pad instead of individual well permits,
extends the term of well permits from 1 to 3 years and allows well locations to vary within 50
feet of specific locations identified on the well permit (​sponsor summary​). These reforms were
included in a​ ​DEP white paper Gov. Wolf released in January of 2018​.
The meeting will be held in Room B-31 of the Main Capitol Building starting at 10:00.
Click Here to watch the meeting online​.
Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Environmental
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-783-1707 or sending email to:
dmetcalf@pahousegop.com​. Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-7647 or sending email to: ​gvitali@pahouse.net​.
Related Stories:
House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If DRBC
Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
House Environmental Committee Holds Info Meeting March 27 On Debunking Modern Myths
Surrounding Climate Change
March 27 DEP Meeting On Proposed Drilling Permits At U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson Plant,
Allegheny County
Op-Ed: Will Our Dirt Roads Again Be Used As Dumping Sites For Oil & Gas Well Wastewater
PUC Pipeline Safety Investigation Underway Involving Possible Sunoco Gasoline Pipeline Leak
In Berks County On March 17
Dueling Press Conferences Pit Opponents Of Mariner East Pipeline Against Those Supporting
Pipeline Development
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

38
Joint Conservation Committee Meeting Highlights Initiatives To Boost Bicycle Tourism
Along PA Route 6

On March 19, the ​Joint Legislative Air and Water


Pollution Control and Conservation Committee
hosted an informational meeting to provide updates
on projects along the ​PA Route 6 corridor​ which aim
to enhance bicycle tourism across the state.
The PA Route 6 corridor spans 427 miles across the
northern part of Pennsylvania and has received
several accolades over the years including, “One of
America’s most scenic drives” by National
Geographic and the pick for “Most amazing road trips
to take in every state” for Pennsylvania by The
Weather Channel.
Terri Dennison, executive director of the ​Route 6
Alliance​, and Jim Foringer, district executive for PennDOT District 1, led the discussion at the
meeting.
Dennison discussed the significant economic impact of bicycle tourism in Pennsylvania,
citing studies that reported $83 billion in trip-related sales and $97 billion in retail spending back
in 2017, as well as $1.06 billion in visitor spending in 2015 along the corridor.
Foringer provided a comprehensive overview of Section 1 of the ​Pennsylvania Route 6
Bicycle Master Plan Design Guide​, which highlighted improvement strategies for enhancing PA
Route 6 for bicyclists as well as some of the challenges facing bicycle travel along the route.
Rep. Parke Wentling (R-Crawford, a member of the Committee who brought this
discussion to the forefront, emphasized the significance of the Route 6 corridor in helping to link
businesses, communities and citizens together.
“So many cyclists, including myself, have taken the opportunity to ride along parts of the
Route 6 corridor, and during my stops I have eaten at new restaurants, visited heritage sites and
just soaked in all that the route has to offer,” said Rep. Wentling. “Just exchanging conversations
with locals and fellow cyclists about what we’ve seen and experienced along the corridor really
bonds people and helps to make connections that last a lifetime.”
Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R-Venango), Chair of the Committee said, “The biggest takeaway
from this meeting is the fact that Pennsylvania continues to look for ways to take advantage of its
diverse landscapes in order to strengthen the economy, create local jobs and provide
Pennsylvanians with the opportunity to enjoy the great outdoors. Bicycle tourism serves a prime
example for helping to achieve these goals.”
Click Here for the presentation​ by the Route 6 Alliance. ​Click Here for a summary​ of the
Route 6 Bicycle Master Plan.
For more information, visit the ​Joint Conservation Committee​ website, ​Like them on
Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the
Committee.
Related Stories:
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden

39
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council Meets March 27 To Discuss
Update To PA Outdoor Recreation Plan
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
William Penn Foundation Announced Creative Communities Grant Awards Totaling $2.6
Million
Pike County Outdoors Guide For Sportsmen, Outdoor Enthusiasts Now Available
PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern
Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated By Congress
March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
March 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
NewsClips:
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Op-Ed: Philly’s Demand For Public Spaces Requires Creative Funding Solutions
DCNR Accepting Sealed Bids To Operate Presque Isle’s Concession
Luzerne Committee Narrows Proposed Natural Gas Rec Funding Awards
Northwestern Recreation Fields Damage Prompts Cash Reward In Lehigh Valley
Skate Park Coming Back In Luzerne
Frye: Camping When Campfires Are Prohibited
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

Bill Authorizing Fish & Boat Commission To Set Own Fees To Be Considered By House
Committee On March 25

The ​House Game and Fisheries Committee​ is


scheduled to meet on March 25 to consider​ ​House
Bill 808​ (Mehaffie-R-Dauphin) authorizing the Fish
and Boat Commission to set its own fees for 3 years
(​sponsor summary​).
Tim Schaeffer, Executive Director of the Fish and
Boat Commission told the Committee on February 27
securing the long-term financial future of the agency
was his most pressing priority.
“While our revenue has remained stagnant, costs continue to rise. Fish Fund expenditures
have increased by 27 percent or $8.2 million since 2005, while Boat Fund expenditures have
risen by 30 percent, or $3.3 million,” Schaeffer said. “Inflation, increased personnel costs, and
aging infrastructure have all placed considerable pressure on the Commission’s long-term
financial picture in the absence of new or increased revenue.
“The Commission has taken aggressive steps to cut costs and secure new revenue where
possible. Since 2005, we have sold non-performing assets like real property, vehicles, and other
equipment; marketed oil, gas, water access, and timber resources; and secured revenues through

40
the Act 13 Impact Fee,” Schaeffer explained. “We are also receiving the full amount of taxes
paid on motorboat fuel thanks to the Act 89 Transportation Bill.
“On the expenditure side, we have reduced full-time and seasonal staff positions. The
Commission has also deferred investments in $18 million of prioritized equipment, vehicles, and
maintenance needs for its hatcheries, public facilities, and other operations.”
Last October the 4 Chairs of the Senate and House Game and Fisheries Committees
promised to seek additional funding​ for the Commission in 2019.
The meeting will be held in Room 205 of the Ryan Building starting at 9:30. ​Click Here
to watch the meeting online​.
Rep. Keith Gillespie (R-York) serves as Majority Chair of the ​House Game and Fisheries
Committee​ and can be contacted by calling 717-705-7167 or send email to:
kgillesp@pahousegop.com​. Rep. William Kortz (D-Allegheny) serves as Minority Chair and
can be contacted by calling 717-780-4783 or send email to: ​bkortz@pahouse.net​.
Related Stories:
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership: Call Your House Member To Support Bill To
Allow Fish & Boat Commission To Adopt Its Own Fees
Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
NewsClips:
Schneck: Flattened Frogs, Toads, Salamanders: Love & Death On PA Roadways
Ad Crable, Outdoor, Environmental Writer For LancasterOnline.com Is Retiring
Times Leader Layoffs Decimate Sports Department - Tom Venesky, Paul Sokoloski
Op-Ed: Rolling Back Portions Of Federal Clean Water Act Is A Bad Idea
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership: Call Your House Member To Support Bill
To Allow Fish & Boat Commission To Adopt Its Own Fees

On March 22, the ​Theodore Roosevelt


Conservation Partnership​ issued a ​call to
the public to contact their House member
to support ​House Bill 808​ (Mehaffie-R-
Dauphin) authorizing the Fish and Boat
Commission to set its own fees.
The ​House Game and Fisheries
Committee​ is scheduled to consider the bill
on Monday, March 25.
“Pennsylvania is a sportsman's paradise and home to nearly 1.3 million anglers, who
contribute to our state's $26.9-billion outdoor economy. We must give the Fish and Boat
Commission the authority to determine license and boat registration fees so they can fulfill their
mission of protecting, conserving, and enhancing our waters. Tell your elected leaders to support
PA House Bill 808.”
Click Here to contact your House member​ or to learn more.
Related Stories:

41
Bill Authorizing Fish & Boat Commission To Set Own Fees To Be Considered By House
Committee On March 25
Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
NewsClips:
Schneck: Flattened Frogs, Toads, Salamanders: Love & Death On PA Roadways
Ad Crable, Outdoor, Environmental Writer For LancasterOnline.com Is Retiring
Times Leader Layoffs Decimate Sports Department - Tom Venesky, Paul Sokoloski
Op-Ed: Rolling Back Portions Of Federal Clean Water Act Is A Bad Idea
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

Senate Agriculture Committee Holds Hearing On Redding As Secretary Of Agriculture


April 9

The ​Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee​ is scheduled to meet


on April 9 to consider the ​re-confirmation of Russell Redding as Secretary
of Agriculture.
Redding has led the Department of Agriculture since being named
Acting Secretary in January 2015 and was later confirmed by the Senate.
Redding is the former dean of the School of Agriculture and
Environmental Sciences at Delaware Valley College.
Redding has extensive experience as a public servant, having spent
more than 20 years serving Pennsylvania in Harrisburg and Washington
D.C. He worked on Capitol Hill as Agriculture Policy Advisor to U.S.
Senator Harris Wofford and served for 16 years in the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture,
serving as secretary from 2009-2011 under Governor Rendell.
The hearing will be held in ​Room 461 of the Main Capitol starting at 12:30.
Sen. Elder Vogel (R-Beaver) serves as Majority Chair of the ​Senate Agriculture
Committee​, and can be contacted by calling 717-787-3076 or sending email to:
evogel@pasen.gov​. Sen. Judy Schwank (D-Berks) serves as Minority Chair and can be
contacted by calling 717-787-8925 or sending email to: ​SenatorSchwank@pasenate.com​.
[​Note:​ No word yet on confirmation hearings for Patrick McDonnell at DEP or Cindy Adams
Dunn at DCNR.]
Related Story:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation Funding In
DC
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

The Feds

Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation
Funding In DC
42
On March 13, conservation district officials from across the
nation descended upon the nation’s capital as part of the National
Association of Conservation District’s 2019 Spring Fly-In,
including Kelly Stagen, ​PA Association of Conservation Districts
Secretary and North East Region Director and ​Pike County
Conservation District​ board member.
More than 150 district representatives from over 30 states took to
Capitol Hill to educate their federal representatives about and
advocate for voluntary, locally-led conservation.
Stagen rallied on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. for voluntary
conservation along with other locally-elected conservation district
officials and conservation leaders from around the country.
“Meeting with Pennsylvania’s leaders on Capitol Hill was a great opportunity to stress
the importance of conservation district work in our local communities,” said Stagen. It’s
important to keep the conversation going about issues facing our natural resources to ensure
enough clean water and healthy soil for future generations.”
At this year’s fly-in, district officials communicated the value of:
-- Farm bill conservation programs.​ Because the farm bill is the federal government’s primary
tool for setting agriculture and food policy in the United States, ​NACD has carefully developed
nine farm bill principles​ to promote in and out of farm bill negotiations now and until the next
farm bill is passed.
Several of NACD’s farm bill principles advocate for locally-led and incentive-based
conservation on working and urban lands, another calls for streamlined land-use and reporting
regulations.
-- Strong conservation funding.​ Every year through the appropriations process, federal funding
is allotted to specific conservation programs housed under USDA, the Interior Department, and
the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). NACD believes these funds are critical to helping
Americans voluntarily enhance soil and water quality at the local level across the country.
-- Conservation technical assistance.​ Conservation technical assistance – like conservation
planning and monitoring – helps landowners become better stewards of their natural resources.
Without it, many landowners and land managers wouldn’t have the capacity to implement
conservation practices at all.
For more information about the work of Pennsylvania’s 66 conservation districts, visit
the ​PA Association of Conservation Districts​ website. You can also follow ​PACD on Facebook​.
(​Photo:​ Adam Tarr, Legislative Assistant for PA Senator Bob Casey with Kelly Stagen, PACD
Secretary.)
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
Senate Agriculture Committee Holds Hearing On Redding As Secretary Of Agriculture April 9
[Posted: March 19, 2019]

PA Receives $53.8 Million In 2019 Federal Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Funds,
Reclamation Fee Due To Expire

43
On March 19, the federal Office of Surface Mining
Reclamation and Enforcement announced Pennsylvania
will receive $53,846,935 in Abandoned Mine Land
Reclamation funding.
This amount is down slightly from 2018 when
Pennsylvania received $55.6 million​.
Pennsylvania, which has one-third of the abandoned
mine sites in the nation, received the second largest
amount of funding behind Wyoming with $87.8 million.
In addition, for each of the last 2 years, Pennsylvania has
received a total of $55 million in additional funding from a pilot program to reclaim abandoned
mines in areas that have economic development potential-- $30 million in 2016 and $25 million
in 2017. A third year grant request for this pilot program totalling $25 million is pending.
Click Here​ for the full OMRE funding announcement.
AML Fee Expires
The per ton fee on coal mined in the United States that supports the federal Abandoned
Mine Land Reclamation Program is due to expire in September 2021.
John Stefanko, DEP Deputy Secretary for Active and Abandoned Mine Operations, ​told
the Citizens Advisory Council last July​ that reauthorization of the fee is critical to the continued
success of Pennsylvania’s Abandoned Mine Reclamation Program.
Pennsylvania has nearly 250,000 acres of abandoned mine sites yet to reclaim causing
over 5,500 miles of streams to be impaired.
Since DEP’s Abandoned Mine Reclamation Program began in earnest in the mid-1960s,
more than ​76,391 acres of abandoned mines have been reclaimed​ at a cost of $661 million.
Stefanko said Pennsylvania is ​cooperating with Wyoming and other states to push​ for
reauthorization of the fee before it expires, but so far Congress has taken no action.
RECLAIM Initiative
Congress has also been considering making the pilot program to reclaim abandoned mine
sites with economic development potential permanent as part of the RECLAIM initiative to
provide $258 million over 5 years from the Abandoned Mine Land Fund to support state
reclamation efforts.
Pennsylvania, the ​Eastern PA Coalition for Abandoned Mine Reclamation​, the
Foundation for Pennsylvania Watersheds​ and many other groups have supported this effort, but
so far Congress has not acted.
Good Samaritan Program
Also pending in Congress is legislation to create a Good Samaritan Program designed to
encourage reclamation of abandoned mines by operators, watershed groups and others not
connected to the abandoned mine site.
Pennsylvania has had a ​Good Samaritan Program since 1999​ that has resulted in 79 acid
mine drainage treatment projects in 20 counties all at no cost to taxpayers.
Pennsylvania and ​many other groups have testified in support of this program​, but so far
Congress has failed to act.
Visit DEP’s ​Active and Abandoned Mine Operations​ webpage for more information on
these programs.

44
(​Photo:​ ​Ehrenfeld mine reclamation project​ in Cambria County reclaimed through the federal
pilot Abandoned Mine Lands Economic Revitalization Program.)
Related Stories:
Growing Greener Coalition Issues Call To Action To Make New Investments In Restoring The
Environment, Oppose Backsliding
Growing Greener Coalition Urges New Investment In Restoring The Environment, Preventing
Flooding, No Backsliding On Existing Commitments
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
NewsClips:
As Levee Costs Grow In Williamsport, Next Stage Includes State Funding
Huntingdon County: Restore PA Aims To Avoid Local Disasters
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf Pushes Restore PA To Eliminate Lead From Philly School At A Cost Of $100 Million
Gov. Wolf Confident He Has Votes For Severance Tax, But Republicans Beg To Differ
Republicans, Gas Industry Oppose Severance Tax To Fund Wolf’s Restore PA Infrastructure
Plan
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

PA Projects Receive Over $1.7 Million In Federal Delaware River Watershed Restoration
Grants

On March 22, the ​Coalition for the Delaware


River Watershed​ announced the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service and the National Fish and
Wildlife Foundation jointly awarded the first
round of 25 ​Delaware Watershed Conservation
Fund​ grants totaling $4,140,000 in federal funds.
This is the first time that dedicated federal
funding has been allocated to on-the-ground
projects that conserve and restore the Delaware
River Basin.
Applications are now being accepted for the 2019 round of Delaware Watershed
Conservation Fund Grants. ​Click here for more​.
Pennsylvania projects received a total of $1.757,319 million, the most of any state in the
Watershed. The projects include--
-- Stream Restoration at Jeffersonville Golf Club​, West Norriton Township, $158,946
-- Restoration, Research and Outreach in the Cherry Creek Watershed​, ​Friends of Cherry
Valley Inc,​ $200,000
-- John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge Tidal Marsh Restoration​, ​Ducks Unlimited, Inc​,
$86,000
-- Returning American Eels for Ecological Restoration of the Schuylkill Watershed​,

45
Delaware Riverkeeper Network​, $88,506
-​- Stormwater management and trail restoration in Wissahickon Valley Park​, ​Friends of the
Wissahickon​, $125,000
-- Fish Passage Improvements and Stream Restoration in Bushkill Creek​, ​Wildlands
Conservancy, Inc.​, $183,001
-- Implementing Green Stormwater Infrastructure at Drexel Gardens Park​, ​Pennsylvania
Resources Council​, $202,340
-- Aquatic Habitat Restoration at Aquetong Spring Park, Solebury Township​, $250,000
-- Unassessed Waters Initiative-IV​, ​Western Pennsylvania Conservancy​, $50,000
-- Expanding Stream Restoration in the Red Clay Creek​, ​Brandywine Red Clay Alliance​,
$249,556
-- Wissahickon Headwaters Riparian Restoration​, ​Wissahickon Valley Watershed
Association​, $249,970
Several multi-state grants were also awarded that will benefit Pennsylvania, including--
-- Enhancing Aquatic Connectivity and Flood Resilience at Road Stream Crossings​, ​Trout
Unlimited, Inc.​, $55,021
-- Reducing Microplastics in the Delaware Estuary​, ​Delaware River Basin Commission​,
$60,454
-- Planning and Implementation of a Living Shoreline at Bartram's Garden​, ​Partnership for
the Delaware Estuary, Inc.​, $125,000
-- Enhancing Forest Habitat in the Northern Delaware River Watershed​, ​Wildlife
Management Institute​, $249,917
Click Here for a list of all grants awarded​.
Delaware Watershed Conservation Fund grants were awarded to organizations to address
key issues facing the watershed, such as conserving and restoring fish and wildlife habitat,
improving and maintaining water quality, sustaining and enhancing water management and
reducing flood damage, and improving recreational opportunities and public access.
A large pool of worthy projects was submitted for consideration, signifying the need for
continued robust federal funding for the Delaware River Basin Restoration Program.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Coalition
for the Delaware River Watershed​ website.
Related Stories:
NFWF Accepting Applications For Delaware Watershed Restoration Grants
House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If DRBC
Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For Drilling
Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
NewsClips:
25 Delaware River-Area Water Quality Projects Get $4.1M In Federal Funds
Recap Of March 13 Delaware River Basin Commission Meeting
March 22 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated By Congress

46
The ​Susquehanna Heritage Area​ in Lancaster and York counties received official designation as
a National Heritage Area with the passage and signing of the ​John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation,
Management, and Recreation Act​ this month.
The designation will:
-- Boost visibility and visitation to the region’s historical sites and recreational areas along the
Susquehanna River;
-- Provide more National Park Service support; and
-- Promote the Susquehanna’s significance to the nation’s history.
The Susquehanna River’s role as corridor of culture and commerce will be a major focus
of the National Heritage Area.
Funding received from the federal government would allow for interpretive signs at
historic sites, renovations of historic properties, the creation of maps or websites, and to run
programs, such as boat tours to further enhance the area.
To learn more, visit the ​Susquehanna National Heritage Area​ website.
For more information on heritage areas in other parts of Pennsylvania, visit DCNR’s ​PA
Heritage Areas Program​ webpage.

(Reprinted from the March 20 DCNR Resource newsletter. ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own
copy.​)
Related Story:
President Signs Bill To Permanently Reauthorize Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund
Related Stories This Week:
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council Meets March 27 To Discuss
Update To PA Outdoor Recreation Plan
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
William Penn Foundation Announced Creative Communities Grant Awards Totaling $2.6
Million
Joint Conservation Committee Meeting Highlights Initiatives To Boost Bicycle Tourism Along
PA Route 6
Pike County Outdoors Guide For Sportsmen, Outdoor Enthusiasts Now Available
PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern
March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
NewsClips:
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Op-Ed: Philly’s Demand For Public Spaces Requires Creative Funding Solutions
DCNR Accepting Sealed Bids To Operate Presque Isle’s Concession
Luzerne Committee Narrows Proposed Natural Gas Rec Funding Awards
Northwestern Recreation Fields Damage Prompts Cash Reward In Lehigh Valley
Skate Park Coming Back In Luzerne

47
Frye: Camping When Campfires Are Prohibited
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

News From Around The State

Updated Agency-By-Agency Regulatory Agenda Published By Governor’s Office

On March 23, the Governor’s Office published an updated agency-by-agency Regulatory


​ arch 23 PA
Agenda listing regulations agencies are in the process of developing and adopting. ​(M
Bulletin, page 1461​)
DEP has three regulatory packages on the agenda to increase permit fees for--
Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells, Chapter 91 and 92 Water Quality Permits and Air Quality
Permits
Among the regulations included for environmental agencies are--
DEP-
-- Mining Federal Consistency Update: 2nd Quarter Final
-- Mining Water Supply Replacement: 2nd Quarter Proposed
-- Unconventional Well Permit Fees: 3rd Quarter Final
-- Conventional Oil & Gas Well Environmental Standards: 4th Quarter Proposed
-- Non-Healing Arts Radiation Generating Devices: 4th Quarter Proposed
-- Triennial Review of Water Quality Standards: 3rd Quarter Final
-- Chapter 91 & 92 Water Quality Permit Fee Increases: 1st Quarter Proposed
-- Air Quality Permit Fee Increases: 2nd Quarter Proposed
-- Control of Existing Oil & Gas Emissions: 2nd Quarter Proposed
-- Water Quality Standard for Manganese: 4th Quarter Proposed
-- Chapter 105 Dam Safety & Encroachment Changes: 4th Quarter Proposed
-- Administration Of Land Recycling Program Changes: 3rd Quarter Proposed
-- Ultra Low-Sulfur Standard for Heating Oil: 2nd Quarter Proposed
-- Decommissioning Stage II VOC Controls: 2nd Quarter Proposed
DCNR--
-- Snowmobile & ATV Grants: Spring 2019 Final
Environmental Hearing Board
-- Practice & Procedures: Spring 2019 Proposed
DEP publishes its own Regulatory Agenda, the last of which was done on August 4, 2018
(​PA Bulletin, Page 4733​) and has its own ​Regulatory Update​ webpage to give the current status
of regulations..
In addition, DEP posts a list of technical documents in development. DEP’s last
Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda in July 2018​. This agenda was
suggested by DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council.
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees
Along Streams

One sure sign that spring is arriving in


48
Pennsylvania is the appearance of people planting trees along streams.
Why spring? It’s good to plant trees and shrubs when they are dormant, either in early
spring after the ground thaws and before buds break out, or in the fall when the leaves have
fallen off the plants.
Trees planted along streams are called “riparian forest buffers.”
Ambitious Goals
Pennsylvania has a goal of ​planting 95,000 acres of forest buffers​ along waterways
throughout the state by 2025 (that’s an area larger than the City of Philadelphia).
In 2013, the Commonwealth had credit for 54,843 acres of forest buffers with the federal
Chesapeake Bay Program. Despite several years of adding thousands of acres, in 2015, only 250
acres were planted.
DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn recently told several hundred people gathered in
Harrisburg for the Riparian Forest Buffer Summit that the numbers are increasing.
“Buffer numbers from 2017 and 2018 show we have reversed the trend of declining
acreage,” Dunn said, noting that 1,305 acres were planted in 2017, and 1,528 acres last year.
“This work was accomplished through the enthusiasm of many partners, and we thank them as
well as the landowners for adopting this beneficial practice.”
DCNR has provided $4.5 million in grants over the past several years for buffers. Many
of those acres have yet to be installed.
Trees and Flooding
There are MANY reasons that DCNR is leading the effort to plant stream buffers,
including:
-- Protection against flooding
-- Filtering the pollution that runs off the land, for cleaner water
-- Providing shade that cools the water, which helps with habitat for brook trout
-- Making the streambank stable, preventing erosion
-- They attract birds, pollinators, and wildlife
The more than 60 members of the Riparian Forest Buffer Advisory Committee discussed
buffers and flooding at its most recent meeting.
Last year, Pennsylvania experienced its wettest year on record. Climate change is
expected to cause bigger and more frequent storms.
Floods are caused when the rain cannot soak into the soil fast enough.
Here’s how riparian forest buffers help:
-- Tree leaves -- the canopy -- help intercept water
-- Root systems keep pores of soil open, increasing the water-holding capacity of soil
-- Riparian buffers slow the speed of water running off the land, allowing water to spread out
along the floodplain
-- Slower water can be soaked up by the sponge of streamside forest roots, leaf litter and soils
-- Plants transpire water, drying the soil
Areas that are critical to flood control are often distant from the mainstem of a river.
Riparian forest buffers and forests are especially helpful in the headwaters of tributaries.
Live Staking
Live staking is a practice that is low cost, and is something that landowners can easily do
on their own property. Live stakes are living shrub and tree branches that root readily when
inserted into the soil.

49
The process introduces plants directly in the places that need it most -- the stream banks.
Stem cuttings are taken from trees before the buds break out in the spring. They are then
inserted directly into stream banks where they establish a root network and help prevent soil loss.
Secretary Dunn this week helped harvest Elderberry and Silky Dogwood from a property
near Lewisburg.
DCNR is partnering with Susquehanna University, Chesapeake Conservancy, and the
Merrill W. Linn Land and Waterways Conservancy to collect approximately 8,000 live stakes
across Union, Centre, and Snyder counties over a total of four volunteer days.
These free cuttings will be distributed to nine project partners, and embedded into 2.5
miles of stream banks for forest restoration projects later this year.
There is one more volunteer opportunity to assist with collecting ​livestakes on March 24​.
Penn State Extension provides additional information about ​livestaking for stream
restoration at a March 30 workshop in Lancaster​.
Buffer Grants
DCNR is now accepting applications for its Community Conservation Partnership
Program Grants which includes stream buffers. ​Click Here for more​.
Resources
For resources to help with planning, funding and installing riparian buffers, visit DCNR’s
Forest Buffers Along Waterways​ webpage.
To get involved in tree planting events near you, visit the ​Keystone 10 Million Trees
Partnership​ website.
Visit the Penn State Extension ​Riparian Buffer​ webpage and Center for Private Forests
Riparian Buffers for Private Lands​ webpage to learn more about riparian stream buffers.
Related Stories:
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
Chesapeake Conservancy Seeking Volunteers To Identify, Collect Livestakes In Centre,
Northumberland March 19, 24
Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop March 30 In Lancaster County
March 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Fort Indiantown Gap Begins Spring 2019 Prescribed Burn Season In Lebanon County
NewsClips:
DCNR Secretary Highlights Riparian Buffer Effort In Union County
Livestaking: Utilize Cuttings From Willows, Dogwoods To Improve Streams
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Spotted Lanternfly Spreads To Dauphin County
Nanticoke’s Oldest Tree Coming Down
PECO Tree Clearing Riles Residents In Bucks
PaEN: March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Forests - Wildfires
California National Guard To Leave Border To Help Stop Wildfires
AP: California To Waive Environmental Rules For Fire Season Prep

50
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

CBF-PA: Media Invited To Paddle Along As Students Explore Local PA Waterways

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA ​invites


media representatives​ to join local students, grades
6 through 12, for a day of watershed exploration
with the ​Susquehanna Watershed Environmental
Education Program​ (SWEEP).
SWEEP, one of CBF’s field education programs,
has been providing hands-on experiential learning
programs in Pennsylvania for 28 years. Over
48,000 Pennsylvania students have participated in
the programs.
This year students from Adams, Cambria, Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon,
Perry, Union and York counties will participate.
SWEEP will guide students through a series of water quality programs designed to
reinforce in-class lessons and to emphasize the importance of clean water.
Students enjoy the opportunity to paddle a canoe. They will also investigate the health of
local waterways through a variety of hands-on activities like up-close studies of the bugs and
other species living in the waterway; studying the physical characteristics of the waterway, the
shoreline, and the adjoining lands; using water chemistry tests to determine quality; and by using
maps to orient students with their specific watershed.
The purpose of the program is to provide field experiences that help students build a
critical connection to the natural world in which they live that will motivate their
decision-making as they develop into citizens and future leaders in Pennsylvania.
This spring season, our education team will work with 16 regional groups in 9 counties to
get students out onto the water.
You can find our team on a local river or stream doing what they do best – teaching
students about the importance of water quality, how stream systems work, and conducting
hands-on experiments that engage and excite a student’s sense of exploration.
The spring season begins March 29 and ends June 3.
For more info or to schedule time on the water with students and our SWEEP team,
contact B.J. Small, PA Media and Communications Coordinator, at 717-200-4521, or send email
to: ​bsmall@cbf.org​.
Click Here for a copy of the complete advisory​, including dates and places for the
SWEEP programs.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation Funding In
DC

51
Bay Journal: Exelon, Maryland Spar Over Who Is Responsible For Nutrients Passing Over
Conowingo Dam
Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film
PA Green Colleges Hold Conference On Sustainable Development Goals And Higher Education
April 9 In State College
Wildlands Conservancy Highlights Educational Programs, Activities Coming Up In April
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
NewsClips:
Op-Ed: Article Misrepresents PA Farm Bureau’s Role In Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Innovative Green Stormwater Project Improves Water Infrastructure in Pittsburgh
Stormwater Fee Headaches Persist In Luzerne County
You Didn’t Pay Your Stormwater Fee In Luzerne? What Now?
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Accepting Submissions For Photo Contest
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film

By Jeff Mulhollem, ​Penn State News

It's a long way from Shanerburg Run, not far from


Williamsport, Pennsylvania, to the closest shores of
the Chesapeake Bay … about 200 miles. And yet the
stream — or more precisely the studies Penn State
researchers are conducting on the eastern brook trout
it harbors — will be highlighted in a new film about
the estuary and its watershed.
“​Expedition Chesapeake, A Journey of Discovery​,” is
the first giant-screen film to focus on the Chesapeake
Bay and its watershed, as well as the first film
developed by Whitaker Center for Science and the
Arts.
It will debut at Whitaker's Harrisburg headquarters in a special showing March 20. Later
this year, it will be shown in IMAX theatres around the country.
Developed in partnership with a world-class team of scientists, educators and
conservationists, “Expedition Chesapeake” encourages audiences to appreciate the value of the
bay and take steps to support long-term conservation efforts in their communities.
Emmy-award-winning naturalist Jeff Corwin leads viewers on an expedition from New
York to Virginia, meeting along the way the families and teams that are working together to
understand and address the issues facing the country’s largest estuary.
One of the featured teams is Penn State's ​Tyler Wagner​ and ​Shannon White​, researchers

52
in the ​College of Agricultural Sciences​ who have been studying brook trout in the Keystone
State's picturesque Loyalsock Creek Watershed. Shanerburg Run is a scenic and productive
tributary of the "'Sock" in Sullivan County.
Wagner, adjunct professor of fisheries ecology, has been studying the ecology of eastern
brook trout for more than a decade.
White, a member of Wagner's research group and a doctoral student in Penn State’s
Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, is researching the behavioral and molecular
ecology of brook trout to assist with the management and conservation of this iconic species.
Because brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis — “fish of the fountains”) require cool, clean
water to survive, they are considered an indicator of health in streams and watersheds they
inhabit, according to Wagner.
Although historically widespread in areas with cold water and suitable habitat conditions,
brook trout are now a species of concern throughout much of their native range in the eastern
United States.
"Most populations have been extirpated, greatly reduced or isolated to small headwater
streams largely as a result of land-use change, including historical deforestation and
contemporary land-use change, acid deposition, and competition with non-native species," he
said.
White noted that brook trout are an important part of the region's natural heritage;
however, brook trout populations in the Chesapeake Bay watershed have fallen significantly over
the past 150 years, which has motivated efforts aimed at restoring and sustaining naturally
reproducing brook trout populations.
Attempts to restore and maintain brook trout populations, she explained, are one piece of
a broader goal held by many state and federal agencies within the Chesapeake Bay watershed: to
restore, enhance, and protect the land, water, and variety of fish and wildlife that utilize those
habitats, and to increase public benefits such as water quality and recreational uses.
“It’s really important to highlight this species as a way to illustrate that the health of the
bay quite literally starts here, in the headwaters," she said. "Maintaining and restoring
high-quality habitat in these small streams — where brook trout can thrive — has great
implications for the health of the entire watershed, including the estuary.”
The film crew followed Wagner and White to Shanerburg Run, where they have been
monitoring the movement and status of brook trout for the last four years. The crew captured
video of the scientists collecting and measuring brook trout and discussing the major threats to
brook trout conservation.
They then plunged the camera below the water’s surface to show fish swimming, feeding
and interacting in the currents.
Capturing high-quality video for an IMAX film in the middle of the forest was no easy
feat, with much of the day spent hauling heavy equipment to the streamside and adjusting for
correct camera angles and lighting.
But, as White explained, the efforts are important for advancing public awareness about
stream conservation.
“Sometimes it’s hard for people to get excited about fish conservation because these
organisms aren’t immediately obvious to the naked eye — you can drive right past a population
of brook trout and never know it," she said.
"But fish have remarkable behaviors and live in some of the most complex habitats. This

53
film really helps emerge viewers into the underwater world and brings a new perspective to
challenges with conservation of aquatic resources in general, and in the Chesapeake Bay
watershed in particular.”
(Reprinted from ​Penn State News​.)
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
Showing Added: Expedition Chesapeake iMax Film Premieres March 20 At The Whitaker
Center For Science & The Arts In Harrisburg
CBF-PA: Media Invited To Paddle Along As Students Explore Local PA Waterways
Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation Funding In
DC
Bay Journal: Exelon, Maryland Spar Over Who Is Responsible For Nutrients Passing Over
Conowingo Dam
NewsClips:
Op-Ed: Article Misrepresents PA Farm Bureau’s Role In Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Innovative Green Stormwater Project Improves Water Infrastructure in Pittsburgh
Stormwater Fee Headaches Persist In Luzerne County
You Didn’t Pay Your Stormwater Fee In Luzerne? What Now?
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Accepting Submissions For Photo Contest
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

Bay Journal: Exelon, Maryland Spar Over Who Is Responsible For Nutrients Passing Over
Conowingo Dam

By Karl Blankenship, ​Chesapeake Bay Journal

A Maryland official called the pending relicensing of


Conowingo Dam a “once in a generation” chance to hold
its owners accountable for the environmental impacts the
94-foot-high structure has on the Susquehanna River and
Chesapeake Bay.
But a representative of Exelon, the utility that
owns the hydroelectric facility, said it had already pledged
more than $300 million to mitigate the dam’s impacts
over the coming decades and the state was trying to force
it to pay billions more to fix problems it didn’t cause.
Most of the recent debate between the two parties has taken place in court since Exelon
sued Maryland last May over conditions the state sought to place on the company’s request for a
new 46-year operating license.
But representatives from each side also sought to make their case in public at a January

54
meeting of the Chesapeake Bay Commission, a body of state lawmakers and other officials that
advise general assemblies in the Bay region.
The dam looms as a major obstacle for Bay cleanup efforts, largely because the 14-mile
reservoir it creates has reached its capacity to trap sediment from upstream sources that flows
down the river.
As a result, the nutrients associated with that sediment now flow into the Chesapeake,
where they can spur algae blooms and contribute to other water quality woes.
The state-federal Bay Program partnership has estimated that additional annual
reductions of 6 million pounds of nitrogen and 260,000 pounds of phosphorus are needed to
offset the impact of the dam’s lost trapping capacity.
That would be roughly an additional 5 percent reduction for a river where upstream
nutrient control efforts in Pennsylvania are already far behind schedule.
The U.S. Environmental Protection agency in February began requesting applications
from entities interested in developing a plan to tackle the problem.
Exelon is seeking a new operating license from the Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission to continue generating power from Conowingo, one of five hydroelectric facilities
along the lower Susquehanna.
But as part of the licensing process, Maryland has to issue a certification that the
operation of the dam will maintain water quality standards.
Maryland issued that certification April 27, but imposed numerous conditions that it said
were needed to mitigate water-quality impacts from the dam.
Along with a requirement that Exelon fund pollution control practices to offset increased
nutrient levels — which could cost the company up to $172 million a year — it called for new
efforts that would keep debris from flowing downstream, manage river flows to protect nearby
habitats, and make fish passage improvements beyond what the utility had already agreed to.
Exelon responded a month later by filing suit in state and federal courts charging that the
state was placing an “unfair burden” on the utility by imposing a financial requirement that it
contended was “orders of magnitude” more than the dam was worth.
Its suit in state court was later dismissed, but the federal litigation is still pending.
In his presentation to the commission, Mike Pedone, a senior policy adviser with the
Maryland Department of the Environment, said the state was simply fulfilling its responsibility
under the law when it issued a certification requiring that Exelon take actions to ensure its
operations would protect water quality in the area.
Pedone said the dam caused a host of impacts that have “fundamentally altered” both the
river and the Bay.
He argued that, in addition to impacting Bay water quality from nutrient and sediment
pollution, it has blocked migratory fish such as shad, herring and eels; altered river flow in a way
that harms downstream habitats; and promoted growth of algae blooms that could impact
drinking water supplies.
The state’s water quality certification, Pedone said, fulfills its obligation to outline the
actions required to offset those impacts and ensure that water quality standards would be met.
“This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity,” Pedone said, noting that Exelon is seeking a
46-year license. “That means the next time that it comes up for renewal, everybody in this room
will be retired or dead. So what we do today, or don’t do today, is going to have some very
long-term consequences.”

55
He disputed the utility’s stance that it could not afford to fix the problems. The dam had
operated for 90 years generating profits for its various owners during that time, but Pedone
contended they had only reinvested a “small portion” of that money to mitigate environmental
impacts.
“Is the water quality certification going to bankrupt Conowingo?” he asked. “I don’t
think so.”
Pedone also questioned Exelon’s contention that the certification would cost the utility
more than the dam is worth, noting that Conowingo is intricately tied to two nearby facilities that
it also owns.
Both the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and the Muddy Run Pumped Storage
Station require water from the dam’s reservoir to operate, and both are more profitable than
Conowingo, he said.
“So,” Pedone added, “I would suggest the viability of Conowingo depends not solely on
its profitability, but the profitability of all three of these facilitates taken together.”
In her presentation, Kathleen Barron, Exelon’s senior vice president for government and
regulatory affairs and public policy, argued that the state had gone beyond its authority with its
requirements for Conowingo, which she said was also the state’s largest producer of renewable
electricity.
Under the law, she said, a dam owner is responsible for discharges “added by the
operator” but not for pollution that originates upstream, as is the case with the nutrients and
sediment at Conowingo.
“The law just simply does not require the dam sitting in the middle of the river to be the
one that is required to reduce those pollutants, given that it is not the entity that is putting the
pollutants into the water,” she said.
Similarly, she said, Exelon cannot remove “all visible debris” from the river as it passes
through the dam, as the state has requested. While it removes accumulated trash weekly, she said
refuse cannot be safely collected during periods of extreme flows, like those that frequently took
place last year.
Barron said that, by trapping sediment and nutrients, the dam has benefitted the Bay by
preventing pollution from flowing downstream for most of its existence. And, she contended, it
still helps in that regard.
Although its reservoir is essentially full, it continues to trap some portion of nutrients for
a short period of time, allowing them to degrade and making them less harmful when washed
downstream.
Barron said the utility had already committed more than $300 million toward future
environmental projects during the life of the new license, much of it related to resolving fish
passage issues at the dam.
But, she said, meeting Maryland’s requirements in the water quality certification could
cost $15 billion.
“I can tell you the dam is not worth $15 billion,” she said. “The other facilities up there
are not worth $15 billion.”
Both sides indicated they would welcome negotiations to resolve the issues. But by late
February, a spokeswoman for Exelon said no talks had taken place.
Meanwhile, the EPA in February requested applications from entities interested in
developing a plan to offset the increase in nitrogen and phosphorus pollution making its way past

56
the dam’s reservoir.
That entity would be in charge of overseeing the creation of a watershed implementation
plan — similar to those being developed by states to meet their Bay nutrient reduction
obligations — that would identify needed actions to reduce or offset the increased pollution.
The entity would also develop a strategy for funding the cleanup actions, identify new
sources of revenue and potentially develop new public-private partnerships to get the job done.
“This has the opportunity to actually spur some innovation, create some innovative
financing, maybe bring more money to solve this challenging problem,” said Matt Rowe,
assistant director of the MDE’s Water and Science Administration and a member of the Bay
Program committee working on the Conowingo issue.
The EPA’s request does not mention Exelon, but Maryland officials have said they
anticipate any settlement with the utility would help fund implementation of the plan.
Meanwhile, in the [Maryland] state General Assembly, a group of lawmakers introduced
legislation in February that would require Exelon to pay for at least 25 percent of the cost
associated with the Conowingo watershed implementation plan.
(Reprinted from the ​Chesapeake Bay Journal​.)
Related Stories:
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates Funding
Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation Funding In
DC
Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film
CBF-PA: Media Invited To Paddle Along As Students Explore Local PA Waterways
EPA Accepting Grant Applications For Help To Develop Plan To Offset Lack Of Sediment
Trapping Capacity At Conowingo Dam
One Court Rejects Exelon’s Challenge To Maryland’s Conowingo Dam Cleanup Requirements
Op-Ed: Don't Blame The Conowingo Dam For Chesapeake Bay Pollution
NewsClips:
Op-Ed: Article Misrepresents PA Farm Bureau’s Role In Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Innovative Green Stormwater Project Improves Water Infrastructure in Pittsburgh
Stormwater Fee Headaches Persist In Luzerne County
You Didn’t Pay Your Stormwater Fee In Luzerne? What Now?
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Accepting Submissions For Photo Contest
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

NFWF Accepting Applications For Delaware Watershed Restoration Grants

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation is


accepting proposals for 2 ​Delaware River
Watershed Restoration Grant Programs​. The
deadline for applications is April 11.

57
The Delaware River Program will award matching grants of $50,000 to $500,000 each to
conserve and restore waters and habitats on public and private​ land that contribute to the overall
health of the Delaware River watershed—as well as benefit the quality of life and economic
vitality of the communities in the Delaware River watershed.
Approximately $6 million in grant funding is available. Major funding for the Delaware
River Program is provided by the U.S Fish & Wildlife Service and the William Penn Foundation.
NFWF will award grants through 2 distinct grant opportunities--
-- DWCF Conservation Action Grants​ will be awarded to nonprofit organizations; federal,
state, interstate and local governments; Indian tribes; and educational institutions to implement
on-the-ground restoration and conservation projects that achieve the goals of the Delaware River
Basin Restoration Partnership and Program Framework: sustain and enhance fish and wildlife
habitat; improve and maintain water quality for fish, wildlife and people; sustain and enhance
water management to benefit fish and wildlife; and improve outdoor recreational opportunities.
To address these goals, projects, which may be located anywhere within the Delaware River
watershed.
-- DRRF Targeted Implementation and Cornerstone Grants​ will be awarded to nonprofit
organizations, local governments and educational institutions to implement on-the-ground
restoration activities to improve water quality in one or more of seven Delaware River
Watershed Initiative (DRWI​) restoration or hybrid “Clusters,” including: the Poconos and
Kittatinny, Kirkwood-Cohansey, New Jersey Highlands, Middle Schuylkill, Schuylkill
Highlands, Brandywine-Christina, and Upstream Suburban Philadelphia Clusters.
Click Here for all the details​.
Related Stories:
PA Projects Receive Over $1.7 Million In Federal Delaware River Watershed Restoration Grants
House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If DRBC
Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For Drilling
Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
NewsClips:
25 Delaware River-Area Water Quality Projects Get $4.1M In Federal Funds
Recap Of March 13 Delaware River Basin Commission Meeting
March 22 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

Penn State Water Insights Seminar March 26: Seeking Opportunities To Reduce The
Impact Of Flood Events

The ​Penn State Environment and Natural Resources Institute​ will


host another in its series of ​Water Insights Seminars​ on March 26 on
Seeking Opportunities to Reduce the Impact Of Flood Events In
Urban Areas.
Shirley Clark, Professor of Environmental Engineering at
Penn State Harrisburg will do a presentation entitled, Playing the
Hand We're Dealt: Understand the Effects of Historical Urban
Development While Seeking Opportunities to Reduce the Impact of

58
Flood Events.
Middletown, Dauphin County receives piped stormwater runoff from more than 5
jurisdictions and passes it through to the river.
On July 23, 2017, a microburst storm dropped 4.7 inches of rainfall on the watershed in 2
hours, resulting in substantial flash flooding.
Two capstone classes have identified opportunities for temporary storage in the system.
In several locations, the piping system and detention pond capacities may not be not fully used
and could be optimized to attenuate flood peaks.
However, historical information indicates the area contains several streams that have
been buried and soils data indicates that the soils have limited water holding capacity, both of
which are likely to increase runoff and reduce available storage capacity.
This presentation highlights why a complete watershed analysis is needed to address
flooding issues, especially in older urban areas where the systems are old, leaky, and may
contain forgotten streams.
The Seminar will held from Noon to 1:00 in Room 312 of the Ag and Bio Engineering
Building on Penn State’s main campus in State College and ​is available online via Zoom​.
For more information on past Seminars, visit the ​Water Insights Seminars​ webpage.
Related Stories:
House Committee Reports Out Bill Creating Flood Insurance Premium Assistance Task Force
NewsClips:
Twp.. Supervisors, Farmers Discuss Flooding Issues With DEP
Flooding Closes Central PA Roads, Swamps Yards After Heavy Rain
Updates To Flood Insurance Policy Could Cost Homeowners More
Mansfield Council, DEP To Collaborate On Flooding Issue In Borough
As Levee Costs Grow In Williamsport, Next Stage Includes State Funding
Williamsport Authority Reorganizes To Tackle Costs Of Levee Recertification
Grafius Run Flood Damage At $5 Million In Lycoming County
Editorial: Recertifying Levee In Williamsport: Runaway Costs, Hazy Payment Plan
Luzerne County Involvement In Wyoming Valley Levee System Debated
Luzerne Flood Authority Hres Solicitor, Debates Ties To Luzerne County
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Huntingdon County: Restore PA Aims To Avoid Local Disasters
NOAA Forecasters Say Midwest’s Flooding Could Preview Unprecedented Spring
Flooding - National
Nebraska Floods: 74 Cities, 65 Counties Declare State Of Emergency
Missouri River Floods Causing Many To Evacuate
Rescues, Evacuations As Floodwaters Breach Levees In Midwest
Lessons Learned After Puerto Rican Hurricane Evacuees Came To Philly
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

Penn State Extension: Spring’s A Good Time To Do Pond Inspections

59
If you are a pond owner, early spring is a good time to take a walk around your pond and check
to see if any maintenance is needed.
If you don’t inspect your pond regularly and make any necessary repairs promptly, more
costly or even irreparable damage may occur.
In doing your inspections and observations, there are several areas to which you should
pay attention:
-- Water Quality –​ Pond assessment should include routine testing of the pond water quality.
Water tests are helpful to document existing problems and to monitor for important changes in
water quality as well as aid in herbicide selection if needed.
-- Aquatic Plants –​ Properly identifying any nuisance plants are important, especially if any
control measures are needed early in the season. Detailed information on plant ID and control is
available in the Pond Management section of the Water Resources website.
-- Dam and Banks –​ The dam and any exposed banks should be checked to ensure that they
have complete grass cover and no erosion. Grass, weeds, brush, and small trees should be
occasionally cut from the dam and banks. Keep large, established trees in place.
-- Overflow Pipe –​ It is especially important to inspect the overflow pipe and remove debris in
or near the pipe as they may result in water breaching the dam or continually flowing through
any existing auxiliary spillway.
-- Pond Access –​ Be sure that any roads to the pond are maintained to allow access for safety
vehicles. This is especially important if a dry hydrant exists to allow access for fire trucks.
-- Check for Signs of Leaks –​ The pond water level should be routinely observed to monitor for
early signs of leakage. Most ponds lose some water to underground seepage and evaporation.
Water loss greater than these few inches, may be attributed to a significant leak that might be
visible as a wet area outside the pond.
-- Pond Sediment –​ Depending on the source of water, ponds may fill up over time with
sediment. As sediment fills in the pond, growth of aquatic plants and algae will generally
increase, due to increased sunlight penetrating the shallower water. If sedimentation is
noticeable, steps should be taken to reduce sediment entering the pond.
-- Safety Equipment –​ Ponds, like any body of water, attract both invited and uninvited people.
As part of your pond inspection, consider safety features (warning signs) and equipment (life
buoys) to protect visitors. Mark the swimming area and post safety rules for all permitted water
uses.
Penn State Extension also has an online course available on ​Pond Management For Rural,
Farm Pond Owners​.
More information on pond inspections can be found in the article at ​Pond Assessment and
Inspection​ on ​Penn State’s Water Resources​ website.

(Reprinted from the ​March 21 Penn State Extension Watershed Winds​ newsletter.)
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

PA Rural Water Assn. Will Hold Annual Conference March 26-29 In State College,
Including Seminar On Zebra Mussels, Algal Blooms

The ​PA Rural Water Association​ will hold its ​2019


Annual Conference​ March 26-29 at the Penn Stater

60
Hotel and Conference Center in State College.
Join PRWA and your water and wastewater utility colleagues throughout Pennsylvania at
the largest utility conference in Pennsylvania.
One of the programs will be a seminar by environmental chemist Dr. David Hammond,
Senior Scientist with ​Earth Science Laboratories Inc.​, will address two problems that plague
water treatment plants: zebra mussels and harmful algal blooms (HABs).
As a Great Lakes State, Pennsylvania lies at the epicenter of these issues. Zebra mussels
were first introduced into Lake Erie in 1988. Large and potentially dangerous cyanobacteria
blooms began appearing annually in Lake Erie in the mid-2000s.
Smaller lakes that provide drinking water to rural communities are vulnerable to the same
problems, says Hammond. “Rural water treatment plants sometimes lack the resources to tackle
zebra mussels and cyanobacteria blooms at once. Fortunately, there is a single, cost-effective and
environmentally-friendly solution. An advanced liquid copper formulation can control zebra
mussels and cyanobacteria with minimal impact on fish. This is important for communities that
use their lakes for drinking water and recreation.”
Hammond supervised a recent project to eradicate quagga mussels from the historic
Billmeyer Quarry in Lancaster County. Quagga mussels are cousins of zebra mussels and equally
invasive. Billmeyer Quarry is the largest and deepest lake from which invasive mussels have
ever been eradicated.
Hammond will present recent data from this project at the Conference on March 26.
Click Here for more information​ on the Conference program.
Learn more about the invasive mussel species by visiting the PA Sea Grant ​PA Zebra and
Quagga Mussel Monitoring Network​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Editorial: Philly State Proposals Will Keep Lead From Robbing Children’s Potential
Pittsburgh Water Authority Working To Better Document Water Main Replacements
Penn State Extension: Why Conserve Water In A Water Rich State?
New Jersey Implements Nation’s Toughest PFAS Standard
AP: Army Bill To Release Public Records On PFAS Testing At Installations $290,400
Access To Clean Water A Problem In The U.S. Affecting Minority, Rural Groups Most
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

EQB Invites Comments On Changes To Class A Stream Redesignations, April 26 Hearing


Set

The Environmental Quality Board published notice in the March 23 PA Bulletin of proposed
changes to Class A Stream Redesignations in 19 counties. ​(​PA Bulletin, page 1367​)
The counties include Berks, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Centre, Clearfield, Columbia,
Crawford, Elk, Erie, Indiana, Lackawanna, McKean, Potter, Schuylkill, Somerset, Susquehanna,
Tioga and Wayne.
The Board will hold a hearing on the proposed changes April 26 at DEP’s Southcentral
Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Avenue in Harrisburg starting at 1:00.
Persons wishing to present testimony at a hearing are requested to contact the
Environmental Quality Board, P.O. Box 8477, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8477 or call 717-787- 4526
at least 1 week in advance of the hearing to reserve a time to present testimony.

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​ A Bulletin, page 1367)​
Read the entire PA Bulletin notice for all the details. ​(P
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

PA Green Colleges Hold Conference On Sustainable Development Goals And Higher


Education April 9 In State College

The ​PA Environmental Resources Consortium​-- PA's


Green Colleges-- hold a ​Conference on Sustainable
Development and Higher Education​ on April 9 in the
HUB Center on Penn State's University Park campus.
The Conference will explore higher education's role in
Agenda 2030 and learn how our members are acting on
the goals. It will explore the idea of kick-starting a
Pennsylvania-focused Sustainable Development
Solutions Network as well as these other topics--
-- Learn about the United Nations Sustainable
Development Goals and the United States Sustainable
Development Solutions Network.
-- What is the state of solar energy and climate action in Pennsylvania? How is the state doing in
terms of urban and rural health and what are the social indicators of health in Pennsylvania?
-- How are faculty, staff, and students engaging with our communities and with our operations to
create a more sustainable Commonwealth?
-- Where do you see you and your campus acting to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals?
The keynote speaker for the event will be former DEP Secretary ​John Quigley​ now
Director of the ​Center for Environment, Energy and Economy​ at Harrisburg University.
Pennsylvania has a unique role in the world today as a food, water, and energy economic
powerhouse.
The agricultural sector produces a wide variety of food, we have more miles of moving
surface water than any state in the union except Alaska, and we are the nation’s third biggest
electricity supplier.
While productive, our state has urban and rural poverty, nutritional disparity, health
problems, and entrenched educational, gender, and racial inequality.
Our agricultural sector is the biggest single polluter of the Chesapeake Bay and energy
extraction and production makes us one of the world’s most intense greenhouse gas sources.
But with the rise of smart agricultural practices, water stewardship, clean energy
development, and a renewed focus on justice and health, things are changing.
What are colleges and universities in Pennsylvania doing on these today? What can we be
doing in the coming decade?
Click Here to register​ or for more information.
Related Stories:
Sustainable Pittsburgh Announces Winners Of Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge
Phipps' Center For Sustainable Landscapes In Pittsburgh First Project In World To Be Awarded
SITES Platinum Certification
CBF-PA: Media Invited To Paddle Along As Students Explore Local PA Waterways
Wildlands Conservancy Highlights Educational Programs, Activities Coming Up In April

62
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
NewsClips:
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Lehigh Valley Leaders Discuss Efforts To Go Green
First Ever Eco-Innovation District Brings Sustainable Redevelopment To Uptown, West
Oakland
[Posted: March 19, 2019]

Pennsylvania Seeks Volunteers For Statewide Spring Cleanup, Beautification Effort

On March 19, Department of Transportation


and Department of Environmental Protection
are seeking volunteers for this year's ​Great
American Cleanup of Pennsylvania​, a
campaign of statewide community cleanup
activities that runs through May 31.
Groups participating in PennDOT's
Adopt-A-Highway (AAH) program, which
involves volunteers cleaning roadsides
year-round, are also encouraged to take part in
the campaign.
“For years, PennDOT has taken an active role in supporting the many volunteers who’ve
taken a vested interest in cleaning up Pennsylvania,” said PennDOT Secretary Leslie S.
Richards. "We are more than thankful for the thousands who share our desire to keep
Pennsylvania beautiful."
"Each year communities, volunteer organizations, friends, and co-workers come together
for trash cleanup projects that make a tangible difference," DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell
said. "Getting trash off roads and streambanks makes communities more inviting, as well as
improving public health and reducing stormwater runoff pollution. I thank the many
Pennsylvanians who volunteer and look forward to joining in a cleanup event again this year."
“Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful is grateful to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for its
support of the thousands of volunteers that pitch in to make Pennsylvania a more clean and
beautiful place to live, work and play,” said ​Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful​ President, Shannon
Reiter.
Volunteering is easy. People can simply organize their own local event and register it at
the ​Great American Cleanup of Pennsylvania​ website, or can register to participate in an already
registered event.
Gloves, trash bags, and safety vests for the cleanup campaign will be provided by
PennDOT, DEP, and the GLAD Products Company, a national sponsor.
In addition, during "Pick It Up, PA Days," April 13 – May 6, registered cleanup events
have access to reduced or free disposal at participating landfills, through support from DEP and
the ​PA Waste Industries’ Association​.
During last year's cleanup, 108,638 volunteers collected over 6.5 million pounds of litter
from Pennsylvania's roads, trails, and shorelines. Over 5,300 events were held, with every county

63
participating.
Adopt-A-Highway
PennDOT's Adopt-A-Highway Program​ contributed 25,927 volunteers, who cleaned up
nearly 25 percent of the collected litter on 10,076 miles of cleaned-up roadway.
Through PennDOT's AAH program, volunteers collect litter on a 2-mile section of state
highway at least twice a year. The program currently has over 4,700 participating groups, more
than 91,800 volunteers, and 10,244 miles of adopted state-maintained roadways.
PennDOT has created a ​comprehensive webpage​ that includes all volunteer opportunities
available, from the Great American Cleanup of Pa and Adopt-A-Highway to Safety Training,
Litter Brigades and more.
Pollinator Plantings
In addition to the department’s clean-up activities, PennDOT is participating in a
multi-agency initiative to promote plantings that will benefit Pennsylvania’s pollinators and
native species. Volunteers can assist by applying to adopt pollinator habitats.
More information on the department’s new ​Pollinator Habitat Plan​ can be found under
PennDOT’s ​Adopt and Beautify​ webpage.
The ​Great American Cleanup of Pennsylvania​ is sponsored each year by PennDOT, DEP,
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful​, and other partners.
Video Contest
And don’t forget to enter the Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Video Contest featuring your
Great American Cleanup Of PA event. ​Click Here for all the details​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
Related Stories:
Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy Stream Cleanup Set For April 6 In Montgomery County
PA Resources Council, Partners Hold Reuse Fest As Part Of FutureFest April 20 In Allegheny
County
NewsClips:
PennDOT, DEP Asking For Volunteers For Great American Cleanup Event
Spring Cleanup Of Yard Waste In Williamsport In A Few Weeks
Got A TV, Washing Machine, Refrigerator To Throw Away? How To Do It Legally In Philly
Grant Could End Illegal Dumping At Williamsport Waste Collection Site
[Posted: March 19, 2019]

Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy Stream Cleanup Set For April 6 In Montgomery


County

The ​Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy’s​ 2019


Steam Cleanup​ is now the largest single day stream
clean-up in the state of Pennsylvania!
On April 6th from 9:00 a.m. to Noon there will be

64
over 1,200 volunteers working together to remove trash, tires and other debris from over 80
different streamside sites throughout the watershed.
Want to get involved in this record breaking event? There are still a few spots available,
but they won’t last long! Sign up now at the ​Conservancy’s website​.
Busy on the day of the Clean-up?...there’s still time to donate to the cause! There are a
variety of sponsorship levels available for corporate groups as well as individuals.​ Check out our
website to donate today​!
Thank you to all of our corporate sponsors who have already donated: ​SEI​, ​Aqua
Pennsylvania​, ​Sustainable Waste Solutions​, ​American Canoe Association​, PCWIC, ​Marshall
Geo-Science​, ​Global Advanced Metals​, ​Faith Bible Fellowship Church​, ​Greater Philadelphia
YMCA​, ​Phoenixville Federal Bank and Trust​, ​Isabelle’s Kitchen​, ​Jobsite Products​, ​Harleysville
Savings Bank​, ​QNB Bank​, ​Little’s John Deere of Zieglersville​, and ​Asher’s Chocolate​.
Click Here for all the details​.
For more information on programs, initiatives, upcoming education events and activities,
visit the ​Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy​ website.
Related Stories:
Pennsylvania Seeks Volunteers For Statewide Spring Cleanup, Beautification Effort
PA Resources Council, Partners Hold Reuse Fest As Part Of FutureFest April 20 In Allegheny
County
NewsClips:
PennDOT, DEP Asking For Volunteers For Great American Cleanup Event
Spring Cleanup Of Yard Waste In Williamsport In A Few Weeks
Got A TV, Washing Machine, Refrigerator To Throw Away? How To Do It Legally In Philly
Grant Could End Illegal Dumping At Williamsport Waste Collection Site
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

PA Resources Council, Partners Hold Reuse Fest As Part Of FutureFest April 20 In


Allegheny County

The ​PA Resources Council​ and its partners will hold the ​Reuse
Fest on April 20​ at Buhl Park in Pittsburgh from 10:00 a.m. to
3:00 p.m.
Reuse Fest will be held in partnership with Communitopia as
part of ​FutureFest 2019​.
Reuse Fest
ReuseFest is a one-day drop off​ event open to the general public
that diverts materials from local landfills to reuse by Pittsburgh
nonprofits.
PRC collaborates with a number of local nonprofits to provide
the public with the opportunity to easily donate items that otherwise may have ended up in the
trash.
ReuseFest helped to connect these usable materials with great local non-profit
organizations who found ways to give this material a second life, while benefiting those in need.
Individuals can drop off items for reuse including medical equipment, usable building
materials, clothing, furniture, pet supplies, bikes and more.

65
PRC’s 8th annual ReuseFest supports local nonprofits including ​Brother’s Brother​,
Construction Junction​, ​Dress for Success​, ​Free Ride​, ​Free Store Wilkinsburg​, ​Global Links​,
Goodwill​, ​Grow Pittsburgh​, ​Humane Animal Rescue​, ​Off the Floor​, ​Pittsburgh Center for
Creative Reuse​, ​Propel Northside Community Wellness Center​ and ​The Education Partnership​.
Click Here for more information​.
FutureFest 2019
FutureFest 2019​ is a future-focused, fresh take on Earth Day. Visitors will get a glimpse
of the world of tomorrow through art, demonstrations, performance, science, food, hands-on
activities, and fun for all ages.
A large, public festival, it’s the result of collaboration between many stakeholder
organizations, working across different sectors, with the same goal of celebrating our successes
and helping visitors imagine Pittsburgh’s achievable, sustainable future.
For more information, visit the ​FutureFest 2019​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Resources
Council​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates, follow ​PRC on Twitter​ or ​Like them
on Facebook​. ​Click Here​ for PRC’s Events Calendar. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
Related Stories:
Pennsylvania Seeks Volunteers For Statewide Spring Cleanup, Beautification Effort
Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy Stream Cleanup Set For April 6 In Montgomery County
NewsClips:
Allegheny Front: Curbside Glass Recycling May Become A Thing Of The Past​ - PA Resources
Council Pop Up Glass Recycling
Got A TV, Washing Machine, Refrigerator To Throw Away? How To Do It Legally In Philly
Grant Could End Illegal Dumping At Williamsport Waste Collection Site
E-Media Recycling To Alternative Between Mercer, Lawrence Counties
Could PA Be Next State To Ban Foam Takeout Containers?
Op-Ed: Recycling Is Dying, So What’s Next For Our Trash?
PennDOT, DEP Asking For Volunteers For Great American Cleanup Event
Spring Cleanup Of Yard Waste In Williamsport In A Few Weeks
Got A TV, Washing Machine, Refrigerator To Throw Away? How To Do It Legally In Philly
Grant Could End Illegal Dumping At Williamsport Waste Collection Site
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

May 14 DEP Hearing On Proposed RACT II Air Quality Plan For Specialty Tires Plant,
Indiana County

The Department of Environmental Protection has scheduled a public hearing on the proposed
RACT II Air Quality Plan for the Speciality Tires Plant in Indiana for May 14. ​(​PA Bulletin,
page 1420)​
The hearing will be held at DEP’s Southwest Regional office, 400 Waterfront Drive in
Pittsburgh from 9:00 to 9:30. To register to speak at a hearing, or to inquire if a hearing will be
held, contact Thomas Joseph at 412-442- 4336.
The last day to pre-register to speak at the hearing will be April 23, 2019. If the
Department does not receive any pre-registered speakers by this date, the hearing will be
canceled. ​Click Here​ to check the status of the hearing.

66
Read the entire PA Bulletin notice for all the details. ​(​PA Bulletin, page 1420​)
Related Story:
Hearing May 14 On Proposed DEP RACT II Air Quality Plan For Texas Eastern Compressor
Plant In Cambria County
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh To Enforce Seven Year Old Clean Construction Law For First Time
Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility Opponents Propose Clean Air Ordinance In Bucks
Op-Ed: Don’t Roll Back Federal Mercury Standard
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

Hearing May 14 On Proposed DEP RACT II Air Quality Plan For Texas Eastern
Compressor Plant In Cambria County

The Department of Environmental Protection has scheduled a public hearing on the proposed
RACT II Air Quality Plan for the Texas Eastern Compressor Plant in Cambria County for May
14. ​(​PA Bulletin, page 1421)​
The hearing will be held at DEP’s Southwest Regional office, 400 Waterfront Drive in
Pittsburgh from 9:30 to 10:00. To register to speak at a hearing, or to inquire if a hearing will be
held, contact Thomas Joseph at 412-442- 4336.
The last day to pre-register to speak at the hearing will be April 23, 2019. If the
Department does not receive any pre-registered speakers by this date, the hearing will be
canceled. ​Click Here​ to check the status of the hearing.
Read the entire PA Bulletin notice for all the details. ​(​PA Bulletin, page 1421​)
Related Story:
May 14 DEP Hearing On Proposed RACT II Air Quality Plan For Specialty Tires Plant, Indiana
County
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh To Enforce Seven Year Old Clean Construction Law For First Time
Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility Opponents Propose Clean Air Ordinance In Bucks
Op-Ed: Don’t Roll Back Federal Mercury Standard
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

March 27 DEP Meeting On Proposed Drilling Permits At U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson
Plant, Allegheny County

On March 21, Department of Environmental Protection announced it will hold a public meeting
March 27 to present information and answer questions on the ​applications for permits for natural
gas drilling​ on U.S. Steel Corporation’s Edgar Thomson Plant.
The meeting will take place from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Braddock Volunteer Fire
Department #2 Social Hall located at 845 Talbot Avenue, Braddock, PA 15104. Doors will open
at 5:30 p.m. and pre-registration is not required.
DEP has invited representatives from Merrion Oil & Gas, U.S. Steel, and the Allegheny
County Health Department. ACHD oversees air quality permitting and enforcement in Allegheny
County.
The meeting coincides with a 30-day open public comment period on Merrion Oil &

67
Gas’s application for an Erosion and Sediment Control Permit (ESP070218-001).
Interested individuals can submit comments to DEP’s Southwest District Office: Oil and
Gas Program Manager, 400 Waterfront Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 attention: Brian Bailey, P.E.
Responses should include the name, address, and telephone number of the person submitting the
comments; identification of the permit application number (ESP070218-001), and concise
statements regarding the relevance of the information or objections to issuance of the permit.
DEP is also reviewing Merrion’s application for a Utility Line Stream Crossing
(GP05020718002) and Well Drilling and Operation permits (003-22563).
Applications and supporting documents under consideration by DEP are available for
review on DEP’s website under the ​Merrion Oil & Gas​ webpage, or by scheduling a file review
by contacting DEP’s Southwest Regional Office at 412-442-4203.
Individuals in need of an accommodation in order to participate in the meeting, as
provided for in the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, should contact the Pennsylvania
AT&T Relay Service at 1-800-654-5984 (TDD) to discuss how DEP may accommodate your
needs.
Questions should be directed to Lauren Fraley, DEP Southwest Regional Office, by
calling 412-442-4203 or send email to: ​lfraley@pa.gov​.
Related Stories:
Op-Ed: Will Our Dirt Roads Again Be Used As Dumping Sites For Oil & Gas Well Wastewater
PUC Pipeline Safety Investigation Underway Involving Possible Sunoco Gasoline Pipeline Leak
In Berks County On March 17
Dueling Press Conferences Pit Opponents Of Mariner East Pipeline Against Those Supporting
Pipeline Development
House Environmental Committee Reports Out Bill Allowing Cross Unit Drilling Under Several
Properties, Voluntary Pooling
House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If DRBC
Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For Drilling
Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
NewsClips:
Gov. Wolf Confident He Has Votes For Severance Tax, But Republicans Beg To Differ
Republicans, Gas Industry Oppose Severance Tax To Fund Wolf’s Restore PA Infrastructure
Plan
Man Dies At Lawrence County Gas/Oil Well Site
Legere: Court Keeps Alive Attorney General’s Case Over Landowner Gas Royalty Payments
A Fracking-Driven Industrial Boom Renews Pollution Concerns In Pittsburgh
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

PUC Pipeline Safety Investigation Underway Involving Possible Sunoco Gasoline Pipeline
Leak In Berks County On March 17

In response to reports of a possible gasoline pipeline leak in Berks County on March 17, a safety
investigation is underway involving the Bureau of Investigation & Enforcement (I&E) – the
independent investigation and enforcement bureau of the Public Utility Commission.
On March 17, investigators from I&E’s Pipeline Safety Division responded to reports of

68
a possible pipeline leak and strong gasoline odor near 409 Mountain Home Road in South
Heidelberg Township, Berks County. The incident site is approximately 6 miles west of the City
of Reading.
In addition to safety engineers from the Pipeline Safety Division, the initial report also
resulted in response by local fire departments, municipal emergency management officials, the
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and Sunoco Pipeline.
The pipeline – identified as Sunoco line No. 12001 – is a 14-inch steel line used to
transport petroleum products from Sunoco’s Montello terminal, near Reading, to
Northumberland and other points in northern Pennsylvania and New York state.
During the early morning of March 17th, the pipeline was being used to transport
gasoline.
As part of the initial response and investigation, test holes and a trench were excavated
near the reported leak site by Sunoco crews, to identify the source of the strong gasoline odor.
The investigation is ongoing, and the site continues to be monitored by the Pipeline
Safety Division while further testing is conducted by Sunoco.
Groundwater monitoring wells located around the incident site were also tested this
weekend and continue to be monitored.
Reporting Pipeline Safety Incidents
The Pipeline Safety Division encourages residents and businesses located near pipelines
to understand how to recognize and report unusual incidents involving those lines – including the
sounds, smells and sights of possible leaks.
Pipeline operators are required to regularly provide safety and awareness information to
property owners along their routes, along with emergency contact information.
If you suspect a leak, call 9-1-1 or local emergency responders and the pipeline operator
from a safe location.
Related Stories:
March 27 DEP Meeting On Proposed Drilling Permits At U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson Plant,
Allegheny County
Op-Ed: Will Our Dirt Roads Again Be Used As Dumping Sites For Oil & Gas Well Wastewater
Dueling Press Conferences Pit Opponents Of Mariner East Pipeline Against Those Supporting
Pipeline Development
House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If DRBC
Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For Drilling
Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
NewsClips:
Crews Investigate Possible Gasoline Leak From Sunoco Pipeline Near Reading
Phillips: Higher Operating Pressure In Mariner East 2x Pipeline Prompts New Safety Concerns
PA’s New Pipeline Caucus Wants Stronger Regulation Of Mariner East Pipelines
Legislators Press Forward On Pipeline Safety Concerns
Sen. Muth To Introduce Pipeline Safety, Public Awareness Standards Bills
Lawmakers Call For Expanded Natural Gas Pipeline Network
Legislators, Leaders In Business, Labor, Industry Stand In Solidarity For Pipeline Infrastructure
Development
Federal Appeals Court Issues Stay Halting PennEast Pipeline Project

69
U.S. Appeals Court Grants Motion For Stay On PennEast Pipeline
Court Stay Allows PennEast Pipeline To Continue Environmental Surveys
Turnout Low For Session On Proposed Pipeline Compressor Station In Luzerne
Pipeline Construction Firm Offers Unique Venue For Local Artists In Luzerne County
Forbes: PA Homeowners Take Fight Against Gas Pipeline Land Grab To U.S. Supreme Court
Report: Plant Bailout Back On Tap As DOE’s Perry, Coal Interests Derail FERC Nomination
FERC Chief Of Staff Pugliese Steps Down
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

Dueling Press Conferences Pit Opponents Of Mariner East Pipeline Against Those
Supporting Pipeline Development

On March 19, the Capitol in Harrisburg was the


scene of dueling press conferences between
opponents of the Mariner East Pipelines and those
supporting pipeline development.
Opponents
An estimated 200 residents from across
Pennsylvania gathered at the state Capitol to call
for an immediate shutdown to Sunoco’s Mariner
East pipeline project.
Sen. Andy Dinniman (D-Chester), Tom
Killion (R-Delaware), Rep. Danielle Friel Otten
(D-Chester) and other lawmakers also announced the formation of a bipartisan, House/Senate
Pipeline Safety Caucus at the rally.
The residents’ call was reinforced by ​14 members of the General Assembly, each of
whom signed a March 11, 2019 letter to Gov. Tom Wolf​ calling for the project to be shut down.
Sunoco proposed the Mariner East project to transport industrial quantities of hazardous,
highly volatile liquids—such as ethane, butane, and propane—to Marcus Hook for export
overseas.
Sunoco has reported more than 300 pipeline accidents to the federal government since
2006. The Mariner East 1 Pipeline leaked highly volatile liquids at least three times in less than
one year before being shut down over public safety concerns.
The Mariner East project includes Mariner East 2 and 2X, the currently shut down
Mariner East 1, and a twelve-inch workaround pipeline. This workaround pipeline has its own
extensive history of accidents in Chester and Delaware Counties.
The groups said Sunoco has failed to provide either a credible notification system or
evacuation plan for people within what it calls the “blast radius.” According to a study procured
by Delaware County and released in November 2018, the probable fatality zone is more than one
mile wide.
“This threat—that hundreds of children might not come home from school one day, is the
inexcusable, unnecessary, and unacceptable risk that Sunoco is imposing on
communities—across seventeen Pennsylvania counties,” said Bibianna Dussling of Delaware
County. “Our government agencies have been spending time pointing fingers and shirking
responsibility rather than using their authority to take meaningful action to protect life and

70
property from harm.”
Rebecca Britton, a school director from Uwchlan Township, Chester County said,
“Pennsylvanians have traveled from across the entire state to come here today and demand that
our rights to health and safety are upheld by our state government and agencies. We are here
today to demand a permanent and complete shutdown of Mariner East.”
Added Ellen Gerhart of Huntingdon County, “We call upon the legislature to take swift
action to protect the constitutional rights of all Pennsylvanians to private property. And we call
upon Governor Wolf and the Public Utility Commission to permanently halt the Mariner East
pipeline project, which has caused so much suffering for so many Pennsylvanians.”
The group said every day that the Governor allows any part of Mariner East to stay in
operation without the credible emergency plan required by existing regulations is another day
that Pennsylvania communities are subjected to unacceptable risk of catastrophe.
Pipeline Proponents
A bipartisan group of state lawmakers joined leaders in business, labor and industry to
highlight the economic and public safety benefits of pipeline infrastructure development.
Senate Gas and Oil Caucus co-Chair Sen. Camera Bartolotta (R-Washington) emphasized
the importance of the oil and natural gas industry to the state’s economy. The industries have a
nearly $44.5 billion economic impact in Pennsylvania, supporting nearly 322,600 jobs and
generating nearly $23 billion in wages.
“By a wide margin, pipelines are the safest and most efficient means of transporting gas
and oil products to consumers,” Sen. Bartolotta said. “The demand for these resources is growing
every day. It is essential that we support the safe, responsible development of pipeline
infrastructure so our Commonwealth can reap the considerable economic benefits of these
critical industries in the form of more jobs and lower energy costs to consumers.”
Rep. Eric Nelson (R-Westmoreland) pointed out that pipelines also lead to a healthier
environment due to lower carbon emissions than transportation by rail or truck. Senate Gas and
Oil Caucus co-Chair John Blake (D-Lackawanna) and Sen. Sharif Street (D-Philadelphia) also
offered remarks in support of the responsible development of pipelines due to the economic and
environmental benefits.
Steamfitters Local 420 Business Manager Jim Snell highlighted the knowledge and
experience of the state’s construction workers, allowing them to complete projects safely with
minimal impact on the environment. Pennsylvania Chamber of Commerce Director of
Government Affairs Kevin Sunday touted the importance of the multi-billion dollar investments
generated by the industry.
Sen. Bartolotta emphasized the economic impact of the continued development of
pipelines in the future and said that the greatest threat to the industry is not a lack of resources or
workforce, but politicians who do not understand or appreciate the impact of the gas and oil
industries in the lives of Pennsylvanians.
“Pennsylvania is uniquely positioned to be a national leader in the gas and oil industries
for decades into the future, particularly based on our rich deposits of natural gas in the Marcellus
Shale region, coupled with our skilled workforce,” Sen. Bartolotta said. “What happens over the
next several months and years will determine whether we will be a leader in these industries for a
generation. The future of these industries hinges on our willingness to support pipeline projects
that show the greatest promise in terms of economic development and public safety.”
(​Photo:​ Pipeline opponents’ rally.)

71
Related Stories:
March 27 DEP Meeting On Proposed Drilling Permits At U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson Plant,
Allegheny County
Op-Ed: Will Our Dirt Roads Again Be Used As Dumping Sites For Oil & Gas Well Wastewater
PUC Pipeline Safety Investigation Underway Involving Possible Sunoco Gasoline Pipeline Leak
In Berks County On March 17
House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If DRBC
Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For Drilling
Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
NewsClips:
PA’s New Pipeline Caucus Wants Stronger Regulation Of Mariner East Pipelines
Legislators Press Forward On Pipeline Safety Concerns
Sen. Muth To Introduce Pipeline Safety, Public Awareness Standards Bills
Lawmakers Call For Expanded Natural Gas Pipeline Network
Legislators, Leaders In Business, Labor, Industry Stand In Solidarity For Pipeline Infrastructure
Development
Crews Investigate Possible Gasoline Leak From Sunoco Pipeline Near Reading
Phillips: Higher Operating Pressure In Mariner East 2x Pipeline Prompts New Safety Concerns
Federal Appeals Court Issues Stay Halting PennEast Pipeline Project
U.S. Appeals Court Grants Motion For Stay On PennEast Pipeline
Court Stay Allows PennEast Pipeline To Continue Environmental Surveys
Turnout Low For Session On Proposed Pipeline Compressor Station In Luzerne
Pipeline Construction Firm Offers Unique Venue For Local Artists In Luzerne County
Forbes: PA Homeowners Take Fight Against Gas Pipeline Land Grab To U.S. Supreme Court
Report: Plant Bailout Back On Tap As DOE’s Perry, Coal Interests Derail FERC Nomination
FERC Chief Of Staff Pugliese Steps Down
[Posted: March 19, 2019]

PJM: Reliability, Fuel Supply Strong In PJM During 2018-19 Winter

On March 18, the ​PJM electrical grid​ came ​through the 2018–2019 winter reliably​ in the face of
extreme temperatures and high electricity demand.
The 2018–2019 winter provided insights into grid operation, market trends and the
security of fuel supplies for the 13 states and District of Columbia that make up PJM’s service
area. PJM saw the following:
-- Electricity was supplied by a diverse set of resources, including natural gas, coal, nuclear and
renewables.
-- Generator performance continued to improve, with forced outages down from previous cold
weather
periods.
-- A break in a major natural gas pipeline occurred during winter peak operations, but did not
pose a significant impact to generation.
-- Pricing in PJM’s reserve market during stressed conditions showed that valuable energy
reserves, while adequate during these periods, were not appropriately compensated in the market,

72
which supports the movement for price reforms.
-- Wind generation in PJM reached its all-time peak of 7,808 MW on Jan. 9.
During the short but intense cold snap that impacted PJM’s footprint between Jan. 28–31,
forced outages were slightly higher than normal winter operations, which is typical for extreme
cold periods. But overall generator performance was good, and continued to show marked
improvement over the polar vortex winter of 2013–2014.
During the 2013-2014 winter, PJM faced forced generation outages of up to 22 percent.
Last winter (2017–2018), the extended cold snap produced forced outages of just 12 percent.
And during the recent cold weather of Jan. 30 and Jan. 31, PJM saw outages down to 8.6 percent
and 10.6 percent, respectively.
The output of the diverse generation fleet was similar to that of the 2018 cold snap, with a
significant increase in the percentage of natural gas, and a decrease in the percentage of
coal-fired generation.
More information is available in PJM’s ​Cold Weather Operations Summary​.
Related Stories:
Community Solar Legislative Forum April 3 In Wilkes-Barre
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation & Carbon
Dividend Act
Op-Ed: Science, Panic And Politics Of Climate Change
House Environmental Committee Holds Info Meeting March 27 On Debunking Modern Myths
Surrounding Climate Change
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

Community Solar Legislative Forum April 3 In Wilkes-Barre

On April 3 there will be a ​Community


Solar Legislative Forum​ at the Arnaud C.
Marts Center, Room 214 at ​Wilkes
University​, 292 S. Franklin Street in
Wilkes-Barre starting at 7:00 p.m.
Community solar projects can dramatically
expand the opportunities for residents and
businesses to participate in the growing
solar economy.
In community solar, participants can
subscribe to a portion of an offsite solar project and receive credit on their electricity bill for the
power produced, just as if the solar panels were on their own roof.
Eighteen states and the District of Columbia have enacted community solar programs.
The General Assembly is now considering legislation to create a community solar
program in Pennsylvania-- ​House Bill 531​. Come to this informative Community Solar
Legislative Forum to learn more
Speakers at the event include--
-- Rob Altenburg​, Director of the ​PennFuture Energy Center
-- Rep. Aaron Kaufer​ (R-Luzerne), prime sponsor of House Bill 531
-- Sen. John Yudichak ​(D-Luzerne), Minority Chair of the Senate Environmental Resources and

73
Energy Committee
-- Matt Tripoli​, Director of Project Development, ​Conti Solar
-- Dr. Ken Klemow​, Professor and Chair of Biology, Certified Senior Ecologist, Wilkes
University
-- Liz Robinson​, Executive Director, ​Philadelphia Solar Energy Association
Questions about this event can be directed to Steve Stroman, 717-350-0437 or send email
to: ​stevestroman@hotmail.com​.
Click Here for more information ​on Community Solar Projects.
For more information on plans to expand solar energy in Pennsylvania, visit the ​PA Solar
Future Plan​.
Related Stories:
PJM: Reliability, Fuel Supply Strong In PJM During 2018-19 Winter
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
Op-Ed: Science, Panic And Politics Of Climate Change
House Environmental Committee Holds Info Meeting March 27 On Debunking Modern Myths
Surrounding Climate Change
NewsClips:
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Penn Aims To Be Carbon Neutral By 2042
Olson: Casey: Green New Deal Worthy Of Review
Olson: Cong. Wild Talks Green New Deal, Trump Investigations, More
Trump Mocking Wind Power: When The Wind Doesn’t Blow, Just Turn Off the TV
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

Greater Philadelphia Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Accepting


Applications For Scholarships

The ​Greater Philadelphia Society Of Women


Environmental Professionals​ is now accepting
applications for two $3,000 college scholarships
for outstanding women studying to pursue
environmental careers. The deadline for
applications is May 15.
SWEP presents these grants to encourage girls
and/or women in the sciences, engineering, or
environmental fields.
To be eligible for a grant, applicants and projects must be located within the Greater
Philadelphia Area, which includes northern Delaware and Southern New Jersey.
Click Here for all the details​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Greater Philadelphia Society Of Women Environmental Professionals​ website.
Related Stories:
Capital Chapter Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Annual Conference April 25
The Energy Co-op’s Alexandra Kroger Appointed Philadelphia WRISE Chapter President

74
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

Capital Chapter Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Annual Conference April


25

The ​Capital Chapter Society of Women


Environmental Professionals​ will hold their
Annual Conference on April 25​ at ​Central
Penn College​, 600 College Hill Road in
Summerdale, Cumberland County.
Topics covered at the Conference
include: EPA’s Waters Of The U.S. Rule,
PFAS Emergening Contaminant Issue,
Electronic Waste, Air Permitting 101,
Algal Blooms, Watershed Restoration and
Modeling, Use Of Drones, a panel on wildlife issues and more.
Click Here to register​ or for more information.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Capital Chapter Society of Women Environmental Professionals​ website.
Related Stories:
Greater Philadelphia Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Accepting Applications
For Scholarships
The Energy Co-op’s Alexandra Kroger Appointed Philadelphia WRISE Chapter President
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

The Energy Co-op’s Alexandra Kroger Appointed Philadelphia WRISE Chapter President

The Energy Co-op’s​ Energy Program Manager Alexandra


Kroger was recently appointed president of the ​Philadelphia
Chapter of Women of Renewable Industries and Sustainable
Energy​ (WRISE).
WRISE is one of the nation’s premier organizations for
women in energy and related fields with more than 30 chapters
nationwide.
Alexandra joined The Energy Co-op last year, where she
manages the organization’s renewable energy programs –
electricity and natural gas. She oversees the acquisition of clean
energy and develops and implements strategies to ensure that the
organization acquires clean energy cost-effectively on behalf of
its membership.
Alexandra brings a diverse professional background to
her leadership role at WRISE including experience with the City of New York, a solar energy
company, and a public policy nonprofit in Washington, DC.
“The Energy Co-op is committed to leading the ongoing energy evolution and helping the
residents of southeastern Pennsylvania buy, use, and understand energy better,” said Energy

75
Co-op Executive Director Ronald Fisher. “Alexandra is an integral and valued member of our
team, and we congratulate her on her appointment.”.
The Energy Co-op​ was founded in 1979, the Energy Co-op, based in Philadelphia, Pa. is
leading the energy evolution by helping members buy energy as sustainably and affordably as
possible.
The organization has been addressing Pennsylvania’s energy challenges for over 40 years
and offers renewable electricity, renewable natural gas and affordable home heating oil.
Related Stories:
Greater Philadelphia Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Accepting Applications
For Scholarships
Capital Chapter Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Annual Conference April 25
[Posted: March 22, 2019]

DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council Meets March 27 To Discuss
Update To PA Outdoor Recreation Plan

DCNR’s Conservation and Natural Resources Advisory Council​ is


scheduled to meet on March 27 to discuss the update to the
2014-19 PA Outdoor Recreation Plan​.
Diane Kripas, Division Chief for DCNR’s Bureau of Recreation
and Conservation will lead the discussion of the Recreation Plan.
DCNR is required to complete an Outdoor Recreation Plan every
5 years to remain eligible for federal Land and Water
Conservation Fund monies.
So far, DCNR has begun some of the survey work and formed a
Technical Advisory Committee.
DCNR expects to have a draft plan done by the end of the year
and publish the 2020-2025 Plan next spring.
Also on the agenda​ is an overview of Gov. Wolf’s ​Restore
Pennsylvania​ infrastructure funding plan.
The meeting will be held in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building starting at 10:00.
For more information and available handouts, visit the ​Conservation and Natural
Resources Advisory Council​ webpage. Questions should be directed to ​Gretchen Leslie by
calling 717-772-9084 or sending email to: ​gleslie@pa.gov​.
Related Stories:
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
William Penn Foundation Announced Creative Communities Grant Awards Totaling $2.6
Million
Joint Conservation Committee Meeting Highlights Initiatives To Boost Bicycle Tourism Along
PA Route 6
Pike County Outdoors Guide For Sportsmen, Outdoor Enthusiasts Now Available
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon

76
Dividend Act
PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern
Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated By Congress
March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
March 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
NewsClips:
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
DCNR: Prince Gallitzin State Park, Cambria County, Needs $3.5 Million Of Infrastructure Work
DCNR Secretary Tours Potential Trail Site In Pittsburgh To Promote Restore PA
Delaware Canal State Park Needs $90 Million Worth Of Improvements
Editorial: State Parks Report Sounds Alarm
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Op-Ed: Philly’s Demand For Public Spaces Requires Creative Funding Solutions
DCNR Accepting Sealed Bids To Operate Presque Isle’s Concession
Luzerne Committee Narrows Proposed Natural Gas Rec Funding Awards
Northwestern Recreation Fields Damage Prompts Cash Reward In Lehigh Valley
Skate Park Coming Back In Luzerne
Frye: Camping When Campfires Are Prohibited
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

William Penn Foundation Announced Creative Communities Grant Awards Totaling $2.6
Million

On March 18, the ​William Penn Foundation


announced the award of ​$2.6 million Creative
Community Grants​ to support equitable access to
great public spaces.
The grants are designed to support projects that
also promote health through physical activity,
help children learn through play, enhance
appreciation of the natural environment, and offer
platforms for cultural expression.
Among the grants awarded were to the ​Riverfront
North Partnership​ ($2,000,000) for the
development of the new 10-acre ​Bridesburg Park​ along the Delaware river.
This project will transform a former industrial site into a new 10-acre waterfront park,
creating waterfront public access for the Bridesburg neighborhood as well as for the entire region
via the Circuit Trails network. This grant was co-funded by our Watershed Protection program,
as part of our work to expand public access to the region's riverfronts.
Click Here​ for a complete list of grants awarded.
(​Photo:​ Bridesburg Park concept.)
Related Stories:
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden

77
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council Meets March 27 To Discuss
Update To PA Outdoor Recreation Plan
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
Joint Conservation Committee Meeting Highlights Initiatives To Boost Bicycle Tourism Along
PA Route 6
Pike County Outdoors Guide For Sportsmen, Outdoor Enthusiasts Now Available
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern
Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated By Congress
March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
NewsClips:
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
DCNR: Prince Gallitzin State Park, Cambria County, Needs $3.5 Million Of Infrastructure Work
DCNR Secretary Tours Potential Trail Site In Pittsburgh To Promote Restore PA
Delaware Canal State Park Needs $90 Million Worth Of Improvements
Editorial: State Parks Report Sounds Alarm
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Op-Ed: Philly’s Demand For Public Spaces Requires Creative Funding Solutions
DCNR Accepting Sealed Bids To Operate Presque Isle’s Concession
Luzerne Committee Narrows Proposed Natural Gas Rec Funding Awards
Northwestern Recreation Fields Damage Prompts Cash Reward In Lehigh Valley
Skate Park Coming Back In Luzerne
Frye: Camping When Campfires Are Prohibited
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

Pike County Outdoors Guide For Sportsmen, Outdoor Enthusiasts Now Available

On March 20, the Pike County Commissioners


announce publication of ​Pike Outdoors, a Public Lands
Guide for Sportsmen and Outdoor Enthusiasts​.
The guide is a comprehensive resource that includes
maps and helpful information about Pike County’s
120,00+ acres of federal, state and locally owned lands.
Now in its third edition, Pike Outdoors features articles
by environmental experts on topics such as camping,
bicycling, fishing, boating, and birding; as well as
beautiful nature photography by David B. Soete, Ron
Tussel, Nicholas Tonelli, and the Game Commission.
The printed guide will be available free to the public at
the Pike County Administration building, the ​Pike

78
County Office of Community Planning​, the ​Pike County Conservation district​, and through
Pocono Mountain Visitors Bureau​ welcome centers, regional nature centers, and local outdoor
outfitters.
A downloadable version of the guide will also be ​available at PikePa.org​.
The printed guide was created by the Pike County Office of Community Planning with
the help of the following partners: Pike County Board of Commissioners, USDI National Park
Service, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Game Commission, Fish & Boat
Commission, ​Pike County Conservation District,​ and ​Pennsylvania Environmental Council​.
“No other resource combines all of our local public lands into one comprehensive
publication,” says Pike County Assistant Planning Director Jessica Yoder. “We hope all outdoor
enthusiasts use this helpful guide to get outside and enjoy all of the recreational opportunities
that Pike County has to offer.”
Funding for the project was provided by the Pocono Mountains Visitors Bureau.
Pike Outdoors App
In September of 2018, all of the great features of the printed guide became available in a
digital Pike Outdoors app for iPhone or Android. The public can ​access the app at PikePa.org​ or
through Google Play and the Apple App Store.
For more information, contact the Pike County Office of Community Planning by
sending email to: ​planning@pikepa.org​ or calling 570-296-3500.
Related Stories:
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council Meets March 27 To Discuss
Update To PA Outdoor Recreation Plan
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
William Penn Foundation Announced Creative Communities Grant Awards Totaling $2.6
Million
Joint Conservation Committee Meeting Highlights Initiatives To Boost Bicycle Tourism Along
PA Route 6
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern
Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated By Congress
March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
NewsClips:
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
DCNR: Prince Gallitzin State Park, Cambria County, Needs $3.5 Million Of Infrastructure Work
DCNR Secretary Tours Potential Trail Site In Pittsburgh To Promote Restore PA
Delaware Canal State Park Needs $90 Million Worth Of Improvements
Editorial: State Parks Report Sounds Alarm
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Op-Ed: Philly’s Demand For Public Spaces Requires Creative Funding Solutions

79
DCNR Accepting Sealed Bids To Operate Presque Isle’s Concession
Luzerne Committee Narrows Proposed Natural Gas Rec Funding Awards
Northwestern Recreation Fields Damage Prompts Cash Reward In Lehigh Valley
Skate Park Coming Back In Luzerne
Frye: Camping When Campfires Are Prohibited
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

Wildlands Conservancy Highlights Educational Programs, Activities Coming Up In April

The Lehigh Valley-based ​Wildlands Conservancy


highlighted ​education programs and activities
coming up in April, including--
-- Earth Day Is April 22!
-- April 7: ​Spring Migration: Meet Our Raptors
-- April 11:​ ​PreK Pathfinders: Amphibian
Adventure
-- April 14:​ ​Park Clean Up At Trout Creek Park
-- April 24:​ ​You & Me: Bunny Circle
-- April 27:​ ​Tunnels And Nor-Bath Rail To Trail
-- May 4:​ ​Wild Eggs… Not Your Average Egg Hunt!
-- ​Click Here​ if you are interested in volunteering for the Conservancy.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Wildlands
Conservancy​ website. ​Like on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​ and ​Join on Instagram​. ​Click Here
to support the Conservancy.
Related Stories:
Greater Philadelphia Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Accepting Applications
For Scholarships
CBF-PA: Media Invited To Paddle Along As Students Explore Local PA Waterways
PA Green Colleges Hold Conference On Sustainable Development Goals And Higher Education
April 9 In State College
Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film
Wildlife Honors Students Get Hands-On Experience In Pennsylvania’s Elk Range
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
NewsClips:
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Penn Aims To Be Carbon Neutral By 2042
Editorial: Listen To, Support Students Speaking Out On Climate Change
PaEN: Wildlands Conservancy Highlights Educational Programs, Activities Coming Up In April
Schneck: Rare Spring-Equinox, Super, Full Moon Shines Tonight
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

Fort Indiantown Gap Begins Spring 2019 Prescribed Burn Season In Lebanon County

Fort Indiantown Gap​ has begun its spring

80
prescribed burn season to reduce the risk of wildfires at Fort Indiantown Gap, Lebanon County.
The burns will be conducted on approximately 4,500 acres, as conditions permit, March
18 through May 3 between 8 a.m. and 11 p.m. Local residents may notice smoke originating
from or in the vicinity of the installation while burns are being conducted.
A prescribed burn is a commonly used forestry management technique that reduces the
amount of combustible material naturally existing in the wilderness. It is performed only when
conditions such as humidity, wind and temperature are ideal for managing fires.
Prescribed burns are not conducted unless all required conditions are met.
Fort Indiantown Gap, headquarters to the DMVA and Pennsylvania National Guard,
offers more than 17,000 acres and 140 training areas and facilities for year-round training.
It balances one of the region’s most ecologically diverse areas with a military mission
that annually supports 19,000 Pennsylvania National Guard personnel and more than 130,000
other states’ Guard, military, law enforcement, and civilian personnel each year.
It is the only live-fire, maneuver military training facility in Pennsylvania. It is the busiest
Army National Guard training center in the nation.
For more information visit the ​Fort Indiantown Gap​ website, or ​follow on Facebook​.
Individuals may also call the installation’s community information line at 717-861-2007 to hear
a recorded message with dates and times of community activities and training events.
For more information on the use of prescribed fire, visit DCNR’s ​Prescribed Fire
webpage, the ​PA Prescribed Fire Council​ website, read the Game Commission’s ​Better Hunting
With Prescribed Burning​ backgrounder and visit The Nature Conservancy’s ​Fire Management In
Pennsylvania​ webpage.
Learn more about wildfire risks and prevention methods, by visiting DCNR’s ​Wildfire
webpage.
Related Stories:
DCNR: Pennsylvanians Urged To Exercise Caution To Prevent Wildfires
DCNR Now Accepting Applications For Volunteer Fire Company Wildfire Fighting Grants
Related Stories This Week​:
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees Along
Streams
March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
March 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
NewsClips:
DCNR Secretary Highlights Riparian Buffer Effort In Union County
Livestaking: Utilize Cuttings From Willows, Dogwoods To Improve Streams
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Spotted Lanternfly Spreads To Dauphin County
Nanticoke’s Oldest Tree Coming Down
PECO Tree Clearing Riles Residents In Bucks
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

DCNR Good Natured Blog: Native Plant Conservation Gets Renewed Focus In PA,

81
Meeting April 26

​Recall a time that you were out in nature. Perhaps


walking along a wooded trail, or even enjoying an
urban greenspace. You probably noticed the animals
that inhabit that space; an American robin singing
above in the tree canopy; squirrels gathering acorns
for the not-so-long winter.
Did you pay attention to the plants or were you
largely unaware of their diversity? If you failed to
notice the plants, you’re not alone; “plant blindness”
is a real thing!
Defined as the “inability to see or notice the plants in
one’s own environment,” this condition leads to a lack of recognition regarding the importance
of plants’ roles in our daily lives.
Less funding towards plant conservation has been unfortunate consequence of plant
blindness.
Rare plants and endangered plant communities almost always receive less publicity, less
protection, and lower levels of funding than do animals, although the threat to their survival is
even greater. Extinction rates for plant species are seven times greater than for animals.
However, it’s not all doom and gloom, as plant conservation programs are sprouting up!
Nationwide, these organizations all share a similar goal: to protect native plants by ensuring that
native plant populations and their communities are maintained, enhanced, and restored.
Plant conservation programs typically engage a wide audience, from school age children,
average citizens, and hobbyists to professional botanists and academics. What do these folks
have in common? An appreciation of flora and a concern for the long-term health of our plant
communities.
PA Plant Conservation Network
In response to the growing need for on-the-ground, active conservation efforts, the
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has established a statewide network for the
conservation of native plants.
The ​Pennsylvania Plant Conservation Network​ (PPCN) works collaboratively to promote
and coordinate the conservation of native plant species and plant communities through
education, outreach, and stewardship.
The PPCN serves botanical professionals, as well as average citizens who have an
interest in learning more about how they can positively impact their native plant communities.
Worldwide, it is predicted that 28 percent of all plant species may become extinct by
2050.
In Pennsylvania, climate change, habitat loss due to development, encroachment by
invasive species, and selective browsing by animals such as white-tail deer are some of the many
contributing elements threatening our state’s approximately 3,000 plant species.
Roughly two-thirds of those species are considered native to the commonwealth. Of those
native plants, 582 are classified by DCNR, with 349 considered rare, threatened, or endangered
in Pennsylvania.
The PPCN is just getting started, but hopes to identify rare plants in need of stewardship

82
in your community!
Help Shape the Future for Native Plants
The Pennsylvania Plant Conservation Network will hold its first public meeting in
conjunction with the 2019 Rare Plant Forum.
Plant conservation stakeholders, concerned citizens, and other plant enthusiasts are
encouraged to attend this free meeting for a collaborative discussion about the goals of the
PPCN.
The meeting will be held April 26 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at ​Shaver’s Creek
Environmental Center,​ 3400 Discovery Road in Petersburg, Huntingdon County.
If you would like to attend the PPCN meeting, ​please register online​.
If you’re interested in learning more about how you can get involved in plant
conservation efforts in Pennsylvania, contact the PPCN program coordinator, Kristi Allen by
sending email to: ​krallen@pa.gov​.
(​Photo:​ PPCN members preparing to plant Goodyera tesselata grown from native seed at a state
forest wild plant sanctuary.)
Native Plant Resources
There are lots of resources available to help property owners landscape with native
plants, and now is the best time to start planning for Spring projects. Here are just of a few of
the resources available--
-- ​DCNR Landscaping With Native Plants
-- Game Commission: ​Common Beneficial Plants Found In Wildlife Habitat
-- U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: ​Native Plants For Wildlife Habitat And Conservation
Landscaping
-- ​Chesapeake Bay Sustainable Landscape Professional Directory
-- Brandywine Conservancy: ​Forested Riparian Buffer Planting Guide
-- Audubon PA: ​Bird Habitat Recognition Program
-- National Audubon: ​Native Plants Database
-- ​Xerces Society For Invertebrate Conservation
-- ​Gardening For Butterflies: Penn State Extension
-- ​Planting For Pollinators: Penn State Extension
-- ​Center For Pollinator Research, Penn State
-- ​P​ennsylvania Pollinator Protection Plan​ ​- Learn Why Pollinators Are At Risk In PA
-- ​Ernst Seeds - Pollinator Habitat Restoration
-- ​Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
You can also check with ​l​and trusts​, ​watershed groups​, ​PA Audubon​ and ​Trout Unlimited
Chapters, ​county conservation districts​ or other groups near you to see how they can help.
Related Stories:
Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service In Dauphin County
[Recommended]
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species And Preserving Pollinators
DCNR: New Wild Plant Regulations Now In Place In PA; What You Can Do To Help Native
Plants, Pollinators
Feature: Recognizing The Value Of Native Plants For Pollinators​ - ​Dr. Doug Tallamy
Agriculture, Penn State Release PA Pollinator Protection Plan Recommendations
Pollinator Population Is Going Down In PA Due To Pesticides, Parasites And Pathogens

83
Sen. Yudichak, Cong. Barletta, Author Caroline Jones Celebrate The Launch Of We Saved The
Bees And The Butterflies Children's Book
PA Rural Water Assn. Will Hold Annual Conference March 26-29 In State College, Including
Seminar On Zebra Mussels, Algal Blooms
NewsClips:
Spotted Lanternfly Spreads To Dauphin County
Editorial: U.S. Must Ensure Protections For Imperiled Wildlife
[Posted: March 18, 2019]

March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR

The ​March 20 Resource newsletter​ from


the Department of Conservation and
Natural Resources is now available
featuring articles on--
-- ​Making Progress Toward A Goal Of
Planting More Trees Along Streams
-- ​DCNR Tours Potential Trail Sites In
Pittsburgh Restore PA Could Fund
-- ​Tour Of Prince Gallitzin State Park
Highlights Infrastructure Needs Restore PA Could Fund
-- ​Tours Of Delaware Canal, Washington Crossing Infrastructure Needs Restore PA Could Fund
-- ​DCNR Now Accepting Applications For Volunteer Fire Company Wildfire Fighting Grants
-- ​Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated
-- ​Chinquapin Hill Campground Renovations Completed At Caledonia State Park
-- ​Help Build A Future For Native Plants In PA, April 26 Meeting
-- ​DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County Watershed Steward
-- ​Anglers Prepare For Opening Of Trout Season
-- ​Conservation Tip: 40% Of Wildfires Start With Backyard Trash Burning
-- ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own copy.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, Visit the ​Good Natured​ DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click
Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
Related Stories:
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The Golden
Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council Meets March 27 To Discuss
Update To PA Outdoor Recreation Plan
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
William Penn Foundation Announced Creative Communities Grant Awards Totaling $2.6
Million
Joint Conservation Committee Meeting Highlights Initiatives To Boost Bicycle Tourism Along
PA Route 6
Pike County Outdoors Guide For Sportsmen, Outdoor Enthusiasts Now Available

84
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern
Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated By Congress
NewsClips:
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
DCNR: Prince Gallitzin State Park, Cambria County, Needs $3.5 Million Of Infrastructure Work
DCNR Secretary Tours Potential Trail Site In Pittsburgh To Promote Restore PA
Delaware Canal State Park Needs $90 Million Worth Of Improvements
Editorial: State Parks Report Sounds Alarm
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Op-Ed: Philly’s Demand For Public Spaces Requires Creative Funding Solutions
DCNR Accepting Sealed Bids To Operate Presque Isle’s Concession
Luzerne Committee Narrows Proposed Natural Gas Rec Funding Awards
Northwestern Recreation Fields Damage Prompts Cash Reward In Lehigh Valley
Skate Park Coming Back In Luzerne
Frye: Camping When Campfires Are Prohibited
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

Game Commission: 2018-19 Deer Harvest At 374,690 Largest Since 2004-05

On March 19, the Game Commission reported Pennsylvania


hunters posted their highest overall deer harvest in 14 years
when they took 374,690 deer during the state’s 2018-19
hunting seasons, which closed in January.
The 2018-19 deer harvest topped the previous year’s
harvest of 367,159 by about 10 percent. The last time the total
deer harvest exceeded this year’s total was in 2004-05.
After four years of successive annual increases in buck
harvests, hunters posted a buck harvest of 147,750, which
placed fourth overall since the start of antler restrictions in
2002. The 2018-19 buck harvest represents a 10 percent decline from the 2017-18 buck harvest
of 163,750.
The largest harvest in the antler-restrictions era – 165,416 – occurred in the first year.
Although the total deer harvest was not impacted by downpours on the opening day of
the firearms deer season, the buck harvest seemed to take a hit. About half of the firearms
season’s overall buck harvest typically occurs on the season’s opening day, when hunter
participation is usually at its highest.
Steady rain in most of the state persisted through the morning if not longer of the firearms
season opener, making hunting for deer, as well as staying dry and warm while afield, more
difficult. And when hunter participation drops on the best harvest day of any season, the harvest
typically does, too.
“This year’s opening day antlered harvest was down significantly from last year’s

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harvest,” said Christopher Rosenberry, Game Commission Deer and Elk Section supervisor.
“Although the rest of the firearms season’s daily harvests were similar to or above last year’s,
they did not make up for the low opening day harvest.”
Click Here for the full announcement​.
For more information on deer in Pennsylvania, visit the Game Commission’s
White-Tailed Deer​ webpage.
Related Stories:
Wildlife Honors Students Get Hands-On Experience In Pennsylvania’s Elk Range
Peregrine Falcon Nests: Pittsburgh - 4 Eggs, Harrisburg- 2 Eggs; Egg Watch On For PPL
Building In Allentown
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Kicks Off Spring Migration Season With Raptorthon March 30
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
NewsClips:
Dietz: Game Commission Has Support In Its Battle Against Chronic Wasting Disease
Dietz: Game Commission Receives Credible Support In Its Battle Against Chronic Wasting
Disease
Game Commission To Decide Hot-Button Issues In April
Crable: Deer Kill In PA Highest In 4 Years, Buck Kill Down 10 Percent
Hunters In Pennsylvania Have Killed 17,492,302 Deer Since 1915
Carr: Raccoon In Monroeville Tested Positive For Rabies, 6th Case This Year In Allegheny
County
[Posted: March 19, 2019]

Wildlife Honors Students Get Hands-On Experience In Pennsylvania’s Elk Range

By Steve Harmic, ​Penn State News

Honors students in the ​Penn State DuBois Wildlife


Technology Program​ had an exclusive opportunity
for hands-on learning recently with members of
the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s (PGC)
biological staff.
The PGC is currently researching reproductive
trends among ​Pennsylvania’s elk herd​ in hopes of
improving the overall health of the herd and
increasing the population.
To that end, four first-year honors students from
the program, with their instructor Keely Roen,
joined Elk Biologist Jeremy Banfield and Elk
Biologist Aide Avery Corondi in chemically immobilizing a cow, or female elk, so that blood
samples crucial to these conservation efforts be collected.
“We collected blood samples during our hunting season for elk, which happens in the

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first full week of November, and we’ve been testing for pregnancy, and it’s been suspiciously
low. Around 55 to 60 percent,” Banfield explained, noting that the pregnancy rates in November
would ideally be at around 90 percent. “So, we are collecting blood samples now, later in the
season, to see if pregnancy increased. Basically, we want to see that if you give the animals more
time to breed, will pregnancy go up.”
While this research is still in its very early stages, Banfield said seeing pregnancy rates
increase into the spring is not actually a positive finding.
He said late season pregnancy among female elk means an increased mortality rate for
their calves and hopes that most cows will be pregnant earlier in the season. Ultimately, through
this research, they hope to understand why that isn’t happening.
“It’s going to depend on what we find here, what our next step is. When you have either
low pregnancy or late pregnancy, it obviously influences the population. So, we are trying to
deduce what’s going on here so we can hopefully correct it in the future,” Banfield said. “You
want the animals to be bred in as short of a window as possible. Early on in late September is the
prime period. The reason is that the rut [breeding season] is rough on both genders, especially
bulls that can lose up to 20 percent of their body weight.
"Also, nature has evolved this way so that the calves that are born during the end of May,
beginning of June, which is the prime time for vegetation, and that’s a good time," added
Banfield. "Food is plentiful, and they can gain weight fast. If they’re born late, they don’t have as
much time to gain that weight and have lower chances of survival going into the fall, so we don’t
want late pregnancy. We want the population to grow; more importantly we want the natural
process to work as it should, but right now it appears that it’s not.”
While these early steps of this research will hopefully reveal why these late pregnancies
are happening, Corondi added that it is a confusing setback for the population of a species that
otherwise is poised for great survival and reproductive success in the Commonwealth. She said,
“It’s high quality forage we have here, so there’s plenty of food, a great bull to cow ratio,
and no natural predators. These animals really have very few stressors, so the pregnancy rates
should be higher.”
The process by which samples are collected for this research is challenging, adding
another layer of difficulty for these wildlife professionals. They are specifically targeting female
elk, three-and-a-half years of age and older.
They must first locate a group of animals, visually identify an individual they hope to
collect samples from, then close in, getting into range for a clean shot with an air powered gun
that fires darts that deliver the immobilizing chemicals that sedate the elk long enough for
samples to be collected.
The safe range to ensure a chance at a clean shot with that device is about 40 yards. Just
immobilizing the animal alone can take a great deal of know-how and woodsmanship.
“We collected blood samples during our hunting season for elk, which happens in the
first full week of November, and we’ve been testing for pregnancy, and it’s been suspiciously
low. Around 55 to 60 percent,” said Elk biologist Jeremy Banfield.
It was this process that Penn State DuBois honors students in the Wildlife Technology
program had the opportunity to participate in, an opportunity not open to any other members of
the public or community outside of PGC staff.
Currently studying to work in the field of wildlife conservation, this exclusive experience
gave the students the chance for a real-world look at some of the work they could look forward

87
to completing when they enter their careers.
Freshman Wildlife Technology honors student Samantha Carns, of Clearfield, said, “It
was amazing. I one hundred percent want to do it again. I have never been that close to an elk
and it was so cool.”
Banfield and Corondi led the group of students from Winslow Hill near Benezette in Elk
County, out into the heart of Pennsylvania’s Elk Range at sunrise. They quickly came upon a
group of elk and identified a cow that fit their profile for testing.
After Banfield made the shot with the dart gun, the group waited about 10 minutes before
tracking the animal.
They were assisted by radio telemetry that homes in on a signal put out by the dart, and
used the device to help locate the elk, which was able to run a couple of hundred yards before
she would succumb to the immobilization drugs.
Once located, Banfield and Corondi quickly got to work collecting blood, as well as other
data from the cow. Banfield said, “While we have her down, we check heart rate, breathing, and
temperature, to assure the health of the animal. We age her by examining her teeth. The blood
sample is what we’re after, but while we have her there, we take the chance to assure the overall
health of the elk.”
Following the collection of samples and data, reversal drugs are injected into the elk to
counteract the immobilization drugs that tranquilized her. All animals studied are monitored until
they’re awake and able to regain their feet. In this case, the cow elk was awake and able return to
the herd within four minutes after recovery drugs were administered.
Penn State DuBois students helped the PGC staff throughout this process and in
collecting data, including blood samples and vital signs, taking the opportunity for more
real-world lessons that will give them experience as they go into their future careers.
Carns said, “This helped me realize what wildlife biologists actually do, and it just
opened up my eyes.”
Garrett Orcutt, a freshman wildlife technology student from Rockton, Pennsylvania, said,
“It was definitely one of the most awesome opportunities I’ve ever had the pleasure of being a
part of. It was great of Jeremy for letting us be a part of this.”
Getting to be in such close contact to wildlife, as well as the hands-on work that
conservationists do every day, was and invaluable learning experience for these aspiring
professionals.
“Being that close to such a large mammal that is such a big part of Pennsylvania’s
heritage really narrows it down that I want to do something in my career with big game animals,”
Orcutt said.
Instructor Keely Roen said the type of inspiration and real-world experience Orcutt is
thankful for is exactly why she seeks out these opportunities for her students.
She said, “This gives students the chance to interact with professionals in natural
resources, and to be part of an experience that they may very well relive five or 10 years from
now in their careers. There’s no way to replicate that in the classroom. You have to really see it
to understand what goes into something like this. If you don’t see it in person, you really don’t
truly understand it.”
Roen said the students participating in this experience will use what they’ve learned to
help their classmates take their education one step further, as well.
She said, “These honors students will do a presentation on their experience for other

88
students in the Wildlife Technology program when we learn about chemically immobilizing deer
in the fall semester, so they’ll be able to share what they’ve learned and note the differences they
see between deer and elk.”
According to Banfield, the elk herd in Pennsylvania was extirpated due to overhunting in
the late 1800s.
Beginning in 1913, efforts to bring the species back to the Keystone State began with
importing animals from other states. Between 1913 and 1926, 177 elk were introduced into
Pennsylvania. That number initially grew to between 400 and 500 animals.
Official yearly counts of the species began in 1971, and eventually a hunting season for
elk in Pennsylvania was open in 2001 when it was determined the population increased to a
sustainable number that could be managed by hunting.
Though the current pregnancy rate is alarming, importation of elk as was done in the past
is no longer an option due to the outbreak of ​Chronic Wasting Disease​ (CWD). An affliction
plaguing deer and elk alike, CWD originated in the west and has already found its way into
Pennsylvania.
There is no cure for the disease, which attacks the nervous system of the animals, and it is
always terminal to those that contract it.
To prevent the spread of the disease, conservationists have determined that deer and elk
should not be relocated. Though it is a threat to deer and elk species populations, no evidence has
been discovered that it is harmful to humans.
Additionally, Banfield’s opinion as the state elk biologist is that it can be mitigated to the
point of sustaining wildlife species.
He said, “Our elk will inevitably get it. When that’s going to occur is always difficult to
predict. But when it happens, we have no reason to expect it will wipe out the elk population.
There will be a presence of the disease that we’ll have to respond to; it’s a serious thing and
we’ll keep it on the forefront. But it won’t wipe out our herd.”
Currently Pennsylvania boasts an elk population of approximately 1,000 animals.
Banfield said members of the public should be reminded that feeding elk is illegal, and in
CWD areas of the state, feeding of deer is prohibited, as well. Refraining from feeding wildlife
will help in stopping the spread of diseases like CWD.
For more information on elk in Pennsylvania, visit the Game Commission’s ​Elk Viewing
Destinations​ webpage.
(Reprinted from ​Penn State News.​ )
Related Stories:
Game Commission: 2018-19 Deer Harvest At 374,690 Largest Since 2004-05
Peregrine Falcon Nests: Pittsburgh - 4 Eggs, Harrisburg- 2 Eggs; Egg Watch On For PPL
Building In Allentown
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Kicks Off Spring Migration Season With Raptorthon March 30
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
NewsClips:
Dietz: Game Commission Has Support In Its Battle Against Chronic Wasting Disease
Dietz: Game Commission Receives Credible Support In Its Battle Against Chronic Wasting

89
Disease
Game Commission To Decide Hot-Button Issues In April
Crable: Deer Kill In PA Highest In 4 Years, Buck Kill Down 10 Percent
Hunters In Pennsylvania Have Killed 17,492,302 Deer Since 1915
Carr: Raccoon In Monroeville Tested Positive For Rabies, 6th Case This Year In Allegheny
County
[Posted: March 20, 2019]

Peregrine Falcon Nests: Pittsburgh - 4 Eggs, Harrisburg- 3 Eggs; Egg Watch On For PPL
Building In Allentown

The peregrine falcons nesting on buildings in


Pittsburgh, Harrisburg and Allentown are in
different stages of nesting and laying eggs this
season.
Pittsburgh Falcons
The ​peregrine falcon nest at the
Cathedral of Learning​ on the University of
Pittsburgh campus have so far laid 4 eggs this
season, the last one coming March 18.
Typically the female lays an egg at one
or two day intervals and has a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs.
The entire incubation period lasts for 32 to 35 days. The female will do most of the sitting
on the eggs; the male will sit for approximately 30 percent of the incubation time. The male will
increase his hunting efforts to provide food for both of them.
Click Here to watch​ the nest live and for updates. The National Aviary in Pittsburgh
makes the webcast available for the public.
Harrisburg Falcons
The ​peregrine falcons nesting on the Rachel Carson Building​ in Harrisburg welcomed
their third egg on Saturday.. The first egg arrived on March 19.
Click Here to watch the nest live​ and for regular updates.
PPL Allentown Falcons
Peregrine falcons are once again making their presence known around ​PPL's 23-story
headquarters in downtown Allentown
The raptors this year find themselves with a new nesting box and the public will be able
to see more of them thanks to streaming video from three new cameras installed inside and
outside the box.
PPL worked with WFMZ-TV to install the cameras and will also be working with ​Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary​ as a science partner to attach telemetry tracking units to the falcon
fledglings at the time the young birds are banded by the Game Commission.
"This is what environment and community are all about," said Mike Hasel, PPL Electric
Utilities manager of environmental compliance. "PPL has a long-standing involvement with
efforts to restore the peregrine falcon population in Pennsylvania that dates to 1995 and the
Pennsylvania Peregrine Project. We're excited the birds have returned and hope they successfully
nest again this year. We're proud of the viewing and learning opportunities we're able to provide

90
to the public."
Click Here​ for a live video feed of the Allentown nesting box.
For more information on peregrine falcon restoration, visit the Game Commission’s
Peregrine Falcon​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ Harrisburg falcon nest.)
Related Stories:
Game Commission: 2018-19 Deer Harvest At 374,690 Largest Since 2004-05
Wildlife Honors Students Get Hands-On Experience In Pennsylvania’s Elk Range
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Kicks Off Spring Migration Season With Raptorthon March 30
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
NewsClips:
Nesting Pair Of Eagles Returns To Presque Isle State Park
Editorial: Bald Eagles Settle Into Nest On Presque Isle
Middle Creek Snow Geese Season Is Over, How Many Stopped By?
Kennett Township Becomes Audubon Bird Town
Trout Stocking, Birding Events To Soon Be Underway In Centre County
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Kicks Off Spring Migration Season With Raptorthon March
30

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary​ in Berks County will


launch this upcoming spring migration season by
participating in the ​2019 Raptorthon on March 30
hosted by ​Hawk Migration Association of North
America​ (HMANA).
Senior Educator Rachel Spagnola is Hawk
Mountain's representative for this year, with her
team Ridgetop Rachel and the Wing Watchers.
Raptorthon is an annual fundraiser event that
engages bird and hawk watch sites and garners
support for those organizations. The pledge
proceeds are split between HMANA and the organization of your choice.
The focus is aimed at getting the maximum count of raptor species in a 24-hour period,
all while gaining support for raptor organizations across the continent.
Hawk Mountain's event takes place on March 30, with a rain date of March 31. Team
Ridgetop Rachel and the Wing Watchers will begin with a driving road survey following the
Kittatinny ridge, from Little Gap to the Lehigh Gap, eventually ending at Hawk Mountain
Sanctuary.
This route allows the team to explore this important migration corridor for raptors,
songbirds, monarchs, and more.
After lunch, Rachel and her team will station atop North Lookout, Hawk Mountain's

91
official migration count location. The team will tally any passing raptors from 1 to 4 p.m. and
will help identify and inform for any joining visitors.
Those who wish to support Hawk Mountain can join in the fun throughout the day and/or
make a donation online​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary​ website or call 610-756-6961. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates
from the Sanctuary, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​visit them on Flickr​ and visit
their ​YouTube Channel​. ​Click Here ​to support Hawk Mountain.
Related Stories:
Game Commission: 2018-19 Deer Harvest At 374,690 Largest Since 2004-05
Wildlife Honors Students Get Hands-On Experience In Pennsylvania’s Elk Range
Peregrine Falcon Nests: Pittsburgh - 4 Eggs, Harrisburg- 2 Eggs; Egg Watch On For PPL
Building In Allentown
Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp; Carbon
Dividend Act
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
NewsClips:
Nesting Pair Of Eagles Returns To Presque Isle State Park
Editorial: Bald Eagles Settle Into Nest On Presque Isle
Middle Creek Snow Geese Season Is Over, How Many Stopped By?
Kennett Township Becomes Audubon Bird Town
Trout Stocking, Birding Events To Soon Be Underway In Centre County
[Posted: March 19, 2019]

PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern

On March 20, the ​PA Environmental Council​ named veteran


trail developer Brett Hollern as the newest member of its ​Trails
and Recreation team​.
The long-serving Somerset County Trail Manager brings two
decades of experience to PEC’s State College office, where he
will support the ongoing efforts of the ​Industrial Heartland Trails
Coalition​ to create a 1,500+ mile network of multi-use trails in
western Pennsylvania and three neighboring states.
“Brett’s extensive experience working on trail projects in
western Pennsylvania will be invaluable as we move forward to
help partners close gaps on the Erie to Pittsburgh and PA Wilds alignments, and along the
Sheepskin Trail,” PEC President Davitt Woodwell said.
In his more than two decades with Somerset County, Hollern was involved in the
planning, development, and management of two of the region’s most visible and popular trail
assets: the ​Great Allegheny Passage​ and the ​September 11th National Memorial Trail​. He
continues to serve on the Board of Directors for the Allegheny Trail Alliance and the September
11th National Memorial Trail.
Hollern holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Recreation and Park Management from

92
Penn State University. He came to Somerset County in 1997 as a planner before assuming the
role of Trail and Greenways Coordinator, serving ATA and the County under DCNR’s Circuit
Rider Program.
“Having worked with PEC throughout my career, I’m thrilled to join the team and bring
my experience and knowledge of trails to help others achieve their trail building goals,” Hollern
said.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​, ​PEC Bill/Regulation Tracker​, follow ​PEC
on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts. ​Click
Here​ to receive regular updates from PEC.
Related Stories:
PaEN: PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The
Golden Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council Meets March 27 To Discuss
Update To PA Outdoor Recreation Plan
Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal For
Conservation
William Penn Foundation Announced Creative Communities Grant Awards Totaling $2.6
Million
Joint Conservation Committee Meeting Highlights Initiatives To Boost Bicycle Tourism Along
PA Route 6
Pike County Outdoors Guide For Sportsmen, Outdoor Enthusiasts Now Available
Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated By Congress
March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
NewsClips:
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
DCNR: Prince Gallitzin State Park, Cambria County, Needs $3.5 Million Of Infrastructure Work
DCNR Secretary Tours Potential Trail Site In Pittsburgh To Promote Restore PA
Delaware Canal State Park Needs $90 Million Worth Of Improvements
Editorial: State Parks Report Sounds Alarm
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Op-Ed: Philly’s Demand For Public Spaces Requires Creative Funding Solutions
DCNR Accepting Sealed Bids To Operate Presque Isle’s Concession
Luzerne Committee Narrows Proposed Natural Gas Rec Funding Awards
Northwestern Recreation Fields Damage Prompts Cash Reward In Lehigh Valley
Skate Park Coming Back In Luzerne
Frye: Camping When Campfires Are Prohibited
[Posted: March 21, 2019]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.
93
The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​ and ​Twitter Feed​.

PaEN: Senate Agriculture Committee Holds Hearing On Redding As Secretary Of Agriculture


April 9
AP: W. S. Merwin, Prize-Winning Poet Of Nature, Dies At 91
Politics
PA Redistricting Reform Commission Announces 9 Public Meetings To Gather Input
Have An Opinion About Gerrymandering, Redistricting? Sound Off At These Meetings
Redistricting Reform Is Back On In Pennsylvania
AP: May 21 Special Election Set For Ellis House Seat
Click Here for a Week’s Worth Of Political NewsClips
Air
Pittsburgh To Enforce Seven Year Old Clean Construction Law For First Time
Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility Opponents Propose Clean Air Ordinance In Bucks
PaEN: Hearing May 14 On Proposed DEP RACT II Air Quality Plan For Texas Eastern
Compressor Plant In Cambria County
PaEN: May 14 DEP Hearing On Proposed RACT II Air Quality Plan For Specialty Tires Plant,
Indiana County
Op-Ed: Don’t Roll Back Federal Mercury Standard
Alternative Fuels
Mennonite Church In Lancaster Constructs EV Charging Station
Awards & Recognition
PaEN: Sustainable Pittsburgh Announces Winners Of Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge
PaEN: Phipps' Center For Sustainable Landscapes In Pittsburgh First Project In World To Be
Awarded SITES Platinum Certification
PaEN: Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence
Award
PaEN: Award-Winning Master Watershed Steward Projects Across Pennsylvania
PaEN: Ted Evgeniadis, Lower Susquehanna RiverKeeper, Recognized By York County Master
Watershed Stewards
PaEN: Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal
For Conservation
Valley Creek Restoration Partnership Honored For Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award
3 Pittsburgh-Area Organizations Win Governor’s Environmental Awards
Bagenstose: 2 Bucks County Groups Win Governor’s Award For Environmental Excellence
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County, Watershed Steward
Kennett Township Becomes Audubon Bird Town
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
PaEN: PA Rural Water Assn. Will Hold Annual Conference March 26-29 In State College,
Including Seminar On Zebra Mussels, Algal Blooms
Spotted Lanternfly Spreads To Dauphin County
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Blog: Native Plant Conservation Gets Renewed Focus In PA,
Meeting April 26

94
Editorial: U.S. Must Ensure Protections For Imperiled Wildlife
Budget
PaEN: Growing Greener Coalition Issues Call To Action To Make New Investments In
Restoring The Environment, Oppose Backsliding
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates
Funding Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
PaEN: Growing Greener Coalition Urges New Investment In Restoring The Environment,
Preventing Flooding, No Backsliding On Existing Commitments
PaEN: PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The
Golden Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
As Levee Costs Grow In Williamsport, Next Stage Includes State Funding
Huntingdon County: Restore PA Aims To Avoid Local Disasters
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf Pushes Restore PA To Eliminate Lead From Philly School At A Cost Of $100 Million
Gov. Wolf Confident He Has Votes For Severance Tax, But Republicans Beg To Differ
Republicans, Gas Industry Oppose Severance Tax To Fund Wolf’s Restore PA Infrastructure
Plan
AP: Wolf Says $4.5B Restore PA Could Help Schools Cleanup Lead Paint
Sen. Yudichak: Growth Wll Fuel PA’s Future - Restore PA
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
Op-Ed: Pass A Natural Gas Severance Tax to Fund Infrastructure In PA​ - Gov. Wolf
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
PaEN: Bill Authorizing Fish & Boat Commission To Set Own Fees To Be Considered By House
Committee On March 25
PaEN: Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership: Call Your House Member To Support Bill
To Allow Fish & Boat Commission To Adopt Its Own Fees
PaEN: PA Receives $53.8 Million In 2019 Federal Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Funds,
Reclamation Fee Due To Expire
PaEN: Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation
Funding In DC
Editorial: Funding For Lower Mon Project Arrives Just In Time
AP: Federal Black Lung Fund In Danger Of Drying Up
Editorial: Coal Miners Continue To Suffer With Black Lung
Chesapeake Bay
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates
Funding Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
PaEN: Bay Journal: Exelon, Maryland Spar Over Who Is Responsible For Nutrients Passing
Over Conowingo Dam
Op-Ed: Article Misrepresents PA Farm Bureau’s Role In Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Innovative Green Stormwater Project Improves Water Infrastructure in Pittsburgh

95
Stormwater Fee Headaches Persist In Luzerne County
You Didn’t Pay Your Stormwater Fee In Luzerne? What Now?
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
PaEN: Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Accepting Submissions For Photo Contest
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
PaEN: Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation
Funding In DC
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Citizen Action
PaEN: Award-Winning Master Watershed Steward Projects Across Pennsylvania
PaEN: Ted Evgeniadis, Lower Susquehanna RiverKeeper, Recognized By York County Master
Watershed Stewards
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County, Watershed Steward
PaEN: Pennsylvania Seeks Volunteers For Statewide Spring Cleanup, Beautification Effort
Pennsylvania Seeks Volunteers For Spring Cleanup
Livestaking: Utilize Cuttings From Willows, Dogwoods To Improve Streams
PaEN: Community Solar Legislative Forum April 3 In Wilkes-Barre
PaEN: EQB Invites Comments On Changes To Class A Stream Redesignations, April 26
Hearing Set
Climate
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Holds Info Meeting March 27 On Debunking Modern
Myths Surrounding Climate Change
Mennonite Church In Lancaster Constructs EV Charging Station
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Penn Aims To Be Carbon Neutral By 2042
Editorial: Listen To, Support Students Speaking Out On Climate Change
AP: Report: Great Lakes Feeling Effects Of Rapid Climate Warming
PaEN: Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp;
Carbon Dividend Act
PaEN: Op-Ed: Science, Panic And Politics Of Climate Change
Lessons Learned After Puerto Rican Hurricane Evacuees Came To Philly
Olson: Casey: Green New Deal Worthy Of Review
Olson: Cong. Wild Talks Green New Deal, Trump Investigations, More
U.S. Court Halts Drilling On Federal Land In Wyoming Over Climate Change
AP: EPA Argues For Shifting Focus From Climate Change To Water
Coal Mining
Op-Ed: Don’t Roll Back Federal Mercury Standard
AP: Federal Black Lung Fund In Danger Of Drying Up
Editorial: Coal Miners Continue To Suffer With Black Lung

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Intra-Agency Effort Underway To Plan The Future Of PHMC’s Eckley Miners’ Village
Delaware River
PaEN: PA Projects Receive Over $1.7 Million In Federal Delaware River Watershed Restoration
Grants
25 Delaware River-Area Water Quality Projects Get $4.1M In Federal Funds
PaEN: NFWF Accepting Applications For Delaware Watershed Restoration Grants
Recap Of March 13 Delaware River Basin Commission Meeting
March 22 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
PaEN: PA Rural Water Assn. Will Hold Annual Conference March 26-29 In State College,
Including Seminar On Zebra Mussels, Algal Blooms
Editorial: Philly State Proposals Will Keep Lead From Robbing Children’s Potential
Pittsburgh Water Authority Working To Better Document Water Main Replacements
Penn State Extension: Why Conserve Water In A Water Rich State?
New Jersey Implements Nation’s Toughest PFAS Standard
AP: Army Bill To Release Public Records On PFAS Testing At Installations $290,400
Access To Clean Water A Problem In The U.S. Affecting Minority, Rural Groups Most
Economic Development
A Fracking-Driven Industrial Boom Renews Pollution Concerns In Pittsburgh
Education
PaEN: Fayette County Boy Scout Peter Livengood Awarded William T. Hornaday Silver Medal
For Conservation
PaEN: Greater Philadelphia Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Accepting
Applications For Scholarships
PaEN: Wildlife Honors Students Get Hands-On Experience In Pennsylvania’s Elk Range
PaEN: Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Penn Aims To Be Carbon Neutral By 2042
Editorial: Listen To, Support Students Speaking Out On Climate Change
PaEN: Wildlands Conservancy Highlights Educational Programs, Activities Coming Up In April
Schneck: Rare Spring-Equinox, Super, Full Moon Shines Tonight
Energy
Thompson: Save Three Mile Island? What A Difference 40 Years Makes
Thompson: Can PA’s Energy Market Survive Without Three Mile Island?
McKelvey: What Happens To Three Mile Island’s Nuclear Waste If Plant Closes?
A Three Mile Island Evacuation Today? It Would Be A Crawl
I-83 Ill-Equipped For Three Mile Island-Level Evacuation
If Three Mile Island Shuts Down, Counties Could Lose Grant Money In Evacuation Zone
Three Mile Island’s Towers Remain A Constant Reminder Of 1979 Disaster
Berks Lawmakers React To Bill Seeking To Save Nuclear Power In PA
Ohio, Pennsylvania Consider Nuclear Plant Bailouts
AP-Levy: Debate Over Nuclear Power Hits Home In Rural Pennsylvania
House Leaders Moving Cautiously On Nuclear Power Rescue Bill
Lancaster Weighs In: Should We Close Three Mile Island?
Op-Ed: PA’s Nuclear Industry Does Not Deserve Another Bailout

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Editorial: Time’s Up For Corporate Welfare, Exelon
Report: Cost Of Closing Beaver County Nuclear Assets Will Top $900 Million
Mennonite Church In Lancaster Constructs EV Charging Station
PaEN: Community Solar Legislative Forum April 3 In Wilkes-Barre
PaEN: Reliability, Fuel Supply Strong In PJM Electrical Grid During 2018-19 Winter
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Lehigh Valley Leaders Discuss Efforts To Go Green
Litvak: Who’s Afraid Of FirstEnergy Solutions’ Restructuring Plan? Every Agency That’s Seen
It
Column: We Deserve Assurances Door-To-Door Electricity Sellers Aren’t Rapists
PECO Tree Clearing Riles Residents In Bucks
Power Restored To 1,000 In Plum After Transformer Fire
PaEN: The Energy Co-op’s Alexandra Kroger Appointed Philadelphia WRISE Chapter President
Maykuth: Are Tiny Nuclear Reactors The Path To A Carbon-Free Future?
Olson: Casey: Green New Deal Worthy Of Review
Report: Plant Bailout Back On Tap As DOE’s Perry, Coal Interests Derail FERC Nomination
Environmental Heritage
Remembering The Three Mile Island Accident: Concern, Confusion, Chaos
Robert Swift: Three Mile Island - March 29 & 30, 1979
Three Mile Island Nuclear Accident: The Ultimate Out-Of-Body Experience
Chaos At Three Mile Island
Eshelman: 1979 Three Mile Island Accident Came At A Time Of Personal Terror
The Three Mile Island Accident, Enduring Questions Of Ties To Cancer And Deaths
Op-Ed: Three Mile Island Was Gov. Thornburgh’s Defining Moment, And His Legacy
Three Mile Island Accident In Living Color: A Look Into The National Archives
Go To Three Mile Island And Camp There: Reporter Gets Careers Lessons From Nuclear
Accident
It’s Been 40 Years Since Three Mile Island Accident
TMI Podcast: Behind The Scenes, Three Mile Island As It Happened
Journalists, Locals Gather to Remember Three Mile Island Accident
How Three Mile Island, Nuclear Industry Influenced Pop Culture
Penn-Anthracite SME’s Presentation On Anthracite Coal Heritage
Intra-Agency Effort Underway To Plan The Future Of PHMC’s Eckley Miners’ Village
Farming
Spotted Lanternfly Spreads To Dauphin County
Op-Ed: Article Misrepresents PA Farm Bureau’s Role In Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees
Along Streams
DCNR Secretary Highlights Riparian Buffer Effort In Union County
Rodale Institute: Farm Conservation Practices Watershed Impact Trial
Should PA Invest Money In Organic Agriculture? Some Lawmakers Aren’t So Sure
PaEN: Penn State Extension: Spring’s A Good Time To Do Pond Inspections
Urban Farming In Philadelphia To Get Growing With A Plan That Includes Hundreds Of Vacant
Lots
Backyard Farmers Support Philadelphia Bill To Legalize Undercover Chicken Coops

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PaEN: Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation
Funding In DC
Flooding
Twp.. Supervisors, Farmers Discuss Flooding Issues With DEP
Flooding Closes Central PA Roads, Swamps Yards After Heavy Rain
PaEN: House Committee Reports Out Bill Creating Flood Insurance Premium Assistance Task
Force
Updates To Flood Insurance Policy Could Cost Homeowners More
Mansfield Council, DEP To Collaborate On Flooding Issue In Borough
As Levee Costs Grow In Williamsport, Next Stage Includes State Funding
Williamsport Authority Reorganizes To Tackle Costs Of Levee Recertification
Grafius Run Flood Damage At $5 Million In Lycoming County
Editorial: Recertifying Levee In Williamsport: Runaway Costs, Hazy Payment Plan
Luzerne County Involvement In Wyoming Valley Levee System Debated
Luzerne Flood Authority Hres Solicitor, Debates Ties To Luzerne County
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Huntingdon County: Restore PA Aims To Avoid Local Disasters
PaEN: Penn State Water Insights Seminar March 26: Seeking Opportunities To Reduce The
Impact Of Flood Events
NOAA Forecasters Say Midwest’s Flooding Could Preview Unprecedented Spring
Flooding - National
Nebraska Floods: 74 Cities, 65 Counties Declare State Of Emergency
Missouri River Floods Causing Many To Evacuate
Rescues, Evacuations As Floodwaters Breach Levees In Midwest
Lessons Learned After Puerto Rican Hurricane Evacuees Came To Philly
Forests
PaEN: PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The
Golden Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees
Along Streams
DCNR Secretary Highlights Riparian Buffer Effort In Union County
Livestaking: Utilize Cuttings From Willows, Dogwoods To Improve Streams
PaEN: March 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
PaEN: Fort Indiantown Gap Begins Spring 2019 Prescribed Burn Season In Lebanon County
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
Spotted Lanternfly Spreads To Dauphin County
Nanticoke’s Oldest Tree Coming Down
PECO Tree Clearing Riles Residents In Bucks
PaEN: March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Forests - Wildfires
California National Guard To Leave Border To Help Stop Wildfires

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AP: California To Waive Environmental Rules For Fire Season Prep
Grants & Funding
PaEN: NFWF Accepting Applications For Delaware Watershed Restoration Grants
Green Infrastructure
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates
Funding Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees
Along Streams
DCNR Secretary Highlights Riparian Buffer Effort In Union County
Livestaking: Utilize Cuttings From Willows, Dogwoods To Improve Streams
Innovative Green Stormwater Project Improves Water Infrastructure in Pittsburgh
Stormwater Fee Headaches Persist In Luzerne County
You Didn’t Pay Your Stormwater Fee In Luzerne? What Now?
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Hazardous Substances
Wolf Pushes Restore PA To Eliminate Lead From Philly School At A Cost Of $100 Million
Editorial: Philly State Proposals Will Keep Lead From Robbing Children’s Potential
New Jersey Implements Nation’s Toughest PFAS Standard
AP: Army Bill To Release Public Records On PFAS Testing At Installations $290,400
PaEN: Op-Ed: Will Our Dirt Roads Again Be Used As Dumping Sites For Oil & Gas Well
Wastewater?
Hazardous Waste
Elcon Hazardous Waste Facility Opponents Propose Clean Air Ordinance In Bucks
Lake Erie
AP: Report: Great Lakes Feeling Effects Of Rapid Climate Warming
Land Conservation
U.S. Court Halts Drilling On Federal Land In Wyoming Over Climate Change
Land Use
Op-Ed: Philadelphia’s Next Challenge: Keeping It Affordable To Live There​ - Richard Florida
Littering/Illegal Dumping
PaEN: Pennsylvania Seeks Volunteers For Statewide Spring Cleanup, Beautification Effort
Pennsylvania Seeks Volunteers For Spring Cleanup
PennDOT, DEP Asking For Volunteers For Great American Cleanup Event
PaEN: Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy Stream Cleanup Set For April 6 In Montgomery
County
Spring Cleanup Of Yard Waste In Williamsport In A Few Weeks
Got A TV, Washing Machine, Refrigerator To Throw Away? How To Do It Legally In Philly
Grant Could End Illegal Dumping At Williamsport Waste Collection Site
Mine Reclamation
PaEN: PA Receives $53.8 Million In 2019 Federal Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Funds,
Reclamation Fee Due To Expire
Oil & Gas

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PaEN: House Committee To Consider Bill To Compensate Landowners For Drilling Rights If
DRBC Adopts Fracking Ban, Well Pad Permitting March 26
PaEN: Presenters Urge House Committee To Support Bill Compensating Landowners For
Drilling Rights If DRBC Adopts A Fracking Ban
PaEN: House Environmental Committee Reports Out Bill Allowing Cross Unit Drilling Under
Several Properties
PaEN: Op-Ed: Will Our Dirt Roads Again Be Used As Dumping Sites For Oil & Gas Well
Wastewater?
Gov. Wolf Confident He Has Votes For Severance Tax, But Republicans Beg To Differ
Republicans, Gas Industry Oppose Severance Tax To Fund Wolf’s Restore PA Infrastructure
Plan
Man Dies At Lawrence County Gas/Oil Well Site
Legere: Court Keeps Alive Attorney General’s Case Over Landowner Gas Royalty Payments
PaEN: March 27 DEP Meeting On Proposed Drilling Permits At U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson
Plant, Allegheny County
Litvak: EQT Says Employees Took Data To Aid Rice In Proxy Battle
Litvak: Rice Names 9 Directors They Hope Will Reshape EQT Drilling
A Fracking-Driven Industrial Boom Renews Pollution Concerns In Pittsburgh
PUC Hosts Smart Hearings To Gather Public Input On Proposed $71 Million. UGI Natural Gas
Rate Increase
Worley & Obetz Fuel Squabble Settled For $225,000
GasBuddy: Madness At The Pumps As Gasoline Prices Race Higher
Gasoline Prices Continue Climb As Refinery Issues Raise Concerns
Struggling South Philadelphia Refinery Suffers Exodus Of Senior Executives
U.S. Court Halts Drilling On Federal Land In Wyoming Over Climate Change
Pipelines
PaEN: PUC Pipeline Safety Investigation Underway Involving Possible Sunoco Gasoline
Pipeline Leak In Berks County On March 17
Crews Investigate Possible Gasoline Leak From Sunoco Pipeline Near Reading
Phillips: Higher Operating Pressure In Mariner East 2x Pipeline Prompts New Safety Concerns
PaEN: Dueling Press Conferences Pit Opponents Of Mariner East Pipeline Against Those
Supporting Pipeline Development
PA’s New Pipeline Caucus Wants Stronger Regulation Of Mariner East Pipelines
Legislators Press Forward On Pipeline Safety Concerns
Sen. Muth To Introduce Pipeline Safety, Public Awareness Standards Bills
Lawmakers Call For Expanded Natural Gas Pipeline Network
Legislators, Leaders In Business, Labor, Industry Stand In Solidarity For Pipeline Infrastructure
Development
Federal Appeals Court Issues Stay Halting PennEast Pipeline Project
U.S. Appeals Court Grants Motion For Stay On PennEast Pipeline
Court Stay Allows PennEast Pipeline To Continue Environmental Surveys
Turnout Low For Session On Proposed Pipeline Compressor Station In Luzerne
Pipeline Construction Firm Offers Unique Venue For Local Artists In Luzerne County
Forbes: PA Homeowners Take Fight Against Gas Pipeline Land Grab To U.S. Supreme Court
Report: Plant Bailout Back On Tap As DOE’s Perry, Coal Interests Derail FERC Nomination

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FERC Chief Of Staff Pugliese Steps Down
Permitting
PaEN: DEP Posts 60 Pages Of Permit Notices In March 23 PA Bulletin
Personnel
PaEN: The Energy Co-op’s Alexandra Kroger Appointed Philadelphia WRISE Chapter President
PaEN: Greater Philadelphia Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Accepting
Applications For Scholarships
PaEN: Capital Chapter Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Annual Conference
April 25
PAEN: PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern
Ad Crable, Outdoor, Environmental Writer For LancasterOnline.com Is Retiring
Times Leader Layoffs Decimate Sports Department - Tom Venesky, Paul Sokoloski
Radiation Protection
Thompson: Save Three Mile Island? What A Difference 40 Years Makes
Thompson: Can PA’s Energy Market Survive Without Three Mile Island?
McKelvey: What Happens To Three Mile Island’s Nuclear Waste If Plant Closes?
A Three Mile Island Evacuation Today? It Would Be A Crawl
I-83 Ill-Equipped For Three Mile Island-Level Evacuation
If Three Mile Island Shuts Down, Counties Could Lose Grant Money In Evacuation Zone
Three Mile Island’s Towers Remain A Constant Reminder Of 1979 Disaster
Berks Lawmakers React To Bill Seeking To Save Nuclear Power In PA
Ohio, Pennsylvania Consider Nuclear Plant Bailouts
AP-Levy: Debate Over Nuclear Power Hits Home In Rural Pennsylvania
House Leaders Moving Cautiously On Nuclear Power Rescue Bill
Lancaster Weighs In: Should We Close Three Mile Island?
Op-Ed: PA’s Nuclear Industry Does Not Deserve Another Bailout
Editorial: Time’s Up For Corporate Welfare, Exelon
Report: Cost Of Closing Beaver County Nuclear Assets Will Top $900 Million
Maykuth: Are Tiny Nuclear Reactors The Path To A Carbon-Free Future?
PaEN: Reliability, Fuel Supply Strong In PJM Electrical Grid During 2018-19 Winter
Report: Plant Bailout Back On Tap As DOE’s Perry, Coal Interests Derail FERC Nomination
Recreation
PaEN: PA Parks & Forests Foundation Tells House Committee: State Parks & Forests Are The
Golden Egg, But We’re Starving The Goose
PaEN: DCNR Conservation & Natural Resources Advisory Council Meets March 27 To Discuss
Update To PA Outdoor Recreation Plan
DCNR Tours Mira Lloyd Dock Center To Discuss How Restore PA Could Address
Infrastructure Needs
PaEN: March 22 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey
PaEN: William Penn Foundation Announced Creative Communities Grant Awards Totaling $2.6
Million
Op-Ed: Philly’s Demand For Public Spaces Requires Creative Funding Solutions
PaEN: Joint Conservation Committee Meeting Highlights Initiatives To Boost Bicycle Tourism

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Along PA Route 6
PaEN: Susquehanna National Heritage Area Officially Designated By Congress
PaEN: Pike County Outdoors Guide For Sportsmen, Outdoor Enthusiasts Now Available
DCNR Accepting Sealed Bids To Operate Presque Isle’s Concession
Luzerne Committee Narrows Proposed Natural Gas Rec Funding Awards
Northwestern Recreation Fields Damage Prompts Cash Reward In Lehigh Valley
Skate Park Coming Back In Luzerne
Frye: Camping When Campfires Are Prohibited
PAEN: PA Environmental Council Welcomes Trails Program Manager Brett Hollern
PaEN: March 20 Resource Newsletter Now Available From DCNR
Recycling/Waste
Allegheny Front: Curbside Glass Recycling May Become A Thing Of The Past​ - PA Resources
Council Pop Up Glass Recycling
PaEN: PA Resources Council, Partners Hold Reuse Fest As Part Of FutureFest April 20 In
Allegheny County
Got A TV, Washing Machine, Refrigerator To Throw Away? How To Do It Legally In Philly
Grant Could End Illegal Dumping At Williamsport Waste Collection Site
E-Media Recycling To Alternative Between Mercer, Lawrence Counties
Could PA Be Next State To Ban Foam Takeout Containers?
Op-Ed: Recycling Is Dying, So What’s Next For Our Trash?
Regulations
PaEN: Updated Agency-By-Agency Regulatory Agenda Published By Governor’s Office
Renewable Energy
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Penn Aims To Be Carbon Neutral By 2042
PaEN: Community Solar Legislative Forum April 3 In Wilkes-Barre
Olson: Casey: Green New Deal Worthy Of Review
Olson: Cong. Wild Talks Green New Deal, Trump Investigations, More
Trump Mocking Wind Power: When The Wind Doesn’t Blow, Just Turn Off the TV
Stormwater
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates
Funding Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
PaEN: Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence
Award
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees
Along Streams
DCNR Secretary Highlights Riparian Buffer Effort In Union County
Livestaking: Utilize Cuttings From Willows, Dogwoods To Improve Streams
Innovative Green Stormwater Project Improves Water Infrastructure in Pittsburgh
Stormwater Fee Headaches Persist In Luzerne County
You Didn’t Pay Your Stormwater Fee In Luzerne? What Now?
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements
Rodale Institute: Farm Conservation Practices Watershed Impact Trial
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure

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Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Sustainability
PaEN: Sustainable Pittsburgh Announces Winners Of Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge
PaEN: Phipps' Center For Sustainable Landscapes In Pittsburgh First Project In World To Be
Awarded SITES Platinum Certification
PaEN: PA Green Colleges Hold Conference On Sustainable Development Goals And Higher
Education April 9 In State College
Lafayette Becomes First Lehigh Valley College To Pledge Carbon Neutrality
Lehigh Valley Leaders Discuss Efforts To Go Green
First Ever Eco-Innovation District Brings Sustainable Redevelopment To Uptown, West
Oakland
Wastewater Facilities
PaEN: PA Rural Water Assn. Will Hold Annual Conference March 26-29 In State College,
Including Seminar On Zebra Mussels, Algal Blooms
Amended Lawsuit Challenging Scranton Sewer Sale Gets Hearing
Watershed Protection
PaEN: PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Workgroup Estimates
Funding Gap Of $1.467 Billion Over Next 6 Years
PaEN: Westmoreland Conservation District To Receive Governor’s Environmental Excellence
Award
PaEN: Award-Winning Master Watershed Steward Projects Across Pennsylvania
PaEN: Ted Evgeniadis, Lower Susquehanna RiverKeeper, Recognized By York County Master
Watershed Stewards
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Pennsylvanians: Jodi Sulpizio, York County, Watershed Steward
PaEN: Bay Journal: Exelon, Maryland Spar Over Who Is Responsible For Nutrients Passing
Over Conowingo Dam
Bay Journal: Trump Administration Makes Another Bid To Slash Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Funds
PaEN: PA Receives $53.8 Million In 2019 Federal Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Funds,
Reclamation Fee Due To Expire
PaEN: Conservation District Leader From PA Presses Case For Strong Federal Conservation
Funding In DC
Twp.. Supervisors, Farmers Discuss Flooding Issues With DEP
Stormwater Fee Headaches Persist In Luzerne County
You Didn’t Pay Your Stormwater Fee In Luzerne? What Now?
Franklin County Municipalities Want Public Input On Stormwater Fees
Antrim Twp Might Use Reserve Funds On Stormwater Requirements
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help York With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
Wolf: Restore PA Will Help Lancaster With Flooding, Green Infrastructure
PaEN: DCNR Good Natured Blog: Making Progress Toward A Goal Of Planting More Trees
Along Streams
DCNR Secretary Highlights Riparian Buffer Effort In Union County
Rodale Institute: Farm Conservation Practices Watershed Impact Trial
PaEN: PA Projects Receive Over $1.7 Million In Federal Delaware River Watershed Restoration
Grants

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25 Delaware River-Area Water Quality Projects Get $4.1M In Federal Funds
PaEN: Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy Stream Cleanup Set For April 6 In Montgomery
County
PaEN: NFWF Accepting Applications For Delaware Watershed Restoration Grants
March 22 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
AP: Report: Great Lakes Feeling Effects Of Rapid Climate Warming
PaEN: EQB Invites Comments On Changes To Class A Stream Redesignations, April 26
Hearing Set
AP: EPA Argues For Shifting Focus From Climate Change To Water
Editorial: Funding For Lower Mon Project Arrives Just In Time
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
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Wildlife
PaEN: Bill Authorizing Fish & Boat Commission To Set Own Fees To Be Considered By House
Committee On March 25
PaEN: Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership: Call Your House Member To Support Bill
To Allow Fish & Boat Commission To Adopt Its Own Fees
Dietz: Game Commission Has Support In Its Battle Against Chronic Wasting Disease
Dietz: Game Commission Receives Credible Support In Its Battle Against Chronic Wasting
Disease
Game Commission To Decide Hot-Button Issues In April
PaEN: Op-Ed: Trout Unlimited Supports Common Sense Federal Energy Innovation &amp;
Carbon Dividend Act
PaEN: Game Commission: 2018-19 Deer Harvest At 374,690 Largest Since 2004-05
Crable: Deer Kill In PA Highest In 4 Years, Buck Kill Down 10 Percent
Hunters In Pennsylvania Have Killed 17,492,302 Deer Since 1915
Carr: Raccoon In Monroeville Tested Positive For Rabies, 6th Case This Year In Allegheny
County
AP: Venesky: Outdoors: Murky Waters For Pennsylvania’s Mallard Duck Numbers
PaEN: Peregrine Falcon Nests: Pittsburgh - 4 Eggs, Harrisburg- 2 Eggs; Egg Watch On For PPL
Building In Allentown
Nesting Pair Of Eagles Returns To Presque Isle State Park
Editorial: Bald Eagles Settle Into Nest On Presque Isle
PaEN: Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Kicks Off Spring Migration Season With Raptorthon March
30
Middle Creek Snow Geese Season Is Over, How Many Stopped By?
Kennett Township Becomes Audubon Bird Town
Trout Stocking, Birding Events To Soon Be Underway In Centre County
Fort Indiantown Gap Begins Spring 2019 Prescribed Burn Season
PaEN: Wildlife Honors Students Get Hands-On Experience In Pennsylvania’s Elk Range
PaEN: Penn State Brook Trout Researchers Featured In New Expedition Chesapeake Film
Frye: Tips On Releasing Fish So they Survive To Breed, Fight Again
Schneck: Flattened Frogs, Toads, Salamanders: Love & Death On PA Roadways

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Op-Ed: Rolling Back Portions Of Federal Clean Water Act Is A Bad Idea
Editorial: U.S. Must Ensure Protections For Imperiled Wildlife
Ad Crable, Outdoor, Environmental Writer For LancasterOnline.com Is Retiring
Times Leader Layoffs Decimate Sports Department - Tom Venesky, Paul Sokoloski
West Nile/Zika Virus
Warmer Weather Brings More Ticks, Lyme Disease Diagnosis
PA Keeping An Eye On Ticks With Statewide Collection Survey

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

Note: ​DEP published the 2019 schedules of its advisory committees, councils and board
meetings in the ​Dec. 10 PA Bulletin, page 7708​.

March 23--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Adams County Barn Survey Volunteer
Training​. ​Apple Museum in Biglerville​. 8:30.

March 23--​ ​Jacobs Creek Watershed Association Tired Of Tires Collection Campaign,
Westmoreland County​. ​Scottdale Borough, 10 Mount Pleasant Road, Scottdale. 9:00 to Noon.

March 23--​ ​Pocono Environmental Ed Center Angling & Hunting For Conservation Program​.
At the Center, ​538 Emery Road in Dingmans Ferry, Pike County.10:00 to 2:15.

March 24--​ C​hesapeake Conservancy Livestake Identification, Collection Volunteer Event In


Centre County​. Instructions on where to meet will be given to those who sign up.

March 25--​ ​Botstiber Institute For Wildlife Fertility Control Pennsylvania Deer Conflict
Management Seminar​. Dixon University Center, Administration Building, Conference Room
B/C, 2986 North Second Street, Harrisburg. 5:30 to 8:00

March 25-26--​ ​Green Building Alliance Certified Passive House Tradesperson Training -
Module II​. Pittsburgh.

March 25-29-​- ​Carnegie Mellon University Energy Week 2019​. Pittsburgh.

March 25--​ ​NEW​. ​House Game and Fisheries Committee​ meets to consider ​House Bill 808
(Mehaffie-R-Dauphin) authorizing the Fish and Boat Commission to set its own fees for 3 years
(​sponsor summary​). Room 205 Ryan Building. 9:30. ​Click Here to watch the meeting online​.
Click Here for more​ on the agenda.

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March 26-​- ​NEW.​ ​House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ holds a meeting to
consider ​ ​House Bill 827​ (Fritz-R-Wayne) which requiring compensation for oil and gas rights
owners in Delaware River Watershed if the Delaware River Basin Commission adopts a
permanent ban on fracking (​sponsor summary​). (​Click Here​ for more background on
compensating landowners and a companion bill in the Senate-- Senate Bill 305​.); ​House Bill 828
(Fritz-R-Wayne) authorizes DEP to issue one permit for multiple gas wells on a single pad
instead of individual well permits, extends the term of well permits from 1 to 3 years and allows
well locations to vary within 50 feet of specific locations identified on the well permit (​sponsor
summary​); --​House Bill 829​ (Fritz-R- Wayne) prohibiting the Delaware River Basin
Commission from regulating onlot septic systems (​sponsor summary​). Room B-31 Main Capitol
Building. 10:00. ​Click Here to watch the meeting online​. ​Click Here​ for more on the agenda.

March 26-​- ​NEW. ​Penn State Environment & Natural Resources Institute Water Insights
Seminar: Seeking Opportunities to Reduce the Impact Of Flood Events In Urban Areas​. Room
312 of the Ag and Bio Engineering Building, Penn State’s main campus in State College and​ ​is
available online via Zoom​. Noo to 1:00.

March 26--​ ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. Lewisburg, Union County.

March 26-29--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Rural Water Association Annual Conference​. ​Penn Stater Hotel and
Conference Center, State College.

March 27-​- ​NEW.​ ​House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee​ holds an
informational meeting on “factually debunking some of the modern myths surrounding the
‘climate change’ discussion.” Room G-50 Irvis Building. 8:30. ​Click Here to watch the meeting
online​. ​Click Here​ for more on the agenda.

March 27-​- ​NEW​. ​Joint Legislative Budget & Finance Committee​ meets to release performance
audit of the Fish and Boat Commission. Room 8E-A East Wing. 9:00.

March 27--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Public Meeting On Proposed Drilling Permits At U.S. Steel’s Edgar
Thomson Plant, Allegheny County.​ ​Braddock Volunteer Fire Department #2 Social Hall, 845
Talbot Avenue, Braddock. 6:00 to 8:00.

March 27--​ ​DCNR Conservation and Natural Resources Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Gretchen Leslie, 717-772-9084, ​gleslie@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

March 27--​ ​Penn State Harrisburg 40th Anniversary Of Three Mile Island Accident Program​.
Multiple events during the day.

March 27--​ ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. Macungie, Lehigh County.

March 27-28--​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​. ​Jennings
Environmental Education Center​, 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock, Butler County.​ ​Click

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Here to register​.

March 28--​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.

March 28--​ ​DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board​ Reclamation Committee meeting.
14th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden,
717-783-8846 or send email to: ​dsnowden@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

March 28--​ ​Pike County Conservation District. Ways To Help Your Lake Stay Healthy​.
Dingman Township Fire Hall, 680 Log Tavern Road, Milford. 9:00 to 11:00.

March 29--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Natural Gas In PA: Energy, Innovation And The
Environment. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326 Market Street, Harrisburg.
11:30 to 1:00.

March 29--​ ​Keystone Elk Country Alliance Student Environmental Career Day & Job Fair​. ​Elk
Country Visitor Center​, 134 Homestead Drive, Benezette, Elk County. 10:00 to 2:00

March 30--​ ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Edgeworth Borough,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

March 30--​ ​Penn State Extension Livestaking For Minor Streambank Repairs Workshop​.
Southeast Agricultural Research & Extension Center, 1446 Auction Road, Manheim, Lancaster
County. 9:00 to 11:30.

March 30--​ ​NEW​. ​Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Spring Migration Season Kick Off Raptorthon​.

March 31-- ​Brodhead Watershed Association Reflections On A Changing Climate Program​.


Brodhead Creek Heritage Center​, 1539 Cherry Lane Road, Analomink, Monroe County. 1:00.

April 1--​ ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. Phoenixville, Chester
County.

April 2-- ​Penn State Extension Spring Gardening Workshop​. ​Northampton Community Fowler
Family Center​, 511 E. 3rd Street, Bethlehem. 6:30 to 8:30.

April 2-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Cambria County.

April 2--​ ​Registration Open​. ​PRPS Parks & Green Infrastructure - Managing Water For Multiple
Community Benefits Workshop​. Penn Stater Conference Center, State College. 8:30 to 3:00.

April 3--​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Planning Steering Committee

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meeting. 2nd Floor Auditorium, Rachel Carson Building. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here to join the
meeting via Skype​. Participants may also need to call in +1 (267) 332-8737. CONFERENCE
ID: 75588007.

April 3--​ ​DEP State Board for Certification Of Water And Wastewater Systems Operator
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building 10:00. Contact: Edgar
Chescattie, 717-772-2814, ​echescattie@pa.gov​.

April 3- ​Brandywine Conservancy Land Trusts & Farmland Roundtable​. Brandywine


Conservancy Offices, 1 Hoffman’s Mill Road, Chadds Ford, Chester County. 10:00 to 2:30.

April 3--​ ​NEW​. ​Community Solar Legislative Forum​. Arnaud C. Marts Center, Room 214 at
Wilkes University​, 292 S. Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre. 7:00.

April 4-6--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Mid-Atlantic Greenways & Trails Summit​. Philadelphia.

April 5-- ​Wildlife For Everyone We Love Wild Things & Wild Places Gala​. Nittany Lion Inn,
State College.

April 5--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate Disruption
& Sustainable Development Series​: Towards A Public Web-Platform For Limiting Methane
Emissions From The Oil & Gas Sector. Harrisburg University, 14th Floor Auditorium, 326
Market Street, Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

April 6--​ ​NEW.​ ​Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy Stream Cleanup In Montgomery County​.
9:00 to Noon.

April 6--​ ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. South Fayette Twp., Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

April 6--​ ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Point Breeze, Allegheny
County. 10:30 to Noon.

April 7-9--​ ​CMU Mascaro Center For Sustainable Innovation. 2019 Engineering Sustainability
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

April 8-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Westmoreland County.

April 9--​ ​NEW​. ​Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee​ holds a hearing to consider the
re-confirmation of Russell Redding as Secretary of Agriculture. Room 461 Main Capitol.
12:30.

April 9--​ ​DEP Environmental Justice Advisory Board ​meeting. 16th Floor Delaware Room,
Rachel Carson Building. 8:30. DEP Contact: Allison Acevedo, 484-250-5942. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

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April 9--​ ​DEP Mine Families First Response & Communications Advisory Council​ meeting.
DEP New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Road, New Stanton. 10:00. Contact: Peggy
Scheloske, 724-404-3143, ​mscheloske@pa.gov​.

April 9-- ​Penn State Extension Spring Gardening Workshop​. ​Northampton Community Fowler
Family Center​, 511 E. 3rd Street, Bethlehem. 6:30 to 8:30.

April 9-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Crawford County.

April 9-- ​ ​Capital RC&D, NRCS-PA Farming & Conservation Opportunities For Hispanic,
African American, Other Underserved Farmers​. ​Pine Forge Academy​, 361 Pine Forge Road in
Pine Forge, Berks County. 9:00 to 3:00.

April 9--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Environmental Resources Consortium - PA Green Colleges - Conference On
Sustainable Development And Higher Education​. HUB Center on Penn State's University Park
campus.

April 10--​ ​DEP Technical Advisory Committee On Diesel-Powered Equipment​ (Mining)


meeting. DEP New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Road, New Stanton. 10:00. Contact; Peggy
Scheloske, 724-404-3143, ​mscheloske@pa.gov​.

April 10--​ ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Point Breeze,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

April 11- ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to: ​kdalal@pa.gov​.

April 11-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Lehigh County.

April 11-- ​South Mountain Partnership Science Summit​.

April 13--​ ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Dormont Borough, Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

April 13--​ ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. O’Hara Township,
Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

April 13--​ ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. Springfield, Delaware
County.

April 16--​ ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

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April 16-- ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to: ​ksalador@pa.gov​.

April 16--​ ​EQB Hearing On Proposed Fine Particulate Matter Regulations​. DEP Southcentral
Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 1:00.

April 16- ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Charcoal Hearths, Collier Huts And
Haul Roads​. Dickinson College in the​ ​Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium​, Carlisle, Cumberland
County. 7:00.

April 16-- ​PA Environmental Council Dinner Recognizing Winners Of Governor’s Awards For
Environmental Excellence​. Hilton Harrisburg. 5:00. ​PA Environment Digest is a proud sponsor
​ lick Here for a list of 2019 winners​.
of this special event. C

April 16-18-- ​PA American Water Works Association Annual Conference​. Hershey Lodge and
Convention Center.

April 16-18--​ ​Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Association Tree Wrapping​. ​Shillelagh Farm,
6623 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County. 9:00 to Noon.

April 17- ​DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee​ meeting. 12th Floor
Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Nancy Herb, 717-783-9269,
nherb@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

April 17--​ ​EQB Hearing On Proposed Fine Particulate Matter Regulations​. DEP Southwest
Regional office, 400 Waterfront Dr., Pittsburgh. 1:00.

April 17--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​Making The Most Of Historical And
Heritage Assets​. Noon to 1:15.

April 17--​ ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Phipps Garden
Center, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

April 18--​ ​EQB Hearing On Proposed Fine Particulate Matter Regulations​. DEP Southeast
Regional Office, 2 East Main St., Norristown. 1:00.

April 18--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Benefits Of Energy Management
Systems Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

April 19--​ ​Harrisburg University Center for Environment, Energy & Economy Climate
Disruption & Sustainable Development Series​: Using The Latest Digital Innovations To Address
Energy Poverty In Developing Counties. Harrisburg University, Room 1151, 326 Market Street,
Harrisburg. 11:30 to 1:00.

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April 20--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Resources Council Resue Fest As Part Of FutureFest.​ Pittsburgh. 10:00 to
3:00.

April 20--​ ​Clean Air Council Run For Clean Air​. Philadelphia.

April 20--​ ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. ​Construction
Junction​, Point Breeze, Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

April 20--​ ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR Tree Planting Weiser State Forest, Columbia
County​. 9:00 to 1:00.

April 20--​ ​Audubon Society of Western PA Earth Day Of Service To The Planet At 3 Locations​.
Butler, Allegheny counties.

April 22-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Dauphin County.

April 23--​ ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building 10:00. Contact: Lindsay Byron, 717-772-8951, ​lbyron@pa.gov​.

April 23- ​PA Chamber Of Business & Industry 2019 Environmental Conference & Trade Show​.
Hershey.

April 24--​ ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Sewickley
Public Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

April 25--​ ​DEP Agricultural Advisory Board​ meeting. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909
Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 9:30. DEP Contact: Jay Braund 717-772-5636 or ​jbraund@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

April 25--​ ​DEP Mining And Reclamation Advisory Board​ meeting. 14th Floor Conference
Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Daniel Snowden, 717-783-8846 or send email
to: ​dsnowden@pa.gov​.

April 25- ​PennFuture Celebrating Women In Conservation Awards Celebration​. Susquehanna


Club, New Cumberland, Cumberland County. 5:30 to 8:00.

April 25-​- ​NEW​. ​Capital Chapter Society of Women Environmental Professionals Annual
Conference​. ​Central Penn College​, 600 College Hill Road in Summerdale, Cumberland County.
8:00 to 4:00.

April 26--​ ​NEW​. ​Environmental Quality Board​ Hearing On Changes To Class A Stream
Redesignations. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 1:00.

April 26-- ​Berks Conservation District Forested Riparian Buffer Showcase​. ​Berks County 4-H

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Center, 1206 County Welfare Road, Leesport. Noon.

April 26--​ ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. Lords Valley, Pike County.

April 26-​- ​NEW​. ​PA Plant Conservation Network 2019 Rare Plant Forum​. ​Shaver’s Creek
Environmental Center,​ 3400 Discovery Road in Petersburg, Huntingdon County. 10:00 to 2:30.

April 26-27-- ​Bucknell University 7th Annual Sustainability Symposium​. Bucknell University,
Lewisburg, Union County.

April 27--​ ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Avalon & Bellevue Boroughs,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

April 27--​ ​Conodoguinet Creek Watershed Association Riparian Buffer Planting​. East
Pennsboro Township's Ridley Park, 1625 Matthew Drive, Camp Hill, Cumberland County. 9:00

April 29-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Lackawanna County.

April 29 to May 2--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National
Watershed and Stormwater Conference​. South Carolina.

April 30-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Bedford County.

May 1-- ​DEP Laboratory Accreditation Advisory Committee​ meeting. Bureau of Laboratories,
Room 206, 2575 Interstate Drive, Harrisburg. 9:00. Contact: Aaren Alger, 717-346-8212 or send
email to: ​aaalger@pa.gov​.

May 1-- ​DEP Aggregate Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
Contact: Daniel Snowden, 717-783-8846 or send email to: ​dsnowden@pa.gov​.

May 1--​ ​Pennsylvania Groundwater Symposium​. State College.

May 1-- ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Green Tree
Municipal Building, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 4--​ ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR Moshannon State Forest Tree Planting, Clearfield
County​.

May 4--​ ​Manada Conservancy Native Plant Sale​. Hummelstown Boro Park, Poplar Avenue and
Water Street in Hummelstown, Dauphin County.

May 4--​ ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR Tree Planting at Moshannon State Forest, Clearfield
County​. 9:00 to 2:00.

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May 7--​ ​Southwestern PA Commission’s Water Resource Center Stormwater Workshop​. Moon
Twp. Municipal Building, Moon Township, ​Allegheny County​. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here to
register​.

May 8--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Pollinators And Their Habitat​. ​Messiah
College​, Boyer Hall Room 131, Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County. 6:00.

May 8--​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Annual Awards Celebration​. Susquehanna Club, New
Cumberland, Cumberland County. 5:00. ​Click Here ​for sponsor information. PA Environment
Digest is a proud sponsor of this special event.

May 8--​ ​Southwestern PA Commission’s Water Resource Center Stormwater Workshop​. Peters
Twp. Municipal Building, McMurray, ​Washington County.​ 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here to
register​.

May 8-10--​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

May 10--​ ​PA Environmental Council, DCNR 2019 PA Mountain Bike Summit​. ​Raystown Lake
Visitors Center​, Huntingdon County. 10:00 to 4:00.

May 11--​ ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Upper St. Clair Twp,
Allegheny County. 9:00 to 2:00.

May 11--​ ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. O’Hara
Township, Allegheny County. 10:30 to Noon.

May 14--​ ​DEP Environmental Justice Advisory Board ​meeting. 16th Floor Delaware Room,
Rachel Carson Building. 8:30. DEP Contact: Allison Acevedo, 484-250-5942.

May 14-​- ​NEW.​ ​DEP Hearing On Proposed RACT II Air Quality Plan For Specialty Tires Plant,
Indiana County​. DEP’s Southwest Regional Office, 400 Waterfront Drive, Pittsburgh. 9:00 to
9:30.

May 14-​- ​NEW.​ ​DEP Hearing On Proposed RACT II Air Quality Plan For Texas Eastern
Compressor Plant, Cambria County​. DEP’s Southwest Regional Office, 400 Waterfront Drive,
Pittsburgh. 9:30 to 10:00.

May 15--​ ​Penn State Extension Land Use Webinar Series​. ​The Benefits And Challenges of
Ridesharing On The Transportation System​. Noon to 1:15.

May 16--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Basics Of Building Re-Tuning Energy
Efficiency Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

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May 16-- ​PennVEST Information Session On Water Quality, Green Infrastructure Funding
Programs​. Luzerne County.

May 16--​ ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Mt. Lebanon
Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 16-18--​ ​Registration Open.​ ​PA Land Trust Association​. ​Land Conservation Conference​.
Monroe County.

May 18-​- ​Registration Open​. ​Environmental Advisory Council Network Conference​. Held in
conjunction with the ​PA Land Conservation Conference​ in Monroe County.

May 18--​ ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Ross Township, Allegheny
County. 4:00 to 5:30.

May 21--​ ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Mt. Lebanon Library,
Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 22--​ ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

May 22--​ ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to: ​ksalador@pa.gov​.

May 22--​ ​DEP State Board For Certification Of Sewage Enforcement Officers​ meeting. 11th
Floor Conference Room B, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. Contact: Amy Forney,
717-772-2186, ​aforney@pa.gov​.

May 22--​ ​PA Resources Council Healthy Body & Healthy Home Workshop​. Sewickley Public
Library, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

May 23--​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.

June 1--​ ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Kilbuck Township, Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

June 3-7--​ ​Registration Open.​ ​American Society of Mining & Reclamation Annual Meeting​.
Montana.

June 4-- ​DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Kris Shiffer, 717-772-5809, ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.

June 4--​ ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Cambria Office, 286 Industrial Park
Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. Contact; Peggy Scheloske, 724-404-3143, ​mscheloske@pa.gov​.

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June 4--​ ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. North Park Rose
Barn, Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

June 6--​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713, ​lahenry@pa.gov​. ​(formal notice)​

June 6- ​PA Resources Council Watershed Awareness/Rain Barrel Workshop​. Phipps Garden
Center, Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

June 8--​ ​PA Resources Council Pop-Up Glass Recycling Event​. Mt. Lebanon, Allegheny
County. 9:00 to 2:00.

June 11--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Appreciating The PA Local Craft Brew
Industry​. ​ ​Appalachian Brewing Company in Shippensburg​. 6:30.

June 11--​ ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. North Park Rose Barn,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

June 12--​ ​DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:00. Contact: Michael Maddigan, 717-772-3609, ​mmaddigan@pa.gov​.

June 13--​ ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:15. Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to: ​kdalal@pa.gov​.

June 13--​ ​PA Resources Council Backyard Composting Workshop​. Phipps Garden Center,
Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30.

June 13--​ ​Penn State Extension Spotted Lanternfly Public Meeting​. Exton, Chester County.

June 16-21--​ ​Cumberland Valley TU Rivers Conservation & Fly-Fishing Youth Camp​. ​Messiah
College​, Grantham, Cumberland County.

June 17-21--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Group Against Smog And Pollution Air Adventures Summer
Youth Camp​. Pittsburgh.

June 18--​ ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

June 18--​ ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
Contact: Keith Calador, Executive Director, 717-787-8171 or send email to: ​ksalador@pa.gov​.

June 19--​ ​DEP Coastal Zone Advisory Committee​ meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room,
Rachel Carson Building. 9:30. Contact: Stacey Box, 717-772-5622 or ​sbox@pa.gov​.

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June 20--​ ​DEP Agricultural Advisory Board​ meeting. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909
Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 9:30. DEP Contact: Jay Braund 717-772-5636 or ​jbraund@pa.gov​.

June 20-- ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​.

June 23-29--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Keystone/TU Teens Conservation Camp​. Keystone College,
Lackawanna County.

July 8-12--​ ​Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp​. ​Hawk Mountain
Sanctuary​, Berks County.

July 18--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Funding & Incentives To Implement
Energy Efficiency Projects Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

June 20--​ ​Pike County Conservation District. Homeowner Tips To Protect Clean Water​.
Dingman Township Fire Hall, 680 Log Tavern Road, Milford. 9:00 to 11:00.

July 24-26-- ​Registration Open​.​ ​Professional Recyclers Of PA Annual Recycling & Organics
Conference​. Harrisburg.

June 25--​ ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building 10:00. Contact: Lindsay Byron, 717-772-8951, ​lbyron@pa.gov​.

August 12-16--​ ​Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Youth Appalachian Adventure Camp​. ​Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary​, Berks County.

August 15--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Building Re-Tuning For Energy
Efficiency In Downtown Buildings Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

August 22-25--​ ​PA Association Of Hazardous Materials Technicians Annual Hazmat Training
and Education Conference​. Seven Springs, Somerset County.

September 4-5--​ ​PA Waste Industries Assn/Solid Waste Assn-Keystone Chapter Joint
Conference​. Harrisburg Hilton.

September 8-11--​ ​Registration Open​. ​2019 PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation and National
Abandoned Mine Lands Program Conference​. Pittsburgh. PA Environment Digest is a proud
sponsor of this event.

September 11-- ​DEP Sewage Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:30. Contact: Janice Vollero, 717-772-5157, ​jvollero@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

September 12--​ ​South Mountain Partnership Speakers Series: Methods Of Combating Illegal
Dumping And Vandalism In A Forest Setting​. ​Caledonia State Park​ in Fayetteville, Franklin

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County. 6:30.

September 19--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Alternative Energy Projects For
Agriculture-Related Businesses Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

September 19--​ ​Pike County Conservation District. Properly Maintaining Your On-Lot Septic
System​. ​Dingman Township Fire Hall, 680 Log Tavern Road, Milford. 9:00 to 11:00.

September 22-24--​ ​Pennsylvania Greenways And Trails Summit​. Shippensburg University


Conference Center.

October 3--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Economy, Energy And Environment
For Food-Related Industries Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

October 8-10--​ ​Natural Areas Association Natural Areas Conference​. Pittsburgh.

October 16-17--​ ​7th Annual Delaware River Watershed Forum​. Allentown.

November 21--​ ​Penn State PA Technical Assistance Program Entrepreneurship Ecosystem At


Penn State Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.


Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.
Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.
Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.
DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel
DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events
Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and
Flickr.
Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule
You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

March 29-- ​PA Environmental Professionals Karl Mason, Walter Lyon Awards
March 29--​ ​PA American Water Environmental Grants
March 29--​ ​Schuylkill River Network Student Street Art Contest
March 31--​ ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
March 31--​ ​DEP Municipal, Hazardous Waste Host Municipality Inspector Grants
April 1--​ ​DEP Farm Conservation Planning Reimbursement In 43 Counties
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April 5--​ ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation Save The Bay Photo Contest
April 10--​ ​DCNR Community Conservation Partnership, Recreation, Buffer Grants
April 10--​ ​Appalachian Regional Commission Coal Regions Workforce Grants
April 11--​ ​NEW​. ​NFWF Delaware Watershed Conservation Action Grants
April 11-​- ​NEW.​ ​NFWF Delaware Watershed Implementation & Cornerstone Grants
April 12--​ ​PA American Water Protect Our Watersheds Student Art Contest
April 18-- ​Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Land Transaction Grants
April 19--​ ​NRCS-PA Wetlands, Farmland Easement Programs
April 20-- ​PPL Future Environmental Leaders Scholarship
April 30-​- ​Schuylkill Highlands Landscape Mini-Grants
May 2-- ​DCNR Volunteer Fire Company Wildfire Fighting Grants
May 3-​- ​Pike Conservation District Environmental Ed Grant
May 10-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
May 14-- ​NFWF Chesapeake Bay Small Watershed Grants
May 14--​ ​NFWF Chesapeake Bay Innovative Nutrient & Sediment Reduction Grants
May 15-- ​Delaware River Basin Commission Spring Photo Contest
May 15-​- ​NEW​. ​Philadelphia Society Of Women Environmental Professionals Scholarships
May 17--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
May 17--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Watershed Restoration Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Abandoned Mine Drainage Abatement and Treatment Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Orphan or Abandoned Well Plugging Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Baseline Water Quality Data Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Sewage Facilities Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Flood Mitigation Grants
May 31--​ ​CFA Act 13 Greenways, Trails And Recreation Grants
July 1--​ ​PA Wilds Center Champion Of PA Wilds Awards
July 15--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
July 19--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal and Wind Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
July 19--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
August 15--​ ​Leopold Farm Conservation Award
September 30--​ ​DEP Recycling Performance Grants
December 16--​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
March 22--​ ​DEP Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
June 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 4--​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Photo Contest
September 23-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
December 1--​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

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-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.
-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

The Environmental Quality Board published notice in the March 23 PA Bulletin of proposed
changes to Class A Stream Redesignations in Berks, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Centre,
Clearfield, Columbia, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Indiana, Lackawanna, McKean, Potter, Schuylkill,
Somerset, Susquehanna, Tioga and Wayne counties. A public hearing is scheduled for April 26
​ A Bulletin, page 1367)​
in Harrisburg ​(P

The Game Commission ​published notice in the March 23 PA Bulletin​ of final threatened and
endangered species listing for the Peregrine Falcon, Piping Plover, Red Knot, Northern
long-eared bat, Little brown bat and Tri-colored bat.

The Public Utility Commission ​published notice in the March 23 PA Bulletin​ of supplemental
information submissions and filing timeline on the staff Report on Home Energy Affordability
for Low-Income Customers in Pennsylvania and a ​second notice on the same report​.

The Governor’s Office published an updated agency-by-agency Regulatory Agenda listing


regulations agencies are in the process of developing and adopting. ​(​March 23 PA Bulletin, page
1461​)

Pennsylvania Bulletin - March 23, 2019

Technical Guidance -------------------

No new technical guidance published this week.

Permits ------------

Note:​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 60 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the March 23 PA Bulletin -
pages 1400 to 1460​.

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and

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regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Related Tools ----------------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

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PA Environment Digest​ is a publication of ​PA Environment News LLC​ and is edited by


David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. He can
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PA Environment Digest Proudly Helps Sponsor These Award, Educational


Programs

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Sponsor: PEC Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence Dinner

PA Environment Digest​ is a proud sponsor of the ​PA Environmental Council Dinner


Recognizing Winners Of Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence​ on April 16 in
Harrisburg. ​Click Here for a list of the 2019 award winners​.

Sponsor: PA Parks & Forests Foundation Awards Celebration

PA Environment Digest​ is proud to be a sponsor of the 2019 ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Annual Awards Celebration​ on May 8 in New Cumberland, Cumberland County.

Sponsor: PA/National Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conference

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PA Environment Digest​ is proud to be a sponsor of the 2019 ​PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation
and National Abandoned Mine Lands Program Conference​ to be held in Pittsburgh on September
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