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Recommended Practice: Coiled Tubing Conveyed E-Line LogsPage 1 of 7

Alaska Wells Group


Rigless Operations Manual: Coiled Tubing Operations
Section: CTU Conveyed E-Line Logs
NSU ADW Well NSU ADW Wells
Authority: Custodian:
Operations Supervisor Engineer
Document
Document Control
Scope: Wells: Coiled Tubing Control
Specialist
Administrator:
Alaska Wells Group
Issue Date: January 22, 2002 Issuing Dept:
(WELS)
Revision Date: August 12, 2008 Control Tier: Tier 4
Next Review Date: August 12, 2012

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE


© 2009 BP America Inc. (for all US copyright notices) All rights reserved.
This document contains confidential information, which is the exclusive and proprietary property of BP America Inc. and affiliates.
In whole or part, this document or its attachments MAY NOT be reproduced by any means, disclosed or used for any purpose
without the express written permission of BP America Inc. or affiliates.

1.0 Purpose
This section provides a discussion of techniques used to run conventional electric line logs with coiled
tubing. It offers recommendations for planning and supervising these operations by the Wells Production
Engineers of the North Slope.

Coil tubing conveyed E-line logging (CTE) is essential in wells that have high deviation and/or dog-leg
severity. Even with roller bars and flex joints developed over the past several years, wireline tools
generally cannot get down hole in wells with a deviation over 70 degrees. More options have become
available recently with the advent of tractor tools and new coil tubing conveyed memory logging tools, but
there is still a demand for CTE. For example, open hole logs for horizontal sidetracks are obtained with
CTE when MWD or LWD is not adequate.

2.0 Definitions
CTU – Coiled Tubing Unit
CTE – Coiled Tubing Unit with an electric logging unit cable installed in the coiled tubing
PE – Wells Production Engineer

3.0 General Requirements


This section provides recommended procedures for planning and conducting CTE operations on the North
Slope of Alaska.

4.0 Key Responsibilities


Well Operations Supervisor is:
 To designate the person to update manual as necessary to incorporate new policies or procedures
Wells Production Engineers are:
 Responsible for identifying and submitting changes to the procedures and methodology based on new
technology and new and better ways of performing work
 Update the manual based on changes as a result of Root Cause Investigations

5.0 Procedure
5.1 Coiled Tubing Conveyed E-Line Logs

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Some advantages of CTE over CT memory logging are that CTE can use a wider variety of sondes,
provide real time data, and achieve more precise measurements for remedial well work. Disadvantages
would include higher cost due to the need for an integrated unit and more job preparation time.
Scheduling several CTE well operations consecutively can minimize the job preparation costs.

5.2 Equipment Preparation


1. The conductor cable, generally a heptacable (7 conductor line), is pumped into a reel of coiled tubing
and then reverse circulated for slack management. When the slack management has been completed,
the length of the conductor line should be approximately 1-1.5% more than the coil tubing on the
reel.
2. The coil service company then installs the reel on the coil unit, makes up the pressure bulkhead, and
connects the E-line to the collector. The logging company should then check the cable electrically.
3. Check with the coil company to see if slack management has been done on the cable since its last use.

Slack management is a set of procedures developed to prevent the E-Line inside of the CT from
pulling out of the cable head at the weak point. Before implementing slack management this was a
common problem w/ CTE. The problem arises when the "slack" in the E-Line ends up on the
collector end of the line (in the reel). If the CTE is RIH in this situation, then the E-Line will lay on
the on the low-side of the CT where the CT goes over the gooseneck. Due to the curvature of the CT
as it follows the gooseneck more coiled tubing will be fed into the well than E-Line. Because of the
numerous wraps of coiled tubing around the reel, the friction force due to contact of the E-Line with
the coiled tubing inside the coil is greater than the tension required to pull off of the weak point at the
cable head and the weak point will eventually fail.

To prevent this problem from occurring, always pump sea water or 60/40 methanol/water 0.5 bpm or
more while POOH. This will help to "push" the E-Line around the reel and down over the gooseneck
(away from the collector). The goal is to keep 1 – 1.5% excess length of cable inside the coiled
tubing. Sufficient slack should be established when the cable is pumped into the coiled tubing and
needs to be maintained throughout the life of the string.

If slack management was not done, make arrangements to have enough fluid on the location and
access the flowline (or empty tanks) at the well site to perform slack management. It is usually better
to be rigged up on the well and be able to pump down the flowline. Initial slack management should
be performed in the following manner:
 Reverse circulate the coil at a fluid velocity of 700-800 ft/min ~1.8 bpm for approximately two
coil volumes. Pumping warm fluids (~110 F min) will increase the flexibility of the cable and
make it easier to move.
 Cut off the coil until the cable is located.
 Install a nozzle and pump down the coil at 2 bpm for about two coil volumes.
 Remove the nozzle, cut off the extra cable and install the E-line logging head.
Note: If winter operations remember to freeze protect the coil after each circulation sequence
4. After the coiled tubing E-line logging head is installed, it should be checked electrically for
conductivity and insulation. This is usually done by the logging company. Note that the logging head
is tied with a weak point. This weak point protects cable from excessive tension which could destroy
the line.
5. The logging service company personnel should make sure they have the right leads from both the
collector and encoder to the unit. The collector and the patch cord to the E-line unit are exposed to
the Arctic environments and can develop intermittent electrical shorts from moisture. If possible,
have a backup patch cord on location.

5.3 Job Preparation


1. Refer to the “Electric Line” section of the PE Manual for procedures which deal with the logging
operations which are specified in the well program. Review the well history and current production
parameters thoroughly. Be certain that the analysis of the problem and objectives of the program are
clear.

BP Confidential and © 2009 BP America Inc.


Control Tier: 4 - ADW Revision Date: 8/12/2008
Document Number: UPS-US-AK-ADW-WLS-ADW-DOC-00061-4 Print Date: 3/24/2019
PAPER COPIES ARE UNCONTROLLED. THIS COPY VALID ONLY AT THE TIME OF PRINTING. THE CONTROLLED
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Recommended Practice: Coiled Tubing Conveyed E-Line LogsPage 3 of 7

2. Review the scope of the CTE job with the pad engineer, the logging engineer, and the coil operator.
Some things to consider are:
 Ensure that the coil is long enough for the job. If not, the coil service company will need to
prepare a coil and conductor with sufficient length. This process can be somewhat time
consuming and tedious. You will need to allow them 2 to 3 days for this operation. In addition,
they usually require support equipment from the Well Support such as tanks, filters, and
methanol.
 Determine if 24 hour operations are required. If so, make arrangements for additional crews to
operate the unit.
 If there has not been previous coil work performed in the well, have Dowell run the CoilCade coil
simulator based on actual well parameters. This will help determine if the coil can be safely
operated based on well conditions. If there are still concerns after running CoilCade, discuss the
situation with the Well Operations Supervisor and consider making a drift run without any
logging tools.
 The length of the tool string will determine the required mast height and lubricator length to
cover the tool string. A long tool string may require either pressure deployment or a crane to
pickup the injector head and lubricator. If possible, consider running a shorter tool string or
making two separate surveys to avoid a complicated rig up.
Note: If the well has a bad dog-leg and the well has a small liner you should consider running
either a shorter tool string or making two separate runs.
 Determine the tool string configuration and consider running a centralizer in wells with
relatively small liner tops inside larger casing. An example of this would be a 4-1/2” liner inside
9-5/8” casing.
 During production logging, the well should be flowing through the test separator (review the
Memory Logging section of the manual). Arrange with Production Control to have the well in
the test separator during the job. Make these arrangements the day prior, as the separator may be
scheduled for other use.
Note: In 2-7/8” and 3-1/2” liners, large rate differences have been observed between when the
coil is at the top of the liner and when the coil is at the bottom of the liner. This is due to friction
and the choke effect from the coiled tubing in the smaller liners. When running production logs,
the flowing parameters may not be the same as when the logging tools and coil are removed from
the well.
 Know the flowing and shut-in well head pressures. Smaller diameter logging tools can be
somewhat fragile and excessive snubbing force should not be used. Before running in the well,
plan to either partially kill the well or open up the choke on wells with high surface pressures.
Inform Production Control/Drill site Operator in advance if the well is to be opened up to lower
the pressure.
3. Provide a tentative schedule to Production Control/Drill Site Operator; discuss the job with them and
the availability of the test separator.

5.4 Recommended Equipment


The following equipment is recommended for coiled tubing conveyed e-line logging. The equipment list
is a minimum and some logging operations may require additional equipment and/or fluids
1. Pump-in sub with line to the ground.
2. Upright(s) with enough fluid to circulate well a minimum of 2 times. Fluid should be either 2% KCl
or seawater (non-slick)
3. Filter
4. BHA – none; E-Line logging head (Schlumberger)
5. Logging tools (Schlumberger)
6. If cold weather
 Methanol tanker
 Methanol Approved Triplex pump
 Neat methanol trailer
 Heaters

5.5 Execution
BP Confidential and © 2009 BP America Inc.
Control Tier: 4 - ADW Revision Date: 8/12/2008
Document Number: UPS-US-AK-ADW-WLS-ADW-DOC-00061-4 Print Date: 3/24/2019
PAPER COPIES ARE UNCONTROLLED. THIS COPY VALID ONLY AT THE TIME OF PRINTING. THE CONTROLLED
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Recommended Practice: Coiled Tubing Conveyed E-Line LogsPage 4 of 7

1. Conduct a safety meeting prior to rigging up the tools for the job. Discuss the scope of the job,
particular hazards associated with this job, and cover the usual safety topics. Follow all BP
requirements for PPE, including proper fall protection.
Note: If the E-line company will be using a radioactive source, ensure the coil crew thoroughly
understand the dangers as they are not used to working with radioactive material. Specifically, go
through the process of picking up the tools and connecting the lubricator to the BOPs, the duties and
location of each crew member during this process. Repeat this safety meeting prior to pulling and
laying down tools containing a radioactive source.
2. Rig up the BOPs and lubricator. Make up the tool string. The tools should be tested by the logging
engineer at surface after they are made up. Make up and pressure test the lubricator.
3. Load and kill the well if feasible. If performing a production log, it is preferable to have the well
producing so you may have to choke the well with the wing temporarily, while moving the tools
through the well head. This protects the tools from excessive and damaging fluid velocities.
4. Run in the hole with tool string carefully. Have the logging engineer monitor the tools while running
in the well to ensure they are working properly. Be careful passing through all the jewelry and when
entering the liner.
Note: If well is in test, call Production Control at regular intervals and record the separator data in
your telex. Compare this information to the last test retrieved from SCADA / PBAS. This will help
you determine if the coil and logging tools are restricting the normal flow and the extent that the
flowing parameters may have been impacted.
5. After entering liner, tie into the reference log as soon as possible. Give the well time to stabilize.
Note any changes in flowing characteristics and adjust the manifold choke if production has
decreased since the job commenced. The first logging pass is very important since the tools may fail
at anytime.
6. Begin your logging passes. Avoid tagging TD, unless the program stipulates to do so and then tag TD
on the final pass. Remember to quality check the log before pulling out of the hole and to record a
jewelry log if there is not one already.
Remember: If you become stuck there is no way of getting any pumping action to the end of the tool
string.
7. As you pull out of hole, perform slack management by pumping 0.5 bpm down the coil all the way
out of the hole.
8. Prior to reaching the surface with the tools, have a safety meeting to discuss laying down the tools.
Pull the tools into the lubricator and rig down.
9. Verify the logging engineer has the proper information for the log headings, and a copy of the
appropriate section from the “Electric Line” segment of the manual which specifies correct scales
and presentation order for the log prints. In the case of production logs, make sure the logging
engineer has the test separator information and includes it in the remarks section of his log heading.

5.6 Risk Analysis


The following table lists the risks that would be typically encountered when running E-Line logs using
coiled tubing. The hazards shown in the following tables are in addition to those shown in the tables in
Chapter 20 which address the hazards common to all Alaska North Slope coiled tubing jobs. The risk
analysis should be reviewed prior to running CTE jobs. If additional risks for a specific job are identified,
the impact should be assessed and remedies/mitigating measures should be discussed and documented.

Each hazard identifies the potential impact to personnel, the environment and economics. The probability
of an incident happening and the frequency of an incident happening is rated as very low, low, medium,
high or very high. For example, for the hazard of exposure to cold, the potential for personnel contracting
frostbite is low and the impact to an individual if they were frostbitten is low.

BP Confidential and © 2009 BP America Inc.


Control Tier: 4 - ADW Revision Date: 8/12/2008
Document Number: UPS-US-AK-ADW-WLS-ADW-DOC-00061-4 Print Date: 3/24/2019
PAPER COPIES ARE UNCONTROLLED. THIS COPY VALID ONLY AT THE TIME OF PRINTING. THE CONTROLLED
VERSION OF THIS DOCUMENT CAN BE FOUND AT http://eportal.bpweb.bp.com/hse
Recommended Practice: Coiled Tubing Conveyed E-Line LogsPage 5 of 7

Running E-Line Logs with Coiled Tubing


Risk Assessment Table

Potential for Injury / Probability of Risk Occurring /


Description of Risk / Hazard Environmental Harm / Impact of Hazard (Very Low to Remedy / Mitigation
Economic Loss Very High)
Stuck Coil – may require cutting coil Personnel – injury Low occurrence – High impact 1. Monitor weights and pressures
2. Be sure to drift disconnect
Environmental – spill, possibly Low occurrence – Medium impact prior to RIH. Have proper size
major if loss of well control; disconnect ball
3. Be patient
Economic – damage to Very low Occurrence – High
equipment and facilities; impact
additional workover cost; loss of
well; loss of production
Hazardous materials on location – CNL or Personnel – exposure to Very Low occurrence – low impact 1. Discuss exposure hazard at
Borax logs – radioactive sources will be used radioactive source safety meeting
Very Low occurrence – Low 2. Minimize personnel in vicinity
Environmental – radioactive impact of radioactive source
contamination of ground or 3. Radioactive source to be only
water be handled by trained
personnel from the logging
company
4. Logging company personnel to
be in a radioactivity
monitoring program
Lose fish in well – additional cost/hazard if Personnel – injury; exposure to Low Occurrence – Low Impact 1. Monitor pressures and weights
logging tool with radioactive source is lost radioactive source closely.
2. Be sure to drift disconnect
Environmental – spill If going to system: Low prior to RIH. Have proper size
Occurrence – Low impact disconnect ball
3. RIH at reduced speed of 80
Environmental – lost radioactive Very Low Occurrence – High – 100 fpm
source impact 4. If fishing source, discuss
exposure in safety meeting.

BP Confidential and © 2009 BP America Inc.


Control Tier: 4 - ADW Revision Date: 8/12/2008
Document Number: UPS-US-AK-ADW-WLS-ADW-DOC-00061-4 Print Date: 3/24/2019
PAPER COPIES ARE UNCONTROLLED. THIS COPY VALID ONLY AT THE TIME OF PRINTING. THE CONTROLLED VERSION OF THIS DOCUMENT CAN BE FOUND
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Recommended Practice: Coiled Tubing Conveyed E-Line LogsPage 6 of 7

Potential for Injury / Probability of Risk Occurring /


Description of Risk / Hazard Environmental Harm / Impact of Hazard (Very Low to Remedy / Mitigation
Economic Loss Very High)
Economic –lost production; Low Occurrence – Medium Impact 5. Minimize personnel in
additional workover cost to fish vicinity of radioactive
or abandon radioactive source source.

BP Confidential and © 2009 BP America Inc.


Control Tier: 4 - ADW Revision Date: 8/12/2008
Document Number: UPS-US-AK-ADW-WLS-ADW-DOC-00061-4 Print Date: 3/24/2019
PAPER COPIES ARE UNCONTROLLED. THIS COPY VALID ONLY AT THE TIME OF PRINTING. THE CONTROLLED VERSION OF THIS DOCUMENT CAN BE FOUND
AT http://eportal.bpweb.bp.com/hse
Recommended Practice: Coiled Tubing Conveyed E-Line LogsPage 7 of 7

6.0 Key Documents/Tools/References


BP Alaska PE Manual
ARCO Alaska Wells Group Policies, Guidelines and Resources Manual
Arco Alaska Well Support General Guidelines Manual

Revision Log
Revision Date Approving Custodian/Author Revision Details
Authority
Steve Rossberg Andrew Pfaff Original Issue
January 22, 2002
December 6, 2004 Doug Cismoski Ken Bulloch Verified content still
reflected current
practice

March 16, 2006 Jerry L. Bixby Wells Operation Revised Approving


Supervisor Authority and Custodian.
Next review date
extended. Changed
SOP to RP.
August 12, 2008 Clark Olsen Dan Scarpella Document reviewed for
technical accuracy.
Modified all steps in
section 5.2.
August 3, 2010 Andy Kirk Chris Tzvetcoff Add BP Confidentiality
Statement

(or, see attached e-mail )


Approving Authority signature Date

BP Confidential and © 2009 BP America Inc.


Control Tier: 4 - ADW Revision Date: 8/12/2008
Document Number: UPS-US-AK-ADW-WLS-ADW-DOC-00061-4 Print Date: 3/24/2019
PAPER COPIES ARE UNCONTROLLED. THIS COPY VALID ONLY AT THE TIME OF PRINTING. THE CONTROLLED
VERSION OF THIS DOCUMENT CAN BE FOUND AT http://eportal.bpweb.bp.com/hse