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PMID- 30226426

OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20181108
LR - 20181108
IS - 1747-0226 (Electronic)
IS - 1747-0218 (Linking)
VI - 71
IP - 10
DP - 2018 Oct
TI - The influence of social network size on speech perception.
PG - 2249-2260
LID - 10.1177/1747021817739865 [doi]
AB - Infants and adults learn new phonological varieties better when exposed to
multiple rather than a single speaker. This article tests whether having a
larger
social network similarly facilitates phonological performance. Experiment 1
shows
that people with larger social networks are better at vowel perception in
noise,
indicating that the benefit of laboratory exposure to multiple speakers
extends
to real life experience and to adults tested in their native language.
Furthermore, the experiment shows that this association is not due to
differences
in amount of input or to cognitive differences between people with different
social network sizes. Follow-up computational simulations reveal that the
benefit
of larger social networks is mostly due to increased input variability.
Additionally, the simulations show that the boost that larger social networks
provide is independent of the amount of input received but is larger if the
population is more heterogeneous. Finally, a comparison of "adult" and
"child"
simulations reconciles previous conflicting findings by suggesting that input
variability along the relevant dimension might be less useful at the earliest
stages of learning. Together, this article shows when and how the size of our
social network influences our speech perception. It thus shows how aspects of
our
lifestyle can influence our linguistic performance.
FAU - Lev-Ari, Shiri
AU - Lev-Ari S
AD - 1 Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
AD - 2 Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, UK.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20180101
PL - England
TA - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)
JT - Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)
JID - 101259775
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adult
MH - Attention
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language
MH - Learning
MH - Linguistics
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Models, Psychological
MH - Phonetics
MH - *Social Support
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Social network
OT - individual differences
OT - speech perception
EDAT- 2018/09/19 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/09 06:00
CRDT- 2018/09/19 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/19 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/09/19 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/09 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1177/1747021817739865 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2018 Oct;71(10):2249-2260. doi:
10.1177/1747021817739865.
Epub 2018 Jan 1.

PMID- 29941577
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180910
LR - 20181114
IS - 1091-6490 (Electronic)
IS - 0027-8424 (Linking)
VI - 115
IP - 28
DP - 2018 Jul 10
TI - Piano training enhances the neural processing of pitch and improves speech
perception in Mandarin-speaking children.
PG - E6630-E6639
LID - 10.1073/pnas.1808412115 [doi]
AB - Musical training confers advantages in speech-sound processing, which could
play
an important role in early childhood education. To understand the mechanisms
of
this effect, we used event-related potential and behavioral measures in a
longitudinal design. Seventy-four Mandarin-speaking children aged 4-5 y old
were
pseudorandomly assigned to piano training, reading training, or a no-contact
control group. Six months of piano training improved behavioral auditory word
discrimination in general as well as word discrimination based on vowels
compared
with the controls. The reading group yielded similar trends. However, the
piano
group demonstrated unique advantages over the reading and control groups in
consonant-based word discrimination and in enhanced positive mismatch
responses
(pMMRs) to lexical tone and musical pitch changes. The improved word
discrimination based on consonants correlated with the enhancements in
musical
pitch pMMRs among the children in the piano group. In contrast, all three
groups
improved equally on general cognitive measures, including tests of IQ,
working
memory, and attention. The results suggest strengthened common sound
processing
across domains as an important mechanism underlying the benefits of musical
training on language processing. In addition, although we failed to find
far-transfer effects of musical training to general cognition, the near-
transfer
effects to speech perception establish the potential for musical training to
help
children improve their language skills. Piano training was not inferior to
reading training on direct tests of language function, and it even seemed
superior to reading training in enhancing consonant discrimination.
FAU - Nan, Yun
AU - Nan Y
AD - State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, International
Data
Group (IDG)/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University,
100875 Beijing, China; nany@bnu.edu.cn desimone@mit.edu.
FAU - Liu, Li
AU - Liu L
AD - State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, International
Data
Group (IDG)/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University,
100875 Beijing, China.
FAU - Geiser, Eveline
AU - Geiser E
AD - McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139.
AD - Neuropsychology and Neurorehabilitation Service, The Laboratory for
Investigative
Neurophysiology, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, 1011
Lausanne, Switzerland.
AD - Radiodiagnostic Service, The Laboratory for Investigative Neurophysiology,
University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, 1011 Lausanne,
Switzerland.
FAU - Shu, Hua
AU - Shu H
AD - State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, International
Data
Group (IDG)/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University,
100875 Beijing, China.
FAU - Gong, Chen Chen
AU - Gong CC
AD - McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139.
FAU - Dong, Qi
AU - Dong Q
AD - State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, International
Data
Group (IDG)/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University,
100875 Beijing, China.
FAU - Gabrieli, John D E
AU - Gabrieli JDE
AD - McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139.
AD - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
(MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139.
FAU - Desimone, Robert
AU - Desimone R
AD - McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139; nany@bnu.edu.cn desimone@mit.edu.
LA - eng
PT - Clinical Trial
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20180625
PL - United States
TA - Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
JT - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of
America
JID - 7505876
SB - IM
MH - Attention/*physiology
MH - Child
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - China
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/*physiology
MH - *Music
MH - Pitch Perception/*physiology
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
PMC - PMC6048476
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *education
OT - *music
OT - *piano
OT - *reading
COIS- The authors declare no conflict of interest.
EDAT- 2018/06/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/09/11 06:00
CRDT- 2018/06/27 06:00
PMCR- 2019/01/10 00:00
PHST- 2019/01/10 00:00 [pmc-release]
PHST- 2018/06/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/09/11 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/06/27 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 1808412115 [pii]
AID - 10.1073/pnas.1808412115 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Jul 10;115(28):E6630-E6639. doi:
10.1073/pnas.1808412115. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

PMID- 29795602
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180806
LR - 20181114
IS - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI - 13
IP - 5
DP - 2018
TI - Inference comprehension in text reading: Performance of individuals with
right-
versus left-hemisphere lesions and the influence of cognitive functions.
PG - e0197195
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0197195 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Right-hemisphere lesions (RHL) may impair inference
comprehension.
However, comparative studies between left-hemisphere lesions (LHL) and RHL
are
rare, especially regarding reading comprehension. Moreover, further knowledge
of
the influence of cognition on inferential processing in this task is needed.
OBJECTIVES: To compare the performance of patients with RHL and LHL on an
inference reading comprehension task. We also aimed to analyze the effects of
lesion site and to verify correlations between cognitive functions and
performance on the task. METHODS: Seventy-five subjects were equally divided
into
the groups RHL, LHL, and control group (CG). The Implicit Management Test was
used to evaluate inference comprehension. In this test, subjects read short
written passages and subsequently answer five types of questions (explicit,
logical, distractor, pragmatic, and other), which require different types of
inferential reasoning. The cognitive functional domains of attention, memory,
executive functions, language, and visuospatial abilities were assessed using
the
Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT). RESULTS: The LHL and RHL groups
presented
difficulties in inferential comprehension in comparison with the CG. However,
the
RHL group presented lower scores than the LHL group on logical, pragmatic and
other questions. A covariance analysis did not show any effect of lesion site
within the hemispheres. Overall, all cognitive domains were correlated with
all
the types of questions from the inference test (especially logical,
pragmatic,
and other). Attention and visuospatial abilities affected the scores of both
the
RHL and LHL groups, and only memory influenced the performance of the RHL
group.
CONCLUSIONS: Lesions in either hemisphere may cause difficulties in making
inferences during reading. However, processing more complex inferences was
more
difficult for patients with RHL than for those with LHL, which suggests that
the
right hemisphere plays an important role in tasks with higher comprehension
demands. Cognition influences inferential processing during reading in
brain-injured subjects.
FAU - Silagi, Marcela Lima
AU - Silagi ML
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-0721-8638
AD - Department of Physical Therapy, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and
Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao
Paulo,
Brazil.
FAU - Radanovic, Marcia
AU - Radanovic M
AD - Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao
Paulo, Brazil.
FAU - Conforto, Adriana Bastos
AU - Conforto AB
AD - Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao
Paulo, Brazil.
FAU - Mendonca, Lucia Iracema Zanotto
AU - Mendonca LIZ
AD - Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao
Paulo, Brazil.
FAU - Mansur, Leticia Lessa
AU - Mansur LL
AD - Department of Physical Therapy, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and
Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao
Paulo,
Brazil.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20180524
PL - United States
TA - PLoS One
JT - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Attention/physiology
MH - Brain Injuries/diagnostic imaging/physiopathology/*rehabilitation
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - Cerebrum/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - Executive Function/physiology
MH - Female
MH - *Functional Laterality
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuroimaging
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Orientation, Spatial/physiology
MH - *Reading
MH - Visual Perception/physiology
PMC - PMC5968410
COIS- The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.
EDAT- 2018/05/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/08/07 06:00
CRDT- 2018/05/26 06:00
PHST- 2017/10/31 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/04/27 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/05/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/05/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/08/07 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0197195 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-17-38794 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - PLoS One. 2018 May 24;13(5):e0197195. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0197195.
eCollection 2018.
PMID- 29728186
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180905
LR - 20180905
IS - 1872-8464 (Electronic)
IS - 0165-5876 (Linking)
VI - 109
DP - 2018 Jun
TI - Passive sentence comprehension difficulties and its related factors in
children
with cochlear implants.
PG - 60-66
LID - S0165-5876(18)30151-4 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.03.025 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES: The purposes of this study were to investigate which syntactic
structures, from active and passive sentences, sensitively differentiate
children
with cochlear implants (CIs) from children with normal hearing (NH), to
explore
the correlations among working memory (WM) and other factors for each group,
and
to examine predictors of the active and passive sentence scores for both
groups.
METHODS: Twenty deaf children with CIs and 20 children with NH, aged 8-14
years,
were included in this study. Sentence comprehension skills were measured
using
the picture-pointing comprehension task, which consisted of active and
passive
sentences. The WM capacity was tested by the digit forward, digit backward,
word
forward, and word backward span tasks. RESULTS: Passive sentence type was a
significant predictor to differentiate between the two groups (p<.05). In the
CI
group, passive sentence scores were significantly correlated with age,
duration
of an implant use, receptive vocabulary scores, and WM scores (all p
values<.05).
In the stepwise regression analysis, WM capacity was a significant factor in
predicting the passive sentence scores of children with CIs (p<.05).
CONCLUSION:
Passive sentence type was a significant factor in distinguishing the CI group
from the NH group. The WM capacity was an important predictor accounting for
individual differences in processing complex sentence types for children with
CIs. The results indicate that a complex syntactic form may serve as a
clinically
critical index in detecting higher-level cognitive and linguistic processing
difficulties in good performers after implantation.
CI - Copyright (c) 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.
FAU - Lee, Youngmee
AU - Lee Y
AD - Department of Communication Disorders, Tongmyong University, Busan, Republic
of
Korea.
FAU - Sung, Jee Eun
AU - Sung JE
AD - Department of Communication Disorders, Ewha Womans University, Seoul,
Republic of
Korea. Electronic address: jeesung@ewha.ac.kr.
FAU - Sim, Hyunsub
AU - Sim H
AD - Department of Communication Disorders, Ewha Womans University, Seoul,
Republic of
Korea.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20180329
PL - Ireland
TA - Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol
JT - International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
JID - 8003603
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Age Factors
MH - Child
MH - *Cochlear Implants
MH - *Comprehension
MH - Female
MH - Hearing
MH - Humans
MH - *Linguistics
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Speech Perception
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Vocabulary
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Children
OT - Cochlear implant
OT - Passive sentence comprehension
OT - Working memory
EDAT- 2018/05/08 06:00
MHDA- 2018/09/06 06:00
CRDT- 2018/05/06 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/31 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/03/25 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2018/03/27 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/05/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/05/08 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/09/06 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0165-5876(18)30151-4 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.03.025 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2018 Jun;109:60-66. doi:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.03.025. Epub 2018 Mar 29.

PMID- 29726445
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180625
LR - 20180625
IS - 0926-9630 (Print)
IS - 0926-9630 (Linking)
VI - 248
DP - 2018
TI - Development and Evaluation of Cognitive Games to Promote Health and Wellbeing
in
Elderly People with Mild Cognitive Impairment.
PG - 255-262
AB - BACKGROUND: In Europe the number of elderly people is increasing. This
population
growth has resulted in higher healthcare costs. The purpose of this project
was
to try to promote active ageing in people aged 65-80 with mild cognitive
impairment through cognitive games delivered via a tablet computer.
OBJECTIVES:
Age-appropriate cognitive games were developed targeting different aspects of
cognition and then experiences of elderly people using these games were
evaluated. METHODS: The design of games was developed through iterative
user-centered design focus groups with elderly people as participants. The
experiences of participants playing the games over a 47 day period were
explored
through semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: Four games were developed that
addressed a range of cognitive functions such as perception, attention,
memory,
language, comprehension and executive function. The participants were able to
play these games without external intervention over an extended period and
reported positively on their experiences. CONCLUSION: Cognitive games can be
used
successfully by people with mild cognitive impairment to promote active
ageing.
FAU - Scase, Mark
AU - Scase M
AD - Division of Psychology, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
FAU - Kreiner, Karl
AU - Kreiner K
AD - Center for Health & Bioresources, Austrian Institute of Technology, Graz.
FAU - Ascolese, Antonio
AU - Ascolese A
AD - imaginary srl, Milano, Italy.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - Netherlands
TA - Stud Health Technol Inform
JT - Studies in health technology and informatics
JID - 9214582
SB - T
MH - Aged
MH - Cognition
MH - Cognition Disorders
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/*rehabilitation
MH - Europe
MH - Humans
MH - *Video Games
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Psychology
OT - aging
OT - cognition
OT - eHealth
OT - mobile application
EDAT- 2018/05/05 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/26 06:00
CRDT- 2018/05/05 06:00
PHST- 2018/05/05 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/05/05 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/26 06:00 [medline]
PST - ppublish
SO - Stud Health Technol Inform. 2018;248:255-262.

PMID- 29370252
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180326
LR - 20181113
IS - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI - 13
IP - 1
DP - 2018
TI - The modulating effect of education on semantic interference during healthy
aging.
PG - e0191656
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0191656 [doi]
AB - Aging has traditionally been related to impairments in name retrieval. These
impairments have usually been explained by a phonological transmission
deficit
hypothesis or by an inhibitory deficit hypothesis. This decline can, however,
be
modulated by the educational level of the sample. This study analyzed the
possible role of these approaches in explaining both object and face naming
impairments during aging. Older adults with low and high educational level
and
young adults with high educational level were asked to repeatedly name
objects or
famous people using the semantic-blocking paradigm. We compared naming when
exemplars were presented in a semantically homogeneous or in a semantically
heterogeneous context. Results revealed significantly slower rates of both
face
and object naming in the homogeneous context (i.e., semantic interference),
with
a stronger effect for face naming. Interestingly, the group of older adults
with
a lower educational level showed an increased semantic interference effect
during
face naming. These findings suggest the joint work of the two mechanisms
proposed
to explain age-related naming difficulties, i.e., the inhibitory deficit and
the
transmission deficit hypothesis. Therefore, the stronger vulnerability to
semantic interference in the lower educated older adult sample would possibly
point to a failure in the inhibitory mechanisms in charge of interference
resolution, as proposed by the inhibitory deficit hypothesis. In addition,
the
fact that this interference effect was mainly restricted to face naming and
not
to object naming would be consistent with the increased age-related
difficulties
during proper name retrieval, as suggested by the transmission deficit
hypothesis.
FAU - Paolieri, Daniela
AU - Paolieri D
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-3964-7405
AD - Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC), University of Granada,
Granada, Spain.
FAU - Marful, Alejandra
AU - Marful A
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Jaen, Jaen, Spain.
FAU - Morales, Luis
AU - Morales L
AD - Department of Psychology, University Loyola Andalucia, Seville, Spain.
FAU - Bajo, Maria Teresa
AU - Bajo MT
AD - Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC), University of Granada,
Granada, Spain.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20180125
PL - United States
TA - PLoS One
JT - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Aged
MH - Attention
MH - Cognitive Aging/*psychology
MH - Education
MH - Facial Recognition
MH - Female
MH - Healthy Aging/*psychology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Mental Recall
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Names
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual
MH - Semantics
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5784967
EDAT- 2018/01/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/01/26 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/11 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/01/09 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/01/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/01/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0191656 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-17-26025 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - PLoS One. 2018 Jan 25;13(1):e0191656. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0191656.
eCollection 2018.

PMID- 29222572
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180724
LR - 20181113
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 12
DP - 2017 Dec 20
TI - Word Processing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence From
Event-Related Potentials.
PG - 3441-3455
LID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0011 [doi]
AB - Purpose: This investigation was conducted to determine whether young children
with autism spectrum disorders exhibited a canonical neural response to word
stimuli and whether putative event-related potential (ERP) measures of word
processing were correlated with a concurrent measure of receptive language.
Additional exploratory analyses were used to examine whether the magnitude of
the
association between ERP measures of word processing and receptive language
varied
as a function of the number of word stimuli the participants reportedly
understood. Method: Auditory ERPs were recorded in response to spoken words
and
nonwords presented with equal probability in 34 children aged 2-5 years with
a
diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder who were in the early stages of
language
acquisition. Average amplitudes and amplitude differences between word and
nonword stimuli within 200-500 ms were examined at left temporal (T3) and
parietal (P3) electrode clusters. Receptive vocabulary size and the number of
experimental stimuli understood were concurrently measured using the
MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories. Results: Across the
entire
participant group, word-nonword amplitude differences were diminished. The
average word-nonword amplitude difference at T3 was related to receptive
vocabulary only if 5 or more word stimuli were understood. Conclusions: If
ERPs
are to ever have clinical utility, their construct validity must be
established
by investigations that confirm their associations with predictably related
constructs. These results contribute to accruing evidence, suggesting that a
valid measure of auditory word processing can be derived from the left
temporal
response to words and nonwords. In addition, this measure can be useful even
for
participants who do not reportedly understand all of the words presented as
experimental stimuli, though it will be important for researchers to track
familiarity with word stimuli in future investigations. Supplemental
Material:
https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5614840.
FAU - Sandbank, Micheal
AU - Sandbank M
AD - Department of Special Education, University of Texas at Austin.
FAU - Yoder, Paul
AU - Yoder P
AD - Special Education Department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.
FAU - Key, Alexandra P
AU - Key AP
AD - Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development and Department of
Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville,
TN.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Autism Spectrum Disorder/*psychology
MH - *Child Language
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Comprehension
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Evoked Potentials/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/physiology
MH - Speech Perception/physiology
MH - Vocabulary
PMC - PMC6111525
EDAT- 2017/12/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/25 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/09 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/10 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/12/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/25 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/12/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2666177 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0011 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Dec 20;60(12):3441-3455. doi:
10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0011.

PMID- 29204601
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180724
LR - 20180724
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 12
DP - 2017 Dec 20
TI - Receptive Vocabulary, Cognitive Flexibility, and Inhibitory Control
Differentially Predict Older and Younger Adults' Success Perceiving Speech by
Talkers With Dysarthria.
PG - 3632-3641
LID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0119 [doi]
AB - Purpose: Previous research has demonstrated equivocal findings related to the
effect of listener age on intelligibility ratings of dysarthric speech. The
aim
of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that support younger
and
older adults' perception of speech by talkers with dysarthria. Method:
Younger
and older adults identified words in phrases produced by talkers with
dysarthria.
Listeners also completed assessments on peripheral hearing, receptive
vocabulary,
and executive control functions. Results: Older and younger adults did not
differ
in their ability to perceive speech by talkers with dysarthria. Younger
adults'
success in identifying words produced by talkers with dysarthria was
associated
only with their hearing acuity. In contrast, older adults showed effects of
working memory and cognitive flexibility and interactions between hearing
acuity
and receptive vocabulary and between hearing acuity and inhibitory control.
Conclusions: Although older and younger adults had equivalent performance
identifying words produced by talkers with dysarthria, older adults appear to
utilize more cognitive support to identify those words.
FAU - Ingvalson, Erin M
AU - Ingvalson EM
AD - School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University,
Tallahassee.
AD - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University,
Chicago, IL.
FAU - Lansford, Kaitlin L
AU - Lansford KL
AD - School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University,
Tallahassee.
FAU - Fedorova, Valeriya
AU - Fedorova V
AD - School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University,
Tallahassee.
FAU - Fernandez, Gabriel
AU - Fernandez G
AD - School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University,
Tallahassee.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - *Age Factors
MH - Aged
MH - Cognition
MH - Dysarthria/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Inhibition (Psychology)
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - *Vocabulary
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/12/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/25 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/06 06:00
PHST- 2017/04/03 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/12/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/25 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/12/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2665789 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0119 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Dec 20;60(12):3632-3641. doi:
10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0119.

PMID- 29160333
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180131
LR - 20180131
IS - 2317-1782 (Electronic)
IS - 2317-1782 (Linking)
VI - 29
IP - 6
DP - 2017 Nov 13
TI - Effect of education on listening comprehension of sentences on healthy
elderly:
analysis of number of correct responses and task execution time.
PG - e20160224
LID - S2317-17822017000600302 [pii]
LID - 10.1590/2317-1782/20172016224 [doi]
AB - PURPOSE: To analyze the effect of education on sentence listening
comprehension
on cognitively healthy elderly. METHODS: A total of 111 healthy elderly, aged
60-80 years of both genders were divided into two groups according to
educational
level: low education (0-8 years of formal education) and high education (>/=9
years of formal education). The participants were assessed using the Revised
Token Test, an instrument that supports the evaluation of auditory
comprehension
of orders with different working memory and syntactic complexity demands. The
indicators used for performance analysis were the number of correct responses
(accuracy analysis) and task execution time (temporal analysis) in the
different
blocks. RESULTS: The low educated group had a lower number of correct
responses
than the high educated group on all blocks of the test. In the temporal
analysis,
participants with low education had longer execution time for commands on the
first four blocks related to working memory. However, the two groups had
similar
execution time for blocks more related to syntactic comprehension.
CONCLUSION:
Education influenced sentence listening comprehension on elderly. Temporal
analysis allowed to infer over the relationship between comprehension and
other
cognitive abilities, and to observe that the low educated elderly did not use
effective compensation strategies to improve their performances on the task.
Therefore, low educational level, associated with aging, may potentialize the
risks for language decline.
FAU - Silagi, Marcela Lima
AU - Silagi ML
AD - Departamento de Fisioterapia, Fonoaudiologia e Terapia Ocupacional, Faculdade
de
Medicina - FMUSP, Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP - Sao Paulo (SP), Brazil.
FAU - Rabelo, Camila Maia
AU - Rabelo CM
AD - Departamento de Fisioterapia, Fonoaudiologia e Terapia Ocupacional, Faculdade
de
Medicina - FMUSP, Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP - Sao Paulo (SP), Brazil.
FAU - Schochat, Eliane
AU - Schochat E
AD - Departamento de Fisioterapia, Fonoaudiologia e Terapia Ocupacional, Faculdade
de
Medicina - FMUSP, Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP - Sao Paulo (SP), Brazil.
FAU - Mansur, Leticia Lessa
AU - Mansur LL
AD - Departamento de Fisioterapia, Fonoaudiologia e Terapia Ocupacional, Faculdade
de
Medicina - FMUSP, Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP - Sao Paulo (SP), Brazil.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20171113
PL - Brazil
TA - Codas
JT - CoDAS
JID - 101623246
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aging/*physiology
MH - Auditory Perception
MH - Brazil
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - Educational Status
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
EDAT- 2017/11/22 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/01 06:00
CRDT- 2017/11/22 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/11 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/21 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/11/22 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/11/22 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - S2317-17822017000600302 [pii]
AID - 10.1590/2317-1782/20172016224 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO - Codas. 2017 Nov 13;29(6):e20160224. doi: 10.1590/2317-1782/20172016224.

PMID- 29159036
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180629
LR - 20181113
IS - 2213-1582 (Electronic)
IS - 2213-1582 (Linking)
VI - 17
DP - 2018
TI - EEG oscillations during word processing predict MCI conversion to Alzheimer's
disease.
PG - 188-197
LID - 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.10.009 [doi]
AB - Only a subset of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients progress to develop
a
form of dementia. A prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a
progressive decline in language. We investigated if subtle anomalies in EEG
activity of MCI patients during a word comprehension task could provide
insight
into the likelihood of conversion to AD. We studied 25 amnestic MCI patients,
a
subset of whom developed AD within 3-years, and 11 elderly controls. In the
task,
auditory category descriptions (e.g., 'a type of wood') were followed by a
single
visual target word either semantically congruent (i.e., oak) or incongruent
with
the preceding category. We found that the MCI convertors group (i.e. patients
that would go on to convert to AD in 3-years) had a diminished early
posterior-parietal theta (3-5 Hz) activity induced by first presentation of
the
target word (i.e., access to lexico-syntactic properties of the word),
compared
to MCI non-convertors and controls. Moreover, MCI convertors exhibited
oscillatory signatures for processing the semantically congruent words that
were
different from non-convertors and controls. MCI convertors thus showed basic
anomalies for lexical and meaning processing. In addition, both MCI groups
showed
anomalous oscillatory signatures for the verbal learning/memory of repeated
words: later alpha suppression (9-11 Hz), which followed first presentation
of
the target word, was attenuated for the second and third repetition in
controls,
but not in either MCI group. Our findings suggest that a subtle breakdown in
the
brain network subserving language comprehension can be foretelling of
conversion
to AD.
FAU - Mazaheri, Ali
AU - Mazaheri A
AD - School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
AD - Centre for Human Brain Health, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
FAU - Segaert, Katrien
AU - Segaert K
AD - School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
AD - Centre for Human Brain Health, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
FAU - Olichney, John
AU - Olichney J
AD - Center for Mind and Brain and Neurology Department, University of California,
Davis, CA, United States.
FAU - Yang, Jin-Chen
AU - Yang JC
AD - Center for Mind and Brain and Neurology Department, University of California,
Davis, CA, United States.
FAU - Niu, Yu-Qiong
AU - Niu YQ
AD - Center for Mind and Brain and Neurology Department, University of California,
Davis, CA, United States.
FAU - Shapiro, Kim
AU - Shapiro K
AD - School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
AD - Centre for Human Brain Health, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
FAU - Bowman, Howard
AU - Bowman H
AD - School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
AD - Centre for Human Brain Health, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
AD - School of Computing, University of Kent, United Kingdom.
LA - eng
GR - R01 AG048252/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20171009
PL - Netherlands
TA - Neuroimage Clin
JT - NeuroImage. Clinical
JID - 101597070
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Alzheimer Disease/diagnosis/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Brain/*physiopathology
MH - *Brain Waves
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Comprehension/physiology
MH - *Disease Progression
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Evoked Potentials
MH - Humans
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Semantics
MH - Speech Perception/physiology
PMC - PMC5683194
EDAT- 2017/11/22 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/30 06:00
CRDT- 2017/11/22 06:00
PHST- 2017/06/13 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/09/15 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/10/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/11/22 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/11/22 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.10.009 [doi]
AID - S2213-1582(17)30250-4 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - Neuroimage Clin. 2017 Oct 9;17:188-197. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.10.009.
eCollection 2018.

PMID- 29106999
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180622
LR - 20180622
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 106
DP - 2017 Nov
TI - Functional connectivity in the dorsal stream and between bilateral
auditory-related cortical areas differentially contribute to speech decoding
depending on spectro-temporal signal integrity and performance.
PG - 398-406
LID - S0028-3932(17)30406-2 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.10.030 [doi]
AB - Speech processing relies on the interdependence between auditory perception,
sensorimotor integration, and verbal memory functions. Functional and
structural
connectivity between bilateral auditory-related cortical areas (ARCAs)
facilitates spectro-temporal analyses, whereas the dynamic interplay between
ARCAs and Broca's area (i.e., dorsal pathway) contributes to verbal memory
functions, articulation, and sound-to-motor mapping. However, it remains
unclear
whether these two neural circuits are preferentially driven by spectral or
temporal acoustic information, and whether their recruitment is predictive of
speech perception performance and learning. Therefore, we evaluated EEG-based
intracranial (eLORETA) functional connectivity (lagged coherence) in both
pathways (i.e., between bilateral ARCAs and in the dorsal stream) while good-
(GPs, N = 12) and poor performers (PPs, N = 13) learned to decode natural
pseudowords (CLEAN) or comparable items (speech-noise chimeras) manipulated
in
the envelope (ENV) or in the fine-structure (FS). Learning to decode degraded
speech was generally associated with increased functional connectivity in the
theta, alpha, and beta frequency range in both circuits. Furthermore, GPs
exhibited increased connectivity in the left dorsal stream compared to PPs,
but
only during the FS condition and in the theta frequency band. These results
suggest that both pathways contribute to the decoding of spectro-temporal
degraded speech by increasing the communication between brain regions
involved in
perceptual analyses and verbal memory functions. Otherwise, the left-
hemispheric
recruitment of the dorsal stream in GPs during the FS condition points to a
contribution of this pathway to articulatory-based memory processes that are
dependent on the temporal integrity of the speech signal. These results
enable to
better comprehend the neural circuits underlying word-learning as a function
of
temporal and spectral signal integrity and performance.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Elmer, Stefan
AU - Elmer S
AD - Division Neuropsychology (Auditory Research Group Zurich, ARGZ), Institute of
Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address:
s.elmer@psychologie.uzh.ch.
FAU - Kuhnis, Jurg
AU - Kuhnis J
AD - Division Neuropsychology (Auditory Research Group Zurich, ARGZ), Institute of
Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address:
juerg.kuehnis@uzh.ch.
FAU - Rauch, Piyush
AU - Rauch P
AD - Division Neuropsychology (Auditory Research Group Zurich, ARGZ), Institute of
Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address:
piyush.rauch@students.unibe.ch.
FAU - Abolfazl Valizadeh, Seyed
AU - Abolfazl Valizadeh S
AD - Division Neuropsychology (Auditory Research Group Zurich, ARGZ), Institute of
Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address:
valizadeh@hest.ethz.ch.
FAU - Jancke, Lutz
AU - Jancke L
AD - Division Neuropsychology (Auditory Research Group Zurich, ARGZ), Institute of
Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland; Center for Integrative Human
Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Switzerland; International Normal
Aging
and Plasticity Imaging Center (INAPIC), University of Zurich, Switzerland;
University Research Priority Program (URPP) "Dynamic of Healthy Aging",
University of Zurich, Switzerland; Department of Special Education, King
Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address:
lutz.jaencke@uzh.ch.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20171105
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Auditory Cortex/*physiology
MH - Auditory Pathways/physiology
MH - Broca Area/*physiology
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Learning/*physiology
MH - Male
MH - Memory
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Noise
MH - Speech
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Auditory cortex
OT - Dorsal stream
OT - EEG
OT - Functional connectivity
OT - Spectro-temporal processing
OT - Speech learning
EDAT- 2017/11/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/23 06:00
CRDT- 2017/11/07 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/04 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/09/21 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/10/25 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/11/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/23 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/11/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(17)30406-2 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.10.030 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2017 Nov;106:398-406. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.10.030. Epub 2017 Nov 5.

PMID- 29073044
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180615
LR - 20181113
IS - 1091-6490 (Electronic)
IS - 0027-8424 (Linking)
VI - 114
IP - 43
DP - 2017 Oct 24
TI - SMELL-S and SMELL-R: Olfactory tests not influenced by odor-specific
insensitivity or prior olfactory experience.
PG - 11275-11284
LID - 10.1073/pnas.1711415114 [doi]
AB - Smell dysfunction is a common and underdiagnosed medical condition that can
have
serious consequences. It is also an early biomarker of neurodegenerative
diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, where olfactory deficits precede
detectable memory loss. Clinical tests that evaluate the sense of smell face
two
major challenges. First, human sensitivity to individual odorants varies
significantly, so test results may be unreliable in people with low
sensitivity
to a test odorant but an otherwise normal sense of smell. Second, prior
familiarity with odor stimuli can bias smell test performance. We have
developed
nonsemantic tests for olfactory sensitivity (SMELL-S) and olfactory
resolution
(SMELL-R) that use mixtures of odorants that have unfamiliar smells. The
tests
can be self-administered by healthy individuals with minimal training and
show
high test-retest reliability. Because SMELL-S uses odor mixtures rather than
a
single molecule, odor-specific insensitivity is averaged out, and the test
accurately distinguished people with normal and dysfunctional smell. SMELL-R
is a
discrimination test in which the difference between two stimulus mixtures can
be
altered stepwise. This is an advance over current discrimination tests, which
ask
subjects to discriminate monomolecular odorants whose difference in odor
cannot
be quantified. SMELL-R showed significantly less bias in scores between North
American and Taiwanese subjects than conventional semantically based smell
tests
that need to be adapted to different languages and cultures. Based on these
proof-of-principle results in healthy individuals, we predict that SMELL-S
and
SMELL-R will be broadly effective in diagnosing smell dysfunction.
CI - Published under the PNAS license.
FAU - Hsieh, Julien W
AU - Hsieh JW
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-7675-1239
AD - Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New
York,
NY 10065; hsiehjulien@gmail.com Leslie.Vosshall@rockefeller.edu.
AD - Rhinology-Olfactology Unit, Service of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck
Surgery,
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva University Hospitals, CH-1211
Geneva
14, Switzerland.
FAU - Keller, Andreas
AU - Keller A
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-5491-2214
AD - Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New
York,
NY 10065.
FAU - Wong, Michele
AU - Wong M
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-5123-1330
AD - Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New
York,
NY 10065.
FAU - Jiang, Rong-San
AU - Jiang RS
AD - Department of Otolaryngology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Xitun
District,
Taichung City, Taiwan 407.
FAU - Vosshall, Leslie B
AU - Vosshall LB
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-6060-8099
AD - Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New
York,
NY 10065; hsiehjulien@gmail.com Leslie.Vosshall@rockefeller.edu.
AD - Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York, NY 10065.
AD - Kavli Neural Systems Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY
10065.
LA - eng
GR - UL1 TR000043/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
GR - UL1 TR001866/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
GR - HHMI/Howard Hughes Medical Institute/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Multicenter Study
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20171010
PL - United States
TA - Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
JT - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of
America
JID - 7505876
RN - ML9LGA7468 (Phenylethyl Alcohol)
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - North America
MH - Odorants
MH - Olfaction Disorders/diagnosis
MH - Olfactometry/*methods
MH - Phenylethyl Alcohol
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/physiology
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Semantics
MH - Sensory Thresholds
MH - Smell/*physiology
MH - Taiwan
PMC - PMC5664538
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *hyposmia
OT - *odor-specific insensitivity
OT - *olfaction
OT - *olfactory dysfunction
OT - *smell test
COIS- Conflict of interest statement: J.W.H., A.K., and L.B.V. are inventors on US
provisional patent application 62/528,420, filed July 3, 2017, by The
Rockefeller
University, relating to the smell test methods in this manuscript.
EDAT- 2017/10/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/16 06:00
CRDT- 2017/10/27 06:00
PHST- 2017/10/27 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/10/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/16 06:00 [medline]
AID - 1711415114 [pii]
AID - 10.1073/pnas.1711415114 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Oct 24;114(43):11275-11284. doi:
10.1073/pnas.1711415114. Epub 2017 Oct 10.

PMID- 28987909
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180622
LR - 20181113
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 106
DP - 2017 Nov
TI - Event-related brain potentials reveal age-related changes in parafoveal-
foveal
integration during sentence processing.
PG - 358-370
LID - S0028-3932(17)30373-1 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.10.002 [doi]
AB - Normative aging is associated with deficits in visual acuity and cognitive
control that impact the allocation of visual attention, but little is known
about
how those changes affect information extraction and integration during visual
language comprehension in older adulthood. In the current study, we used a
visual
hemi-field flanker RSVP paradigm with event-related brain potentials to study
how
older readers process fine-grained aspects of semantic expectancy in
parafoveal
and foveal vision. Stimuli consisted of high constraint sentences with
expected,
unexpected but plausible, or anomalous parafoveal target words, as well as
low
constraint sentences with neutral but expected target words. Older adults
showed
graded parafoveal N400 effects that were strikingly similar to younger
readers,
indicating intact parafoveal semantic processing. However, whereas young
adults
were able to use this parafoveal pre-processing to facilitate subsequent
foveal
viewing, resulting in a reduced foveal N400 effect, older adults were not
able
to. Instead, older adults re-processed the semantics of words in foveal
vision,
resulting in a larger foveal N400 effect relative to the young. Collectively,
our
findings suggest that although parafoveal semantic processing per se is
preserved
in aging, there exists an age-related deficit in the ability to rapidly
integrate
parafoveal and foveal visual semantic representations.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Payne, Brennan R
AU - Payne BR
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Utah, University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign, United States. Electronic address: brennan.payne@utah.edu.
FAU - Federmeier, Kara D
AU - Federmeier KD
AD - Department of Psychology, Program in Neuroscience, and Beckman Institute,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States.
LA - eng
GR - R01 AG026308/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20171004
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - *Aging
MH - Brain/*physiology
MH - *Evoked Potentials
MH - Evoked Potentials, Visual
MH - Female
MH - *Fixation, Ocular
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Reading
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Semantics
MH - *Vision, Ocular
MH - Visual Acuity
MH - Visual Perception/physiology
PMC - PMC5720378
MID - NIHMS915885
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Aging
OT - ERP
OT - Parafoveal processing
OT - Sentence processing
EDAT- 2017/10/11 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/23 06:00
CRDT- 2017/10/09 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/29 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/24 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/10/02 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/10/11 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/23 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/10/09 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(17)30373-1 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.10.002 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2017 Nov;106:358-370. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.10.002. Epub 2017 Oct 4.

PMID- 28922153
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180409
LR - 20181113
IS - 1875-8908 (Electronic)
IS - 1387-2877 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 2
DP - 2017
TI - Sex-Dependent Associations of Serum Uric Acid with Brain Function During
Aging.
PG - 699-706
LID - 10.3233/JAD-170287 [doi]
AB - Serum uric acid (SUA) is an abundant natural antioxidant capable of reducing
cellular oxidation, a major cause of neurodegenerative disease. In line with
this, SUA levels are lower in Alzheimer's disease; however, the association
between SUA and cognition remains unclear. Results from studies examining the
effects of SUA on cognition may be difficult to interpret in the context of
normal versus pathological aging. This study examined sex-specific
associations
of baseline SUA with cognition during aging. Data from dementia-free
participants
initially aged 26-99 (N = 1,451) recruited for the Baltimore Longitudinal
Study
of Aging (BLSA), were used in the current analyses. SUA was assessed using
blood
samples collected during research visits. Cognition was measured using five
composite scores (verbal memory, attention, executive function, language, and
visuospatial ability). At the first study visit, compared with women, men
were
older, more likely to be White, had more years of education, higher baseline
SUA
levels, and higher cardiovascular risk scores. Higher baseline SUA was
associated
with attenuated declines in attention (beta= 0.006; p = 0.03) and
visuospatial
abilities (beta= 0.007; p = 0.01) in men. There was a trend to suggest higher
baseline SUA in men was associated with attenuated declines in language, but
this
finding did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.09). There were no
significant findings with SUA and cognition in women. In this sample of
cognitively healthy, community-dwelling adults, we found that higher SUA
levels
at baseline were associated with attenuated declines in attention and
visuospatial abilities in men. SUA was not associated with cognition or
change in
cognition over time in women.
FAU - Kueider, Alexandra M
AU - Kueider AM
AD - Unit of Clinical and Translational Neuroscience, Laboratory of Behavioral
Neuroscience, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD, USA.
FAU - An, Yang
AU - An Y
AD - Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, National Institute on Aging,
Baltimore,
MD, USA.
FAU - Tanaka, Toshiko
AU - Tanaka T
AD - Longitudinal Studies Section, Translational Gerontology Branch, National
Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD, USA.
FAU - Kitner-Triolo, Melissa H
AU - Kitner-Triolo MH
AD - Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, National Institute on Aging,
Baltimore,
MD, USA.
FAU - Studenski, Stephanie
AU - Studenski S
AD - Longitudinal Studies Section, Translational Gerontology Branch, National
Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD, USA.
FAU - Ferrucci, Luigi
AU - Ferrucci L
AD - Longitudinal Studies Section, Translational Gerontology Branch, National
Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD, USA.
FAU - Thambisetty, Madhav
AU - Thambisetty M
AD - Unit of Clinical and Translational Neuroscience, Laboratory of Behavioral
Neuroscience, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD, USA.
LA - eng
GR - Z01 AG000963-03/NULL/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
GR - Z99 AG999999/NULL/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Alzheimers Dis
JT - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
JID - 9814863
RN - 268B43MJ25 (Uric Acid)
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aging/*blood/*pathology
MH - Attention/physiology
MH - Brain/*physiology
MH - Cohort Studies
MH - Executive Function/physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Linear Models
MH - Male
MH - Memory/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Sex Characteristics
MH - Uric Acid/*blood
MH - Visual Perception/physiology
PMC - PMC6112110
MID - NIHMS984948
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Aging
OT - cognitive function
OT - older adults
OT - uric acid
EDAT- 2017/09/19 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/10 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/19 06:00
PHST- 2017/09/19 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/09/19 06:00 [entrez]
AID - JAD170287 [pii]
AID - 10.3233/JAD-170287 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;60(2):699-706. doi: 10.3233/JAD-170287.

PMID- 28906240
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180611
LR - 20181113
IS - 2157-3107 (Electronic)
IS - 1050-0545 (Linking)
VI - 28
IP - 8
DP - 2017 Sep
TI - Listening Effort Measured in Adults with Normal Hearing and Cochlear
Implants.
PG - 685-697
LID - 10.3766/jaaa.16014 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Studies have examined listening effort in individuals with
hearing
loss to determine the extent of the impairment. Regarding cochlear implants
(CIs), results suggest that listening effort is improved using bilateral CIs
compared to unilateral CIs. Few studies have investigated listening effort
and
outcomes related to the hybrid CI. PURPOSE: Here, we compared listening
effort
across three CI groups, and to a normal-hearing control group. The impact of
listener traits, that is, age, age at onset of hearing loss, duration of CI
use,
and working memory capacity, were examined relative to listening effort.
RESEARCH
DESIGN: The participants completed a dual-task paradigm with a primary task
identifying sentences in noise and a secondary task measuring reaction time
on a
Stroop test. Performance was assessed for all participant groups at different
signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), ranging in 2-dB steps from 0 to +10 dB
relative to
an individual's SNR-50, at which the speech recognition performance is 50%
correct. Participants completed three questions on listening effort, the
Spatial
Hearing Questionnaire, and a reading span test. STUDY SAMPLE: All 46
participants
were adults. The four participant groups included (1) 12 individuals with
normal
hearing, (2) 10 with unilateral CIs, (3) 12 with bilateral CIs, and (4) 12
with a
hybrid short-electrode CI and bilateral residual hearing. DATA COLLECTION AND
ANALYSIS: Results from the dual-task experiment were compared using a mixed 4
(hearing group) by 6 (SNR condition) analysis of variance (ANOVA).
Questionnaire
results were compared using one-way ANOVAs, and correlations between listener
traits and the objective and subjective measures were compared using Pearson
correlation coefficients. RESULTS: Significant differences were found in
speech
perception among the normal-hearing and the unilateral and the bilateral CI
groups. There was no difference in primary task performance among the hybrid
CI
and the normal-hearing groups. Across the six SNR conditions, listening
effort
improved to a greater degree for the normal-hearing group compared to the CI
groups. However, there was no significant difference in listening effort
between
the CI groups. The subjective measures revealed significant differences
between
the normal-hearing and CI groups, but no difference among the three CI
groups.
Across all groups, age was significantly correlated with listening effort. We
found no relationship between listening effort and the age at the onset of
hearing loss, age at implantation, the duration of CI use, and working memory
capacity for these participants. CONCLUSIONS: Listening effort was reduced to
a
greater degree for the normal-hearing group compared to the CI users. There
was
no significant difference in listening effort among the CI groups. For the CI
users in this study, age was a significant factor with regard to listening
effort, whereas other variables such as the duration of CI use and the age at
the
onset of hearing loss were not significantly related to listening effort.
CI - American Academy of Audiology
FAU - Perreau, Ann E
AU - Perreau AE
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Augustana College, Rock
Island, IL.
FAU - Wu, Yu-Hsiang
AU - Wu YH
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Iowa, Iowa
City, IA.
FAU - Tatge, Bailey
AU - Tatge B
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Iowa, Iowa
City, IA.
FAU - Irwin, Diana
AU - Irwin D
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Augustana College, Rock
Island, IL.
FAU - Corts, Daniel
AU - Corts D
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Augustana College, Rock
Island, IL.
LA - eng
GR - P50 DC000242/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PL - Canada
TA - J Am Acad Audiol
JT - Journal of the American Academy of Audiology
JID - 9114646
SB - IM
MH - Age of Onset
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - *Cochlear Implants
MH - Deafness/physiopathology
MH - Female
MH - Hearing/physiology
MH - Hearing Loss/*physiopathology/rehabilitation
MH - Hearing Tests
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Noise
MH - Perceptual Masking/physiology
MH - Reading
MH - Stroop Test
PMC - PMC6135240
MID - NIHMS988008
EDAT- 2017/09/15 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/12 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/15 06:00
PHST- 2017/09/15 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/09/15 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/12 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.3766/jaaa.16014 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Am Acad Audiol. 2017 Sep;28(8):685-697. doi: 10.3766/jaaa.16014.

PMID- 28886405
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180611
LR - 20180905
IS - 1878-5891 (Electronic)
IS - 0378-5955 (Linking)
VI - 354
DP - 2017 Oct
TI - Emotional recognition of dynamic facial expressions before and after cochlear
implantation in adults with progressive deafness.
PG - 64-72
LID - S0378-5955(17)30076-X [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.heares.2017.08.007 [doi]
AB - Visual processing has been extensively explored in deaf subjects in the
context
of verbal communication, through the assessment of speech reading and sign
language abilities. However, little is known about visual emotional
processing in
adult progressive deafness, and after cochlear implantation. The goal of our
study was thus to assess the influence of acquired post-lingual progressive
deafness on the recognition of dynamic facial emotions that were selected to
express canonical fear, happiness, sadness, and anger. A total of 23 adults
with
post-lingual deafness separated into two groups; those assessed either before
(n
= 10) and those assessed after (n = 13) cochlear implantation (CI); and 13
normal
hearing (NH) individuals participated in the current study. Participants were
asked to rate the expression of the four cardinal emotions, and to evaluate
both
their emotional valence (unpleasant-pleasant) and arousal potential
(relaxing-stimulating). We found that patients with deafness were impaired in
the
recognition of sad faces, and that patients equipped with a CI were
additionally
impaired in the recognition of happiness and fear (but not anger). Relative
to
controls, all patients with deafness showed a deficit in perceiving arousal
expressed in faces, while valence ratings remained unaffected. The current
results show for the first time that acquired and progressive deafness is
associated with a reduction of emotional sensitivity to visual stimuli. This
negative impact of progressive deafness on the perception of dynamic facial
cues
for emotion recognition contrasts with the proficiency of deaf subjects with
and
without CIs in processing visual speech cues (Rouger et al., 2007; Strelnikov
et
al., 2009; Lazard and Giraud, 2017). Altogether these results suggest there
to be
a trade-off between the processing of linguistic and non-linguistic visual
stimuli.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.
FAU - Ambert-Dahan, Emmanuele
AU - Ambert-Dahan E
AD - Unite Otologie, Implants auditifs et Chirurgie de la base du crane, Groupe
Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, France; Laboratoire PSITEC (EA 4072),
Neuropsychologie: Audition, Cognition et Action, Universite de Lille, France;
UMR-S 1159 Inserm/Universite Paris 6 Pierre et Marie Curie, France.
FAU - Giraud, Anne-Lise
AU - Giraud AL
AD - Neuroscience Dept., University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
FAU - Mecheri, Halima
AU - Mecheri H
AD - Faculte des Lettres et Sciences Humaines, Universite Catholique de Lille,
France.
FAU - Sterkers, Olivier
AU - Sterkers O
AD - Unite Otologie, Implants auditifs et Chirurgie de la base du crane, Groupe
Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, France; UMR-S 1159 Inserm/Universite
Paris
6 Pierre et Marie Curie, France.
FAU - Mosnier, Isabelle
AU - Mosnier I
AD - Unite Otologie, Implants auditifs et Chirurgie de la base du crane, Groupe
Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, France; UMR-S 1159 Inserm/Universite
Paris
6 Pierre et Marie Curie, France.
FAU - Samson, Severine
AU - Samson S
AD - Laboratoire PSITEC (EA 4072), Neuropsychologie: Audition, Cognition et
Action,
Universite de Lille, France; Unite d'epilepsie, Groupe Hospitalier
Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, France. Electronic address:
severine.samson@univ-lille3.fr.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170831
PL - Netherlands
TA - Hear Res
JT - Hearing research
JID - 7900445
SB - IM
MH - Adaptation, Psychological
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Auditory Perception
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - Cochlear Implantation/*instrumentation
MH - *Cochlear Implants
MH - *Cues
MH - *Emotions
MH - *Facial Expression
MH - Female
MH - Hearing
MH - Hearing Loss,
Sensorineural/diagnosis/physiopathology/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Humans
MH - Judgment
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Persons With Hearing Impairments/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Visual Perception
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Acquired deafness
OT - *Arousal
OT - *Cochlear implants
OT - *Emotional categories
OT - *Facial emotions
OT - *Valence
EDAT- 2017/09/09 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/12 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/09 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/17 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/08/17 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/08/25 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/09/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/12 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/09/09 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0378-5955(17)30076-X [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.heares.2017.08.007 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Hear Res. 2017 Oct;354:64-72. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2017.08.007. Epub 2017
Aug
31.

PMID- 28879086
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180510
LR - 20181113
IS - 2213-1582 (Electronic)
IS - 2213-1582 (Linking)
VI - 16
DP - 2017
TI - Emotion detection deficits and changes in personality traits linked to loss
of
white matter integrity in primary progressive aphasia.
PG - 447-454
LID - 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.08.020 [doi]
AB - Non-cognitive features including personality changes are increasingly
recognized
in the three PPA variants (semantic-svPPA, non fluent-nfvPPA, and
logopenic-lvPPA). However, differences in emotion processing among the PPA
variants and its association with white matter tracts are unknown. We
compared
emotion detection across the three PPA variants and healthy controls (HC),
and
related them to white matter tract integrity and cortical degeneration.
Personality traits in the PPA group were also examined in relation to white
matter tracts. Thirty-three patients with svPPA, nfvPPA, lvPPA, and 32 HC
underwent neuropsychological assessment, emotion evaluation task (EET), and
MRI
scan. Patients' study partners were interviewed on the Clinical Dementia
Rating
Scale (CDR) and completed an interpersonal traits assessment, the
Interpersonal
Adjective Scale (IAS). Diffusion tensor imaging of uncinate fasciculus (UF),
superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and inferior longitudinal fasciculus
(ILF), and voxel-based morphometry to derive gray matter volumes for
orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior temporal lobe (ATL) regions were
performed.
In addition, gray matter volumes of white matter tract-associated regions
were
also calculated: inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), posterior temporal lobe (PTL),
inferior parietal lobe (IPL) and occipital lobe (OL). ANCOVA was used to
compare
EET performance. Partial correlation and multivariate linear regression were
conducted to examine association between EET and neuroanatomical regions
affected
in PPA. All three variants of PPA performed significantly worse than HC on
EET,
and the svPPA group was least accurate at recognizing emotions. Performance
on
EET was related to the right UF, SLF, and ILF integrity. Regression analysis
revealed EET performance primarily relates to the right UF integrity. The IAS
subdomain, cold-hearted, was also associated with right UF integrity.
Disease-specific emotion recognition and personality changes occur in the
three
PPA variants and are likely associated with disease-specific neuroanatomical
changes. Loss of white matter integrity contributes as significantly as focal
atrophy in behavioral changes in PPA.
FAU - Multani, Namita
AU - Multani N
AD - Division of Neurology, Krembil Neuroscience Centre, Toronto Western Hospital,
University Health Network, 399 Bathurst St., Toronto, ON M5T2S8, Canada.
AD - Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of
Toronto, 60
Leonard Avenue, Toronto, ON M5T2S8, Canada.
FAU - Galantucci, Sebastiano
AU - Galantucci S
AD - Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of
Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele
University, Via Olgettina, 58, 20132 Milan, Italy.
FAU - Wilson, Stephen M
AU - Wilson SM
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, 1500 Owens Suite 320, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
AD - Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona,
1131
E. 2nd Street, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.
FAU - Shany-Ur, Tal
AU - Shany-Ur T
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, 1500 Owens Suite 320, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
FAU - Poorzand, Pardis
AU - Poorzand P
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, 1500 Owens Suite 320, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
FAU - Growdon, Matthew E
AU - Growdon ME
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, 1500 Owens Suite 320, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
FAU - Jang, Jung Yun
AU - Jang JY
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, 3620 South
McClintock Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA.
FAU - Kramer, Joel H
AU - Kramer JH
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, 1500 Owens Suite 320, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
FAU - Miller, Bruce L
AU - Miller BL
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, 1500 Owens Suite 320, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
FAU - Rankin, Katherine P
AU - Rankin KP
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, 1500 Owens Suite 320, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
FAU - Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa
AU - Gorno-Tempini ML
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, 1500 Owens Suite 320, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
FAU - Tartaglia, Maria Carmela
AU - Tartaglia MC
AD - Division of Neurology, Krembil Neuroscience Centre, Toronto Western Hospital,
University Health Network, 399 Bathurst St., Toronto, ON M5T2S8, Canada.
AD - Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of
Toronto, 60
Leonard Avenue, Toronto, ON M5T2S8, Canada.
LA - eng
GR - P50 AG023501/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG029577/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 DC013270/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - P01 AG019724/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - K23 AG021606/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 NS050915/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170826
PL - Netherlands
TA - Neuroimage Clin
JT - NeuroImage. Clinical
JID - 101597070
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aphasia, Primary Progressive/diagnostic imaging/*pathology/*physiopathology
MH - Atrophy/pathology
MH - Cerebral Cortex/diagnostic imaging/*pathology
MH - Diffusion Tensor Imaging/*methods
MH - Emotions/*physiology
MH - *Facial Expression
MH - Facial Recognition/physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Personality/*physiology
MH - *Social Perception
MH - White Matter/diagnostic imaging/*pathology
PMC - PMC5577436
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Diffusion tensor imaging
OT - Emotion detection
OT - Personality
OT - Primary progressive aphasia
OT - Social cognition
EDAT- 2017/09/08 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/11 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/08 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/24 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/08/21 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/08/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/09/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/09/08 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/11 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.08.020 [doi]
AID - S2213-1582(17)30209-7 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - Neuroimage Clin. 2017 Aug 26;16:447-454. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.08.020.
eCollection 2017.

PMID- 28859133
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171016
LR - 20181113
IS - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI - 12
IP - 8
DP - 2017
TI - An association of cognitive impairment with diabetes and retinopathy in end
stage
renal disease patients under peritoneal dialysis.
PG - e0183965
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0183965 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Diabetes and retinopathy have been considered as risk factors of
cognitive impairment (CI) in previous studies. We investigated both of these
two
factors and their relationship with global and specific cognitive functions
in
end stage renal disease patients under peritoneal dialysis (PD). METHODS: In
this
multicenter cross-sectional study, 424 clinically stable patients were
enrolled
from 5 PD units, who performed PD for at least three months and completed
fundoscopy examination if they had diabetes. Global cognitive function was
measured using the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS), Trail-Making
Test forms A and B for executive function, and subtests of the Battery for
the
Assessment of Neuropsychological Status for immediate and delayed memory,
visuospatial skills, and language ability. RESULTS: PD Patients with DM and
Retinopathy had significantly higher prevalence of CI, executive dysfunction,
impaired immediate memory and visuospatial skill, compared with patients in
non-DM group. By multivariate logistic regression analyses, DM and
retinopathy
rather than DM only were significantly associated with increased risk for CI,
executive dysfunction, impaired immediate memory and visuospatial skill, odds
ratios(ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were 2.09[1.11,3.92],
2.89[1.55,5.37],
2.16 [1.15,4.06] and 2.37[1.32,4.22], respectively (all P < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS:
Diabetic PD patients with retinopathy were at two times risk for overall
cognitive impairment, executive dysfunction, impaired immediate memory and
visuospatial skill as compared to non-diabetic PD patients.
FAU - Liao, Jin-Lan
AU - Liao JL
AD - Renal Division, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, China.
FAU - Xiong, Zu-Ying
AU - Xiong ZY
AD - Renal Division, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, China.
FAU - Yang, Zhi-Kai
AU - Yang ZK
AD - Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Peking University First Hospital;
Institute of Nephrology, Peking University; Key Laboratory of Renal Disease,
Ministry of Health; Key Laboratory of Renal Disease, Ministry of Education,
Beijing, China.
FAU - Hao, Li
AU - Hao L
AD - Renal Division, the Second Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Anhui,
China.
FAU - Liu, Gui-Ling
AU - Liu GL
AD - Renal Division, the Second Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Anhui,
China.
FAU - Ren, Ye-Ping
AU - Ren YP
AD - Renal Division, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University,
Heilongjiang, China.
FAU - Wang, Qin
AU - Wang Q
AD - Renal Division, Handan Central Hospital, Hebei, China.
FAU - Duan, Li-Ping
AU - Duan LP
AD - Renal Division, Handan Central Hospital, Hebei, China.
FAU - Zheng, Zhao-Xia
AU - Zheng ZX
AD - Renal Division, Handan Central Hospital, Hebei, China.
FAU - Dong, Jie
AU - Dong J
AD - Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Peking University First Hospital;
Institute of Nephrology, Peking University; Key Laboratory of Renal Disease,
Ministry of Health; Key Laboratory of Renal Disease, Ministry of Education,
Beijing, China.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Multicenter Study
DEP - 20170831
PL - United States
TA - PLoS One
JT - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Amnesia, Anterograde/complications/*diagnosis/physiopathology/therapy
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/complications/*diagnosis/physiopathology/therapy
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications/*diagnosis/physiopathology/therapy
MH - Diabetic Retinopathy/complications/*diagnosis/physiopathology/therapy
MH - Executive Function/physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications/*diagnosis/physiopathology/therapy
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Odds Ratio
MH - Peritoneal Dialysis
MH - Risk Factors
MH - Space Perception/physiology
MH - Speech/physiology
PMC - PMC5578503
EDAT- 2017/09/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/10/17 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/01 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/08/15 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/09/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/09/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/10/17 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0183965 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-50909 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - PLoS One. 2017 Aug 31;12(8):e0183965. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0183965.
eCollection 2017.

PMID- 28854849
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180906
LR - 20180906
IS - 1747-0226 (Electronic)
IS - 1747-0218 (Linking)
VI - 71
IP - 4
DP - 2018 Apr
TI - Spontaneous retrieval reveals right-ear advantage in prospective memory.
PG - 940-948
LID - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1307867 [doi]
AB - The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of individual costs on
prospective memory performance. Individual costs were assessed by contrasting
participants with high costs and those with low costs. Specifically, we
tested
whether prospective memory performance is moderated by costs, cue-focality
and
intention specificity. Participants performed a dichotic listening paradigm
where
they had to indicate whether a word presented to one ear was abstract or
concrete
while ignoring the word presented to the other ear. For the prospective
memory
task, participants had to detect target items; half of them were presented
focally to the same ear as the relevant words for the ongoing task and half
of
them were presented non-focally to the other ear. Moreover, half of the
participants were given specific instructions and the other half were given
categorical instructions. The results revealed a right-ear advantage for
participants with low costs but not for participants with high costs.
Moreover,
the absence of costs was not necessarily accompanied by worse prospective
memory
performance. Given differential results under the same task conditions, we
conclude that individual costs are an important factor which should be
considered
when investigating prospective memory processes.
FAU - Rothen, Nicolas
AU - Rothen N
AD - 1 Institute of Psychology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
AD - 2 Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory, University of Bern, Bern,
Switzerland.
FAU - Meier, Beat
AU - Meier B
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3303-6854
AD - 1 Institute of Psychology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
AD - 2 Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory, University of Bern, Bern,
Switzerland.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20180101
PL - England
TA - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)
JT - Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)
JID - 101259775
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Attention/*physiology
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - Cues
MH - Dichotic Listening Tests
MH - Ear/physiology
MH - Female
MH - Functional Laterality/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Episodic
MH - Mental Recall/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - Vocabulary
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Intention memory
OT - dichotic hearing
OT - dichotic listening
OT - individual differences
OT - monitoring
OT - right-ear advantage
OT - spontaneous retrieval
EDAT- 2017/09/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/09/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/01 06:00
PHST- 2017/09/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/09/07 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/09/01 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1307867 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2018 Apr;71(4):940-948. doi:
10.1080/17470218.2017.1307867. Epub 2018 Jan 1.

PMID- 28821674
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171010
LR - 20181113
IS - 1529-2401 (Electronic)
IS - 0270-6474 (Linking)
VI - 37
IP - 39
DP - 2017 Sep 27
TI - How Auditory Experience Differentially Influences the Function of Left and
Right
Superior Temporal Cortices.
PG - 9564-9573
LID - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0846-17.2017 [doi]
AB - To investigate how hearing status, sign language experience, and task demands
influence functional responses in the human superior temporal cortices (STC)
we
collected fMRI data from deaf and hearing participants (male and female), who
either acquired sign language early or late in life. Our stimuli in all tasks
were pictures of objects. We varied the linguistic and visuospatial
processing
demands in three different tasks that involved decisions about (1) the
sublexical
(phonological) structure of the British Sign Language (BSL) signs for the
objects, (2) the semantic category of the objects, and (3) the physical
features
of the objects.Neuroimaging data revealed that in participants who were deaf
from
birth, STC showed increased activation during visual processing tasks.
Importantly, this differed across hemispheres. Right STC was consistently
activated regardless of the task whereas left STC was sensitive to task
demands.
Significant activation was detected in the left STC only for the BSL
phonological
task. This task, we argue, placed greater demands on visuospatial processing
than
the other two tasks. In hearing signers, enhanced activation was absent in
both
left and right STC during all three tasks. Lateralization analyses
demonstrated
that the effect of deafness was more task-dependent in the left than the
right
STC whereas it was more task-independent in the right than the left STC.
These
findings indicate how the absence of auditory input from birth leads to
dissociable and altered functions of left and right STC in deaf
participants.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Those born deaf can offer unique insights
into neuroplasticity, in particular in regions of superior temporal cortex
(STC)
that primarily respond to auditory input in hearing people. Here we
demonstrate
that in those deaf from birth the left and the right STC have altered and
dissociable functions. The right STC was activated regardless of demands on
visual processing. In contrast, the left STC was sensitive to the demands of
visuospatial processing. Furthermore, hearing signers, with the same sign
language experience as the deaf participants, did not activate the STCs. Our
data
advance current understanding of neural plasticity by determining the
differential effects that hearing status and task demands can have on left
and
right STC function.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Twomey et al.
FAU - Twomey, Tae
AU - Twomey T
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9749-5895
AD - ESRC Deafness, Cognition and Language Research Centre, University College
London,
WC1H 0PD, United Kingdom.
AD - Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, WC1N 3AR,
United
Kingdom.
FAU - Waters, Dafydd
AU - Waters D
AD - ESRC Deafness, Cognition and Language Research Centre, University College
London,
WC1H 0PD, United Kingdom.
FAU - Price, Cathy J
AU - Price CJ
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7448-4835
AD - Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University
College London, WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom, and.
FAU - Evans, Samuel
AU - Evans S
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9667-0671
AD - Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, WC1N 3AR,
United
Kingdom.
AD - Psychology Department, University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street,
London, W1W 6UW.
FAU - MacSweeney, Mairead
AU - MacSweeney M
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2315-3507
AD - ESRC Deafness, Cognition and Language Research Centre, University College
London,
WC1H 0PD, United Kingdom, m.macsweeney@ucl.ac.uk.
AD - Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, WC1N 3AR,
United
Kingdom.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170818
PL - United States
TA - J Neurosci
JT - The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for
Neuroscience
JID - 8102140
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - *Auditory Perception
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - Deafness/*physiopathology
MH - Female
MH - *Functional Laterality
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Semantics
MH - *Sign Language
MH - Temporal Lobe/*physiology/physiopathology
MH - Visual Perception
PMC - PMC5618270
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - deaf
OT - language
OT - plasticity
OT - sign language
OT - superior temporal cortex
OT - visuo-spatial working memory
EDAT- 2017/08/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/10/11 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/20 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/28 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/25 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/07/27 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/20 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/10/11 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/20 06:00 [entrez]
AID - JNEUROSCI.0846-17.2017 [pii]
AID - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0846-17.2017 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Neurosci. 2017 Sep 27;37(39):9564-9573. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0846-
17.2017.
Epub 2017 Aug 18.
PMID- 28793161
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180430
LR - 20180430
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 8
DP - 2017 Aug 16
TI - Visuospatial and Verbal Short-Term Memory Correlates of Vocabulary Ability in
Preschool Children.
PG - 2249-2258
LID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0285 [doi]
AB - Background: Recent studies indicate that school-age children's patterns of
performance on measures of verbal and visuospatial short-term memory (STM)
and
working memory (WM) differ across types of neurodevelopmental disorders.
Because
these disorders are often characterized by early language delay,
administering
STM and WM tests to toddlers could improve prediction of neurodevelopmental
outcomes. Toddler-appropriate verbal, but not visuospatial, STM and WM tasks
are
available. A toddler-appropriate visuospatial STM test is introduced. Method:
Tests of verbal STM, visuospatial STM, expressive vocabulary, and receptive
vocabulary were administered to 92 English-speaking children aged 2-5 years.
Results: Mean test scores did not differ for boys and girls. Visuospatial and
verbal STM scores were not significantly correlated when age was partialed
out.
Age, visuospatial STM scores, and verbal STM scores accounted for unique
variance
in expressive (51%, 3%, and 4%, respectively) and receptive vocabulary scores
(53%, 5%, and 2%, respectively) in multiple regression analyses. Conclusion:
Replication studies, a fuller test battery comprising visuospatial and verbal
STM
and WM tests, and a general intelligence test are required before exploring
the
usefulness of these STM tests for predicting longitudinal outcomes. The lack
of
an association between the STM tests suggests that the instruments have face
validity and test independent STM skills.
FAU - Stokes, Stephanie F
AU - Stokes SF
AD - University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam.
FAU - Klee, Thomas
AU - Klee T
AD - University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam.
FAU - Kornisch, Myriam
AU - Kornisch M
AD - McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Furlong, Lisa
AU - Furlong L
AD - LaTrobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Age Factors
MH - Child Language
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Regression Analysis
MH - *Space Perception
MH - *Vocabulary
EDAT- 2017/08/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/01 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/10 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/13 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/27 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/01 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2648886 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0285 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Aug 16;60(8):2249-2258. doi:
10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0285.

PMID- 28785770
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180430
LR - 20180430
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 8
DP - 2017 Aug 16
TI - Beyond Sentences: Using the Expression, Reception, and Recall of Narratives
Instrument to Assess Communication in School-Aged Children With Autism
Spectrum
Disorder.
PG - 2228-2240
LID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0168 [doi]
AB - Purpose: Impairments in the social use of language are universal in autism
spectrum disorder (ASD), but few standardized measures evaluate communication
skills above the level of individual words or sentences. This study evaluated
the
Expression, Reception, and Recall of Narrative Instrument (ERRNI; Bishop,
2004)
to determine its contribution to assessing language and communicative
impairment
beyond the sentence level in children with ASD. Method: A battery of
assessments,
including measures of cognition, language, pragmatics, severity of autism
symptoms, and adaptive functioning, was administered to 74 8- to 9-year-old
intellectually able children with ASD. Results: Average performance on the
ERRNI
was significantly poorer than on the Clinical Evaluation of Language
Fundamentals-Fourth Edition (CELF-4). In addition, ERRNI scores reflecting
the
number and quality of relevant story components included in the participants'
narratives were significantly positively related to scores on measures of
nonverbal cognitive skill, language, and everyday adaptive communication, and
significantly negatively correlated with the severity of affective autism
symptoms. Conclusion: Results suggest that the ERRNI reveals discourse
impairments that may not be identified by measures that focus on individual
words
and sentences. Overall, the ERRNI provides a useful measure of communicative
skill beyond the sentence level in school-aged children with ASD.
FAU - Volden, Joanne
AU - Volden J
AD - University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
FAU - Dodd, Erin
AU - Dodd E
AD - University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
FAU - Engel, Kathleen
AU - Engel K
AD - University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
FAU - Smith, Isabel M
AU - Smith IM
AD - Dalhousie University and Isaak Walton Killam Children's Hospital, Halifax,
NS,
Canada.
FAU - Szatmari, Peter
AU - Szatmari P
AD - University of Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Fombonne, Eric
AU - Fombonne E
AD - Oregon Health & Science University, Portland.
FAU - Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie
AU - Zwaigenbaum L
AD - University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
FAU - Mirenda, Pat
AU - Mirenda P
AD - University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
FAU - Bryson, Susan
AU - Bryson S
AD - Dalhousie University and Isaak Walton Killam Children's Hospital, Halifax,
NS,
Canada.
FAU - Roberts, Wendy
AU - Roberts W
AD - University of Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Vaillancourt, Tracy
AU - Vaillancourt T
AD - University of Ottawa, ON, Canada.
FAU - Waddell, Charlotte
AU - Waddell C
AD - Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
FAU - Elsabbagh, Mayada
AU - Elsabbagh M
AD - McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
FAU - Bennett, Teresa
AU - Bennett T
AD - McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
FAU - Georgiades, Stelios
AU - Georgiades S
AD - McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
FAU - Duku, Eric
AU - Duku E
AD - McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
CN - Pathways in ASD study team
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Autism Spectrum Disorder/*diagnosis/*psychology
MH - Child
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Mental Recall
MH - *Narration
MH - *Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Speech Perception
EDAT- 2017/08/09 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/01 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/09 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/26 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/01 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/09 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2648607 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0168 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Aug 16;60(8):2228-2240. doi:
10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0168.

PMID- 28780400
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180731
LR - 20180913
IS - 1095-9572 (Electronic)
IS - 1053-8119 (Linking)
VI - 163
DP - 2017 Dec
TI - Visual cortical networks align with behavioral measures of context-
sensitivity in
early childhood.
PG - 413-418
LID - S1053-8119(17)30655-9 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.08.008 [doi]
AB - This study investigates how visual cortical networks align with
context-sensitivity, namely the relative focus on the object versus the
background of a visual scene, in early childhood. Context-sensitivity was
assessed by a picture description and a recognition memory task. To segregate
object and background processing in the visual cortex in 5- and 7-year-old
children, object and background were presented at different frequencies (12
Hz or
15 Hz), evoking disparate neuronal responses (steady state visually evoked
potentials, SSVEPs) in the electroencephalogram. In younger compared to older
children the background elicited higher SSVEPs. Visual cortical processing of
object versus background was associated with behavioral measures for older
but
not for younger children. This relation was strongest for verbal descriptions
and
generalized to the cortical processing of abstract stimuli and object and
background presented alone. Thus, visual cortical networks restructure and
align
with behavioral measures of context-sensitivity in early childhood.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Koster, Moritz
AU - Koster M
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Munster, Fliednerstrasse 21, 48149
Munster, Germany; Institute of Psychology, Free University Berlin,
Habelschwerdter Allee 45, 14195 Berlin, Germany. Electronic address:
moritz.koester@uni-muenster.de.
FAU - Castel, Johanna
AU - Castel J
AD - Institute of Cognitive Science, Osnabruck University, Wachsbleiche 27, 49090
Osnabruck, Germany.
FAU - Gruber, Thomas
AU - Gruber T
AD - Institute of Psychology, Osnabruck University, Seminarstrasse 20, 49074
Osnabruck, Germany.
FAU - Kartner, Joscha
AU - Kartner J
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Munster, Fliednerstrasse 21, 48149
Munster, Germany.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170802
PL - United States
TA - Neuroimage
JT - NeuroImage
JID - 9215515
SB - IM
MH - Child
MH - Child Development/*physiology
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Evoked Potentials, Visual/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Visual Cortex/*physiology
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Brain development
OT - *Cultural learning
OT - *Holistic and analytic perception
OT - *Language restructures cognition
EDAT- 2017/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/08/01 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/09 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/04 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/08/01 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/08/01 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1053-8119(17)30655-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.08.008 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuroimage. 2017 Dec;163:413-418. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.08.008. Epub
2017 Aug 2.

PMID- 28780308
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180530
LR - 20180530
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 104
DP - 2017 Sep
TI - Faster native vowel discrimination learning in musicians is mediated by an
optimization of mnemonic functions.
PG - 64-75
LID - S0028-3932(17)30289-0 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.08.001 [doi]
AB - The ability to discriminate phonemes varying in spectral and temporal
attributes
constitutes one of the most basic intrinsic elements underlying language
learning
mechanisms. Since previous work has consistently shown that professional
musicians are characterized by perceptual and cognitive advantages in a
variety
of language-related tasks, and since vowels can be considered musical sounds
within the domain of speech, here we investigated the behavioral and
electrophysiological correlates of native vowel discrimination learning in a
sample of professional musicians and non-musicians. We evaluated the
contribution
of both the neurophysiological underpinnings of perceptual (i.e., N1/P2
complex)
and mnemonic functions (i.e., N400 and P600 responses) while the participants
were instructed to judge whether pairs of native consonant-vowel (CV)
syllables
manipulated in the first formant transition of the vowel (i.e., from /tu/ to
/to/) were identical or not. Results clearly demonstrated faster learning in
musicians, compared to non-musicians, as reflected by shorter reaction times
and
higher accuracy. Most notably, in terms of morphology, time course, and
voltage
strength, this steeper learning curve was accompanied by distinctive N400 and
P600 manifestations between the two groups. In contrast, we did not reveal
any
group differences during the early stages of auditory processing (i.e., N1/P2
complex), suggesting that faster learning was mediated by an optimization of
mnemonic but not perceptual functions. Based on a clear taxonomy of the
mnemonic
functions involved in the task, results are interpreted as pointing to a
relationship between faster learning mechanisms in musicians and an
optimization
of echoic (i.e., N400 component) and working memory (i.e., P600 component)
functions.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Elmer, Stefan
AU - Elmer S
AD - Institute of Psychology, Division Neuropsychology, University of Zurich,
Switzerland. Electronic address: s.elmer@psychologie.uzh.ch.
FAU - Greber, Marielle
AU - Greber M
AD - Institute of Psychology, Division Neuropsychology, University of Zurich,
Switzerland. Electronic address: marielle.greber@uzh.ch.
FAU - Pushparaj, Arethy
AU - Pushparaj A
AD - Institute of Psychology, Division Neuropsychology, University of Zurich,
Switzerland. Electronic address: arethy.pushparaj@access.uzh.ch.
FAU - Kuhnis, Jurg
AU - Kuhnis J
AD - Institute of Psychology, Division Neuropsychology, University of Zurich,
Switzerland. Electronic address: juerg.kuehnis@bluewin.ch.
FAU - Jancke, Lutz
AU - Jancke L
AD - Institute of Psychology, Division Neuropsychology, University of Zurich,
Switzerland; Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of
Zurich, Switzerland; International Normal Aging and Plasticity Imaging Center
(INAPIC), University of Zurich, Switzerland; University Research Priority
Program
(URPP) "Dynamic of Healthy Aging", University of Zurich, Switzerland;
Department
of Special Education, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
Electronic
address: lutz.jaencke@uzh.ch.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170803
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adult
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Cognition/physiology
MH - Discrimination Learning/*physiology
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Evoked Potentials, Auditory/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Music
MH - Phonetics
MH - Pitch Perception/*physiology
MH - Psychometrics
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Auditory perception
OT - EEG
OT - Mnemonic functions
OT - Phonetic discrimination learning
EDAT- 2017/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/31 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/21 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/11 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/08/02 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/31 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(17)30289-0 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.08.001 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2017 Sep;104:64-75. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.08.001. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

PMID- 28779944
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180716
LR - 20180716
IS - 1873-6947 (Electronic)
IS - 1744-3881 (Linking)
VI - 28
DP - 2017 Aug
TI - Effect of yoga and working memory training on cognitive communicative
abilities
among middle aged adults.
PG - 92-100
LID - S1744-3881(17)30112-3 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.ctcp.2017.05.007 [doi]
AB - Several studies have reported improvements in cognitive communicative
abilities
with working memory training and alternative therapeutic methods conducted
separately. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of combining
yoga
and working memory training among healthy middle aged adults. A total of 45
participants were randomly assigned into three groups. Group 1 received both
yoga
and working memory training, group 2 received only working memory training
and
group 3 served as the control group. Working memory training was provided on
six
tasks. Yoga training involved pranayamas and mudras. Effects of training were
assessed along with the self-perceptual rating of the participants towards
training. Results reveal greater training effects among group 1 participants,
followed by group 2 and group 3. Group 1 also reported better perception of
training (p < 0.05) than group 2. The study highlights that yoga is not only
an
alternative approach, but also augmentative in improving cognitive
communicative
abilities.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Namratha, H G
AU - Namratha HG
AD - Dept. of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Kasturba Medical College,
Manipal University, Mangalore, India.
FAU - George, Vinitha Mary
AU - George VM
AD - Dept. of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Kasturba Medical College,
Manipal University, Mangalore, India.
FAU - Bajaj, Gagan
AU - Bajaj G
AD - Dept. of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Kasturba Medical College,
Manipal University, Mangalore, India. Electronic address:
ggn1.bajaj@gmail.com.
FAU - Mridula, J
AU - Mridula J
AD - Dept. of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Kasturba Medical College,
Manipal University, Mangalore, India.
FAU - Bhat, Jayashree S
AU - Bhat JS
AD - Dept. of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Kasturba Medical College,
Manipal University, Mangalore, India.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Randomized Controlled Trial
DEP - 20170520
PL - England
TA - Complement Ther Clin Pract
JT - Complementary therapies in clinical practice
JID - 101225531
SB - N
MH - Adult
MH - *Cognition
MH - *Communication
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Learning
MH - Male
MH - Meditation/*psychology
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Yoga/*psychology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Alternative therapeutic approach
OT - Mudras
OT - Pranayamas
OT - Working memory
OT - Yoga
EDAT- 2017/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/17 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/18 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/05/16 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/05/17 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/17 06:00 [medline]
AID - S1744-3881(17)30112-3 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.ctcp.2017.05.007 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2017 Aug;28:92-100. doi:
10.1016/j.ctcp.2017.05.007.
Epub 2017 May 20.

PMID- 28763806
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180430
LR - 20180430
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 8
DP - 2017 Aug 16
TI - Noise Equally Degrades Central Auditory Processing in 2- and 4-Year-Old
Children.
PG - 2297-2309
LID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0267 [doi]
AB - Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate developmental and noise-
induced
changes in central auditory processing indexed by event-related potentials in
typically developing children. Method: P1, N2, and N4 responses as well as
mismatch negativities (MMNs) were recorded for standard syllables and
consonants,
frequency, intensity, vowel, and vowel duration changes in silent and noisy
conditions in the same 14 children at the ages of 2 and 4 years. Results: The
P1
and N2 latencies decreased and the N2, N4, and MMN amplitudes increased with
development of the children. The amplitude changes were strongest at frontal
electrodes. At both ages, background noise decreased the P1 amplitude,
increased
the N2 amplitude, and shortened the N4 latency. The noise-induced amplitude
changes of P1, N2, and N4 were strongest frontally. Furthermore, background
noise
degraded the MMN. At both ages, MMN was significantly elicited only by the
consonant change, and at the age of 4 years, also by the vowel duration
change
during noise. Conclusions: Developmental changes indexing maturation of
central
auditory processing were found from every response studied. Noise degraded
sound
encoding and echoic memory and impaired auditory discrimination at both ages.
The
older children were as vulnerable to the impact of noise as the younger
children.
Supplemental materials: https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5233939.
FAU - Niemitalo-Haapola, Elina
AU - Niemitalo-Haapola E
AD - Child Language Research Center, Faculty of Humanities, University of Oulu,
Finland.
AD - Clinical Neurophysiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
FAU - Haapala, Sini
AU - Haapala S
AD - Clinical Neurophysiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
AD - Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku,
Finland.
FAU - Kujala, Teija
AU - Kujala T
AD - Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University
of
Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Raappana, Antti
AU - Raappana A
AD - PEDEGO Research Unit, University of Oulu, Finland.
AD - Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of
Clinical
Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
FAU - Kujala, Tiia
AU - Kujala T
AD - PEDEGO Research Unit, University of Oulu, Finland.
AD - Medical Research Center Oulu, Finland.
FAU - Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira
AU - Jansson-Verkasalo E
AD - Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku,
Finland.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Auditory Pathways/growth & development/physiology
MH - Brain/*growth & development/*physiology
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Discrimination (Psychology)/physiology
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Evoked Potentials, Auditory/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Follow-Up Studies
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Noise
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
EDAT- 2017/08/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/01 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/02 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/23 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/04 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/01 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2647677 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0267 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Aug 16;60(8):2297-2309. doi:
10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0267.

PMID- 28763509
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171017
LR - 20181113
IS - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI - 12
IP - 8
DP - 2017
TI - Mediterranean diet and cognitive health: Initial results from the Hellenic
Longitudinal Investigation of Ageing and Diet.
PG - e0182048
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0182048 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean dietary pattern has been associated with a
decreased risk of many degenerative diseases and cognitive function in
particular; however, relevant information from Mediterranean regions, where
the
prototype Mediterranean diet is typically adhered to, have been very limited.
Additionally, predefined Mediterranean diet (MeDi) scores with use of a
priori
cut-offs have been used very rarely, limiting comparisons between different
populations and thus external validity of the associations. Finally,
associations
between individual components of MeDi (i.e., food groups, macronutrients) and
particular aspects of cognitive performance have rarely been explored. We
evaluated the association of adherence to an a priori defined Mediterranean
dietary pattern and its components with dementia and specific aspects of
cognitive function in a representative population cohort in Greece. METHODS:
Participants from the Hellenic Longitudinal Investigation of Ageing and Diet
(HELIAD), an on-going population-based study, exploring potential
associations
between diet and cognitive performance in a representative sample from Greek
regions, were included in this analysis. Diagnosis of dementia was made by a
full
clinical and neuropsychological evaluation, while cognitive performance was
assessed according to five cognitive domains (memory, language, attention-
speed,
executive functioning, visuospatial perception) and a composite cognitive
score.
Adherence to MeDi was evaluated by an a priori score (range 0-55), derived
from a
detailed food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: Among 1,865 individuals (mean
age
73+/-6 years, 41% male), 90 were diagnosed with dementia and 223 with mild
cognitive impairment. Each unit increase in the Mediterranean dietary score
(MedDietScore) was associated with a 10% decrease in the odds for dementia.
Adherence to the MeDi was also associated with better performance in memory,
language, visuospatial perception and the composite cognitive score; the
associations were strongest for memory. Fish consumption was negatively
associated with dementia and cognitive performance positively associated with
non-refined cereal consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that
adherence
to the MeDi is associated with better cognitive performance and lower
dementia
rates in Greek elders. Thus, the MeDi in its a priori constructed prototype
form
may have cognitive benefits in traditional Mediterranean populations.
FAU - Anastasiou, Costas A
AU - Anastasiou CA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3536-3034
AD - Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
AD - Eginition Hospital, 1st Neurology Clinic, Department of Social
Medicine,Psychiatry and Neurology, National and Kapodistrian University of
Athens, Athens, Greece.
FAU - Yannakoulia, Mary
AU - Yannakoulia M
AD - Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
FAU - Kosmidis, Mary H
AU - Kosmidis MH
AD - Laboratoty of Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Aristotle
University
of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
FAU - Dardiotis, Efthimios
AU - Dardiotis E
AD - School of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece.
FAU - Hadjigeorgiou, Giorgos M
AU - Hadjigeorgiou GM
AD - School of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece.
FAU - Sakka, Paraskevi
AU - Sakka P
AD - Athens Association of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders, Marousi,
Greece.
FAU - Arampatzi, Xanthi
AU - Arampatzi X
AD - Laboratoty of Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Aristotle
University
of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
FAU - Bougea, Anastasia
AU - Bougea A
AD - Eginition Hospital, 1st Neurology Clinic, Athens, Greece.
FAU - Labropoulos, Ioannis
AU - Labropoulos I
AD - Biomedicine Diagnostic Laboratory, Athens, Greece.
FAU - Scarmeas, Nikolaos
AU - Scarmeas N
AD - Eginition Hospital, 1st Neurology Clinic, Department of Social
Medicine,Psychiatry and Neurology, National and Kapodistrian University of
Athens, Athens, Greece.
AD - Taub Institute for Research in Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, the
Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Department of Neurology, Columbia University,
New
York, New York, United States of America.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170801
PL - United States
TA - PLoS One
JT - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aging
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*epidemiology
MH - *Cognition
MH - Cognition Disorders/*epidemiology
MH - Dementia/*epidemiology
MH - *Diet, Mediterranean
MH - Female
MH - Genotype
MH - Greece/epidemiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
PMC - PMC5538737
EDAT- 2017/08/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/10/19 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/02 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/11 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/02 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/08/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/10/19 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0182048 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-17-01168 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - PLoS One. 2017 Aug 1;12(8):e0182048. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0182048.
eCollection 2017.

PMID- 28736204
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180424
LR - 20181113
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 103
DP - 2017 Aug
TI - Neural stability: A reflection of automaticity in reading.
PG - 162-167
LID - S0028-3932(17)30276-2 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.07.023 [doi]
AB - Automaticity, the ability to perform a task rapidly with minimal effort,
plays a
key role in reading fluency and is indexed by rapid automatized naming (RAN)
and
processing speed. Yet little is known about automaticity's neurophysiologic
underpinnings. The more efficiently sound is encoded, the more automatic
sound
processing can be. In turn, this automaticity could free up cognitive
resources
such as attention and working memory to help build an integrative reading
network. Therefore, we hypothesized that automaticity and reading fluency
correlate with stable neural representation of sounds, given a larger body of
literature suggesting the close relationship between neural stability and the
integrative function in the central auditory system. To test this hypothesis,
we
recorded the frequency-following responses (FFR) to speech syllables and
administered cognitive and reading measures to school-aged children. We show
that
the stability of neural responses to speech correlates with RAN and
processing
speed, but not phonological awareness. Moreover, the link between neural
stability and RAN mediates the previously-determined link between neural
stability and reading ability. Children with a RAN deficit have especially
unstable neural responses. Our neurophysiological approach illuminates a
potential neural mechanism specific to RAN, which in turn indicates a
relationship between synchronous neural firing in the auditory system and
automaticity critical for reading fluency.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Lam, Silvia Siu-Yin
AU - Lam SS
AD - Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA;
Department of Communication Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL,
USA.
FAU - White-Schwoch, Travis
AU - White-Schwoch T
AD - Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA;
Department of Communication Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL,
USA.
FAU - Zecker, Steven G
AU - Zecker SG
AD - Department of Communication Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL,
USA.
FAU - Hornickel, Jane
AU - Hornickel J
AD - Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA;
Department of Communication Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL,
USA.
FAU - Kraus, Nina
AU - Kraus N
AD - Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA;
Department of Communication Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL,
USA;
Institute for Neuroscience, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA;
Department of Neurobiology and Physiology, Northwestern University, Evanston,
IL,
USA; Department of Otolaryngology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL,
USA.
Electronic address: nkraus@northwestern.edu.
LA - eng
GR - R01 DC001510/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 HD069414/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170721
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - Brain Waves/*physiology
MH - Child
MH - Dyslexia/physiopathology/psychology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Neutralization Tests
MH - *Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology
MH - Phonetics
MH - *Reading
PMC - PMC5565231
MID - NIHMS896532
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Automaticity
OT - Neural stability
OT - Rapid automatized naming
OT - Reading fluency
EDAT- 2017/07/25 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/25 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/25 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/17 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/05/11 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/07/20 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/25 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/25 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/25 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(17)30276-2 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.07.023 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2017 Aug;103:162-167. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.07.023. Epub 2017 Jul 21.
PMID- 28731448
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180412
LR - 20181113
IS - 1875-8908 (Electronic)
IS - 1387-2877 (Linking)
VI - 59
IP - 4
DP - 2017
TI - Left Frontal Hub Connectivity during Memory Performance Supports Reserve in
Aging
and Mild Cognitive Impairment.
PG - 1381-1392
LID - 10.3233/JAD-170360 [doi]
AB - Reserve in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is defined as maintaining
cognition
at a relatively high level in the presence of neurodegeneration, an ability
often
associated with higher education among other life factors. Recent evidence
suggests that higher resting-state functional connectivity within the
frontoparietal control network, specifically the left frontal cortex (LFC)
hub,
contributes to higher reserve. Following up these previous resting-state fMRI
findings, we probed memory-task related functional connectivity of the LFC
hub as
a neural substrate of reserve. In elderly controls (CN, n = 37) and patients
with
mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 17), we assessed global connectivity of
the
LFC hub during successful face-name association learning, using generalized
psychophysiological interaction analyses. Reserve was quantified as
residualized
memory performance, accounted for gender and proxies of neurodegeneration
(age,
hippocampus atrophy, and APOE genotype). We found that greater education was
associated with higher LFC-connectivity in both CN and MCI during successful
memory. Furthermore, higher LFC-connectivity predicted higher residualized
memory
(i.e., reserve). These results suggest that higher LFC-connectivity
contributes
to reserve in both healthy and pathological aging.
FAU - Franzmeier, Nicolai
AU - Franzmeier N
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Hartmann, Julia C
AU - Hartmann JC
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Taylor, Alexander N W
AU - Taylor ANW
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
FAU - Araque Caballero, Miguel A
AU - Araque Caballero MA
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Simon-Vermot, Lee
AU - Simon-Vermot L
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Buerger, Katharina
AU - Buerger K
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
AD - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE, Munich), Munich, Germany.
FAU - Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Lana M
AU - Kambeitz-Ilankovic LM
AD - Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat
LMU,
Munich, Germany.
FAU - Ertl-Wagner, Birgit
AU - Ertl-Wagner B
AD - Institute for Clinical Radiology, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Mueller, Claudia
AU - Mueller C
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Catak, Cihan
AU - Catak C
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Janowitz, Daniel
AU - Janowitz D
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Stahl, Robert
AU - Stahl R
AD - Institute for Clinical Radiology, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Dichgans, Martin
AU - Dichgans M
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
AD - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE, Munich), Munich, Germany.
AD - Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich, Germany.
FAU - Duering, Marco
AU - Duering M
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
FAU - Ewers, Michael
AU - Ewers M
AD - Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Klinikum der Universitat Munchen,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat LMU, Munich, Germany.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Alzheimers Dis
JT - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
JID - 9814863
RN - 0 (Apolipoproteins E)
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aging/*pathology
MH - Apolipoproteins E/genetics
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnostic imaging/genetics/*pathology
MH - Face
MH - Female
MH - Frontal Lobe/diagnostic imaging/*pathology
MH - Functional Laterality/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Memory/*physiology
MH - Names
MH - Nerve Net/diagnostic imaging/*pathology
MH - Neural Pathways/diagnostic imaging
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology
MH - Sex Factors
PMC - PMC5611800
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Aging
OT - cognitive reserve
OT - education
OT - functional connectivity
OT - memory
OT - mild cognitive impairment
OT - task-fMRI
EDAT- 2017/07/22 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/13 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/22 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/22 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/13 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/22 06:00 [entrez]
AID - JAD170360 [pii]
AID - 10.3233/JAD-170360 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;59(4):1381-1392. doi: 10.3233/JAD-170360.

PMID- 28710824
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180927
LR - 20180927
IS - 1749-4486 (Electronic)
IS - 1749-4478 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 1
DP - 2018 Feb
TI - A novel study on association between untreated hearing loss and cognitive
functions of older adults: Baseline non-verbal cognitive assessment results.
PG - 182-191
LID - 10.1111/coa.12937 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is highly prevalent in older
adults,
and more than two-thirds above age of 70 years suffer from ARHL. Recent
studies
have established a link between ARHL and cognitive impairment; however, most
of
the studies have used verbally loaded cognitive measures to investigate the
association between ARHL and cognition. It is possible that due to hearing
impairment, the elderly may experience difficulty in following verbal
instructions or completing tasks that heavily rely on hearing during
cognitive
assessments. This may result in overestimation of cognitive impairment in
such
individuals. This baseline cross-sectional study investigated the
associations
between untreated hearing loss and a number of cognitive functions using a
battery of non-verbal cognitive tests. Further, association between hearing
loss
and psychological status of older adults was examined. STUDY DESIGN:
Prospective
case-controlled study. METHODS: A total of 119 participants (54 males,
M=66.33+/-10.50 years; 65 females M=61.51+/-11.46 years) were recruited. All
participants completed a hearing assessment, a computerised test battery of
non-verbal cognitive functions and the depression, anxiety and stress scale.
RESULTS: Hierarchical multiple regression analysis results revealed that
hearing
thresholds significantly associated with the working memory (P<0.05), paired
associative learning scores (P<0.05), depression (P<0.001), and anxiety
(P<0.001)
and stress (P<0.001) scores. Analysis of covariance results revealed that
participants with moderately-severe hearing loss performed significantly
poorer
in paired associative learning and working memory tasks and psychological
function tests compared to those with normal hearing. CONCLUSION: Results of
the
current study suggest a significant relationship between ARHL and both
cognition
and psychological status. Our results also have some implications for using
non-verbal cognitive tests to evaluate cognitive functions in post-lingually
hearing impaired ageing adults, at least for those with more than
moderately-severe levels of hearing loss.
CI - (c) 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
FAU - Jayakody, D M P
AU - Jayakody DMP
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-5814-4355
AD - Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA, Australia.
AD - Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia,
Crawley, WA, Australia.
FAU - Friedland, P L
AU - Friedland PL
AD - Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA, Australia.
AD - Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia,
Crawley, WA, Australia.
AD - Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Skull Base Surgery, Sir Charles
Gairdner
Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
FAU - Eikelboom, R H
AU - Eikelboom RH
AD - Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA, Australia.
AD - Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia,
Crawley, WA, Australia.
AD - Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of
Pretoria,
Pretoria, South Africa.
FAU - Martins, R N
AU - Martins RN
AD - School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA,
Australia.
FAU - Sohrabi, H R
AU - Sohrabi HR
AD - School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA,
Australia.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170801
PL - England
TA - Clin Otolaryngol
JT - Clinical otolaryngology : official journal of ENT-UK ; official journal of
Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgery
JID - 101247023
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aging/*physiology
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - Cognition Disorders/epidemiology/*etiology/physiopathology
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Loss/*complications/epidemiology/psychology
MH - Humans
MH - Incidence
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Prospective Studies
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Western Australia/epidemiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *anxiety
OT - *cognition
OT - *depression
OT - *hearing loss
OT - *stress
EDAT- 2017/07/16 06:00
MHDA- 2018/09/28 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/16 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/09 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/09/28 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/coa.12937 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Clin Otolaryngol. 2018 Feb;43(1):182-191. doi: 10.1111/coa.12937. Epub 2017
Aug
1.

PMID- 28708437
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180604
LR - 20180612
IS - 1708-8186 (Electronic)
IS - 1499-2027 (Linking)
VI - 56
IP - 11
DP - 2017 Nov
TI - Are hearing aid owners able to identify and self-report handling
difficulties? A
pilot study.
PG - 887-893
LID - 10.1080/14992027.2017.1347289 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: Although clinician administered surveys evaluating hearing aid
handling skills exist, the development of a self-administered version may
reduce
clinical load, save consultation time, and facilitate more frequent use than
face-to-face consultations allow. However, there is currently no evidence to
support whether hearing aid owners can accurately self-report hearing aid
handling skills via self-report survey that systematically evaluates the
ability
to accurately perform the individual aspects of hearing aid handling required
for
effective hearing aid management. DESIGN: An explorative pilot study using a
prospective research design. STUDY SAMPLE: Nineteen adult hearing aid owners,
aged between 65 and 93 years. RESULTS: The self-administered survey
demonstrated
high sensitivity when compared with clinician evaluation of skills, with 93%
of
participants accurately self-identifying and reporting whether hearing aid
handling skill training was required. CONCLUSIONS: Hearing aid owners are
able to
accurately self-report hearing aid handling difficulties when provided with
an
itemised list of skills.
FAU - Bennett, Rebecca J
AU - Bennett RJ
AD - a Ear Science Institute Australia , Subiaco , Australia.
AD - b Ear Sciences Centre , The University of Western Australia , Nedlands ,
Australia.
FAU - Meyer, Carly
AU - Meyer C
AD - c School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences , University of Queensland ,
Brisbane , Australia.
FAU - Olaithe, Michelle
AU - Olaithe M
AD - d School of Psychology , The University of Western Australia , Nedlands ,
Australia , and.
FAU - Schmulian, Dunay
AU - Schmulian D
AD - b Ear Sciences Centre , The University of Western Australia , Nedlands ,
Australia.
FAU - Eikelboom, Robert H
AU - Eikelboom RH
AD - a Ear Science Institute Australia , Subiaco , Australia.
AD - b Ear Sciences Centre , The University of Western Australia , Nedlands ,
Australia.
AD - e Department of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology , University of
Pretoria
, Pretoria , South Africa.
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170714
PL - England
TA - Int J Audiol
JT - International journal of audiology
JID - 101140017
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - *Auditory Perception
MH - Equipment Design
MH - Female
MH - Hearing
MH - *Hearing Aids
MH - Hearing Disorders/diagnosis/physiopathology/psychology/*therapy
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Patient Education as Topic
MH - *Patient Satisfaction
MH - Persons With Hearing Impairments/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Pilot Projects
MH - Predictive Value of Tests
MH - Prospective Studies
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - *Self Care
MH - *Self Report
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Hearing aids
OT - *behavioural measures
OT - *emotional
OT - *hearing aid satisfaction
OT - *psychosocial
EDAT- 2017/07/15 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/05 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/15 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/15 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/05 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/15 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/14992027.2017.1347289 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Int J Audiol. 2017 Nov;56(11):887-893. doi: 10.1080/14992027.2017.1347289.
Epub
2017 Jul 14.

PMID- 28704424
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170921
LR - 20181113
IS - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI - 12
IP - 7
DP - 2017
TI - Examining distinct working memory processes in children and adolescents using
fMRI: Results and validation of a modified Brown-Peterson paradigm.
PG - e0179959
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0179959 [doi]
AB - Verbal working memory (WM) comprises different processes (encoding,
maintenance,
retrieval) that are often compromised in brain diseases, but their neural
correlates have not yet been examined in childhood and adolescence. To probe
WM
processes and associated neural correlates in developmental samples, and
obtain
comparable effects across different ages and populations, we designed an
adapted
Brown-Peterson task (verbal encoding and retrieval combined with verbal and
visual concurrent tasks during maintenance) to implement during functional
magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In a sample of typically developing
children
and adolescents (n = 16), aged 8 to 16 years, our paradigm successfully
identified distinct patterns of activation for encoding, maintenance, and
retrieval. While encoding activated perceptual systems in posterior and
ventral
visual regions, retrieval activated fronto-parietal regions associated with
executive control and attention. We found a different impact of verbal versus
visual concurrent processing during WM maintenance: at retrieval, the former
condition evoked greater activations in visual cortex, as opposed to
selective
involvement of language-related areas in left temporal cortex in the latter
condition. These results are in accord with WM models, suggesting greater
competition for processing resources when retrieval follows within-domain
compared with cross-domain interference. This pattern was found regardless of
age. Our study provides a novel paradigm to investigate distinct WM brain
systems
with reliable results across a wide age range in developmental populations,
and
suitable for participants with different WM capacities.
FAU - Siffredi, Vanessa
AU - Siffredi V
AD - University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
AD - Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
AD - University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
FAU - Barrouillet, Pierre
AU - Barrouillet P
AD - University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
FAU - Spencer-Smith, Megan
AU - Spencer-Smith M
AD - Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
AD - Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
FAU - Vaessen, Maarten
AU - Vaessen M
AD - University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
FAU - Anderson, Vicki
AU - Anderson V
AD - Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
AD - University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
AD - Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
FAU - Vuilleumier, Patrik
AU - Vuilleumier P
AD - University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170713
PL - United States
TA - PLoS One
JT - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Attention
MH - Brain Mapping/methods
MH - Child
MH - Executive Function
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging/*methods
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/*physiology
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Parietal Lobe/*diagnostic imaging
MH - Temporal Lobe/*diagnostic imaging
MH - Verbal Learning
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
PMC - PMC5509143
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/22 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/06 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/07 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/09/22 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0179959 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-35744 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - PLoS One. 2017 Jul 13;12(7):e0179959. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0179959.
eCollection 2017.

PMID- 28652059
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180524
LR - 20181113
IS - 1532-8511 (Electronic)
IS - 1052-3057 (Linking)
VI - 26
IP - 11
DP - 2017 Nov
TI - Burden and Predictors of Poststroke Cognitive Impairment in a Sample of
Ghanaian
Stroke Survivors.
PG - 2553-2562
LID - S1052-3057(17)30273-2 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2017.05.041 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: There are limited data on vascular cognitive
impairment
(VCI) from low- and middle-income countries where the stroke burden is
burgeoning. The aim of this study was to characterize the burden,
determinants,
and effects of VCI on health-related quality of life in sub-Saharan Africa
(SSA).
METHODS: From January 2015 to February 2016, we collected information on 147
consecutive stroke survivors (>45 years) seen at a tertiary hospital in Ghana
and
49 demographically matched stroke-free controls. Data collected included
demographics, clinical factors, health-related quality of life, and presence
of
depression. Cognitive status was evaluated using a standard Vascular
Neuropsychological Battery that assessed memory, executive function and
mental
speed, language, and visuospatial-visuoconstructive functioning. Expert VCI
guideline and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth
Edition criteria were used to classify stroke patients into no VCI, VCI but
no
dementia, and vascular dementia (VD). RESULTS: The mean age +/- standard
deviation of the stroke survivors was 59.9 +/- 13.7 years, of which 47.6%
were
women. Among the cohort, 77 out of 147 (52.3%) had no VCI, 50 of the 147
(34.0%)
had VCI without dementia, and 20 of the 147 (13.6%) had VD. Three factors
remained significantly associated with VCI: increasing age for each
successive
10-year rise (odds ratio [OR] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-2.02),
lack of formal education (OR 5.26, 95% CI: 1.01-27.52), and worse functional
disability on the modified Rankin scale (OR 2.46, 95% CI: 1.61-3.75).
Patients
with VD had the poorest health-related quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Half of
the
Ghanaian stroke survivors encountered in this cross-sectional study had
evidence
of cognitive dysfunction. Future studies in SSA will need to identify
strategies
to address this immense burden.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.
FAU - Sarfo, Fred Stephen
AU - Sarfo FS
AD - Department of Medicine, Neurology Division, Kwame Nkrumah University of
Science &
Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; Neurology Unit, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital,
Kumasi, Ghana. Electronic address: stephensarfo78@gmail.com.
FAU - Akassi, John
AU - Akassi J
AD - Department of Medicine, Neurology Division, Kwame Nkrumah University of
Science &
Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; Neurology Unit, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital,
Kumasi, Ghana.
FAU - Adamu, Sheila
AU - Adamu S
AD - Neurology Unit, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana.
FAU - Obese, Vida
AU - Obese V
AD - Neurology Unit, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana.
FAU - Ovbiagele, Bruce
AU - Ovbiagele B
AD - Neurology Department, Medical University of South Carolina, South Carolina.
LA - eng
GR - R21 NS094033/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
GR - R21 TW010479/TW/FIC NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170623
PL - United States
TA - J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis
JT - Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of
National
Stroke Association
JID - 9111633
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Cognition Disorders/*diagnosis/*etiology
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - Executive Function/physiology
MH - Female
MH - Ghana/epidemiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Quality of Life/psychology
MH - Retrospective Studies
MH - Statistics, Nonparametric
MH - Stroke/*complications/epidemiology/mortality/psychology
MH - *Survivors
MH - Visual Perception/physiology
PMC - PMC5624827
MID - NIHMS887945
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Ghana
OT - Vascular dementia
OT - quality of life
OT - risk factors
EDAT- 2017/06/28 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/25 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/28 06:00
PHST- 2017/04/14 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/05/30 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/06/28 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/25 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/06/28 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1052-3057(17)30273-2 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2017.05.041 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2017 Nov;26(11):2553-2562. doi:
10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2017.05.041. Epub 2017 Jun 23.

PMID- 28651255
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180523
LR - 20180523
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 9
DP - 2017 Sep 18
TI - Visual Cues Contribute Differentially to Audiovisual Perception of Consonants
and
Vowels in Improving Recognition and Reducing Cognitive Demands in Listeners
With
Hearing Impairment Using Hearing Aids.
PG - 2687-2703
LID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0160 [doi]
AB - Purpose: We sought to examine the contribution of visual cues in audiovisual
identification of consonants and vowels-in terms of isolation points (the
shortest time required for correct identification of a speech stimulus),
accuracy, and cognitive demands-in listeners with hearing impairment using
hearing aids. Method: The study comprised 199 participants with hearing
impairment (mean age = 61.1 years) with bilateral, symmetrical, mild-to-
severe
sensorineural hearing loss. Gated Swedish consonants and vowels were
presented
aurally and audiovisually to participants. Linear amplification was adjusted
for
each participant to assure audibility. The reading span test was used to
measure
participants' working memory capacity. Results: Audiovisual presentation
resulted
in shortened isolation points and improved accuracy for consonants and vowels
relative to auditory-only presentation. This benefit was more evident for
consonants than vowels. In addition, correlations and subsequent analyses
revealed that listeners with higher scores on the reading span test
identified
both consonants and vowels earlier in auditory-only presentation, but only
vowels
(not consonants) in audiovisual presentation. Conclusion: Consonants and
vowels
differed in terms of the benefits afforded from their associative visual
cues, as
indicated by the degree of audiovisual benefit and reduction in cognitive
demands
linked to the identification of consonants and vowels presented
audiovisually.
FAU - Moradi, Shahram
AU - Moradi S
AD - Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department
of
Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linkoping University, Sweden.
FAU - Lidestam, Bjorn
AU - Lidestam B
AD - Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linkoping University, Sweden.
FAU - Danielsson, Henrik
AU - Danielsson H
AD - Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department
of
Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linkoping University, Sweden.
FAU - Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning
AU - Ng EHN
AD - Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department
of
Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linkoping University, Sweden.
FAU - Ronnberg, Jerker
AU - Ronnberg J
AD - Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department
of
Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linkoping University, Sweden.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Auditory Threshold
MH - Cognition
MH - Female
MH - *Hearing Aids
MH - Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pattern Recognition, Physiological
MH - Persons With Hearing Impairments/psychology
MH - *Phonetics
MH - Psychological Tests
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Severity of Illness Index
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - *Visual Perception
EDAT- 2017/06/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/24 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/27 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/19 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/19 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/06/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/24 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/06/27 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2635215 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0160 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Sep 18;60(9):2687-2703. doi:
10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0160.

PMID- 28649944
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20181012
LR - 20181012
IS - 1747-0226 (Electronic)
IS - 1747-0218 (Linking)
VI - 71
IP - 8
DP - 2018 Aug
TI - Hearing without listening: Attending to a quiet audiobook.
PG - 1663-1671
LID - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1345959 [doi]
AB - Careful systematic tests of hearing ability may miss the cognitive
consequences
of sub-optimal hearing when listening in the real world. In Experiment 1,
sub-optimal hearing is simulated by presenting an audiobook at a quiet but
discriminable level over 50 min. Recall of facts, words and inferences are
assessed and performance compared to another group at a comfortable listening
volume. At the quiet intensity, participants are able to detect, discriminate
and
identify spoken words but do so at a cost to sequential accuracy and fact
recall
when attention must be sustained over time. To exclude other interpretations,
the
effects are studied in Experiment 2 by comparing recall to the same sentences
presented in isolation. Here, the differences disappear. The results
demonstrate
that the cognitive consequences of listening at low volume arise when
sustained
attention is demanded over time.
FAU - Roebuck, Hettie
AU - Roebuck H
AD - 1 School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK.
AD - 2 Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
FAU - Guo, Kun
AU - Guo K
AD - 1 School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK.
FAU - Bourke, Patrick
AU - Bourke P
AD - 1 School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20180101
PL - England
TA - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)
JT - Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)
JID - 101259775
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Attention/*physiology
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Hearing/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Mental Recall/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Psychoacoustics
MH - Self Concept
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Vocabulary
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Auditory attention
OT - continuous listening
OT - effortful listening
OT - mild hearing loss
OT - sustained attention
EDAT- 2017/06/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/10/13 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/27 06:00
PHST- 2017/06/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/10/13 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/06/27 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1345959 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2018 Aug;71(8):1663-1671. doi:
10.1080/17470218.2017.1345959. Epub 2018 Jan 1.

PMID- 28641589
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180503
LR - 20181108
IS - 1469-7661 (Electronic)
IS - 1355-6177 (Linking)
VI - 23
IP - 8
DP - 2017 Sep
TI - Modality-Dependent or Modality-Independent Processing in Mental Arithmetic:
Evidence From Unimpaired Auditory Multiplication for a Patient With Left
Frontotemporal Stroke.
PG - 692-699
LID - 10.1017/S1355617717000479 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES: Mental arithmetic is essential to daily life. Researchers have
explored the mechanisms that underlie mental arithmetic. Whether mental
arithmetic fact retrieval is dependent on surface modality or knowledge
format is
still highly debated. Chinese individuals typically use a procedure strategy
for
addition; and they typically use a rote verbal strategy for multiplication.
This
provides a way to examine the effect of surface modality on different
arithmetic
operations. METHODS: We used a series of neuropsychological tests (i.e.,
general
cognitive, language processing, numerical processing, addition, and
multiplication in visual and auditory conditions) for a patient who had
experienced a left frontotemporal stroke. RESULTS: The patient had language
production impairment; but preserved verbal processing concerning basic
numerical
abilities. Moreover, the patient had preserved multiplication in the auditory
presentation rather than in the visual presentation. The patient suffered
from
impairments in an addition task, regardless of visual or auditory
presentation.
CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that mental multiplication could be
characterized as a form of modality-dependent processing, which was accessed
through auditory input. The learning strategy of multiplication table
recitation
could shape the verbal memory of multiplication leading to persistence of the
auditory module. (JINS, 2017, 23, 692-699).
FAU - Cheng, Dazhi
AU - Cheng D
AD - 1Department of Pediatric Neurology,Capital Institute of
Pediatrics,Beijing,China.
FAU - Wu, Haiyan
AU - Wu H
AD - 2Institute of Psychology,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing,China.
FAU - Yuan, Li
AU - Yuan L
AD - 3State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning,Beijing Normal
University,Beijing,China.
FAU - Xu, Rui
AU - Xu R
AD - 5Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine,China Academy of Chinese
Medical Sciences,Beijing,China.
FAU - Chen, Qian
AU - Chen Q
AD - 1Department of Pediatric Neurology,Capital Institute of
Pediatrics,Beijing,China.
FAU - Zhou, Xinlin
AU - Zhou X
AD - 3State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning,Beijing Normal
University,Beijing,China.
LA - eng
PT - Case Reports
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170623
PL - England
TA - J Int Neuropsychol Soc
JT - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS
JID - 9503760
SB - IM
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology/*physiopathology
MH - Humans
MH - Language Disorders/etiology/*physiopathology
MH - Male
MH - *Mathematical Concepts
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Stroke/complications/*physiopathology
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Language
OT - *Left hemisphere
OT - *Mathematics
OT - *Multiplication
OT - *Neuropsychological tests
OT - *Stroke
EDAT- 2017/06/24 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/04 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/24 06:00
PHST- 2017/06/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/04 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/06/24 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1355617717000479 [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S1355617717000479 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2017 Sep;23(8):692-699. doi:
10.1017/S1355617717000479.
Epub 2017 Jun 23.

PMID- 28623677
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180719
LR - 20181113
IS - 1552-5279 (Electronic)
IS - 1552-5260 (Linking)
VI - 13
IP - 12
DP - 2017 Dec
TI - Incidence of cognitively defined late-onset Alzheimer's dementia subgroups
from a
prospective cohort study.
PG - 1307-1316
LID - S1552-5260(17)30216-9 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.jalz.2017.04.011 [doi]
AB - INTRODUCTION: There may be biologically relevant heterogeneity within typical
late-onset Alzheimer's dementia. METHODS: We analyzed cognitive data from
people
with incident late-onset Alzheimer's dementia from a prospective cohort
study. We
determined individual averages across memory, visuospatial functioning,
language,
and executive functioning. We identified domains with substantial impairments
relative to that average. We compared demographic, neuropathology, and
genetic
findings across groups defined by relative impairments. RESULTS: During
32,286
person-years of follow-up, 869 people developed Alzheimer's dementia. There
were
393 (48%) with no domain with substantial relative impairments. Some
participants
had isolated relative impairments in memory (148, 18%), visuospatial
functioning
(117, 14%), language (71, 9%), and executive functioning (66, 8%). The group
with
isolated relative memory impairments had higher proportions with >/= APOE
epsilon4 allele, more extensive Alzheimer's-related neuropathology, and
higher
proportions with other Alzheimer's dementia genetic risk variants.
DISCUSSION: A
cognitive subgrouping strategy may identify biologically distinct subsets of
people with Alzheimer's dementia.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.
FAU - Crane, Paul K
AU - Crane PK
AD - Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
Electronic
address: pcrane@uw.edu.
FAU - Trittschuh, Emily
AU - Trittschuh E
AD - VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical
Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Mukherjee, Shubhabrata
AU - Mukherjee S
AD - Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Saykin, Andrew J
AU - Saykin AJ
AD - Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and the Indiana Alzheimer's
Disease
Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
FAU - Sanders, R Elizabeth
AU - Sanders RE
AD - Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Larson, Eric B
AU - Larson EB
AD - Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - McCurry, Susan M
AU - McCurry SM
AD - Department of Psychosocial and Community Health, University of Washington,
Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - McCormick, Wayne
AU - McCormick W
AD - Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Bowen, James D
AU - Bowen JD
AD - Department of Neurology, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Grabowski, Thomas
AU - Grabowski T
AD - Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA;
Department
of Neurology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Moore, Mackenzie
AU - Moore M
AD - College of Arts and Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Bauman, Julianna
AU - Bauman J
AD - College of Arts and Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Gross, Alden L
AU - Gross AL
AD - Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,
Baltimore, MD, USA.
FAU - Keene, C Dirk
AU - Keene CD
AD - Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Bird, Thomas D
AU - Bird TD
AD - VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical
Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Department of Neurology, University of Washington,
Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Gibbons, Laura E
AU - Gibbons LE
AD - Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Mez, Jesse
AU - Mez J
AD - Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA,
USA.
CN - Executive Prominent Alzheimer's Disease: Genetics and Risk Factors (EPAD:GRF)
Investigators
LA - eng
GR - P30 AG013846/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - P50 AG005136/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG029672/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG042437/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - U01 AG006781/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - K23 AG046377/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170615
PL - United States
TA - Alzheimers Dement
JT - Alzheimer's & dementia : the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
JID - 101231978
RN - 0 (Apolipoproteins E)
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*complications/*epidemiology/genetics
MH - Apolipoproteins E/genetics
MH - Cognition Disorders/*epidemiology/*etiology/genetics
MH - Cohort Studies
MH - Executive Function/physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Incidence
MH - Male
MH - Memory Disorders/epidemiology/etiology
MH - Neurologic Examination
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Visual Perception/physiology
PMC - PMC5723557
MID - NIHMS879101
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Alzheimer's disease
OT - Cognition
OT - Endophenotypes
OT - Genetics
OT - Heterogeneity
OT - Neuropathology
OT - Subgroups
EDAT- 2017/06/18 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/18 06:00
PMCR- 2018/12/01 00:00
PHST- 2016/12/21 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/28 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/04/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/01 00:00 [pmc-release]
PHST- 2017/06/18 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/20 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/06/18 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1552-5260(17)30216-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.jalz.2017.04.011 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Alzheimers Dement. 2017 Dec;13(12):1307-1316. doi:
10.1016/j.jalz.2017.04.011.
Epub 2017 Jun 15.

PMID- 28618296
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180503
LR - 20180503
IS - 1973-8102 (Electronic)
IS - 0010-9452 (Linking)
VI - 93
DP - 2017 Aug
TI - Impaired body perception in developmental prosopagnosia.
PG - 41-49
LID - S0010-9452(17)30161-2 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.05.006 [doi]
AB - Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder
associated with difficulties recognising and discriminating faces. In some
cases,
the perceptual deficits seen in DP appear to be face-specific. However, DP is
known to be a heterogeneous condition, and many cases undoubtedly exhibit
impaired perception of other complex objects. There are several well-
documented
parallels between body and face perception; for example, faces and bodies are
both thought to recruit holistic analysis and engage similar regions of
visual
cortex. In light of these similarities, individuals who exhibit face
perception
deficits, possibly due to impaired holistic processing or aberrant white
matter
connectivity, might also show co-occurring deficits of body perception. The
present study therefore sought to investigate body perception in DP using a
sensitive delayed match-to-sample task and a sizeable group of DPs. To
determine
whether body perception deficits, where observed, co-vary with wider object
recognition deficits, observers' face and body matching ability was compared
with
performance in a car matching condition. Relative to age-matched controls,
the DP
sample exhibited impaired body matching accuracy at the group level, and
several
members of the sample were impaired at the single-case level. Consistent with
previous reports of wider object recognition difficulties, a number of the
DPs
also showed evidence of impaired car recognition.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Biotti, Federica
AU - Biotti F
AD - Department of Psychology, City, University of London, London, UK. Electronic
address: Federica.Biotti@city.ac.uk.
FAU - Gray, Katie L H
AU - Gray KLH
AD - School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading,
Reading, UK.
FAU - Cook, Richard
AU - Cook R
AD - Department of Psychology, City, University of London, London, UK.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170525
PL - Italy
TA - Cortex
JT - Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior
JID - 0100725
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Electroencephalography/methods
MH - Face/physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - Photic Stimulation/methods
MH - Prosopagnosia/*physiopathology
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Visual Cortex/physiopathology
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Body perception
OT - *Developmental prosopagnosia
OT - *Face perception
OT - *Object recognition
EDAT- 2017/06/16 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/04 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/16 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/22 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/20 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/05/17 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/06/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/04 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/06/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0010-9452(17)30161-2 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.05.006 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cortex. 2017 Aug;93:41-49. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.05.006. Epub 2017 May
25.

PMID- 28566108
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180517
LR - 20180525
IS - 1741-203X (Electronic)
IS - 1041-6102 (Linking)
VI - 29
IP - 9
DP - 2017 Sep
TI - Cognitive performance of community-dwelling oldest-old individuals with major
depression: the Pieta study.
PG - 1507-1513
LID - 10.1017/S1041610217000850 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Individuals with late-life depression (LLD) may present cognitive
symptoms. We sought to determine whether a brief cognitive battery (BCB)
could
identify cognitive and functional deficits in oldest-old individuals with LLD
and
a low level of education. METHODS: We evaluated 639 community-dwelling
individuals aged 75+ years in Caete (MG), Brazil. We used the MINI and GDS-15
to
diagnose major depression and evaluate its severity, respectively. The
cognitive
evaluation comprised the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), BCB, clock-
drawing
test, category fluency test (animals) and Pfeffer's Functional Activities
Questionnaire (FAQ). RESULTS: Fifty-four (11.6%) of the included individuals
were
diagnosed with LLD; on average, these participants were aged 81.0 +/- 4.8
years
and had 3.9 +/- 3.4 years of schooling, and 77.8% of the subjects with LLD
were
female. Depressed individuals scored lower than subjects without
dementia/depression on the MMSE overall (p < 0.001) and on several of the
MMSE
subscales, namely, time (p < 0.001) and spatial orientation (p = 0.021),
attention/calculation (p = 0.019), and language (p = 0.004). Individuals with
LLD
performed worse on the incidental and (p = 0.011) immediate memory (p =
0.046)
and learning tasks (p = 0.039) of the BCB. Individuals with LLD also
performed
worse on the category fluency test (p = 0.006), clock-drawing test (p =
0.011)
and FAQ (p < 0.001). Depression severity was negatively correlated with
incidental memory (rho = -0.412; p = 0.003) and positively correlated with
FAQ
score (rho = 0.308; p = 0.035). In the multiple regression analysis, only
temporal orientation and FAQ score remained independently associated with
LLD.
CONCLUSION: Individuals with depression and a low level of education
presented
several cognitive and functional deficits. Depression severity was negatively
correlated with incidental memory and functionality. Our findings serve as a
description of the presence of cognitive dysfunction in individuals with LLD
and
suggest that these deficits may be identified based on the results of a BCB.
FAU - Dias, Filipi Leles da Costa
AU - Dias FLDC
AD - Post-graduate Program in Adult Health,Faculty of Medicine,Federal University
of
Minas Gerais,Belo Horizonte,Brazil.
FAU - Teixeira, Antonio Lucio
AU - Teixeira AL
AD - Post-graduate Program in Adult Health,Faculty of Medicine,Federal University
of
Minas Gerais,Belo Horizonte,Brazil.
FAU - Guimaraes, Henrique Cerqueira
AU - Guimaraes HC
AD - Post-graduate Program in Adult Health,Faculty of Medicine,Federal University
of
Minas Gerais,Belo Horizonte,Brazil.
FAU - Barbosa, Maira Tonidandel
AU - Barbosa MT
AD - Department of Internal Medicine,Faculty of Medicine,Federal University of
Minas
Gerais,Belo Horizonte,Brazil.
FAU - Resende, Elisa de Paula Franca
AU - Resende EPF
AD - Post-graduate Program in Adult Health,Faculty of Medicine,Federal University
of
Minas Gerais,Belo Horizonte,Brazil.
FAU - Beato, Rogerio Gomes
AU - Beato RG
AD - Department of Internal Medicine,Faculty of Medicine,Federal University of
Minas
Gerais,Belo Horizonte,Brazil.
FAU - Carmona, Karoline Carvalho
AU - Carmona KC
AD - Post-graduate Program in Adult Health,Faculty of Medicine,Federal University
of
Minas Gerais,Belo Horizonte,Brazil.
FAU - Caramelli, Paulo
AU - Caramelli P
AD - Post-graduate Program in Adult Health,Faculty of Medicine,Federal University
of
Minas Gerais,Belo Horizonte,Brazil.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170601
PL - England
TA - Int Psychogeriatr
JT - International psychogeriatrics
JID - 9007918
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - Attention
MH - Brazil
MH - Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
MH - *Cognition
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/*diagnosis
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - Depressive Disorder, Major/*psychology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Independent Living
MH - Logistic Models
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Multivariate Analysis
MH - Severity of Illness Index
MH - Space Perception
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *cognition
OT - *geriatric depression
OT - *late-life depression
OT - *oldest-old
EDAT- 2017/06/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/02 06:00
PHST- 2017/06/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/18 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/06/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1041610217000850 [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S1041610217000850 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Int Psychogeriatr. 2017 Sep;29(9):1507-1513. doi: 10.1017/S1041610217000850.
Epub
2017 Jun 1.

PMID- 28557843
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180725
LR - 20181113
IS - 1546-4156 (Electronic)
IS - 0893-0341 (Linking)
VI - 31
IP - 4
DP - 2017 Oct-Dec
TI - Increased Reporting Accuracy of Alzheimer Disease Symptoms in Caribbean
Hispanic
Informants.
PG - 328-334
LID - 10.1097/WAD.0000000000000199 [doi]
AB - INTRODUCTION: Informant report of symptoms is essential for diagnosing and
characterizing Alzheimer disease (AD). Differences in the perception and
experience of dementia across ethnicities may influence informant report.
Understanding such differences is critical given that among those with AD,
Hispanics are disproportionately affected. METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses
examined informant report of cognitive and functional symptoms in mild AD
across
white (n=107) and Caribbean Hispanic (n=71) informants. To explore its
accuracy,
informant report of symptoms was compared against objective measures of
patient
performance. RESULTS: Adjusted analyses revealed Hispanics reported more
symptoms
than white informants. Informant report of symptoms was inversely correlated
with
patients' global cognition in both ethnic groups. Only Hispanic report of
symptoms was significantly associated with memory and language performance.
DISCUSSION: Informant report of symptoms was associated with patients' global
cognition, reflecting relatively accurate informant reports in both ethnic
groups, and was stronger in Hispanics when examining memory and language.
Such
differences may reflect cultural caregiving practices and perceptions of
dementia, having implications for diagnosis and treatment.
FAU - Azar, Martina
AU - Azar M
AD - Department of Neurology, Cognitive Neuroscience Division, G.H. Sergievsky
Center,
and Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and The Aging Brain,
Columbia University Medical Center.
FAU - Zhu, Carolyn
AU - Zhu C
AD - Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai, New York, NY.
FAU - DeFeis, Brittany
AU - DeFeis B
AD - Department of Neurology, Cognitive Neuroscience Division, G.H. Sergievsky
Center,
and Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and The Aging Brain,
Columbia University Medical Center.
FAU - Gu, Yian
AU - Gu Y
AD - Department of Neurology, Cognitive Neuroscience Division, G.H. Sergievsky
Center,
and Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and The Aging Brain,
Columbia University Medical Center.
FAU - Ornstein, Katherine
AU - Ornstein K
AD - Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai, New York, NY.
FAU - Lawless, Siobhan
AU - Lawless S
AD - Department of Neurology, Cognitive Neuroscience Division, G.H. Sergievsky
Center,
and Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and The Aging Brain,
Columbia University Medical Center.
FAU - Cosentino, Stephanie
AU - Cosentino S
AD - Department of Neurology, Cognitive Neuroscience Division, G.H. Sergievsky
Center,
and Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and The Aging Brain,
Columbia University Medical Center.
LA - eng
GR - K01 AG047923/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG007370/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord
JT - Alzheimer disease and associated disorders
JID - 8704771
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*diagnosis
MH - *Caregivers
MH - Caribbean Region
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - Female
MH - Hispanic Americans
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
PMC - PMC5699953
MID - NIHMS866207
EDAT- 2017/05/31 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/26 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/31 06:00
PHST- 2017/05/31 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/26 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/31 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1097/WAD.0000000000000199 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2017 Oct-Dec;31(4):328-334. doi:
10.1097/WAD.0000000000000199.

PMID- 28554086
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180406
LR - 20181113
IS - 1873-7838 (Electronic)
IS - 0010-0277 (Linking)
VI - 166
DP - 2017 Sep
TI - Exposure to multiple accents supports infants' understanding of novel
accents.
PG - 67-72
LID - S0010-0277(17)30148-8 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.cognition.2017.05.031 [doi]
AB - Accented speech poses a challenge for listeners, particularly those with
limited
knowledge of their language. In a series of studies, we explored the
possibility
that experience with variability, specifically the variability provided by
multiple accents, would facilitate infants' comprehension of speech produced
with
an unfamiliar accent. 15- and 18-month-old American-English learning infants
were
exposed to brief passages of multi-talker speech and subsequently tested on
their
ability to distinguish between real, familiar words and nonsense words,
produced
in either their native accent or an unfamiliar (British) accent. Exposure
passages were produced in a familiar (American) accent, a single unfamiliar
(British) accent or a variety of novel accents (Australian, Southern,
Indian).
While 15-month-olds successfully recognized real words spoken in a familiar
accent, they never demonstrated comprehension of English words produced in
the
unfamiliar accent. 18-month-olds also failed to recognize English words
spoken in
the unfamiliar accent after exposure to the familiar or single unfamiliar
accent.
However, they succeeded after exposure to multiple unfamiliar accents,
suggesting
that as they get older, infants are better able to exploit the cues provided
by
variable speech. Increased variability across multiple dimensions can be
advantageous for young listeners.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Potter, Christine E
AU - Potter CE
AD - Department of Psychology and Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
USA. Electronic address: cepotter@princeton.edu.
FAU - Saffran, Jenny R
AU - Saffran JR
AD - Department of Psychology and Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
USA.
LA - eng
GR - P30 HD003352/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R37 HD037466/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
GR - U54 HD090256/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170526
PL - Netherlands
TA - Cognition
JT - Cognition
JID - 0367541
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Infant
MH - *Language
MH - *Language Development
MH - Male
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
PMC - PMC5518928
MID - NIHMS880343
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Accent adaptation
OT - *Language development
OT - *Perceptual learning
OT - *Speech perception
OT - *Word recognition
EDAT- 2017/05/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/30 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/23 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/21 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/05/19 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/07 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/30 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0010-0277(17)30148-8 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cognition.2017.05.031 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cognition. 2017 Sep;166:67-72. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2017.05.031. Epub
2017
May 26.

PMID- 28549936
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180417
LR - 20181113
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 102
DP - 2017 Jul 28
TI - Deficit in feature-based attention following a left thalamic lesion.
PG - 1-10
LID - S0028-3932(17)30197-5 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.05.023 [doi]
AB - Selective attention enables us to prioritise the processing of relevant over
irrelevant information. The model of priority maps with stored attention
weights
provides a conceptual framework that accounts for the visual prioritisation
mechanism of selective attention. According to this model, high attention
weights
can be assigned to spatial locations, features, or objects. Converging
evidence
from neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies propose the involvement of
thalamic and frontoparietal areas in selective attention. However, it is
unclear
whether the thalamus is critically involved in generating different types of
modulatory signals for attentional selection. The aim of the current study
was to
investigate feature- and spatial-based selection in stroke survivors with
subcortical thalamic and non-thalamic lesions. A single case with a
left-hemispheric lesion extending into the thalamus, five cases with
right-hemispheric lesions sparing the thalamus and 34 healthy, age-matched
controls participated in the study. Participants performed a go/no-go task on
task-relevant stimuli, while ignoring simultaneously presented task-
irrelevant
stimuli. Stimulus relevance was determined by colour or spatial location. The
thalamic lesion case was specifically impaired in feature-based selection but
not
in spatial-based selection, whereas performance of non-thalamic lesion
patients
was similar to controls' performance in both types of selective attention. In
summary, our thalamic lesion case showed difficulties in computing
differential
attention weights based on features, but not based on spatial locations. The
results suggest that different modulatory signals are generated mediating
attentional selection for features versus space in the thalamus.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights
reserved.
FAU - Finsterwalder, Sofia
AU - Finsterwalder S
AD - Oxford Cognitive Neuropsychology Centre, Department of Experimental
Psychology,
University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; Laboratory of Experimental
Psychology, Department of Brain & Cognition, University of Leuven, Leuven,
Belgium.
FAU - Demeyere, Nele
AU - Demeyere N
AD - Oxford Cognitive Neuropsychology Centre, Department of Experimental
Psychology,
University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
FAU - Gillebert, Celine R
AU - Gillebert CR
AD - Oxford Cognitive Neuropsychology Centre, Department of Experimental
Psychology,
University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; Laboratory of Experimental
Psychology, Department of Brain & Cognition, University of Leuven, Leuven,
Belgium. Electronic address: celine.gillebert@kuleuven.be.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170523
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/*etiology
MH - Brain Injuries/*complications/diagnostic imaging/etiology/*pathology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language Disorders/etiology
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Memory Disorders/etiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - Space Perception/physiology
MH - Stroke/complications
MH - Thalamus/diagnostic imaging/*pathology
PMC - PMC5555441
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Attention weights
OT - Endogenous control
OT - Feature-based attention
OT - Stroke
OT - Thalamus
EDAT- 2017/05/28 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/28 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/21 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/30 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/05/22 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/28 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/18 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/28 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(17)30197-5 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.05.023 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2017 Jul 28;102:1-10. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.05.023. Epub 2017 May 23.

PMID- 28549663
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180209
LR - 20180209
IS - 1873-6297 (Electronic)
IS - 0001-6918 (Linking)
VI - 178
DP - 2017 Jul
TI - Feature taxonomy: What type of features do children associate with categories
and
how do they fare in predicting category judgments?
PG -
114-123
LID -
S0001-6918(16)30194-9 [pii]
LID -
10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.04.009 [doi]
AB -
The present study investigates category intension in school-aged children and
adults at two different levels of abstraction (i.e., superordinate and basic
level) for two category types (i.e., artefacts and natural kinds). We
addressed
two critical questions: what kind of features do children and adults generate
to
define semantic categories and which features predict category membership
judgment best at each abstraction level? Overall, participants generated
relatively more entity features for natural kinds categories, compared to
artefact categories, as well as for basic level categories, compared to
superordinate categories. Furthermore, the results showed that older children
and
adults generated relatively more entity features than younger children.
Finally,
situation features play the most important role in the prediction of category
judgments at both levels of abstraction. Theoretical implications and
comparable
results from previous studies are described in detail.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Djalal, Farah Mutiasari
AU - Djalal FM
AD - KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address:
farahmutiasari.djalal@kuleuven.be.
FAU - Storms, Gert
AU - Storms G
AD - KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Ameel, Eef
AU - Ameel E
AD - KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Heyman, Tom
AU - Heyman T
AD - KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170523
PL - Netherlands
TA - Acta Psychol (Amst)
JT - Acta psychologica
JID - 0370366
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Child
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - *Concept Formation
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Judgment
MH - Male
MH - Memory/*physiology
MH - Semantics
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Category intension
OT - Category learning
OT - Feature taxonomy
EDAT- 2017/05/28 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/10 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/28 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/26 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/19 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/28 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/28 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0001-6918(16)30194-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.04.009 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Acta Psychol (Amst). 2017 Jul;178:114-123. doi: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.04.009.
Epub 2017 May 23.

PMID- 28547588
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180423
LR - 20181113
IS - 1573-7373 (Electronic)
IS - 0167-594X (Linking)
VI - 134
IP - 1
DP - 2017 Aug
TI - Neurocognition in individuals with incidentally-identified meningioma.
PG - 125-132
LID - 10.1007/s11060-017-2495-8 [doi]
AB - Meningiomas are primary intracranial tumors that are often asymptomatic. To
our
knowledge, no study has attempted to describe neurocognitive function in
patients
with incidentally-discovered meningioma. We utilized the Mayo Clinic Study of
Aging (MCSA), which is a population-based sample of Olmsted County, Minnesota
residents that includes neuropsychological testing and brain MRI
approximately
every 15 months. Using a text search of radiologists' notes of 2402 MCSA
individuals (mean age 77 years, scanned between 2004 and 2014) we identified
48
eligible subjects (2%) who had at least one meningioma. Most meningiomas were
small (90% <3 cm). We matched each of the 48 subjects to 5 non-demented MCSA
controls (n = 240) on age, sex, and education. Cognitive domains assessed
included memory, attention-executive function, language, and visuospatial.
More
women (67%) had a meningioma than men (33%). Groups did not differ on
prevalence
of Mild Cognitive Impairment (Meningioma = 19%, Controls = 13%). Across
cognitive
domains, we observed similar performance for the two groups (p's >/= 0.21).
Subtle differences emerged in memory and language domains (p = 0.05 and p =
0.11)
when we divided the Meningioma group by tumor location, wherein the small
group
with an infratentorial tumor performed more poorly than controls globally as
well
as on select memory and language measures. Our findings suggest that small
meningiomas are generally cognitively benign, but that may change as the
tumor
evolves, and might be impacted by other factors such as meningioma location.
FAU - Butts, Alissa M
AU - Butts AM
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2565-8127
AD - Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
Butts.Alissa@Mayo.edu.
FAU - Weigand, Stephen
AU - Weigand S
AD - Department of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester,
MN,
USA.
FAU - Brown, Paul D
AU - Brown PD
AD - Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
FAU - Petersen, Ronald C
AU - Petersen RC
AD - Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
FAU - Jack, Clifford R Jr
AU - Jack CR Jr
AD - Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
FAU - Machulda, Mary M
AU - Machulda MM
AD - Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
FAU - Cerhan, Jane H
AU - Cerhan JH
AD - Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
LA - eng
GR - R01 AG011378/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG041851/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - U01 AG006786/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170525
PL - United States
TA - J Neurooncol
JT - Journal of neuro-oncology
JID - 8309335
RN - 0 (Apolipoproteins E)
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Apolipoproteins E/genetics
MH - Attention/physiology
MH - Cognition Disorders/epidemiology/*etiology
MH - Community Health Planning
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Longitudinal Studies
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Memory/physiology
MH - Meningeal Neoplasms/*complications/diagnostic imaging/epidemiology/genetics
MH - Meningioma/*complications/diagnostic imaging/epidemiology/genetics
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Visual Perception/genetics
PMC - PMC5544551
MID - NIHMS879632
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Brain tumor
OT - Cognition
OT - Meningioma
OT - Neurocognitive
EDAT- 2017/05/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/24 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/27 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/28 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/05/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/24 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/27 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1007/s11060-017-2495-8 [doi]
AID - 10.1007/s11060-017-2495-8 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Neurooncol. 2017 Aug;134(1):125-132. doi: 10.1007/s11060-017-2495-8. Epub
2017
May 25.

PMID- 28532206
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180604
LR - 20180612
IS - 1708-8186 (Electronic)
IS - 1499-2027 (Linking)
VI - 56
IP - 11
DP - 2017 Nov
TI - The clinical use of Arthur Boothroyd (AB) word lists in Australia: exploring
evidence-based practice.
PG - 870-875
LID - 10.1080/14992027.2017.1327123 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: Limited empirical investigation exists validating the use of
Arthur
Boothroyd (AB) word recognition materials within the Australian clinical
context.
The current research was undertaken to examine the evidence base and clinical
implementation/interpretation of AB words in Australia. DESIGN: An on-line
22-question survey was e-mailed to members of the peak audiology professional
body in Australia. STUDY SAMPLE: Three hundred and twelve responses were
recorded
between April and June 2015 from audiologists of a range of ages, working in
various clinical settings. RESULTS: The survey results suggested audiologists
use
AB words on a wide range of clients from children <5 to adults >/=80 years,
for
diverse purposes including diagnosis of retrocochlear pathology, candidacy
and
validation of rehabilitative options, and client counselling. A majority of
respondents reported typically administering one or two word lists per ear,
and
over 99% of audiologists utilised phonemic scoring. There was no consensus
regarding what constitutes a significant difference between any two given
scores.
CONCLUSIONS: Wide variation exists in the administration and interpretation
of AB
words in Australia. There appears to be a mismatch between clinical
utilisation
of AB words and existing evidence-based empirical data. Further research is
required to improve evidence-based audiologist training, and thereby current
clinical use of AB words.
FAU - Myles, Andrew James
AU - Myles AJ
AD - a Department of Linguistics , Macquarie University , Sydney , Australia.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170522
PL - England
TA - Int J Audiol
JT - International journal of audiology
JID - 101140017
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation/*standards
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aged
MH - Audiologists/*standards
MH - Audiology/*standards
MH - Audiometry, Speech/*standards
MH - Australia
MH - Child
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Evidence-Based Practice/*standards
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Observer Variation
MH - Phonetics
MH - Predictive Value of Tests
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Arthur Boothroyd
OT - *evidence-based practice
OT - *speech audiometry
OT - *word recognition
EDAT- 2017/05/24 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/05 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/24 06:00
PHST- 2017/05/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/05 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/24 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/14992027.2017.1327123 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Int J Audiol. 2017 Nov;56(11):870-875. doi: 10.1080/14992027.2017.1327123.
Epub
2017 May 22.

PMID- 28511620
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180925
LR - 20180925
IS - 1651-2022 (Electronic)
IS - 1401-5439 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 2
DP - 2018 Jul
TI - Is children's listening effort in background noise influenced by the
speaker's
voice quality?
PG - 47-55
LID - 10.1080/14015439.2017.1324914 [doi]
AB - The present study aims at exploring the influence of voice quality on
listening
effort in children performing a language comprehension test with sentences of
increasing difficulty. Listening effort is explored in relation to gender ( =
cisgender). The study has a between-groups design. Ninety-three mainstreamed
children aged 8;2 to 9;3 with typical language development participated. The
children were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 46/47) with equal
allocation
of boys and girls and for the analysis to four groups depending of gender and
voice condition. Working memory capacity and executive functions were tested
in
quiet. A digital version of a language comprehension test (the TROG-2) was
used
to measure the effect of voice quality on listening effort, measured as
response
time in a forced-choice paradigm. The groups listened to sentences through
recordings of the same female voice, one group with a typical voice and one
with
a dysphonic voice, both in competing multi-talker babble noise. Response
times
were logged after a time buffer between the sentence-ending and indication of
response. There was a significant increase in response times with increased
task
difficulty and response times between the two voice conditions differed
significantly. The girls in the dysphonic condition were slower with
increasing
task difficulty. A dysphonic voice clearly adds to the noise burden and
listening
effort is greater in girls than in boys when the teacher speaks with
dysphonic
voice in a noisy background. These findings might mirror gender differences
as
for coping strategies in challenging contexts and have important implications
for
education.
FAU - Sahlen, Birgitta
AU - Sahlen B
AD - a Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and
Audiology ,
Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
AD - b Linneaus' Environment Cognition, Communication and Learning , Lund
University ,
Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Haake, Magnus
AU - Haake M
AD - b Linneaus' Environment Cognition, Communication and Learning , Lund
University ,
Lund , Sweden.
AD - c Division of Cognitive Science , Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
FAU - von Lochow, Heike
AU - von Lochow H
AD - a Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and
Audiology ,
Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
AD - b Linneaus' Environment Cognition, Communication and Learning , Lund
University ,
Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Holm, Lucas
AU - Holm L
AD - a Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and
Audiology ,
Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
AD - b Linneaus' Environment Cognition, Communication and Learning , Lund
University ,
Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Kastberg, Tobias
AU - Kastberg T
AD - a Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and
Audiology ,
Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
AD - b Linneaus' Environment Cognition, Communication and Learning , Lund
University ,
Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Brannstrom, K Jonas
AU - Brannstrom KJ
AD - a Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and
Audiology ,
Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
AD - b Linneaus' Environment Cognition, Communication and Learning , Lund
University ,
Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Lyberg-Ahlander, Viveka
AU - Lyberg-Ahlander V
AD - a Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and
Audiology ,
Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
AD - b Linneaus' Environment Cognition, Communication and Learning , Lund
University ,
Lund , Sweden.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170517
PL - England
TA - Logoped Phoniatr Vocol
JT - Logopedics, phoniatrics, vocology
JID - 9617311
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adaptation, Psychological
MH - Age Factors
MH - Child
MH - *Child Behavior
MH - Dysphonia/physiopathology/psychology
MH - Executive Function
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Noise/*adverse effects
MH - *Perceptual Masking
MH - Random Allocation
MH - Reaction Time
MH - Sex Factors
MH - *Speech Acoustics
MH - *Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Time Factors
MH - *Voice Quality
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Babble noise
OT - children
OT - classroom
OT - cognitive capacity
OT - dysphonic teacher voice
OT - gender
OT - noise
OT - response times
OT - task difficulty
EDAT- 2017/05/18 06:00
MHDA- 2018/09/27 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/18 06:00
PHST- 2017/05/18 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/09/27 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/18 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/14015439.2017.1324914 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Logoped Phoniatr Vocol. 2018 Jul;43(2):47-55. doi:
10.1080/14015439.2017.1324914.
Epub 2017 May 17.

PMID- 28492912
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180314
LR - 20181030
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 5
DP - 2017 May 24
TI - Auditory Verbal Working Memory as a Predictor of Speech Perception in
Modulated
Maskers in Listeners With Normal Hearing.
PG - 1236-1245
LID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0105 [doi]
AB - Purpose: Background noise can interfere with our ability to understand
speech.
Working memory capacity (WMC) has been shown to contribute to the perception
of
speech in modulated noise maskers. WMC has been assessed with a variety of
auditory and visual tests, often pertaining to different components of
working
memory. This study assessed the relationship between speech perception in
modulated maskers and components of auditory verbal working memory (AVWM)
over a
range of signal-to-noise ratios. Method: Speech perception in noise and AVWM
were
measured in 30 listeners (age range 31-67 years) with normal hearing. AVWM
was
estimated using forward digit recall, backward digit recall, and nonword
repetition. Results: After controlling for the effects of age and average
pure-tone hearing threshold, speech perception in modulated maskers was
related
to individual differences in the phonological component of working memory (as
assessed by nonword repetition) but only in the least favorable signal-to-
noise
ratio. The executive component of working memory (as assessed by backward
digit)
was not predictive of speech perception in any conditions. Conclusions: AVWM
is
predictive of the ability to benefit from temporal dips in modulated maskers:
Listeners with greater phonological WMC are better able to correctly identify
sentences in modulated noise backgrounds.
FAU - Millman, Rebecca E
AU - Millman RE
AD - Manchester Centre for Audiology and Deafness, School of Health Sciences,
Faculty
of Biology, Medicine, and Health, University of Manchester, UK.
FAU - Mattys, Sven L
AU - Mattys SL
AD - Department of Psychology, University of York, UK.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Audiometry, Pure-Tone
MH - Auditory Threshold
MH - Executive Function
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Linear Models
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Phonetics
MH - *Speech Perception
EDAT- 2017/05/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/15 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/12 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/16 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/10/27 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/15 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2627555 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0105 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 May 24;60(5):1236-1245. doi:
10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0105.

PMID- 28485635
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180730
LR - 20180801
IS - 1708-8186 (Electronic)
IS - 1499-2027 (Linking)
VI - 56
IP - sup2
DP - 2017
TI - Bimodal benefits in Mandarin-speaking cochlear implant users with
contralateral
residual acoustic hearing.
PG - S17-S22
LID - 10.1080/14992027.2017.1321789 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to measure bimodal benefits and probe
their
underlying mechanisms in Mandarin-speaking cochlear implant (CI) subjects who
had
contralateral residual acoustic hearing. DESIGN: The subjects recognised
words or
phonemes from the Mandarin Lexical Neighborhood Test in noise at a 10-dB
signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with acoustic stimulation, electric stimulation
or
the combined bimodal stimulation. STUDY SAMPLE: Thirteen Mandarin-speaking
subjects wore a CI in one ear and had residual acoustic hearing in the
contralateral ear. Six of the subjects (5.2-13.0 years) had pre-lingual onset
of
severe hearing loss, and seven of them (8.6-45.8 years) had post-lingual
onset of
severe hearing loss. RESULTS: Both groups of subjects produced a significant
bimodal benefit in word recognition in noise. Consonants and tones accounted
for
the bimodal benefit. The bimodal integration efficiency was negatively
correlated
with the duration of deafness in the implanted ear for vowel recognition but
positively correlated with CI or bimodal experience for consonant
recognition.
CONCLUSIONS: The present results support preservation of residual acoustic
hearing, early cochlear implantation and continuous use of bimodal hearing
for
subjects who have significant residual hearing in the non-implanted ear.
FAU - Yang, Hsin-I
AU - Yang HI
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-7165-4368
AD - a Department of Biomedical Engineering and Center for Hearing Research ,
University of California Irvine , Irvine , CA , USA.
FAU - Zeng, Fan-Gang
AU - Zeng FG
AD - a Department of Biomedical Engineering and Center for Hearing Research ,
University of California Irvine , Irvine , CA , USA.
LA - eng
GR - R01 DC008858/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - P30 DC008369/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170509
PL - England
TA - Int J Audiol
JT - International journal of audiology
JID - 101140017
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Audiometry, Speech
MH - Child
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - China
MH - Cochlear Implantation/*instrumentation
MH - *Cochlear Implants
MH - Electric Stimulation
MH - *Hearing
MH - Hearing Loss/diagnosis/physiopathology/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Humans
MH - *Language
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Persons With Hearing Impairments/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Phonetics
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Speech Acoustics
MH - Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Bimodal stimulation
OT - *Mandarin speech recognition
OT - *cochlear implants
OT - *consonants
OT - *hearing aids
OT - *integration efficiency
OT - *tones
OT - *vowels
EDAT- 2017/05/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/31 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/31 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/14992027.2017.1321789 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Int J Audiol. 2017;56(sup2):S17-S22. doi: 10.1080/14992027.2017.1321789. Epub
2017 May 9.

PMID- 28482639
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180321
LR - 20181001
IS - 1875-8908 (Electronic)
IS - 1387-2877 (Linking)
VI - 58
IP - 3
DP - 2017
TI - Chinese Calligraphy Writing for Augmenting Attentional Control and Working
Memory
of Older Adults at Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Controlled
Trial.
PG - 735-746
LID - 10.3233/JAD-170024 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Nonpharmacological intervention for individuals with mild
cognitive
impairment (MCI) needs further investigation. OBJECTIVE: Test efficacy of an
eight-week Chinese calligraphy writing training course in improving
attentional
control and working memory. METHODS: Ninety-nine participants with MCI were
randomized into the eight-week calligraphy writing (n = 48) or control
(tablet
computer) training (n = 51). Outcomes of the interventions were attentional
control, working memory, visual scan and processing speed. They were measured
at
baseline, post-training, and six-month follow-up. RESULTS: Calligraphy
writing,
when compared with control, significantly improved working memory as
reflected
from DST-Backward sequence (p = 0.009) and span scores (p = 0.002), and
divided
attention as reflected from CTT2 (p < 0.001), and at the post-training. The
unique improvement in working memory (span: p < 0.001; sequence: p = 0.008)
of
the intervention group was also found at follow-up when comparing with those
at
baseline. Changes in the other outcome measures were not statistically
significant. CONCLUSION: The findings provide support that Chinese
calligraphy
writing training for eight weeks using a cognitive approach would improve
working
memory and to a lesser extent attentional control functions of patients with
early MCI. They also demonstrate the usefulness of using mind-and-body
practice
for improving specific cognitive functions.
FAU - Chan, Sam C C
AU - Chan SCC
AD - Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, The Hong Kong Polytechnic
University,
Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
AD - Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Hung
Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
FAU - Chan, Chetwyn C H
AU - Chan CCH
AD - Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, The Hong Kong Polytechnic
University,
Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
AD - Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Hung
Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
FAU - Derbie, Abiot Y
AU - Derbie AY
AD - Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, The Hong Kong Polytechnic
University,
Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
AD - Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Hung
Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
FAU - Hui, Irene
AU - Hui I
AD - Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, The Hong Kong Polytechnic
University,
Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
AD - Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Hung
Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
FAU - Tan, Davynn G H
AU - Tan DGH
AD - Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, The Hong Kong Polytechnic
University,
Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
AD - Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Hung
Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
FAU - Pang, Marco Y C
AU - Pang MYC
AD - Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Hung
Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
FAU - Lau, Stephen C L
AU - Lau SCL
AD - Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, The Hong Kong Polytechnic
University,
Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
AD - Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Hung
Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
FAU - Fong, Kenneth N K
AU - Fong KNK
AD - Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Hung
Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Randomized Controlled Trial
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Alzheimers Dis
JT - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
JID - 9814863
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - *Attention
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/*prevention & control/psychology
MH - Computers, Handheld
MH - Female
MH - Follow-Up Studies
MH - Humans
MH - *Learning
MH - Linear Models
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Motor Skills
MH - Treatment Outcome
MH - Visual Perception
MH - *Writing
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Attention
OT - *Chinese calligraphy
OT - *mild cognitive impairment
OT - *randomized controlled trial
OT - *working memory
EDAT- 2017/05/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/22 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/22 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - JAD170024 [pii]
AID - 10.3233/JAD-170024 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;58(3):735-746. doi: 10.3233/JAD-170024.

PMID- 28482210
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171116
LR - 20180823
IS - 1558-1497 (Electronic)
IS - 0197-4580 (Linking)
VI - 56
DP - 2017 Aug
TI - Different trajectories of decline for global form and global motion
processing in
aging, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.
PG - 17-24
LID - S0197-4580(17)30075-1 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.03.004 [doi]
AB - The visual processing of complex motion is impaired in Alzheimer's disease
(AD).
However, it is unclear whether these impairments are biased toward the motion
stream or part of a general disruption of global visual processing, given
some
reports of impaired static form processing in AD. Here, for the first time,
we
directly compared the relative preservation of motion and form systems in AD,
mild cognitive impairment, and healthy aging, by measuring coherence
thresholds
for well-established global rotational motion and static form stimuli known
to be
of equivalent complexity. Our data confirm a marked motion-processing deficit
specific to some AD patients, and greater than any form-processing deficit
for
this group. In parallel, we identified a more gradual decline in static form
recognition, with thresholds raised in mild cognitive impairment patients and
slightly further in the AD group compared with controls. We conclude that
complex
motion processing is more vulnerable to decline in dementia than complex form
processing, perhaps owing to greater reliance on long-range neural
connections
heavily targeted by AD pathology.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Porter, Gillian
AU - Porter G
AD - School of Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. Electronic address:
gillian.porter@bristol.ac.uk.
FAU - Wattam-Bell, John
AU - Wattam-Bell J
AD - Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, Faculty of Brain Sciences,
University College London, London, UK.
FAU - Bayer, Antony
AU - Bayer A
AD - Department of Geriatric Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
FAU - Haworth, Judy
AU - Haworth J
AD - South Glos Memory Services, Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership,
Bristol, UK.
FAU - Braddick, Oliver
AU - Braddick O
AD - Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
FAU - Atkinson, Janette
AU - Atkinson J
AD - Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, Faculty of Brain Sciences,
University College London, London, UK.
FAU - Tales, Andrea
AU - Tales A
AD - School of Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; Department of
Psychology, University of Swansea, Swansea, UK.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170314
PL - United States
TA - Neurobiol Aging
JT - Neurobiology of aging
JID - 8100437
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*psychology
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/*psychology
MH - Female
MH - Form Perception/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Motion Perception/*physiology
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Alzheimer's disease
OT - *Form processing
OT - *Healthy aging
OT - *Mild cognitive impairment
OT - *Motion processing
EDAT- 2017/05/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/09 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/12 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/06 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/03/05 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/09 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0197-4580(17)30075-1 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.03.004 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neurobiol Aging. 2017 Aug;56:17-24. doi:
10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.03.004.
Epub 2017 Mar 14.

PMID- 28477041
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180322
LR - 20181113
IS - 1432-1106 (Electronic)
IS - 0014-4819 (Linking)
VI - 235
IP - 7
DP - 2017 Jul
TI - On the preservation of vigilant attention to semantic information in healthy
aging.
PG - 2287-2300
LID - 10.1007/s00221-017-4969-5 [doi]
AB - Despite decades of research on younger adults, little is known about the way
in
which vigilant attention is affected by healthy aging, and the small body of
work
that does exist has yielded mixed findings. Prior examinations of aging and
vigilant attention have focused almost exclusively on sensory/perceptual
tasks
despite the fact that many real-world vigilance tasks are semantic in nature
and
it has been shown that older adults exhibit memory and attention deficits in
semantic tasks in other domains. Here, we present the first empirical
investigation of vigilant attention to verbal stimuli in healthy normal
aging. In
Experiment 1 we find that older adults are just as able as younger adults to
identify critical targets defined by category membership (both overall and
over
time). In Experiment 2, we increase the difficulty of the task by changing
the
target category from one block to the next, but again find no age-group
effects
in accuracy. Response time data, however, show that older adults respond more
slowly and subjective ratings indicate that older adults experience higher
workload and arousal compared to their younger counterparts. The practical as
well as theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.
FAU - Thomson, David R
AU - Thomson DR
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street,
Toronto,
ON, M5S 3GS, Canada. d.thomson@utoronto.ca.
FAU - Hasher, Lynn
AU - Hasher L
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street,
Toronto,
ON, M5S 3GS, Canada.
AD - Rotman Research Institute, Toronto, Canada.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170505
PL - Germany
TA - Exp Brain Res
JT - Experimental brain research
JID - 0043312
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*physiology
MH - Attention/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Healthy Volunteers
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - Psychomotor Performance
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - *Semantics
MH - Signal Detection, Psychological/*physiology
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Aging
OT - *Attention
OT - *Vigilance
EDAT- 2017/05/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/23 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/07 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/08 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/25 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/23 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1007/s00221-017-4969-5 [doi]
AID - 10.1007/s00221-017-4969-5 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Exp Brain Res. 2017 Jul;235(7):2287-2300. doi: 10.1007/s00221-017-4969-5.
Epub
2017 May 5.

PMID- 28476571
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180409
LR - 20180502
IS - 1872-7549 (Electronic)
IS - 0166-4328 (Linking)
VI - 330
DP - 2017 Jul 14
TI - Identification and intensity of disgust: Distinguishing visual, linguistic
and
facial expressions processing in Parkinson disease.
PG - 30-36
LID - S0166-4328(17)30333-9 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.bbr.2017.05.003 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES & METHODS: Most of the studies since now show an impairment for
facial
displays of disgust recognition in Parkinson disease. A general impairment in
disgust processing in patients with Parkinson disease might adversely affect
their social interactions, given the relevance of this emotion for human
relations. However, despite the importance of faces, disgust is also
expressed
through other format of visual stimuli such as sentences and visual images.
The
aim of our study was to explore disgust processing in a sample of patients
affected by Parkinson disease, by means of various tests tackling not only
facial
recognition but also other format of visual stimuli through which disgust can
be
recognized. RESULTS: Our results confirm that patients are impaired in
recognizing facial displays of disgust. Further analyses show that patients
are
also impaired and slower for other facial expressions, with the only
exception of
happiness. Notably however, patients with Parkinson disease processed visual
images and sentences as controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show a
dissociation
within different formats of visual stimuli of disgust, suggesting that
Parkinson
disease is not characterized by a general compromising of disgust processing,
as
often suggested. The involvement of the basal ganglia-frontal cortex system
might
spare some cognitive components of emotional processing, related to memory
and
culture, at least for disgust.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Sedda, Anna
AU - Sedda A
AD - Psychology, School of Social Sciences, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh
Campus,
UK. Electronic address: a.sedda@hw.ac.uk.
FAU - Petito, Sara
AU - Petito S
AD - School of Psychology and Education Sciences, Bologna University, Cesena
Campus,
Italy.
FAU - Guarino, Maria
AU - Guarino M
AD - Neurology Unit, S. Orsola, Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy.
FAU - Stracciari, Andrea
AU - Stracciari A
AD - School of Psychology and Education Sciences, Bologna University, Cesena
Campus,
Italy; Neurology Unit, S. Orsola, Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna,
Italy.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170503
PL - Netherlands
TA - Behav Brain Res
JT - Behavioural brain research
JID - 8004872
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Basal Ganglia/physiology
MH - Cerebral Cortex/physiology
MH - Emotions/*physiology
MH - Facial Expression
MH - Facial Recognition/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Frontal Lobe
MH - Happiness
MH - Humans
MH - Linguistics/methods
MH - Male
MH - Parkinson Disease/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology
MH - Photic Stimulation/methods
MH - Pleasure/physiology
MH - Social Perception
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Disgust
OT - *Emotion recognition
OT - *Facial expressions
OT - *Insula
OT - *Parkinson disease
EDAT- 2017/05/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/10 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/07 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/27 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/27 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/05/02 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0166-4328(17)30333-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.bbr.2017.05.003 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Behav Brain Res. 2017 Jul 14;330:30-36. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2017.05.003. Epub
2017
May 3.

PMID- 28460217
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180425
LR - 20180425
IS - 1873-3379 (Electronic)
IS - 0891-4222 (Linking)
VI - 64
DP - 2017 May
TI - Verbal working memory and reading abilities among students with visual
impairment.
PG - 87-95
LID - S0891-4222(17)30092-6 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.ridd.2017.03.010 [doi]
AB - AIM: This study investigated the relationship between working memory (WM) and
reading abilities among students with visual impairment (VI). Seventy-five
students with VI (visually impairment and blindness), aged 10-15 years old
participated in the study, of whom 44 were visually impaired and 31 were
blind.
METHODS: The participants' reading ability was assessed with the standardized
reading ability battery Test-A (Padeliadu & Antoniou, 2008) and their verbal
working memory ability was assessed with the listening recall task from the
Working Memory Test Battery for Children (Pickering et al., 2001).
RESULTS-IMPLICATIONS: Data analysis indicated a strong correlation between
verbal
WM and decoding, reading comprehension and overall reading ability among the
participants with VI, while no correlation was found between reading fluency
and
verbal WM. The present study points out the important role of verbal WM in
reading among students who are VI and carries implications for the education
of
those individuals.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Argyropoulos, Vassilios
AU - Argyropoulos V
AD - University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece. Electronic address: vassargi@uth.gr.
FAU - Masoura, Elvira
AU - Masoura E
AD - Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
FAU - Tsiakali, Thomai K
AU - Tsiakali TK
AD - University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece.
FAU - Nikolaraizi, Magda
AU - Nikolaraizi M
AD - University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece.
FAU - Lappa, Christina
AU - Lappa C
AD - University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170428
PL - United States
TA - Res Dev Disabil
JT - Research in developmental disabilities
JID - 8709782
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation/methods
MH - Adolescent
MH - Auditory Perception
MH - Child
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Reading
MH - Statistics as Topic
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - Verbal Behavior/*physiology
MH - *Vision Disorders/diagnosis/psychology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Blindness
OT - Comprehension
OT - Decoding
OT - Reading ability
OT - Verbal working memory
OT - Visual impairment
EDAT- 2017/05/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/26 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/02 06:00
PHST- 2015/12/31 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/11 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/03/21 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/26 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0891-4222(17)30092-6 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.ridd.2017.03.010 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Res Dev Disabil. 2017 May;64:87-95. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2017.03.010. Epub
2017
Apr 28.

PMID- 28456386
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180417
LR - 20181113
IS - 1545-7214 (Electronic)
IS - 1064-7481 (Linking)
VI - 25
IP - 8
DP - 2017 Aug
TI - Personality and Performance in Specific Neurocognitive Domains Among Older
Persons.
PG - 900-908
LID - S1064-7481(17)30255-5 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.006 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: Certain Big 5 personality dimensions have been repeatedly linked
to
global measures of cognitive function and outcome categories. We examined
whether
the Big 5 or their specific components showed differential evidence of
associations with specific neurocognitive domains. METHODS: Participants were
179
older adults (70+) from a broader study on cognitive aging. The NEO-Five
Factor
Inventory and a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests were used.
RESULTS: Adjusted for age, gender, and years of education, probability
values,
Bayes Factors, and measures effect size from linear models suggested strong
evidence for associations between better delayed recall memory and higher
Conscientiousness (principally the facets of Goal-Striving and Dependability)
and
Openness (specifically the Intellectual Interest component). Better executive
function and attention showed moderate to strong evidence of associations
with
lower Neuroticism (especially the Self-conscious Vulnerability facet) and
higher
Conscientiousness (mostly the Dependability facet). Better language
functioning
was linked to higher Openness (specifically, the Intellectual Interests
facet).
Worse visual-spatial function was strongly associated with higher
Neuroticism.
CONCLUSION: Different tests of neurocognitive functioning show varying
degrees of
evidence for associations with different personality traits. Better
understanding
of the patterning of neurocognitive-personality linkages may facilitate grasp
of
underlying mechanisms and/or refine understanding of co-occurring clinical
presentation of personality traits and specific cognitive deficits.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.
FAU - Chapman, Benjamin P
AU - Chapman BP
AD - Departments of Psychiatry and Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester
Medical Center, Rochester, NY. Electronic address:
ben_chapman@urmc.rochester.edu.
FAU - Benedict, Ralph H
AU - Benedict RH
AD - Department of Neurology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences,
University
at Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo, NY.
FAU - Lin, Feng
AU - Lin F
AD - School of Nursing and Departments of Psychiatry and Brain and Cognitive
Sciences,
University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.
FAU - Roy, Shumita
AU - Roy S
AD - Department of Neurology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences,
University
at Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo, NY.
FAU - Federoff, Howard J
AU - Federoff HJ
AD - Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine School of Medicine,
Irvine, CA.
FAU - Mapstone, Mark
AU - Mapstone M
AD - Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine School of Medicine,
Irvine, CA.
LA - eng
GR - K08 AG031328/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG030753/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG042582/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170403
PL - England
TA - Am J Geriatr Psychiatry
JT - The American journal of geriatric psychiatry : official journal of the
American
Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
JID - 9309609
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Attention/*physiology
MH - Cognitive Aging/*physiology
MH - Conscience
MH - Executive Function/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Mental Recall/*physiology
MH - Neuroticism/*physiology
MH - Perception/*physiology
MH - Personality/*physiology
PMC - PMC5647872
MID - NIHMS888974
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Personality
OT - cognitive function
OT - neuropsychological tests
OT - older adults
EDAT- 2017/05/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/01 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/27 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/03 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/03/06 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/18 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/05/01 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1064-7481(17)30255-5 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.006 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 Aug;25(8):900-908. doi:
10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.006.
Epub 2017 Apr 3.

PMID- 28438529
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180316
LR - 20181005
IS - 1872-6240 (Electronic)
IS - 0006-8993 (Linking)
VI - 1667
DP - 2017 Jul 15
TI - An ERP investigation of vertical reading fluency in Scrabble(R) experts.
PG - 1-10
LID - S0006-8993(17)30159-2 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.04.005 [doi]
AB - Previous studies have found that competitive Scrabble expertise is associated
with enhanced performance on visual lexical decision tasks (LDT),
particularly
for vertically presented stimuli. In the current study, we investigated the
underlying mechanisms responsible for this vertical fluency. We examined
behaviour and neural activity during LDT in 19 competitive Scrabble players
and
18 matched controls. Using event related potentials (ERP), we investigated
whether Scrabble expertise modulates the N170, P300, and late positive
component
(LPC), associated with visual-orthographic processing, working memory, and
stimulus classification, respectively. Behavioural results replicated those
from
previous studies: Scrabble experts were significantly faster than controls to
respond to vertical stimuli in LDT. ERP results showed Scrabble experts had
larger P300 amplitudes in right parietal electrodes compared to controls, as
well
as greater differentiation in LPC amplitudes between vertical words and
nonwords.
These findings suggest that the mechanism underlying vertical fluency in
Scrabble
experts involves enhanced domain-specific working memory and stimulus
classification processes. The results have implications for understanding the
flexibility of the adult visual word recognition system, as well as the
behavioural and neural consequences of training within this system.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - van Hees, Sophia
AU - van Hees S
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain
Institute, University of Calgary, Canada. Electronic address:
svanhees@ucalgary.ca.
FAU - Seyffarth, Sabine
AU - Seyffarth S
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Canada.
FAU - Pexman, Penny M
AU - Pexman PM
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain
Institute, University of Calgary, Canada.
FAU - Cortese, Filomeno
AU - Cortese F
AD - Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Canada; Neuroimaging
Research
Unit, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Canada.
FAU - Protzner, Andrea B
AU - Protzner AB
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain
Institute, University of Calgary, Canada.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170421
PL - Netherlands
TA - Brain Res
JT - Brain research
JID - 0045503
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Brain/*physiology
MH - Decision Making/physiology
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - *Evoked Potentials
MH - Female
MH - *Games, Recreational
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - *Practice (Psychology)
MH - Professional Competence
MH - *Reading
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Expertise
OT - *LPC
OT - *Lexical decision
OT - *N170
OT - *P300
OT - *Visual word recognition
EDAT- 2017/04/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/17 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/26 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/17 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/12 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/04/13 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/04/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/17 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/04/26 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0006-8993(17)30159-2 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.04.005 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain Res. 2017 Jul 15;1667:1-10. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.04.005. Epub
2017
Apr 21.

PMID- 28414092
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180312
LR - 20180911
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 100
DP - 2017 Jun
TI - Numbers and functional lateralization: A visual half-field and dichotic
listening
study in proficient bilinguals.
PG - 93-109
LID - S0028-3932(17)30149-5 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.04.019 [doi]
AB - Potential links between language and numbers and the laterality of symbolic
number representations in the brain are still debated. Furthermore, reports
on
bilingual individuals indicate that the language-number interrelationships
might
be quite complex. Therefore, we carried out a visual half-field (VHF) and
dichotic listening (DL) study with action words and different forms of
symbolic
numbers used as stimuli to test the laterality of word and number processing
in
single-, dual-language and mixed -task and language- contexts. Experiment 1
(VHF)
showed a significant right visual field/left hemispheric advantage in
response
accuracy for action word, as compared to any form of symbolic number
processing.
Experiment 2 (DL) revealed a substantially reversed effect - a significant
right
ear/left hemisphere advantage for arithmetic operations as compared to action
word processing, and in response times in single- and dual-language contexts
for
number vs. action words. All these effects were language independent.
Notably,
for within-task response accuracy compared across modalities significant
differences were found in all studied contexts. Thus, our results go counter
to
findings showing that action-relevant concepts and words, as well as number
words
are represented/processed primarily in the left hemisphere. Instead, we found
that in the auditory context, following substantial engagement of working
memory
(here: by arithmetic operations), there is a subsequent functional
reorganization
of processing single stimuli, whether verbs or numbers. This reorganization -
their weakened laterality - at least for response accuracy is not exclusive
to
processing of numbers, but the number of items to be processed. For response
times, except for unpredictable tasks in mixed contexts, the "number problem"
is
more apparent. These outcomes are highly relevant to difficulties that
simultaneous translators encounter when dealing with lengthy auditory
material in
which single items such as number words (and possibly other types of key
words)
need to be emphasized. Our results may also shed a new light on the
"mathematical
savant problem".
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Klichowski, Michal
AU - Klichowski M
AD - Faculty of Educational Studies, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poznan,
Poland. Electronic address: klichowski.michal@gmail.com.
FAU - Kroliczak, Gregory
AU - Kroliczak G
AD - Action and Cognition Laboratory, Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social
Sciences, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poznan, Poland. Electronic
address: krolgreg@amu.edu.pl.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170414
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adult
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - *Dichotic Listening Tests
MH - Female
MH - Functional Laterality/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Mathematics
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Multilingualism
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - Verbal Behavior/*physiology
MH - Visual Fields/*physiology
MH - Vocabulary
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Action words
OT - *Arabic numerals
OT - *Arithmetic operations
OT - *Interpreter problem
OT - *Number words
OT - *Symbolic numbers
EDAT- 2017/04/18 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/13 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/18 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/08 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/08 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/04/11 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/04/18 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/13 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/04/18 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(17)30149-5 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.04.019 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2017 Jun;100:93-109. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.04.019. Epub 2017 Apr 14.

PMID- 28407509
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171103
LR - 20180216
IS - 1090-2155 (Electronic)
IS - 0093-934X (Linking)
VI - 170
DP - 2017 Jul
TI - Infant word segmentation recruits the cerebral network of phonological short-
term
memory.
PG - 39-49
LID - S0093-934X(16)30191-2 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.bandl.2017.03.005 [doi]
AB - Segmenting word units from running speech is a fundamental skill infants must
develop in order to acquire language. Despite ample behavioral evidence of
this
skill, its neurocognitive basis remains unclear. Using behavioral testing and
functional near-infrared spectroscopy, we aimed to uncover the neurocognitive
substrates of word segmentation and its development. Of three age-groups of
Japanese infants (5-6, 7-8, and 9-10months of age), the two older age-groups
showed significantly larger temporo-parietal (particularly supramarginal
gyrus)
responses to target words repeatedly presented for training, than to control
words. After the training, they also exhibited stronger inferior frontal
responses to target words embedded in sentences. These findings suggest that
word
segmentation largely involves a cerebral circuit of phonological (phonetic)
short-term memory. The dorsal pathway involved in encoding and decoding
phonological representation may start to function stably at around 7months of
age
to facilitate the growth of the infant's vocabulary.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Minagawa, Yasuyo
AU - Minagawa Y
AD - Department of Psychology, Faculty of Letters, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi,
Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa-ken 223-8521, Japan; Graduate School of Human
Relations, Keio University, 2-15-45 Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8345, Japan;
CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan. Electronic address:
myasuyo@bea.hi-ho.ne.jp.
FAU - Hakuno, Yoko
AU - Hakuno Y
AD - Graduate School of Human Relations, Keio University, 2-15-45 Mita, Minato-ku,
Tokyo 108-8345, Japan.
FAU - Kobayashi, Ai
AU - Kobayashi A
AD - Graduate School of Human Relations, Keio University, 2-15-45 Mita, Minato-ku,
Tokyo 108-8345, Japan.
FAU - Naoi, Nozomi
AU - Naoi N
AD - Graduate School of Human Relations, Keio University, 2-15-45 Mita, Minato-ku,
Tokyo 108-8345, Japan; CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan.
FAU - Kojima, Shozo
AU - Kojima S
AD - Department of Psychology, Faculty of Letters, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi,
Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa-ken 223-8521, Japan.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170410
PL - Netherlands
TA - Brain Lang
JT - Brain and language
JID - 7506220
SB - IM
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Infant
MH - Japan
MH - *Language
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/*physiology
MH - Phonetics
MH - Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
MH - Speech
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Vocabulary
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Dorsal pathway
OT - *Inferior frontal gyrus
OT - *NIRS
OT - *Phonological short-term memory
OT - *Supra marginal gyrus
OT - *Word segmentation
EDAT- 2017/04/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/04 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/14 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/27 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/01 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/03/02 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/04/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/04 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/04/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0093-934X(16)30191-2 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.bandl.2017.03.005 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain Lang. 2017 Jul;170:39-49. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2017.03.005. Epub 2017
Apr
10.

PMID- 28384805
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170728
LR - 20181113
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 4
DP - 2017 Apr 14
TI - Speech Recognition in Adults With Cochlear Implants: The Effects of Working
Memory, Phonological Sensitivity, and Aging.
PG - 1046-1061
LID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0119 [doi]
AB - Purpose: Models of speech recognition suggest that "top-down" linguistic and
cognitive functions, such as use of phonotactic constraints and working
memory,
facilitate recognition under conditions of degradation, such as in noise. The
question addressed in this study was what happens to these functions when a
listener who has experienced years of hearing loss obtains a cochlear
implant.
Method: Thirty adults with cochlear implants and 30 age-matched controls with
age-normal hearing underwent testing of verbal working memory using digit
span
and serial recall of words. Phonological capacities were assessed using a
lexical
decision task and nonword repetition. Recognition of words in sentences in
speech-shaped noise was measured. Results: Implant users had only slightly
poorer
working memory accuracy than did controls and only on serial recall of words;
however, phonological sensitivity was highly impaired. Working memory did not
facilitate speech recognition in noise for either group. Phonological
sensitivity
predicted sentence recognition for implant users but not for listeners with
normal hearing. Conclusion: Clinical speech recognition outcomes for adult
implant users relate to the ability of these users to process phonological
information. Results suggest that phonological capacities may serve as
potential
clinical targets through rehabilitative training. Such novel interventions
may be
particularly helpful for older adult implant users.
FAU - Moberly, Aaron C
AU - Moberly AC
AD - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Wexner Medical Center,
The
Ohio State University, Columbus.
FAU - Harris, Michael S
AU - Harris MS
AD - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Wexner Medical Center,
The
Ohio State University, Columbus.
FAU - Boyce, Lauren
AU - Boyce L
AD - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Wexner Medical Center,
The
Ohio State University, Columbus.
FAU - Nittrouer, Susan
AU - Nittrouer S
AD - Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida,
Gainesville.
LA - eng
GR - R01 DC000633/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 DC006237/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - UL1 TR001070/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - *Cochlear Implants
MH - Decision Making
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Loss/psychology/rehabilitation
MH - Humans
MH - Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Mental Recall
MH - Mental Status Schedule
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Pattern Recognition, Physiological
MH - *Phonetics
MH - Reaction Time
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - *Speech Perception
PMC - PMC5548076
EDAT- 2017/04/07 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/07 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/25 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/10/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/04/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/04/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2617804 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0119 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Apr 14;60(4):1046-1061. doi:
10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0119.

PMID- 28384751
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170728
LR -20181113
IS -1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS -1092-4388 (Linking)
VI -60
IP -4
DP -2017 Apr 14
TI -A Diagnostic Marker to Discriminate Childhood Apraxia of Speech From Speech
Delay: III. Theoretical Coherence of the Pause Marker with Speech Processing
Deficits in Childhood Apraxia of Speech.
PG - S1135-S1152
LID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0298 [doi]
AB - Purpose: Previous articles in this supplement described rationale for and
development of the pause marker (PM), a diagnostic marker of childhood
apraxia of
speech (CAS), and studies supporting its validity and reliability. The
present
article assesses the theoretical coherence of the PM with speech processing
deficits in CAS. Method: PM and other scores were obtained for 264
participants
in 6 groups: CAS in idiopathic, neurogenetic, and complex neurodevelopmental
disorders; adult-onset apraxia of speech (AAS) consequent to stroke and
primary
progressive apraxia of speech; and idiopathic speech delay. Results:
Participants
with CAS and AAS had significantly lower scores than typically speaking
reference
participants and speech delay controls on measures posited to assess
representational and transcoding processes. Representational deficits
differed
between CAS and AAS groups, with support for both underspecified linguistic
representations and memory/access deficits in CAS, but for only the latter in
AAS. CAS-AAS similarities in the age-sex standardized percentages of
occurrence
of the most frequent type of inappropriate pauses (abrupt) and significant
differences in the standardized occurrence of appropriate pauses were
consistent
with speech processing findings. Conclusions: Results support the hypotheses
of
core representational and transcoding speech processing deficits in CAS and
theoretical coherence of the PM's pause-speech elements with these deficits.
FAU - Shriberg, Lawrence D
AU - Shriberg LD
AD - Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
FAU - Strand, Edythe A
AU - Strand EA
AD - Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic-Rochester, NY.
FAU - Fourakis, Marios
AU - Fourakis M
AD - Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
FAU - Jakielski, Kathy J
AU - Jakielski KJ
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Augustana College, Rock
Island, IL.
FAU - Hall, Sheryl D
AU - Hall SD
AD - Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
FAU - Karlsson, Heather B
AU - Karlsson HB
AD - Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
FAU - Mabie, Heather L
AU - Mabie HL
AD - Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
FAU - McSweeny, Jane L
AU - McSweeny JL
AD - Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
FAU - Tilkens, Christie M
AU - Tilkens CM
AD - Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
FAU - Wilson, David L
AU - Wilson DL
AD - Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
LA - eng
GR - P30 HD003352/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 DC000496/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Apraxias/*diagnosis/etiology
MH - Child
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Diagnosis, Differential
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language Development Disorders/*diagnosis
MH - Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Models, Theoretical
MH - *Speech
MH - Speech Articulation Tests
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5548088
EDAT- 2017/04/07 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/07 06:00
PHST- 2015/08/24 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/08/21 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/04/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/04/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2617251 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0298 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Apr 14;60(4):S1135-S1152. doi:
10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0298.

PMID- 28383957
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180529
LR - 20180712
IS - 1939-1285 (Electronic)
IS - 0278-7393 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 10
DP - 2017 Oct
TI - Accumulating evidence about what prospective memory costs actually reveal.
PG - 1616-1629
LID - 10.1037/xlm0000400 [doi]
AB - Event-based prospective memory (PM) tasks require participants to substitute
an
atypical PM response for an ongoing task response when presented with PM
targets.
Responses to ongoing tasks are often slower with the addition of PM demands
("PM
costs"). Prominent PM theories attribute costs to capacity-sharing between
the
ongoing and PM tasks, which reduces the rate of processing of the ongoing
task.
We modeled PM costs using the Linear Ballistic Accumulator and the Diffusion
Decision Model in a lexical-decision task with nonfocal PM targets defined by
semantic categories. Previous decision modeling, which attributed costs to
changes in caution rather than rate of processing (Heathcote et al., 2015;
Horn &
Bayen, 2015), could be criticized on the grounds that the PM tasks included
did
not sufficiently promote capacity-sharing. Our semantic PM task was
potentially
more dependent on lexical decision resources than previous tasks (Marsh,
Hicks, &
Cook, 2005), yet costs were again driven by changes in threshold and not by
changes in processing speed (drift rate). Costs resulting from a single
target
focal PM task were also driven by threshold changes. The increased thresholds
underlying nonfocal and focal costs were larger for word trials than nonword
trials. As PM targets were always words, this suggests that threshold
increases
are used to extend the time available for retrieval on PM trials. Under
nonfocal
conditions, but not focal conditions, the nonword threshold also increased.
Thus,
it seems that only nonfocal instructions cause a global threshold increase
because of greater perceived task complexity. (PsycINFO Database Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Strickland, Luke
AU - Strickland L
AD - The School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia.
FAU - Heathcote, Andrew
AU - Heathcote A
AD - The School of Medicine, The University of Tasmania.
FAU - Remington, Roger W
AU - Remington RW
AD - The School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.
FAU - Loft, Shayne
AU - Loft S
AD - The School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia.
LA - eng
GR - Australian Research Council
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170406
PL - United States
TA - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn
JT - Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
JID - 8207540
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Decision Making
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Likelihood Functions
MH - Linear Models
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Episodic
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Models, Psychological
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual
MH - Psychological Tests
MH - Reading
MH - Semantics
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/04/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/31 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/07 06:00
PHST- 2017/04/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/31 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/04/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2017-15248-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/xlm0000400 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2017 Oct;43(10):1616-1629. doi:
10.1037/xlm0000400.
Epub 2017 Apr 6.

PMID- 28382870
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180514
LR - 20180530
IS - 1874-6128 (Electronic)
IS - 1874-6098 (Linking)
VI - 10
IP - 3
DP - 2017
TI - Late versus Early Onset Depression in Elderly Patients: Vascular Risk and
Cognitive Impairment.
PG - 211-216
LID - 10.2174/1874609810666170404105634 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Three-quarters of patients with major depressive disorder have
late-onset depression. Late-onset depression is more often associated with
cognitive impairment than earlyonset depression and evidences showed a
relationship between vascular factors and late-life depression. OBJECTIVES:
To
compare cognitive functions between late-onset (&amp;ge;60 years) and early-
onset
(<60 years) depression in elderly patients and to highlight the effect of
vascular risk factors in elderly patients with late and early onset
depression.
METHODS: This was a cross sectional, case control study with consecutive
referral
done on eighty elderly patients with depression who were recruited from
Geriatric
Outpatient Clinic of Psychiatry and Addiction Prevention Hospital, Al Kasr
Al-Ainy, Cairo University. They were divided into two groups according to the
age
of onset of depression: Late Onset Depression (LOD) group and Early Onset
Depression (EOD) group. They were cognitively assessed using ACE III,
Framingham
risk score for vascular risk assessment. RESULTS: Late onset group had worse
performance than early onset group regarding memory, verbal fluency,
language,
visuospatial abilities and had more vascular risk. CONCLUSION: Elderly
patients
with late onset depression had higher severity of depression as well as they
were
more cognitively affected regarding memory, verbal fluency, language, and
visuospatial abilities. Vascular risk factors especially hypertension and
diabetes mellitus were higher elderly patients with late onset depression and
affects the severity of depression and degree of cognitive impairment.
CI - Copyright(c) Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at
epub@benthamscience.org.
FAU - Hashem, Abdelhamid H
AU - Hashem AH
AD - Psychiatry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo. Egypt.
FAU - M, Nasreldin
AU - M N
AD - Psychiatry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo. Egypt.
FAU - Gomaa, Maged A
AU - Gomaa MA
AD - Psychiatry Department, Kasr Al-Ainy, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University,
El-Manial, Cairo. Egypt.
FAU - Khalaf, Ola O
AU - Khalaf OO
AD - Psychiatry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo. Egypt.
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PL - United Arab Emirates
TA - Curr Aging Sci
JT - Current aging science
JID - 101473576
SB - IM
MH - *Affect
MH - Age of Onset
MH - Aged
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - *Cognition
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis/epidemiology/*psychology
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - Depression/diagnosis/epidemiology/*psychology
MH - Egypt/epidemiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Male
MH - Memory
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Risk Assessment
MH - Risk Factors
MH - Severity of Illness Index
MH - Space Perception
MH - Vascular Diseases/diagnosis/epidemiology/*psychology
MH - Verbal Behavior
MH - Visual Perception
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Depression
OT - *cognitive impairment
OT - *elderly
OT - *framingham risk score
OT - *neurologic diseases
OT - *vascular risk
EDAT- 2017/04/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/15 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/07 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/08 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/03/22 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/03/22 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/04/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/15 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/04/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - CAS-EPUB-82623 [pii]
AID - 10.2174/1874609810666170404105634 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Curr Aging Sci. 2017;10(3):211-216. doi: 10.2174/1874609810666170404105634.

PMID- 28377157
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180222
LR - 20181005
IS - 1872-6240 (Electronic)
IS - 0006-8993 (Linking)
VI - 1664
DP - 2017 Jun 1
TI - Age effects on associative memory for novel picture pairings.
PG - 102-115
LID - S0006-8993(17)30146-4 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.03.031 [doi]
AB - Normal aging is usually accompanied by greater memory decline for
associations
than for single items. Though associative memory is generally supported by
recollection, it has been suggested that familiarity can also contribute to
associative memory when stimuli can be unitized and encoded as a single
entity.
Given that familiarity remains intact during healthy aging, this may be one
route
to reducing age-related associative deficits. The current study investigated
age-related differences in associative memory under conditions that were
expected
to differentially promote unitization, in this case by manipulating the
spatial
arrangement of two semantically unrelated objects positioned relative to each
other in either spatially implausible or plausible orientations. Event-
related
potential (ERP) correlates of item and associative memory were recorded
whilst
younger and older adults were required to discriminate between old,
recombined
and new pairs of objects. These ERP correlates of item and associative memory
did
not vary with plausibility, whereas behavioral measures revealed that both
associative and item memory were greater for spatially plausible than
implausible
pair arrangements. Contrary to predictions, older adults were less able to
take
advantage of this memory benefit than younger participants. Potential reasons
for
this are considered, and these are informed by those lines of evidence which
indicate older participants were less sensitive to the bottom-up spatial
manipulation employed here. It is recommended that future strategies for
redressing age-related associative deficits should take account of the aging
brain's increasing reliance on pre-existing semantic associations.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights
reserved.
FAU - Bridger, Emma K
AU - Bridger EK
AD - Division of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, Birmingham City
University,
Birmingham, UK. Electronic address: emma.bridger@bcu.ac.uk.
FAU - Kursawe, Anna-Lena
AU - Kursawe AL
AD - Experimental Neuropsychology Unit, Department of Psychology, Saarland
University,
Saarbrucken, Germany.
FAU - Bader, Regine
AU - Bader R
AD - Experimental Neuropsychology Unit, Department of Psychology, Saarland
University,
Saarbrucken, Germany.
FAU - Tibon, Roni
AU - Tibon R
AD - Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, The Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya,
Israel; MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK.
FAU - Gronau, Nurit
AU - Gronau N
AD - Department of Psychology, Cognitive Science Studies, The Open University of
Israel, Raanana, Israel.
FAU - Levy, Daniel A
AU - Levy DA
AD - Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, The Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya,
Israel.
FAU - Mecklinger, Axel
AU - Mecklinger A
AD - Experimental Neuropsychology Unit, Department of Psychology, Saarland
University,
Saarbrucken, Germany.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170402
PL - Netherlands
TA - Brain Res
JT - Brain research
JID - 0045503
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - *Aging
MH - Association Learning/*physiology
MH - Cerebral Cortex/*physiology
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Evoked Potentials
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Semantics
MH - Visual Perception
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Aging
OT - *Associative memory
OT - *Episodic memory
OT - *Event-related potentials
OT - *Unitization
EDAT- 2017/04/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/23 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/06 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/14 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/18 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/03/29 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/04/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/23 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/04/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0006-8993(17)30146-4 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.03.031 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain Res. 2017 Jun 1;1664:102-115. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.03.031. Epub
2017 Apr 2.

PMID- 28376689
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180220
LR - 20180220
IS - 1465-3656 (Electronic)
IS - 1355-4794 (Linking)
VI - 23
IP - 1
DP - 2017 Feb
TI - A nonmusician with severe Alzheimer's dementia learns a new song.
PG - 36-40
LID - 10.1080/13554794.2017.1287278 [doi]
AB - The hallmark symptom of Alzheimer's Dementia (AD) is impaired memory, but
memory
for familiar music can be preserved. We explored whether a non-musician with
severe AD could learn a new song. A 91 year old woman (NC) with severe AD was
taught an unfamiliar song. We assessed her delayed song recall (24 hours and
2
weeks), music cognition, two word recall (presented within a familiar song
lyric,
a famous proverb, or as a word stem completion task), and lyrics and proverb
completion. NC's music cognition (pitch and rhythm perception, recognition of
familiar music, completion of lyrics) was relatively preserved. She recalled
0/2
words presented in song lyrics or proverbs, but 2/2 word stems, suggesting
intact
implicit memory function. She could sing along to the newly learnt song on
immediate and delayed recall (24 hours and 2 weeks later), and with
intermittent
prompting could sing it alone. This is the first detailed study of preserved
ability to learn a new song in a non-musician with severe AD, and contributes
to
observations of relatively preserved musical abilities in people with
dementia.
FAU - Baird, Amee
AU - Baird A
AD - a Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its
Disorders
and Psychology Department , Macquarie University , Sydney , Australia.
FAU - Umbach, Heidi
AU - Umbach H
AD - a Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its
Disorders
and Psychology Department , Macquarie University , Sydney , Australia.
FAU - Thompson, William Forde
AU - Thompson WF
AD - a Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its
Disorders
and Psychology Department , Macquarie University , Sydney , Australia.
LA - eng
PT - Case Reports
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170221
PL - England
TA - Neurocase
JT - Neurocase
JID - 9511374
SB - IM
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*complications
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Learning Disorders/*etiology
MH - Mental Recall/*physiology
MH - *Music
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Singing/*physiology
MH - Vocabulary
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Alzheimer's Dementia
OT - Music
OT - memory
OT - singing
EDAT- 2017/04/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/06 06:00
PHST- 2017/04/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/04/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/21 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1080/13554794.2017.1287278 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neurocase. 2017 Feb;23(1):36-40. doi: 10.1080/13554794.2017.1287278. Epub
2017
Feb 21.

PMID- 28367655
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180827
LR - 20180827
IS - 1651-2022 (Electronic)
IS - 1401-5439 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 1
DP - 2018 Apr
TI - The effect of voice quality and competing speakers in a passage comprehension
task: perceived effort in relation to cognitive functioning and performance
in
children with normal hearing.
PG - 32-41
LID - 10.1080/14015439.2017.1307446 [doi]
AB - The study investigates the effect of voice quality and competing speakers on
perceived effort in a passage comprehension task in relation to cognitive
functioning. In addition, it explores if perceived effort was related to
performance. A total of 49 children (aged 7:03 to 12:02 years) with normal
hearing participated. The children performed an auditory passage
comprehension
task presented with six different listening conditions consisting of a
typical
voice or a dysphonic voice presented in quiet, with one competing speaker,
and
with four competing speakers. After completing the task, they rated their
perceived effort on a five-grade scale. The children also performed tasks
measuring working memory capacity (WMC) and executive functioning. The
results
show that voice quality had no direct effect on perceived effort but the
children's ratings of perceived effort were related to their executive
functioning. A significant effect was seen for background listening condition
indicating higher perceived effort for background listening conditions with
competing speakers. The effects of background listening condition were mainly
related to the children's WMC but also their executive functioning. It can be
concluded that the individual susceptibility to the effect of the dysphonic
voice
is related to the child's executive functioning. The individual
susceptibility to
the presence of competing speakers is related to the child's WMC and
executive
functioning.
FAU - von Lochow, Heike
AU - von Lochow H
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences in
Lund
, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Lyberg-Ahlander, Viveka
AU - Lyberg-Ahlander V
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences in
Lund
, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
AD - b Linneaus' Environment Cognition, Communication and Learning , Lund
University ,
Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Sahlen, Birgitta
AU - Sahlen B
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences in
Lund
, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Kastberg, Tobias
AU - Kastberg T
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences in
Lund
, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Brannstrom, K Jonas
AU - Brannstrom KJ
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences in
Lund
, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170403
PL - England
TA - Logoped Phoniatr Vocol
JT - Logopedics, phoniatrics, vocology
JID - 9617311
SB - IM
MH - Age Factors
MH - Child
MH - *Child Behavior
MH - *Cognition
MH - *Comprehension
MH - Dysphonia/diagnosis/*physiopathology
MH - Executive Function
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - Noise/*adverse effects
MH - *Perceptual Masking
MH - *Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - *Voice Quality
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Children
OT - dysphonic voice
OT - executive function
OT - multitalker babble noise
OT - voice quality
OT - working memory
EDAT- 2017/04/04 06:00
MHDA- 2018/08/28 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/04 06:00
PHST- 2017/04/04 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/08/28 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/04/04 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/14015439.2017.1307446 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Logoped Phoniatr Vocol. 2018 Apr;43(1):32-41. doi:
10.1080/14015439.2017.1307446.
Epub 2017 Apr 3.

PMID- 28333505
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171128
LR - 20181113
IS - 1939-1498 (Electronic)
IS - 0882-7974 (Linking)
VI - 32
IP - 4
DP - 2017 Jun
TI - Competing cues: Older adults rely on knowledge in the face of fluency.
PG - 331-337
LID - 10.1037/pag0000156 [doi]
AB - Consumers regularly encounter repeated false claims in political and
marketing
campaigns, but very little empirical work addresses their impact among older
adults. Repeated statements feel easier to process, and thus more truthful,
than
new ones (i.e., illusory truth). When judging truth, older adults'
accumulated
general knowledge may offset this perception of fluency. In two experiments,
participants read statements that contradicted information stored in memory;
a
post-experimental knowledge check confirmed what individual participants
knew.
Unlike young adults, older adults exhibited illusory truth only when they
lacked
knowledge about claims. This interaction between knowledge and fluency
extends
dual-process theories of aging. (PsycINFO Database Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Brashier, Nadia M
AU - Brashier NM
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-8039-9477
AD - Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University.
FAU - Umanath, Sharda
AU - Umanath S
AD - Department of Psychology, Claremont McKenna College.
FAU - Cabeza, Roberto
AU - Cabeza R
AD - Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University.
FAU - Marsh, Elizabeth J
AU - Marsh EJ
AD - Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University.
LA - eng
GR - R01 AG019731/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
DEP - 20170323
PL - United States
TA - Psychol Aging
JT - Psychology and aging
JID - 8904079
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - *Cues
MH - Deception
MH - Emotions
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Illusions
MH - *Judgment
MH - *Knowledge
MH - Male
MH - Memory/physiology
MH - *Perception
MH - Reading
MH - Social Behavior
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5476227
MID - NIHMS862242
EDAT- 2017/03/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/24 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/03/24 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2017-12894-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/pag0000156 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Psychol Aging. 2017 Jun;32(4):331-337. doi: 10.1037/pag0000156. Epub 2017 Mar
23.

PMID- 28332938
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180910
LR - 20180910
IS - 1747-0226 (Electronic)
IS - 1747-0218 (Linking)
VI - 71
IP - 5
DP - 2018 May
TI - Semantic transparency affects morphological priming . . . eventually.
PG - 1112-1124
LID - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1310915 [doi]
AB - Semantic transparency has been in the focus of psycholinguistic research for
decades, with the controversy about the time course of the application of
morpho-semantic information during the processing of morphologically complex
words not yet resolved. This study reports two masked priming studies with
English - ness and Russian - ost' nominalisations, investigating how semantic
transparency modulates native speakers' morphological priming effects at
short
and long stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). In both languages, we found
increased morphological priming for nominalisations at the transparent end of
the
scale (e.g. paleness - pale) in comparison to items at the opaque end of the
scale (e.g. business - busy) but only at longer prime durations. The present
findings are in line with models that posit an initial phase of
morpho-orthographic (semantically blind) decomposition.
FAU - Heyer, Vera
AU - Heyer V
AD - Potsdam Research Institute for Multilingualism, University of Potsdam,
Potsdam,
Germany.
FAU - Kornishova, Dana
AU - Kornishova D
AD - Potsdam Research Institute for Multilingualism, University of Potsdam,
Potsdam,
Germany.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20180101
PL - England
TA - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)
JT - Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)
JID - 101259775
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Perceptual Masking
MH - Phonetics
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - *Psycholinguistics
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Semantics
MH - Vocabulary
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Semantic transparency
OT - derivation
OT - masked priming
OT - morpho-orthographic versus morpho-semantic
EDAT- 2017/03/24 06:00
MHDA- 2018/09/11 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/24 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/09/11 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/03/24 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1310915 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2018 May;71(5):1112-1124. doi:
10.1080/17470218.2017.1310915. Epub 2018 Jan 1.

PMID- 28326947
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180910
LR - 20180910
IS - 1747-0226 (Electronic)
IS - 1747-0218 (Linking)
VI - 71
IP - 5
DP - 2018 May
TI - Change deafness, dual-task performance, and domain-specific expertise.
PG - 1100-1111
LID - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1310266 [doi]
AB - In a change deafness manipulation using radio broadcasts of sporting events,
we
show that change deafness to a switch in talker increases when listeners are
asked to monitor both lexical and indexical information for change. We held
semantic content constant and demonstrated a change deafness rate of 85% when
participants listened to the home team broadcast of a hockey game that
switched
midway to the away team broadcast with a different announcer. In Study 2,
participants were asked to monitor either the indexical characteristics
( listen
for a change in announcer) or both the indexical and semantic components
( listen
for a change in announcer or a goal scored). Monitoring both components led
to
significantly greater change deafness even though both groups were alerted to
the
possibility of a change in announcer. In Study 3, we changed both the
indexical
and the semantic components when the broadcast switched from a hockey game to
a
basketball game. We found a negative correlation between sports expertise and
change deafness. The results are discussed in terms of the nature of
perceptual
representation and the influence of expertise and evolution on attention
allocation.
FAU - Neuhoff, John G
AU - Neuhoff JG
AD - Department of Psychology, The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH, USA.
FAU - Bochtler, Katharina S
AU - Bochtler KS
AD - Department of Psychology, The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH, USA.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20180101
PL - England
TA - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)
JT - Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)
JID - 101259775
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adult
MH - Attention/*physiology
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - Deafness/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Discrimination (Psychology)
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Linguistics
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Professional Competence
MH - Reaction Time
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Semantics
MH - Sports/psychology
MH - Statistics as Topic
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Change deafness
OT - auditory attention
OT - evolution
OT - expertise
OT - perceptual representation
OT - sports
EDAT- 2017/03/23 06:00
MHDA- 2018/09/11 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/23 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/23 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/09/11 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/03/23 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1310266 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2018 May;71(5):1100-1111. doi:
10.1080/17470218.2017.1310266. Epub 2018 Jan 1.

PMID- 28294712
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180319
LR - 20180319
IS - 1530-8898 (Electronic)
IS - 0898-929X (Linking)
VI - 29
IP - 7
DP - 2017 Jul
TI - Frequency and Chunking in Derived Words: A Parametric fMRI Study.
PG - 1162-1177
LID - 10.1162/jocn_a_01120 [doi]
AB - In usage-based linguistic theories, the assumption that high-frequency
language
strings are mentally represented as unitary chunks has been invoked to
account
for a wide range of phenomena. However, neurocognitive evidence in support of
this assumption is still lacking. In line with Gestalt psychological
assumptions,
we propose that a language string qualifies as a chunk if the following two
conditions are simultaneously satisfied: The perception of the whole string
does
not involve strong activation of its individual component parts, but the
component parts in isolation strongly evoke the whole. Against this
background,
we explore the relationship between different frequency metrics and the chunk
status of derived words (e.g., "government," "worthless") in a masked visual
priming experiment with two conditions of interest. One condition
investigates
"whole-to-part" priming (worthless-WORTH), whereas the other one analyzes
"part-to-whole" priming (tear-TEARLESS). Both conditions combine mixed-
effects
regression analyses of lexical decision RTs with a parametric fMRI design.
Relative frequency (the frequency of the whole word relative to that of its
onset-embedded part) emerges as the only frequency metric to correlate with
chunk
status in behavioral terms. The fMRI results show that relative frequency
modulates activity in regions that have been related to morphological
(de)composition or general task performance difficulty (notably left inferior
frontal areas) and in regions associated with competition between whole,
undecomposed words (right inferior frontal areas). We conclude that relative
frequency affects early stages of processing, thereby supporting the usage-
based
concept of frequency-induced chunks.
FAU - Blumenthal-Drame, Alice
AU - Blumenthal-Drame A
AD - University of Freiburg.
FAU - Glauche, Volkmar
AU - Glauche V
AD - University of Freiburg.
FAU - Bormann, Tobias
AU - Bormann T
AD - University of Freiburg.
FAU - Weiller, Cornelius
AU - Weiller C
AD - University of Freiburg.
FAU - Musso, Mariacristina
AU - Musso M
AD - University of Freiburg.
FAU - Kortmann, Bernd
AU - Kortmann B
AD - University of Freiburg.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170315
PL - United States
TA - J Cogn Neurosci
JT - Journal of cognitive neuroscience
JID - 8910747
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Brain/diagnostic imaging/*physiology
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Linguistics
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - Reaction Time
MH - *Reading
MH - Repetition Priming/physiology
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/03/16 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/16 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/20 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/03/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1162/jocn_a_01120 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Cogn Neurosci. 2017 Jul;29(7):1162-1177. doi: 10.1162/jocn_a_01120. Epub
2017
Mar 15.

PMID- 28287289
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180827
LR - 20180827
IS - 1651-2022 (Electronic)
IS - 1401-5439 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 1
DP - 2018 Apr
TI - The effect of voice quality and competing speakers in a passage comprehension
task: performance in relation to cognitive functioning in children with
normal
hearing.
PG - 11-19
LID - 10.1080/14015439.2017.1298835 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: This study explores the effect of voice quality and competing
speaker/-s on children's performance in a passage comprehension task.
Furthermore, it explores the interaction between passage comprehension and
cognitive functioning. METHODS: Forty-nine children (27 girls and 22 boys)
with
normal hearing (aged 7-12 years) participated. Passage comprehension was
tested
in six different listening conditions; a typical voice (non-dysphonic voice)
in
quiet, a typical voice with one competing speaker, a typical voice with four
competing speakers, a dysphonic voice in quiet, a dysphonic voice with one
competing speaker, and a dysphonic voice with four competing speakers. The
children's working memory capacity and executive functioning were also
assessed.
RESULTS: The findings indicate no direct effect of voice quality on the
children's performance, but a significant effect of background listening
condition. Interaction effects were seen between voice quality, background
listening condition, and executive functioning. CONCLUSIONS: The children's
susceptibility to the effect of the dysphonic voice and the background
listening
conditions are related to the individual's executive functions. The findings
have
several implications for design of interventions in language learning
environments such as classrooms.
FAU - von Lochow, Heike
AU - von Lochow H
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology , Clinical Sciences in
Lund, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Lyberg-Ahlander, Viveka
AU - Lyberg-Ahlander V
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology , Clinical Sciences in
Lund, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
AD - b Linneaus' Environment Cognition, Communication and Learning , Lund
University ,
Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Sahlen, Birgitta
AU - Sahlen B
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology , Clinical Sciences in
Lund, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Kastberg, Tobias
AU - Kastberg T
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology , Clinical Sciences in
Lund, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
FAU - Brannstrom, K Jonas
AU - Brannstrom KJ
AD - a Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology , Clinical Sciences in
Lund, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170313
PL - England
TA - Logoped Phoniatr Vocol
JT - Logopedics, phoniatrics, vocology
JID - 9617311
SB - IM
MH - Age Factors
MH - Child
MH - *Child Behavior
MH - *Cognition
MH - *Comprehension
MH - Dysphonia/diagnosis/*physiopathology
MH - Executive Function
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - Noise/*adverse effects
MH - *Perceptual Masking
MH - *Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
MH - *Voice Quality
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Background listening conditions
OT - dysphonic voice
OT - executive functioning
OT - noise
OT - working memory
EDAT- 2017/03/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/08/28 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/14 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/08/28 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/03/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/14015439.2017.1298835 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Logoped Phoniatr Vocol. 2018 Apr;43(1):11-19. doi:
10.1080/14015439.2017.1298835.
Epub 2017 Mar 13.

PMID- 28280879
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180319
LR - 20181113
IS - 1432-1106 (Electronic)
IS - 0014-4819 (Linking)
VI - 235
IP - 6
DP - 2017 Jun
TI - Enhanced verbal abilities in the congenitally blind.
PG - 1709-1718
LID - 10.1007/s00221-017-4931-6 [doi]
AB - Numerous studies have found that congenitally blind individuals have better
verbal memory than their normally sighted counterparts. However, it is not
known
whether this reflects superiority of verbal or memory abilities. In order to
distinguish between these possibilities, we tested congenitally blind
participants and normally sighted control participants, matched for age and
education, on a range of verbal and spatial tasks. Congenitally blind
participants were significantly better than sighted controls on all the
verbal
tasks but the groups did not differ significantly on the spatial tasks. Thus,
the
congenitally blind appear to have superior verbal, but not spatial,
abilities.
This may reflect greater reliance on verbal information and the involvement
of
visual cortex in language processing in the congenitally blind.
FAU - Occelli, Valeria
AU - Occelli V
AD - Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA,
30322,
USA.
FAU - Lacey, Simon
AU - Lacey S
AD - Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA,
30322,
USA.
FAU - Stephens, Careese
AU - Stephens C
AD - Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA,
30322,
USA.
AD - Rehabilitation R&D Center for Visual and Neurocognitive Rehabilitation,
Atlanta
VAMC, Decatur, GA, USA.
FAU - Merabet, Lotfi B
AU - Merabet LB
AD - The Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity, Massachusetts Eye and Ear
Infirmary,
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
AD - Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
FAU - Sathian, K
AU - Sathian K
AD - Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA,
30322,
USA. krish.sathian@emory.edu.
AD - Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
krish.sathian@emory.edu.
AD - Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. krish.sathian@emory.edu.
AD - Rehabilitation R&D Center for Visual and Neurocognitive Rehabilitation,
Atlanta
VAMC, Decatur, GA, USA. krish.sathian@emory.edu.
LA - eng
GR - R01 EY012440/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 EY019924/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170309
PL - Germany
TA - Exp Brain Res
JT - Experimental brain research
JID - 0043312
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Blindness/*congenital/*physiopathology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Imagination/*physiology
MH - *Language
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/*physiology
MH - Mental Recall/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Space Perception/*physiology
MH - Spatial Memory/*physiology
MH - Speech Perception/physiology
MH - Verbal Learning/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5436932
MID - NIHMS858912
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Digit span
OT - *Imagery
OT - *Memory
OT - *Spatial
EDAT- 2017/03/11 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/11 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/19 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/21 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/03/11 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/20 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/03/11 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1007/s00221-017-4931-6 [doi]
AID - 10.1007/s00221-017-4931-6 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Exp Brain Res. 2017 Jun;235(6):1709-1718. doi: 10.1007/s00221-017-4931-6.
Epub
2017 Mar 9.

PMID- 28253505
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180309
LR - 20180319
IS - 1421-9972 (Electronic)
IS - 1021-7762 (Linking)
VI - 68
IP - 4
DP - 2016
TI - Event-Related Potentials Reflect Deficits in Lexical Access: The N200 in
Prematurely Born School-Aged Children.
PG - 189-198
LID - 10.1159/000450886 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES: Children born preterm have a high prevalence of neurocognitive
deficits early in life. We examined whether the neural correlates of lexical
access are atypical in 9-year-old children born preterm, and whether the
findings
of acoustic mapping correlate with language- and attention-related skills.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: The subjects were fourteen 9-year-old children born
preterm
and 14 full-term, typically developing controls. Two auditory event-related
potential (ERP) components, the N200 and the N400, were used to assess
discrimination response and word recognition. A set of behavioral tests
(naming
ability, auditory attention, phonological processing, pseudoword repetition,
and
comprehension of instructions) was performed, and the results were compared
with
the amplitudes, latencies, and scalp distribution of the ERP results.
RESULTS: In
prematurely born children, neurophysiological deficits were associated with
difficulties in auditory discrimination. The N200 amplitude correlated
significantly with auditory attention and pseudoword repetition. The scalp
distribution of both the N200 and the N400 was broader in children born
preterm
than in the controls. Low scores in the neuropsychological tasks referred to
difficulties in auditory processing and memory. CONCLUSIONS: Children born
preterm have difficulties in lexical access together with memory- and
attention-related processes, which may have a longstanding impact on their
school
outcomes and academic skills.
CI - (c) 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.
FAU - Korpilahti, Pirjo
AU - Korpilahti P
AD - Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku,
Turku, Finland.
FAU - Valkama, Marita
AU - Valkama M
FAU - Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira
AU - Jansson-Verkasalo E
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170303
PL - Switzerland
TA - Folia Phoniatr Logop
JT - Folia phoniatrica et logopaedica : official organ of the International
Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP)
JID - 9422792
SB - IM
MH - *Attention
MH - *Auditory Perception
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - Child
MH - Comprehension
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - *Evoked Potentials, Auditory
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Phonation
MH - *Premature Birth
EDAT- 2017/03/03 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/10 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/03 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/03/03 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 000450886 [pii]
AID - 10.1159/000450886 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Folia Phoniatr Logop. 2016;68(4):189-198. doi: 10.1159/000450886. Epub 2017
Mar
3.

PMID- 28253009
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171004
LR - 20181113
IS - 1939-2222 (Electronic)
IS - 0022-1015 (Linking)
VI - 146
IP - 3
DP - 2017 Mar
TI - Motor experience influences object knowledge.
PG - 395-408
LID - 10.1037/xge0000269 [doi]
AB - An object's perceived readiness-for-action (e.g., its size, the degree of
rotation from its canonical position, the user's viewpoint) can influence
semantic knowledge retrieval. Yet, the organization of object knowledge may
also
be affected by body-specific sensorimotor experiences. Here, we investigated
whether people's history of performing motor actions with their hands
influences
the knowledge they store and retrieve about graspable objects. We compared
object
representations between healthy right- and left-handers (Experiment 1), and
between unilateral stroke patients, whose motor experience was changed by
impairment of either their right or left hand (Experiment 2). Participants
saw
pictures of graspable everyday items with the handles oriented toward either
the
left or right hand, and they generated the type of grasp they would employ
(i.e.,
clench or pinch) when using each object, responding orally. In both
experiments,
hand dominance and object orientation interacted to predict response times.
In
Experiment 1, judgments were fastest when objects were oriented toward the
right
hand in right-handers, but not in left-handers. In Experiment 2, judgments
were
fastest when objects were oriented toward the left hand in patients who had
lost
the use of their right hand, even though these patients were right-handed
prior
to brain injury. Results suggest that at least some aspects of object
knowledge
are determined by motor experience, and can be changed by new patterns of
motor
experience. People with different bodily characteristics, who interact with
objects in systematically different ways, form correspondingly different
neurocognitive representations of the same common objects. (PsycINFO Database
Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Chrysikou, Evangelia G
AU - Chrysikou EG
AD - Department of Psychology.
FAU - Casasanto, Daniel
AU - Casasanto D
AD - Department of Psychology, Grossman Institute for Neuroscience, University of
Chicago.
FAU - Thompson-Schill, Sharon L
AU - Thompson-Schill SL
AD - Department of Psychology, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of
Pennsylvania.
LA - eng
GR - R01 DC009209/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 MH070850/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
GR - R21 MH083029/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - J Exp Psychol Gen
JT - Journal of experimental psychology. General
JID - 7502587
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Apraxia, Ideomotor/*psychology
MH - Female
MH - *Form Perception
MH - *Functional Laterality
MH - *Hand Strength
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Orientation, Spatial
MH - *Psychomotor Performance
MH - *Reaction Time/physiology
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Retention (Psychology)
MH - Semantics
MH - Stroke/psychology
MH - Verbal Learning
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5335879
MID - NIHMS837939
EDAT- 2017/03/03 06:00
MHDA- 2017/10/05 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/03 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/03 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/03/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/10/05 06:00 [medline]
AID - 2017-08779-002 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/xge0000269 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Exp Psychol Gen. 2017 Mar;146(3):395-408. doi: 10.1037/xge0000269.

PMID- 28252991
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180502
LR - 20180502
IS - 1939-1285 (Electronic)
IS - 0278-7393 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 9
DP - 2017 Sep
TI - Reading time allocation strategies and working memory using rapid serial
visual
presentation.
PG - 1375-1386
LID - 10.1037/xlm0000392 [doi]
AB - Rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) is a useful method for controlling
the
timing of text presentations and studying how readers' characteristics, such
as
working memory (WM) and reading strategies for time allocation, influence
text
recall. In the current study, a modified version of RSVP (Moving Window RSVP
[MW-RSVP]) was used to induce longer pauses at the ends of clauses and ends
of
sentences when reading texts with multiple embedded clauses. We studied if WM
relates to allocation of time at end of clauses or sentences in a self-paced
reading task and in 2 MW-RSVP reading conditions (Constant MW-RSVP and Paused
MW-RSVP) in which the reading rate was kept constant or pauses were induced.
Higher WM span readers were more affected by the restriction of time
allocation
in the MW-RSVP conditions. In addition, the recall of both higher and lower
WM-span readers benefited from the paused MW-RSVP presentation. (PsycINFO
Database Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Busler, Jessica N
AU - Busler JN
AD - Department of Psychology, Auburn University.
FAU - Lazarte, Alejandro A
AU - Lazarte AA
AD - Department of Psychology, Auburn University.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170302
PL - United States
TA - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn
JT - Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
JID - 8207540
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Mental Recall
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Pattern Recognition, Visual
MH - Photic Stimulation/methods
MH - Psychological Tests
MH - *Reading
MH - Time Factors
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/03/03 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/03/03 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/03/03 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2017-09443-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/xlm0000392 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2017 Sep;43(9):1375-1386. doi:
10.1037/xlm0000392.
Epub 2017 Mar 2.

PMID- 28240937
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180413
LR - 20180413
IS - 1939-1285 (Electronic)
IS - 0278-7393 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 8
DP - 2017 Aug
TI - Age-related differences in face recognition: Neural correlates of repetition
and
semantic priming in young and older adults.
PG - 1254-1273
LID - 10.1037/xlm0000380 [doi]
AB - Difficulties in person recognition are among the common complaints associated
with cognitive ageing. The present series of experiments therefore
investigated
face and person recognition in young and older adults. The authors examined
how
within-domain and cross-domain repetition as well as semantic priming affect
familiar face recognition and analyzed both behavioral and event-related
brain
potential (ERP) measures to identify specific processing stages of age-
related
deficits. During repetition priming (Experiments 1 and 2), the authors
observed
evidence of an age-related deficit in behavioral priming and clear reductions
of
both the N250r and the N400 ERP priming effects in older participants. At the
same time, both semantic priming (Experiment 3) and the associated N400 ERP
effect of semantic priming were largely intact in older adults. The authors
suggest that ageing selectively affects the access to domain-general
representations of familiar people via bottom-up perceptual processing units.
At
the same time, accessing domain-general representations via top-down semantic
units seems to be relatively preserved in older adults. (PsycINFO Database
Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Wiese, Holger
AU - Wiese H
AD - Department of Psychology, Durham University.
FAU - Komes, Jessica
AU - Komes J
AD - Department of Psychology, Durham University.
FAU - Tuttenberg, Simone
AU - Tuttenberg S
AD - Department of Psychology, Durham University.
FAU - Leidinger, Jana
AU - Leidinger J
AD - Department of General Psychology, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena.
FAU - Schweinberger, Stefan R
AU - Schweinberger SR
AD - Department of General Psychology and Person Perception Research Unit,
Friedrich
Schiller University of Jena.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170227
PL - United States
TA - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn
JT - Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
JID - 8207540
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Brain/*physiology
MH - Cognitive Aging/*physiology/psychology
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Evoked Potentials
MH - Facial Recognition/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Psychometrics
MH - Reaction Time
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Repetition Priming/*physiology
MH - *Semantics
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/02/28 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/14 06:00
CRDT- 2017/02/28 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/28 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/14 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/02/28 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2017-08709-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/xlm0000380 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2017 Aug;43(8):1254-1273. doi:
10.1037/xlm0000380.
Epub 2017 Feb 27.

PMID- 28201836
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180508
LR - 20180510
IS - 1098-9056 (Electronic)
IS - 0734-0478 (Linking)
VI - 38
IP - 1
DP - 2017 Feb
TI - Working Memory in Aphasia: Considering Discourse Processing and Treatment
Implications.
PG - 40-51
LID - 10.1055/s-0036-1597257 [doi]
AB - Evidence suggests that persons with aphasia (PWAs) present with working
memory
impairments that affect a variety of language tasks. Most of these studies
have
focused on the phonological loop component of working memory and little
attention
has been paid to the episodic buffer component. The episodic buffer, as a
limited
capacity, multimodal system that binds and integrates information from the
phonological loop, visuospatial sketchpad, and long-term memory would likely
be
involved in discourse processing. The purposes of this article were to (1)
review
discourse level deficits associated with aphasia, (2) describe how a deficit
at
the level of the episodic buffer could cause such deficits, (3) to review
discourse treatment approaches for PWAs, and (4) present preliminary results
from
a novel discourse treatment study for PWAs.
CI - Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
FAU - Henderson, Amy
AU - Henderson A
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University,
Greenville, North Carolina.
FAU - Kim, Hana
AU - Kim H
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University,
Greenville, North Carolina.
FAU - Kintz, Stephen
AU - Kintz S
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University,
Greenville, North Carolina.
FAU - Frisco, Nicole
AU - Frisco N
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University,
Greenville, North Carolina.
FAU - Wright, Heather Harris
AU - Wright HH
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University,
Greenville, North Carolina.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
DEP - 20170215
PL - United States
TA - Semin Speech Lang
JT - Seminars in speech and language
JID - 8405117
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aphasia/diagnosis/*psychology/*rehabilitation/*therapy
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory Disorders/*diagnosis/*psychology/*therapy
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Phonetics
MH - Retention (Psychology)
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - *Verbal Behavior
EDAT- 2017/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/09 06:00
CRDT- 2017/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/09 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1055/s-0036-1597257 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Semin Speech Lang. 2017 Feb;38(1):40-51. doi: 10.1055/s-0036-1597257. Epub
2017
Feb 15.

PMID- 28199471
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180220
LR - 20180329
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 60
IP - 2
DP - 2017 Feb 1
TI - Influence of Cognitive Ability on Therapy Outcomes for Anomia in Adults With
Chronic Poststroke Aphasia.
PG - 406-421
LID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0384 [doi]
AB - Purpose: The relationship between cognitive abilities and aphasia
rehabilitation
outcomes is complex and remains poorly understood. This study investigated
the
influence of language and cognitive abilities on anomia therapy outcomes in
adults with aphasia. Method: Thirty-four adults with chronic aphasia
participated
in Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy. A language and
cognitive
assessment battery, including 3 baseline naming probes, was administered
prior to
therapy. Naming accuracy for 30 treated and 30 untreated items was collected
at
posttherapy and 1-month follow-up. Multiple regression models were computed
to
evaluate the relationship between language and cognitive abilities at
baseline
and anomia therapy outcomes. Results: Both language and cognitive variables
significantly influenced anomia therapy gains. Verbal short-term memory
ability
significantly predicted naming gains for treated items at posttherapy (beta =
-.551, p = .002) and for untreated items at posttherapy (beta = .456, p = .
014)
and 1-month follow-up (beta = .455, p = .021). Furthermore, lexical-semantic
processing significantly predicted naming gains for treated items at
posttherapy
(beta = -.496, p = .004) and 1-month follow-up (beta = .545, p = .012).
Conclusions: Our findings suggest that individuals' cognitive ability,
specifically verbal short-term memory, affects anomia treatment success.
Further
research into the relationship between cognitive ability and anomia therapy
outcomes may help to optimize treatment techniques.
FAU - Dignam, Jade
AU - Dignam J
AD - The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Herston,
Queensland,
AustraliaSchool of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of
Queensland, St. Lucia, AustraliaNational Health and Medical Research Council
Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aphasia Rehabilitation, Brisbane,
Queensland, Australia.
FAU - Copland, David
AU - Copland D
AD - The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Herston,
Queensland,
AustraliaSchool of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of
Queensland, St. Lucia, AustraliaNational Health and Medical Research Council
Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aphasia Rehabilitation, Brisbane,
Queensland, Australia.
FAU - O'Brien, Kate
AU - O'Brien K
AD - The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Herston,
Queensland,
Australia.
FAU - Burfein, Penni
AU - Burfein P
AD - Speech Pathology Department, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, Herston,
Queensland, Australia.
FAU - Khan, Asaduzzaman
AU - Khan A
AD - School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland,
St.
Lucia, Australia.
FAU - Rodriguez, Amy D
AU - Rodriguez AD
AD - The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Herston,
Queensland,
AustraliaSchool of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of
Queensland, St. Lucia, AustraliaNational Health and Medical Research Council
Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aphasia Rehabilitation, Brisbane,
Queensland, Australia.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Anomia/etiology/*psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Aphasia/etiology/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Attention
MH - Chronic Disease
MH - *Cognition
MH - Executive Function
MH - Female
MH - Follow-Up Studies
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - *Language Therapy
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pattern Recognition, Physiological
MH - Regression Analysis
MH - Speech Perception
MH - Stroke/*complications/psychology
MH - Stroke Rehabilitation
MH - Treatment Outcome
MH - Visual Perception
EDAT- 2017/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2015/11/05 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/07/15 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/21 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2604539 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0384 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Feb 1;60(2):406-421. doi:
10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0384.

PMID- 28195019
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180108
LR - 20180716
IS - 1467-9280 (Electronic)
IS - 0956-7976 (Linking)
VI - 27
IP - 12
DP - 2016 Dec
TI - Do You See the Forest or the Tree? Neural Gain and Breadth Versus Focus in
Perceptual Processing.
PG - 1632-1643
LID - 10.1177/0956797616665578 [doi]
AB - When perceiving rich sensory information, some people may integrate its
various
aspects, whereas other people may selectively focus on its most salient
aspects.
We propose that neural gain modulates the trade-off between breadth and
selectivity, such that high gain focuses perception on those aspects of the
information that have the strongest, most immediate influence, whereas low
gain
allows broader integration of different aspects. We illustrate our hypothesis
using a neural-network model of ambiguous-letter perception. We then report
an
experiment demonstrating that, as predicted by the model, pupil-diameter
indices
of higher gain are associated with letter perception that is more selectively
focused on the letter's shape or, if primed, its semantic content. Finally,
we
report a recognition-memory experiment showing that the relationship between
gain
and selective processing also applies when the influence of different
stimulus
features is voluntarily modulated by task demands.
FAU - Eldar, Eran
AU - Eldar E
AD - 1 Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London.
AD - 2 Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research,
University College London.
FAU - Niv, Yael
AU - Niv Y
AD - 3 Princeton Neuroscience Institute.
AD - 4 Psychology Department, Princeton University.
FAU - Cohen, Jonathan D
AU - Cohen JD
AD - 3 Princeton Neuroscience Institute.
AD - 4 Psychology Department, Princeton University.
LA - eng
GR - HHMI/Howard Hughes Medical Institute/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20161019
PL - United States
TA - Psychol Sci
JT - Psychological science
JID - 9007542
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Attention/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Fixation, Ocular/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory/physiology
MH - Mental Processes/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Nerve Net/*physiology
MH - Perception/*physiology
MH - Pupil/physiology
MH - Reaction Time/*physiology
MH - Semantics
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *attention
OT - *memory
OT - *neural gain
OT - *neural network
OT - *perception
OT - *pupillometry
EDAT- 2017/02/15 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/09 06:00
CRDT- 2017/02/15 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/15 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/02/15 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/09 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1177/0956797616665578 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Psychol Sci. 2016 Dec;27(12):1632-1643. doi: 10.1177/0956797616665578. Epub
2016
Oct 19.

PMID- 28182494
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170817
LR - 20181115
IS - 1939-1498 (Electronic)
IS - 0882-7974 (Linking)
VI - 32
IP - 1
DP - 2017 Feb
TI - Dynamic adjustments of attentional control in healthy aging.
PG - 1-15
LID - 10.1037/pag0000148 [doi]
AB - In standard attentional control tasks, interference effects are reduced
following
incongruent trials compared to congruent trials, a phenomenon known as the
congruency sequence effect (CSE). Typical explanations of this effect suggest
the
CSE is due to changes in levels of control across adjacent trials. This
interpretation has been questioned by the finding that older adults,
individuals
with impaired attentional control systems, have been shown to produce larger
CSEs
in the Stroop task compared with younger adult controls. In 2 experiments, we
investigate the generality of this finding by examining how the CSE changes
in
healthy aging in 3 standard attentional control tasks-Stroop, Simon, and
flanker-while controlling for additional confounds that have plagued some of
the
past literature. In both experiments, older adult participants exhibited a
larger
CSE in the Stroop task, replicating recent research, but smaller CSEs in both
the
Simon and flanker paradigms. These results are interpreted as reflecting a
pathway priming mechanism in the Stroop task but a control adjustment process
in
Simon and flanker. Hence, there appears to be different mechanisms underlying
the
CSE which are engaged based on the type of attentional selection that is
required
by the task. More generally, these results question the use of the CSE in the
Stroop task as a measure of dynamic adjustments in attentional control and
highlight the importance of consideration of task-specific control systems
underlying the CSE. (PsycINFO Database Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Aschenbrenner, Andrew J
AU - Aschenbrenner AJ
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-4317-7282
AD - Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St.
Louis.
FAU - Balota, David A
AU - Balota DA
AD - Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St.
Louis.
LA - eng
GR - T32 AG000030/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Webcasts
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - Psychol Aging
JT - Psychology and aging
JID - 8904079
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - *Attention
MH - *Color Perception
MH - Discrimination (Psychology)
MH - Female
MH - *Field Dependence-Independence
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - Orientation
MH - *Pattern Recognition, Visual
MH - Reaction Time
MH - *Semantics
MH - Stroop Test
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5309925
MID - NIHMS846323
EDAT- 2017/02/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/02/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/10 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/02/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/18 06:00 [medline]
AID - 2017-05890-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/pag0000148 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Psychol Aging. 2017 Feb;32(1):1-15. doi: 10.1037/pag0000148.

PMID- 28131013
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171116
LR - 20181113
IS - 1558-1497 (Electronic)
IS - 0197-4580 (Linking)
VI - 52
DP - 2017 Apr
TI - Abnormal vocal behavior predicts executive and memory deficits in Alzheimer's
disease.
PG - 71-80
LID - S0197-4580(16)30333-5 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2016.12.020 [doi]
AB - Speakers respond automatically and rapidly to compensate for brief
perturbations
of pitch in their auditory feedback. The specific adjustments in vocal output
require integration of brain regions involved in speech-motor-control in
order to
detect the sensory-feedback error and implement the motor correction.
Cortical
regions involved in the pitch reflex phenomenon are highly vulnerable targets
of
network disruption in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We examined the pitch reflex
in
AD patients (n = 19) compared to an age-matched control group (n = 16). We
measured the degree of behavioral compensation (peak compensation) and the
extent
of the adaptive response (pitch-response persistence). Healthy-controls
reached a
peak compensation of 18.7 +/- 0.8 cents, and demonstrated a sustained
compensation at 8.9 +/- 0.69 cents. AD patients, in contrast, demonstrated a
significantly elevated peak compensation (22.4 +/- 1.2 cents, p < 0.05), and
a
reduced sustained response (pitch-response persistence, 4.5 +/- 0.88 cents, p
<
0.001). The degree of increased peak compensation predicted executive
dysfunction, while the degree of impaired pitch-response persistence
predicted
memory dysfunction, in AD patients. The current study demonstrates pitch
reflex
as a sensitive behavioral index of impaired prefrontal modulation of
sensorimotor
integration, and compromised plasticity mechanisms of memory, in AD.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Ranasinghe, Kamalini G
AU - Ranasinghe KG
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address:
kamalini.ranasinghe@ucsf.edu.
FAU - Gill, Jeevit S
AU - Gill JS
AD - Speech Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck
Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Kothare, Hardik
AU - Kothare H
AD - Speech Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck
Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA;
Biomagnetic Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical
Imaging,
University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Beagle, Alexander J
AU - Beagle AJ
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Mizuiri, Danielle
AU - Mizuiri D
AD - Biomagnetic Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical
Imaging,
University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Honma, Susanne M
AU - Honma SM
AD - Biomagnetic Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical
Imaging,
University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa
AU - Gorno-Tempini ML
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Miller, Bruce L
AU - Miller BL
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Vossel, Keith A
AU - Vossel KA
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California
San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Gladstone Institute of Neurological
Disease,
San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Nagarajan, Srikantan S
AU - Nagarajan SS
AD - Speech Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck
Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA;
Biomagnetic Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical
Imaging,
University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Houde, John F
AU - Houde JF
AD - Speech Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck
Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA;
Biomagnetic Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical
Imaging,
University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic
address: houde@phy.ucsf.edu.
LA - eng
GR - P50 AG023501/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - K23 AG038357/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - U01 AG052943/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R21 DC014525/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R21 NS076171/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
GR - P01 AG019724/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 NS100440/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 NS050915/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 DC013979/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 DC010145/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - K24 DC015544/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - F32 AG050434/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 NS066654/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170103
PL - United States
TA - Neurobiol Aging
JT - Neurobiology of aging
JID - 8100437
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*physiopathology/*psychology
MH - *Executive Function
MH - Feedback, Sensory/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Forecasting
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Memory
MH - Memory Disorders/*physiopathology/*psychology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pitch Perception/*physiology
MH - Prefrontal Cortex/*physiopathology
MH - Reflex/*physiology
MH - Speech/*physiology
MH - Verbal Behavior/*physiology
PMC - PMC5359035
MID - NIHMS846541
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Alzheimer's disease
OT - *Executive dysfunction
OT - *Network disruption
OT - *Pitch perturbation
OT - *Prefrontal modulation
OT - *Sensorimotor integration
EDAT- 2017/01/29 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/29 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/12 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/07 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/12/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/01/29 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/29 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0197-4580(16)30333-5 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2016.12.020 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neurobiol Aging. 2017 Apr;52:71-80. doi:
10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2016.12.020.
Epub 2017 Jan 3.

PMID- 28122382
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170417
LR - 20170417
IS - 1439-1899 (Electronic)
IS - 0174-304X (Linking)
VI - 48
IP - 2
DP - 2017 Apr
TI - Auditory Processing in Children with Migraine: A Controlled Study.
PG - 123-126
LID - 10.1055/s-0037-1598046 [doi]
AB - Background This study aimed to investigate central auditory processing
performance in children with migraine and compared with controls without
headache. Methods Twenty-eight children of both sexes, aged between 8 and 12
years, diagnosed with migraine with and without aura, and a control group of
the
same age range and with no headache history, were included. Gaps-in-noise
(GIN),
duration pattern test (DPT), synthetic sentence identification (SSI) test,
and
nonverbal dichotic test (NVDT) were used to assess central auditory
processing
performance. Results Children with migraine performed significantly worse in
DPT,
SSI test, and NVDT when compared with controls without headache; however, no
significant differences were found in the GIN test. Conclusions Children with
migraine demonstrate impairment in the physiologic mechanism of temporal
processing and selective auditory attention. In our short communication,
migraine
could be related to impaired central auditory processing in children.
CI - Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.
FAU - Agessi, Larissa Mendonca
AU - Agessi LM
AD - Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Federal University of Sao
Paulo,
UNIFESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
FAU - Villa, Thais Rodrigues
AU - Villa TR
AD - Division of Investigation and Treatment of Headaches (DITH), Department of
Neurology and Neurosurgery, Federal University of Sao Paulo, UNIFESP, Sao
Paulo,
Brazil.
FAU - Carvalho, Deusvenir de Souza
AU - Carvalho DS
AD - Division of Investigation and Treatment of Headaches (DITH), Department of
Neurology and Neurosurgery, Federal University of Sao Paulo, UNIFESP, Sao
Paulo,
Brazil.
FAU - Pereira, Liliane Desgualdo
AU - Pereira LD
AD - Division of Investigation and Treatment of Headaches (DITH), Department of
Neurology and Neurosurgery, Federal University of Sao Paulo, UNIFESP, Sao
Paulo,
Brazil.
LA - eng
PT - Controlled Clinical Trial
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170125
PL - Germany
TA - Neuropediatrics
JT - Neuropediatrics
JID - 8101187
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation/methods
MH - Attention
MH - *Auditory Perception
MH - Auditory Perceptual Disorders/complications/physiopathology/psychology
MH - Child
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Tests
MH - Humans
MH - Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Memory
MH - Migraine with Aura/complications/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Migraine without Aura/complications/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
EDAT- 2017/01/26 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/26 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/04/18 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/26 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1055/s-0037-1598046 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropediatrics. 2017 Apr;48(2):123-126. doi: 10.1055/s-0037-1598046. Epub
2017
Jan 25.

PMID- 28106560
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180221
LR - 20180605
IS - 1875-8908 (Electronic)
IS - 1387-2877 (Linking)
VI - 56
IP - 3
DP - 2017
TI - Face-Name Associative Recognition Deficits in Subjective Cognitive Decline
and
Mild Cognitive Impairment.
PG - 1185-1196
LID - 10.3233/JAD-160637 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: There is a need for more sensitive neuropsychological tests to
detect
subtle cognitive deficits emerging in the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's
disease (AD). Associative memory is a cognitive function supported by the
hippocampus and affected early in the process of AD. OBJECTIVE: We developed
a
short computerized face-name associative recognition test (FNART) and tested
whether it would detect memory impairment in memory clinic patients with mild
cognitive impairment (MCI) and subjective cognitive decline (SCD). METHODS:
We
recruited 61 elderly patients with either SCD (n = 32) or MCI (n = 29) and 28
healthy controls (HC) and compared performance on FNART, self-reported
cognitive
deterioration in different domains (ECog-39), and, in a reduced sample (n =
46),
performance on the visual Paired Associates Learning of the CANTAB battery.
RESULTS: A significant effect of group on FNART test performance in the total
sample was found (p < 0.001). Planned contrasts indicated a significantly
lower
associative memory performance in the SCD (p = 0.001, d = 0.82) and MCI group
(p
< 0.001, d = 1.54), as compared to HCs, respectively. The CANTAB-PAL
discriminated only between HC and MCI, possibly because of reduced
statistical
power. Adjusted for depression, performance on FNART was significantly
related to
ECog-39 Memory in SCD patients (p = 0.024) but not in MCI patients.
CONCLUSIONS:
Associative memory is substantially impaired in memory clinic patients with
SCD
and correlates specifically with memory complaints at this putative
preclinical
stage of AD. Further studies will need to examine the predictive validity of
the
FNART in SCD patients with regard to longitudinal (i.e., conversion to
MCI/AD)
and biomarker outcomes.
FAU - Polcher, Alexandra
AU - Polcher A
AD - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
AD - Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Germany.
FAU - Frommann, Ingo
AU - Frommann I
AD - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
AD - Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Germany.
FAU - Koppara, Alexander
AU - Koppara A
AD - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
AD - Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Germany.
FAU - Wolfsgruber, Steffen
AU - Wolfsgruber S
AD - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
AD - Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Germany.
FAU - Jessen, Frank
AU - Jessen F
AD - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
AD - Department of Psychiatry, University of Cologne, Germany.
FAU - Wagner, Michael
AU - Wagner M
AD - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
AD - Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Germany.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Alzheimers Dis
JT - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
JID - 9814863
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - *Association Learning
MH - Cognition
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/*diagnosis/psychology
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - *Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
MH - *Facial Recognition
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Mental Status and Dementia Tests
MH - *Names
MH - *Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Perception
MH - Reaction Time
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Self Report
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Alzheimer's disease
OT - *associative memory
OT - *cognition
OT - *early detection
OT - *hippocampus
OT - *mild cognitive impairment
OT - *neuropsychological tests
OT - *recognition
OT - *subjective cognitive decline
EDAT- 2017/01/21 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/22 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/21 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/21 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/22 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/21 06:00 [entrez]
AID - JAD160637 [pii]
AID - 10.3233/JAD-160637 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;56(3):1185-1196. doi: 10.3233/JAD-160637.

PMID- 28092773
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170824
LR - 20180207
IS - 1873-7838 (Electronic)
IS - 0010-0277 (Linking)
VI - 161
DP - 2017 Apr
TI - How does a newly encountered face become familiar? The effect of within-
person
variability on adults' and children's perception of identity.
PG - 19-30
LID - S0010-0277(16)30307-9 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.cognition.2016.12.012 [doi]
AB - Adults and children aged 6years and older easily recognize multiple images of
a
familiar face, but often perceive two images of an unfamiliar face as
belonging
to different identities. Here we examined the process by which a newly
encountered face becomes familiar, defined as accurate recognition of
multiple
images that capture natural within-person variability in appearance. In
Experiment 1 we examined whether exposure to within-person variability in
appearance helps children learn a new face. Children aged 6-13years watched a
10-min video of a woman reading a story; she was filmed on a single day (low
variability) or over three days, across which her appearance and filming
conditions (e.g., camera, lighting) varied (high variability). After
familiarization, participants sorted a set of images comprising novel images
of
the target identity intermixed with distractors. Compared to participants who
received no familiarization, children showed evidence of learning only in the
high-variability condition, in contrast to adults who showed evidence of
learning
in both the low- and high-variability conditions. Experiment 2 highlighted
the
efficiency with which adults learn a new face; their accuracy was comparable
across training conditions despite variability in duration (1 vs. 10min) and
type
(video vs. static images) of training. Collectively, our findings show that
exposure to variability leads to the formation of a robust representation of
facial identity, consistent with perceptual learning in other domains (e.g.,
language), and that the development of face learning is protracted throughout
childhood. We discuss possible underlying mechanisms.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.
FAU - Baker, Kristen A
AU - Baker KA
AD - Department of Psychology, Brock University, St Catharines, Canada.
FAU - Laurence, Sarah
AU - Laurence S
AD - Department of Psychology, Brock University, St Catharines, Canada; School of
Psychology, Keele University, UK.
FAU - Mondloch, Catherine J
AU - Mondloch CJ
AD - Department of Psychology, Brock University, St Catharines, Canada. Electronic
address: cmondloch@brocku.ca.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170113
PL - Netherlands
TA - Cognition
JT - Cognition
JID - 0367541
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Child
MH - *Facial Recognition
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Children's face learning
OT - *Face recognition
OT - *Perceptual development
OT - *Perceptual learning
OT - *Within-person variability
EDAT- 2017/01/17 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/25 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/17 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/14 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/22 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/12/26 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/01/17 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/25 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/17 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0010-0277(16)30307-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cognition.2016.12.012 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cognition. 2017 Apr;161:19-30. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2016.12.012. Epub
2017
Jan 13.

PMID- 28088063
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170707
LR - 20180126
IS - 1090-2147 (Electronic)
IS - 0278-2626 (Linking)
VI - 113
DP - 2017 Apr
TI - Verbal and musical short-term memory: Variety of auditory disorders after
stroke.
PG - 10-22
LID - S0278-2626(16)30179-8 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.bandc.2017.01.003 [doi]
AB - Auditory cognitive deficits after stroke may concern language and/or music
processing, resulting in aphasia and/or amusia. The aim of the present study
was
to assess the potential deficits of auditory short-term memory for verbal and
musical material after stroke and their underlying cerebral correlates with a
Voxel-based Lesion Symptom Mapping approach (VLSM). Patients with an ischemic
stroke in the right (N=10) or left (N=10) middle cerebral artery territory
and
matched control participants (N=14) were tested with a detailed
neuropsychological assessment including global cognitive functions, music
perception and language tasks. All participants then performed verbal and
musical
auditory short-term memory (STM) tasks that were implemented in the same way
for
both materials. Participants had to indicate whether series of four words or
four
tones presented in pairs, were the same or different. To detect domain-
general
STM deficits, they also had to perform a visual STM task. Behavioral results
showed that patients had lower performance for the STM tasks in comparison
with
control participants, regardless of the material (words, tones, visual) and
the
lesion side. The individual patient data showed a double dissociation between
some patients exhibiting verbal deficits without musical deficits or the
reverse.
Exploratory VLSM analyses suggested that dorsal pathways are involved in
verbal
(phonetic), musical (melodic), and visual STM, while the ventral auditory
pathway
is involved in musical STM.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Hirel, Catherine
AU - Hirel C
AD - INSERM, U1028, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Brain Dynamics and
Cognition
Team, Lyon F-69000, France; CNRS, UMR5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center,
Auditory Cognition and Psychoacoustics Team, Lyon F-69000, France; University
Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69000, France; Stroke Department, Hospices Civils de
Lyon,
Hopital Neurologique Pierre Wertheimer, Bron F-69000, France. Electronic
address:
cat.hirel@gmail.com.
FAU - Nighoghossian, Norbert
AU - Nighoghossian N
AD - University Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69000, France; Stroke Department, Hospices
Civils de Lyon, Hopital Neurologique Pierre Wertheimer, Bron F-69000, France;
CREATIS, CNRS, UMR5220, INSERM, U1044, University Lyon 1, F-69000, France.
FAU - Leveque, Yohana
AU - Leveque Y
AD - INSERM, U1028, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Brain Dynamics and
Cognition
Team, Lyon F-69000, France; CNRS, UMR5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center,
Auditory Cognition and Psychoacoustics Team, Lyon F-69000, France; University
Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69000, France.
FAU - Hannoun, Salem
AU - Hannoun S
AD - University Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69000, France; CREATIS, CNRS, UMR5220,
INSERM,
U1044, University Lyon 1, F-69000, France.
FAU - Fornoni, Lesly
AU - Fornoni L
AD - INSERM, U1028, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Brain Dynamics and
Cognition
Team, Lyon F-69000, France; University Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69000, France.
FAU - Daligault, Sebastien
AU - Daligault S
AD - CERMEP, MEG Department, Bron F-69000, France.
FAU - Bouchet, Patrick
AU - Bouchet P
AD - INSERM, U1028, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Brain Dynamics and
Cognition
Team, Lyon F-69000, France; University Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69000, France.
FAU - Jung, Julien
AU - Jung J
AD - INSERM, U1028, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Brain Dynamics and
Cognition
Team, Lyon F-69000, France; University Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69000, France;
Stroke Department, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Neurologique Pierre
Wertheimer, Bron F-69000, France.
FAU - Tillmann, Barbara
AU - Tillmann B
AD - CNRS, UMR5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Auditory Cognition and
Psychoacoustics Team, Lyon F-69000, France; University Lyon 1, Villeurbanne
F-69000, France.
FAU - Caclin, Anne
AU - Caclin A
AD - INSERM, U1028, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Brain Dynamics and
Cognition
Team, Lyon F-69000, France; University Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69000, France.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170111
PL - United States
TA - Brain Cogn
JT - Brain and cognition
JID - 8218014
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aphasia/etiology/*physiopathology
MH - Brain Ischemia/complications/*physiopathology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Music
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Stroke/complications/*physiopathology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Amusia
OT - *Aphasia
OT - *Dual stream model
OT - *MRI
OT - *VLSM
EDAT- 2017/01/15 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/08 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/15 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/05 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/01/01 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/01/02 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/01/15 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/08 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/15 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0278-2626(16)30179-8 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.bandc.2017.01.003 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain Cogn. 2017 Apr;113:10-22. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2017.01.003. Epub 2017
Jan
11.

PMID- 28077002
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170228
LR - 20170228
IS - 0219-6352 (Print)
IS - 0219-6352 (Linking)
VI - 15
IP - 4
DP - 2016 Dec
TI - Pupil size behavior during online processing of sentences.
PG - 485-496
LID - 10.1142/S0219635216500266 [doi]
AB - In the present work we analyzed the pupil size behavior of 40 subjects while
they
read well-defined sentences with different contextual predictability (i.e.,
regular sentences and proverbs). In general, pupil size increased when
reading
regular sentences, but when readers realized that they were reading proverbs
their pupils strongly increase until finishing proverbs' reading. Our results
suggest that an increased pupil size is not limited to cognitive load (i.e.,
relative difficulty in processing) because when participants accurately
recognized words during reading proverbs, theirs pupil size increased too.
Our
results show that pupil size dynamics may be a reliable measure to
investigate
the cognitive processes involved in sentence processing and memory
functioning.
FAU - Fernandez, G
AU - Fernandez G
AD - * Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Instituto de Investigaciones, en
Ingenieria
Electrica (IIIE) (UNS-CONICET), Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
FAU - Biondi, J
AU - Biondi J
AD - * Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Instituto de Investigaciones, en
Ingenieria
Electrica (IIIE) (UNS-CONICET), Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
AD - dagger Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Departamento de Ciencias, e
Ingenieria
de la Computacion, Laboratorio de visualizacion y computacion grafica
(VyGLab),
Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
FAU - Castro, S
AU - Castro S
AD - dagger Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Departamento de Ciencias, e
Ingenieria
de la Computacion, Laboratorio de visualizacion y computacion grafica
(VyGLab),
Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
FAU - Agamenonni, O
AU - Agamenonni O
AD - * Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Instituto de Investigaciones, en
Ingenieria
Electrica (IIIE) (UNS-CONICET), Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
AD - double dagger Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas, de la Provincia de
Buenos
Aires (CIC), Argentina.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20170111
PL - England
TA - J Integr Neurosci
JT - Journal of integrative neuroscience
JID - 101156357
SB - IM
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - Psychological Tests
MH - Pupil/*physiology
MH - *Reading
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Reading
OT - memory
OT - proverbs
OT - pupil size
EDAT- 2017/01/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/01 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/13 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/03/01 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/13 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1142/S0219635216500266 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Integr Neurosci. 2016 Dec;15(4):485-496. doi: 10.1142/S0219635216500266.
Epub
2017 Jan 11.

PMID- 28077000
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170606
LR - 20170606
IS - 1744-4144 (Electronic)
IS - 1385-4046 (Linking)
VI - 31
IP - 3
DP - 2017 Apr
TI - Specificity rates for non-clinical, bilingual, Mexican Americans on three
popular
performance validity measures.
PG - 587-597
LID - 10.1080/13854046.2016.1277786 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: To measure specificity as failure rates for non-clinical,
bilingual,
Mexican Americans on three popular performance validity measures: (a) the
language format Reliable Digit Span; (b) visual-perceptual format Test of
Memory
Malingering; and (c) visual-perceptual format Dot Counting, using
optimal/suboptimal effort cut scores developed for monolingual, English-
speakers.
METHODS: Participants were 61 consecutive referrals, aged between 18 and 65
years, with <16 years of education who were subjectively bilingual (confirmed
via
formal assessment) and chose the language of assessment, Spanish or English,
for
the performance validity tests. RESULTS: Failure rates were 38% for Reliable
Digit Span, 3% for the Test of Memory Malingering, and 7% for Dot Counting.
For
Reliable Digit Span, the failure rates for Spanish (46%) and English (31%)
languages of administration did not differ significantly. CONCLUSIONS:
Optimal/suboptimal effort cut scores derived for monolingual English-speakers
can
be used with Spanish/English bilinguals when using the visual-perceptual
format
Test of Memory Malingering and Dot Counting. The high failure rate for
Reliable
Digit Span suggests it should not be used as a performance validity measure
with
Spanish/English bilinguals, irrespective of the language of test
administration,
Spanish or English.
FAU - Gasquoine, Philip G
AU - Gasquoine PG
AD - a Department of Psychological Science , University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
,
Edinburg , TX , USA.
FAU - Weimer, Amy A
AU - Weimer AA
AD - a Department of Psychological Science , University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
,
Edinburg , TX , USA.
FAU - Amador, Arnoldo
AU - Amador A
AD - a Department of Psychological Science , University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
,
Edinburg , TX , USA.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Validation Studies
DEP - 20170112
PL - England
TA - Clin Neuropsychol
JT - The Clinical neuropsychologist
JID - 8806548
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Malingering/diagnosis/psychology
MH - Memory
MH - Mexican Americans/*psychology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Multilingualism
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Psychomotor Performance
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Visual Perception
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Hispanic Americans
OT - *Spanish-English bilingualism
OT - *effort in neuropsychological testing
OT - *false positive rates
OT - *symptom validity tests
EDAT- 2017/01/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/13 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/06/07 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/13 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/13854046.2016.1277786 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Clin Neuropsychol. 2017 Apr;31(3):587-597. doi:
10.1080/13854046.2016.1277786.
Epub 2017 Jan 12.

PMID- 28067551
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180112
LR - 20180130
IS - 1362-301X (Electronic)
IS - 0269-9052 (Linking)
VI - 31
IP - 2
DP - 2017
TI - Emotional recognition from dynamic facial, vocal and musical expressions
following traumatic brain injury.
PG - 221-229
LID - 10.1080/02699052.2016.1208846 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES: To assess emotion recognition from dynamic facial, vocal and
musical
expressions in sub-groups of adults with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) of
different severities and identify possible common underlying mechanisms
across
domains. METHODS: Forty-one adults participated in this study: 10 with
moderate-severe TBI, nine with complicated mild TBI, 11 with uncomplicated
mild
TBI and 11 healthy controls, who were administered experimental (emotional
recognition, valence-arousal) and control tasks (emotional and structural
discrimination) for each domain. RESULTS: Recognition of fearful faces was
significantly impaired in moderate-severe and in complicated mild TBI sub-
groups,
as compared to those with uncomplicated mild TBI and controls. Effect sizes
were
medium-large. Participants with lower GCS scores performed more poorly when
recognizing fearful dynamic facial expressions. Emotion recognition from
auditory
domains was preserved following TBI, irrespective of severity. All groups
performed equally on control tasks, indicating no perceptual disorders.
Although
emotional recognition from vocal and musical expressions was preserved, no
correlation was found across auditory domains. CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary
study may contribute to improving comprehension of emotional recognition
following TBI. Future studies of larger samples could usefully include
measures
of functional impacts of recognition deficits for fearful facial expressions.
These could help refine interventions for emotional recognition following a
brain
injury.
FAU - Drapeau, Joanie
AU - Drapeau J
AD - a Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en readaptation (CRIR) - Centre de
readaptation Lucie-Bruneau (CRLB).
AD - b Centre de recherche en neuropsychologie et cognition (CERNEC).
AD - c Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music (CRBLM) and International
Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS).
AD - d Departement de psychologie , Universite de Montreal , Montreal , Quebec ,
Canada.
FAU - Gosselin, Nathalie
AU - Gosselin N
AD - b Centre de recherche en neuropsychologie et cognition (CERNEC).
AD - c Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music (CRBLM) and International
Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS).
AD - d Departement de psychologie , Universite de Montreal , Montreal , Quebec ,
Canada.
FAU - Peretz, Isabelle
AU - Peretz I
AD - c Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music (CRBLM) and International
Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS).
AD - d Departement de psychologie , Universite de Montreal , Montreal , Quebec ,
Canada.
FAU - McKerral, Michelle
AU - McKerral M
AD - a Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en readaptation (CRIR) - Centre de
readaptation Lucie-Bruneau (CRLB).
AD - b Centre de recherche en neuropsychologie et cognition (CERNEC).
AD - d Departement de psychologie , Universite de Montreal , Montreal , Quebec ,
Canada.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20161024
PL - England
TA - Brain Inj
JT - Brain injury
JID - 8710358
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Brain Concussion/*psychology
MH - Brain Injuries, Traumatic/*psychology
MH - *Emotions
MH - *Facial Expression
MH - Facial Recognition
MH - Humans
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Music/*psychology
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Traumatic brain injury
OT - *complicated mild
OT - *emotions
OT - *faces
OT - *mild
OT - *moderate
OT - *music
OT - *non-linguistic vocalizations
OT - *severe
EDAT- 2017/01/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/13 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/13 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/02699052.2016.1208846 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain Inj. 2017;31(2):221-229. doi: 10.1080/02699052.2016.1208846. Epub 2016
Oct
24.

PMID- 28059789
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180221
LR - 20181113
IS - 1875-8908 (Electronic)
IS - 1387-2877 (Linking)
VI - 56
IP - 3
DP - 2017
TI - The Mild Behavioral Impairment Checklist (MBI-C): A Rating Scale for
Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Pre-Dementia Populations.
PG - 929-938
LID - 10.3233/JAD-160979 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Mild behavioral impairment (MBI) is a construct that describes
the
emergence at >/=50 years of age of sustained and impactful neuropsychiatric
symptoms (NPS), as a precursor to cognitive decline and dementia. MBI
describes
NPS of any severity, which are not captured by traditional psychiatric
nosology,
persist for at least 6 months, and occur in advance of or in concert with
mild
cognitive impairment. While the detection and description of MBI has been
operationalized in the International Society to Advance Alzheimer's Research
and
Treatment - Alzheimer's Association (ISTAART-AA) research diagnostic
criteria,
there is no instrument that accurately reflects MBI as described. OBJECTIVE:
To
develop an instrument based on ISTAART-AA MBI criteria. METHODS: Eighteen
subject
matter experts participated in development using a modified Delphi process.
An
iterative process ensured items reflected the five MBI domains of 1)
decreased
motivation; 2) emotional dysregulation; 3) impulse dyscontrol; 4) social
inappropriateness; and 5) abnormal perception or thought content. Instrument
language was developed a priori to pertain to non-demented functionally
independent older adults. RESULTS: We present the Mild Behavioral Impairment
Checklist (MBI-C), a 34-item instrument, which can easily be completed by a
patient, close informant, or clinician. CONCLUSION: The MBI-C provides the
first
measure specifically developed to assess the MBI construct as explicitly
described in the criteria. Its utility lies in MBI case detection, and
monitoring
the emergence of MBI symptoms and domains over time. Studies are required to
determine the prognostic value of MBI for dementia development, and for
predicting different dementia subtypes.
FAU - Ismail, Zahinoor
AU - Ismail Z
AD - Department of Psychiatry, and the Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research
&
Education, Cumming School of Medicine, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
AD - Department of Clinical Neurosciences, and The Ron and Rene Ward Centre for
Healthy Brain Aging Research, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of
Calgary,
Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
FAU - Aguera-Ortiz, Luis
AU - Aguera-Ortiz L
AD - Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM,Department
of
Psychiatry & Research Institute i+12, Hospital, Universitario 12 de Octubre,
Madrid, Spain.
FAU - Brodaty, Henry
AU - Brodaty H
AD - Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing and Dementia Collaborative Research Centre,
University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
FAU - Cieslak, Alicja
AU - Cieslak A
AD - Department of Clinical Neurosciences, and The Ron and Rene Ward Centre for
Healthy Brain Aging Research, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of
Calgary,
Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
FAU -
Cummings, Jeffrey
AU -
Cummings J
AD -
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, Las Vegas, NV, USA.
FAU -
Fischer, Corinne E
AU -
Fischer CE
AD -
Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Research, the Li Ka Shing Knowledge
Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Department of
Psychiatry,
University of Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Gauthier, Serge
AU - Gauthier S
AD - McGill Centre for Studies in Aging, Douglas Mental Health Research Institute,
Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Geda, Yonas E
AU - Geda YE
AD - Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA.
FAU - Herrmann, Nathan
AU - Herrmann N
AD - Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,
University
of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD - Neuropsychopharmacology Research Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute and
Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology/Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine,
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Kanji, Jamila
AU - Kanji J
AD - Department of Clinical Neurosciences, and The Ron and Rene Ward Centre for
Healthy Brain Aging Research, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of
Calgary,
Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
FAU - Lanctot, Krista L
AU - Lanctot KL
AD - Neuropsychopharmacology Research Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute and
Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology/Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine,
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Miller, David S
AU - Miller DS
AD - Bracket Global, Wayne, PA, USA.
FAU - Mortby, Moyra E
AU - Mortby ME
AD - Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, Research School of
Population Health, The Australian National University, NHMRC National
Institute
for Dementia Research, Canberra, Australia.
FAU - Onyike, Chiadi U
AU - Onyike CU
AD - Division of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neuropsychiatry, Department of
Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,
Baltimore,
MD, USA.
FAU - Rosenberg, Paul B
AU - Rosenberg PB
AD - Division of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neuropsychiatry, Department of
Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,
Baltimore,
MD, USA.
FAU - Smith, Eric E
AU - Smith EE
AD - Department of Clinical Neurosciences, and The Ron and Rene Ward Centre for
Healthy Brain Aging Research, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of
Calgary,
Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
FAU - Smith, Gwenn S
AU - Smith GS
AD - Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Russell H. Morgan
Department
of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of
Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
FAU - Sultzer, David L
AU - Sultzer DL
AD - Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Geffen School of
Medicine at
UCLA, and the Brain, Behavior, and Aging Research Center, VA Greater Los
Angeles
Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
FAU - Lyketsos, Constantine
AU - Lyketsos C
AD - Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center and Alzheimer's Disease Research
Center,
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bayview and
Johns
Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
CN - NPS Professional Interest Area of the International Society of to Advance
Alzheimer's Research and Treatment (NPS-PIA of ISTAART)
LA - eng
GR - P20 GM109025/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
GR - P50 AG005146/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG038893/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG041633/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - CIHR/Canada
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Alzheimers Dis
JT - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
JID - 9814863
SB - IM
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/*diagnosis
MH - Delphi Technique
MH - Emotions
MH - Executive Function
MH - Humans
MH - Impulsive Behavior
MH - Motivation
MH - *Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Perception
MH - *Severity of Illness Index
MH - Social Behavior
MH - Thinking
PMC - PMC5652315
MID - NIHMS911978
EDAT- 2017/01/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/22 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/07 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/22 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - JAD160979 [pii]
AID - 10.3233/JAD-160979 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;56(3):929-938. doi: 10.3233/JAD-160979.

PMID- 28059047
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180220
LR - 20180725
IS - 1469-7661 (Electronic)
IS - 1355-6177 (Linking)
VI - 23
IP - 3
DP - 2017 Mar
TI - The Elusive Nature of APOE epsilon4 in Mid-adulthood: Understanding the
Cognitive
Profile.
PG - 239-253
LID - 10.1017/S1355617716000990 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES: The apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele is an established
risk
factor for dementia, yet this genetic variant is associated with a mixed
cognitive profile across the lifespan. This study undertakes both a
systematic
and meta-analytic review of research investigating APOE-related differences
in
cognition in mid-adulthood, when detrimental effects of the allele may first
be
detectable. METHODS: Thirty-six papers investigating the behavioral effects
of
APOE epsilon4 in mid-adulthood (defined as a mean sample age between 35 and
60
years) were reviewed. In addition, the effect of carrying an epsilon4 allele
on
individual cognitive domains was assessed in separate meta-analyses. RESULTS:
The
average effect size of APOE epsilon4 status was non-significant across
cognitive
domains. Further consideration of genotype effects indicates preclinical
effects
of APOE epsilon4 may be observable in memory and executive functioning.
CONCLUSIONS: The cognitive profile of APOE epsilon4 carriers at mid-age
remains
elusive. Although there is support for comparable performance by epsilon4 and
non-e4 carriers in the 5th decade, studies administering sensitive cognitive
paradigms indicate a more nuanced profile of cognitive differences.
Methodological issues in this field preclude strong conclusions, which future
research must address, as well as considering the influence of further
vulnerability factors on genotype effects. (JINS, 2016, 23, 239-253).
FAU - Lancaster, Claire
AU - Lancaster C
AD - 1School of Psychology,University of Sussex,Brighton,East Sussex.
FAU - Tabet, Naji
AU - Tabet N
AD - 2Brighton and Sussex Medical School,Institute of Postgraduate
Medicine,Brighton,East Sussex.
FAU - Rusted, Jennifer
AU - Rusted J
AD - 1School of Psychology,University of Sussex,Brighton,East Sussex.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Meta-Analysis
PT - Review
DEP - 20170106
PL - England
TA - J Int Neuropsychol Soc
JT - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS
JID - 9503760
RN - 0 (Apolipoprotein E4)
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Apolipoprotein E4/*genetics
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies/statistics & numerical data
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Memory/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Space Perception/physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Alzheimer disease
OT - *Cognitive aging
OT - *Executive function
OT - *Memory
OT - *Middle-aged
OT - *Neuroimaging
EDAT- 2017/01/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/07 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/21 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1355617716000990 [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S1355617716000990 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2017 Mar;23(3):239-253. doi:
10.1017/S1355617716000990.
Epub 2017 Jan 6.

PMID- 28054821
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170809
LR - 20181115
IS - 1931-1559 (Electronic)
IS - 0894-4105 (Linking)
VI - 31
IP - 3
DP - 2017 Mar
TI - Multimodal emotion processing deficits are present in amyotrophic lateral
sclerosis.
PG - 304-310
LID - 10.1037/neu0000323 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: Emotion processing abilities might be reduced in amyotrophic
lateral
sclerosis (ALS). Previous studies of emotion processing in ALS have
inconsistent
results, and are limited by variations in task difficulty, modalities
examined,
and participants' cognitive status. The current study used a battery of
emotion
processing tasks at differing levels of difficulty and across different
modalities (facial affect and voice prosody) to assess the extent of emotion
processing deficits in nondemented ALS. METHOD: 33 ALS participants with
intact
basic cognition and 22 healthy controls completed the abbreviated
Comprehensive
Affect Testing System (CATS), which assesses simple and complex facial affect
recognition, affective prosody recognition, cross-modal face-prosody
integration,
and semantic comprehension of affect. Participants also completed measures of
executive function, mood, and functional impairment. RESULTS: ALS
participants
showed impairments on complex facial affect recognition, affective prosody
recognition, and cross-modal integration. In contrast, simple facial affect
recognition and semantic comprehension of affect were intact. ALS
participants
did not have significant mood symptoms, and neither mood nor functional
impairment was related to emotion processing. Performance on the cross-modal
composite was related to executive function, however, this relationship was
not
apparent for facial or prosody recognition within a single modality.
CONCLUSIONS:
These results indicate that people living with ALS without dementia often
have
subtle difficulties with recognizing emotions in both faces and voices, even
in
the context of intact basic cognition. Clinicians should be aware of the
potential for these emotion processing difficulties to be present in ALS and
to
affect interpersonal behavior and quality of life. (PsycINFO Database Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Andrews, Sophie C
AU - Andrews SC
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-2103-7748
AD - Neuropsychology Department, Calvary Health Care Bethlehem.
FAU - Staios, Mathew
AU - Staios M
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-3008-0753
AD - School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University.
FAU - Howe, Jim
AU - Howe J
AD - Neuropsychology Department, Calvary Health Care Bethlehem.
FAU - Reardon, Katrina
AU - Reardon K
AD - Neuropsychology Department, Calvary Health Care Bethlehem.
FAU - Fisher, Fiona
AU - Fisher F
AD - Neuropsychology Department, Calvary Health Care Bethlehem.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170105
PL - United States
TA - Neuropsychology
JT - Neuropsychology
JID - 8904467
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/*psychology
MH - Cognition
MH - *Emotions
MH - *Executive Function
MH - Facial Recognition
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Quality of Life
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Semantics
EDAT- 2017/01/06 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/10 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/06 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2017-00080-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/neu0000323 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychology. 2017 Mar;31(3):304-310. doi: 10.1037/neu0000323. Epub 2017
Jan
5.

PMID- 28045787
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180315
LR - 20181113
IS - 1538-4667 (Electronic)
IS - 0196-0202 (Linking)
VI - 38
IP - 3
DP - 2017 May/Jun
TI - Some Neurocognitive Correlates of Noise-Vocoded Speech Perception in Children
With Normal Hearing: A Replication and Extension of ).
PG - 344-356
LID - 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000393 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES: Noise-vocoded speech is a valuable research tool for testing
experimental hypotheses about the effects of spectral degradation on speech
recognition in adults with normal hearing (NH). However, very little research
has
utilized noise-vocoded speech with children with NH. Earlier studies with
children with NH focused primarily on the amount of spectral information
needed
for speech recognition without assessing the contribution of neurocognitive
processes to speech perception and spoken word recognition. In this study, we
first replicated the seminal findings reported by ) who investigated effects
of
lexical density and word frequency on noise-vocoded speech perception in a
small
group of children with NH. We then extended the research to investigate
relations
between noise-vocoded speech recognition abilities and five neurocognitive
measures: auditory attention (AA) and response set, talker discrimination,
and
verbal and nonverbal short-term working memory. DESIGN: Thirty-one children
with
NH between 5 and 13 years of age were assessed on their ability to perceive
lexically controlled words in isolation and in sentences that were noise-
vocoded
to four spectral channels. Children were also administered vocabulary
assessments
(Peabody Picture Vocabulary test-4th Edition and Expressive Vocabulary test-
2nd
Edition) and measures of AA (NEPSY AA and response set and a talker
discrimination task) and short-term memory (visual digit and symbol spans).
RESULTS: Consistent with the findings reported in the original ) study, we
found
that children perceived noise-vocoded lexically easy words better than
lexically
hard words. Words in sentences were also recognized better than the same
words
presented in isolation. No significant correlations were observed between
noise-vocoded speech recognition scores and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary
test-4th Edition using language quotients to control for age effects.
However,
children who scored higher on the Expressive Vocabulary test-2nd Edition
recognized lexically easy words better than lexically hard words in
sentences.
Older children perceived noise-vocoded speech better than younger children.
Finally, we found that measures of AA and short-term memory capacity were
significantly correlated with a child's ability to perceive noise-vocoded
isolated words and sentences. CONCLUSIONS: First, we successfully replicated
the
major findings from the ) study. Because familiarity, phonological
distinctiveness and lexical competition affect word recognition, these
findings
provide additional support for the proposal that several foundational
elementary
neurocognitive processes underlie the perception of spectrally degraded
speech.
Second, we found strong and significant correlations between performance on
neurocognitive measures and children's ability to recognize words and
sentences
noise-vocoded to four spectral channels. These findings extend earlier
research
suggesting that perception of spectrally degraded speech reflects early
peripheral auditory processes, as well as additional contributions of
executive
function, specifically, selective attention and short-term memory processes
in
spoken word recognition. The present findings suggest that AA and short-term
memory support robust spoken word recognition in children with NH even under
compromised and challenging listening conditions. These results are relevant
to
research carried out with listeners who have hearing loss, because they are
routinely required to encode, process, and understand spectrally degraded
acoustic signals.
FAU - Roman, Adrienne S
AU - Roman AS
AD - 1Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical
Center,
Nashville, Tennessee, USA; 2Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences,
Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA; and 3Department of Psychiatry,
Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
FAU - Pisoni, David B
AU - Pisoni DB
FAU - Kronenberger, William G
AU - Kronenberger WG
FAU - Faulkner, Kathleen F
AU - Faulkner KF
LA - eng
GR - R01 DC000111/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 DC009581/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - T32 DC000012/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Ear Hear
JT - Ear and hearing
JID - 8005585
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Child
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Female
MH - Hearing/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - *Vocabulary
PMC - PMC5404985
MID - NIHMS825950
EDAT- 2017/01/04 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/16 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/04 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/04 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/16 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/01/04 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000393 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Ear Hear. 2017 May/Jun;38(3):344-356. doi: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000393.

PMID- 27997994
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180109
LR - 20181113
IS - 1098-1063 (Electronic)
IS - 1050-9631 (Linking)
VI - 27
IP - 3
DP - 2017 Mar
TI - Deciding what is possible and impossible following hippocampal damage in
humans.
PG - 303-314
LID - 10.1002/hipo.22694 [doi]
AB - There is currently much debate about whether the precise role of the
hippocampus
in scene processing is predominantly constructive, perceptual, or mnemonic.
Here,
we developed a novel experimental paradigm designed to control for general
perceptual and mnemonic demands, thus enabling us to specifically vary the
requirement for constructive processing. We tested the ability of patients
with
selective bilateral hippocampal damage and matched control participants to
detect
either semantic (e.g., an elephant with butterflies for ears) or constructive
(e.g., an endless staircase) violations in realistic images of scenes. Thus,
scenes could be semantically or constructively 'possible' or 'impossible'.
Importantly, general perceptual and memory requirements were similar for both
types of scene. We found that the patients performed comparably to control
participants when deciding whether scenes were semantically possible or
impossible, but were selectively impaired at judging if scenes were
constructively possible or impossible. Post-task debriefing indicated that
control participants constructed flexible mental representations of the
scenes in
order to make constructive judgements, whereas the patients were more
constrained
and typically focused on specific fragments of the scenes, with little
indication
of having constructed internal scene models. These results suggest that one
contribution the hippocampus makes to scene processing is to construct
internal
representations of spatially coherent scenes, which may be vital for
modelling
the world during both perception and memory recall. (c) 2016 The Authors.
Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
CI - (c) 2016 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
FAU - McCormick, Cornelia
AU - McCormick C
AD - Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London,
United
Kingdom.
FAU - Rosenthal, Clive R
AU - Rosenthal CR
AD - Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford,
United Kingdom.
FAU - Miller, Thomas D
AU - Miller TD
AD - Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford,
United Kingdom.
FAU - Maguire, Eleanor A
AU - Maguire EA
AD - Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London,
United
Kingdom.
LA - eng
GR - 101759/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom
GR - G0300117/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
GR - G1002276/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170107
PL - United States
TA - Hippocampus
JT - Hippocampus
JID - 9108167
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Comprehension/physiology
MH - Discrimination (Psychology)/physiology
MH - Hippocampus/diagnostic imaging/*injuries/*physiopathology
MH - Humans
MH - Judgment/*physiology
MH - Limbic Encephalitis/complications/diagnostic
imaging/physiopathology/psychology
MH - Male
MH - Memory Disorders/diagnostic imaging/etiology/physiopathology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Reaction Time
MH - *Semantics
MH - Single-Blind Method
MH - Space Perception/*physiology
MH - Temporal Lobe/diagnostic imaging/physiopathology
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
PMC - PMC5324536
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *amnesia
OT - *hippocampus
OT - *impossible scenes
OT - *scene construction
OT - *semantic knowledge
EDAT- 2016/12/21 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/10 06:00
CRDT- 2016/12/21 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/13 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/12/21 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/12/21 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1002/hipo.22694 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Hippocampus. 2017 Mar;27(3):303-314. doi: 10.1002/hipo.22694. Epub 2017 Jan
7.

PMID- 27989776
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180222
LR - 20180816
IS - 1095-9572 (Electronic)
IS - 1053-8119 (Linking)
VI - 147
DP - 2017 Feb 15
TI - Language in context: Characterizing the comprehension of referential
expressions
with MEG.
PG - 447-460
LID - S1053-8119(16)30716-9 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.12.006 [doi]
AB - A critical component of comprehending language in context is identifying the
entities that individual linguistic expressions refer to. While previous
research
has shown that language comprehenders resolve reference quickly and
incrementally, little is currently known about the neural basis of successful
reference resolution. Using source localized MEG, we provide evidence across
3
experiments and 2 languages that successful reference resolution in simple
visual
displays is associated with increased activation in the medial parietal lobe.
In
each trial, participants saw a simple visual display containing three objects
which constituted the referential domain. Target referential expressions were
embedded in questions about the displays. By varying the displays, we
manipulated
referential status while keeping the linguistic expressions constant. Follow-
up
experiments addressed potential interactions of reference resolution with
linguistic predictiveness and pragmatic plausibility. Notably, we replicated
the
effect in Arabic, a language that differs in a structurally informative way
from
English while keeping referential aspects parallel to our two English
studies.
Distributed minimum norm estimates of MEG data consistently indicated that
reference resolution is associated with increased activity in the medial
parietal
lobe. With one exception, the timing of the onset of the medial parietal
response
fell into a mid-latency time-window at 350-500ms after the onset of the
resolving
word. Through concurrent EEG recordings on a subset of subjects we also
describe
the EEG topography of the effect of reference resolution, which makes the
result
available for comparison with a larger existing literature. Our results
extend
previous reports that medial parietal lobe is involved in referential
language
processing, indicating that it is relevant for reference resolution to
individual
referents, and suggests avenues for future research.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Brodbeck, Christian
AU - Brodbeck C
AD - Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA; NYU
Abu
Dhabi Institute, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Electronic address:
christianbrodbeck@nyu.edu.
FAU - Pylkkanen, Liina
AU - Pylkkanen L
AD - Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA; NYU
Abu
Dhabi Institute, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Department of Linguistics,
New
York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20161216
PL - United States
TA - Neuroimage
JT - NeuroImage
JID - 9215515
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Cerebral Cortex/*physiology
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - Electroencephalography/*methods
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language
MH - Magnetoencephalography/*methods
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Psycholinguistics
MH - Reading
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *EEG
OT - *MEG
OT - *Reference resolution
OT - *Sentence comprehension
OT - *Visual short-term memory
EDAT- 2016/12/19 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/23 06:00
CRDT- 2016/12/20 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/09 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/04 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/12/19 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/23 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/12/20 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1053-8119(16)30716-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.12.006 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuroimage. 2017 Feb 15;147:447-460. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.12.006.
Epub
2016 Dec 16.

PMID- 27984068
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170509
LR - 20181113
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 93
IP - Pt A
DP - 2016 Dec
TI - Age-related differences in resolving semantic and phonological competition
during
receptive language tasks.
PG - 189-199
LID - S0028-3932(16)30390-6 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.10.016 [doi]
AB - Receptive language (e.g., reading) is largely preserved in the aging brain,
and
semantic processes in particular may continue to develop throughout the
lifespan.
We investigated the neural underpinnings of phonological and semantic
retrieval
in older and younger adults during receptive language tasks (rhyme and
semantic
similarity judgments). In particular, we were interested in the role of
competition on language retrieval and varied the similarities between a cue,
target, and distractor that were hypothesized to affect the mental process of
competition. Behaviorally, all participants responded faster and more
accurately
during the rhyme task compared to the semantic task. Moreover, older adults
demonstrated higher response accuracy than younger adults during the semantic
task. Although there were no overall age-related differences in the
neuroimaging
results, an AgexTask interaction was found in left inferior frontal gyrus
(IFG),
with older adults producing greater activation than younger adults during the
semantic condition. These results suggest that at lower levels of task
difficulty, older and younger adults engaged similar neural networks that
benefited behavioral performance. As task difficulty increased during the
semantic task, older adults relied more heavily on largely left hemisphere
language regions, as well as regions involved in perception and internal
monitoring. Our results are consistent with the stability of language
comprehension across the adult lifespan and illustrate how the preservation
of
semantic representations with aging may influence performance under
conditions of
increased task difficulty.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Zhuang, Jie
AU - Zhuang J
AD - Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Duke University School of Medicine, United
States.
FAU - Johnson, Micah A
AU - Johnson MA
AD - Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Duke University School of Medicine, United
States.
FAU - Madden, David J
AU - Madden DJ
AD - Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Duke University School of Medicine, United
States; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University
School
of Medicine, United States.
FAU - Burke, Deborah M
AU - Burke DM
AD - Department of Linguistics and Cognitive Science, Pomona College, United
States.
FAU - Diaz, Michele T
AU - Diaz MT
AD - Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, United States.
Electronic address: mtd143@psu.edu.
LA - eng
GR - R01 AG034138/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG039684/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20161029
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*physiology/*psychology
MH - Brain/*physiology
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - Comprehension/physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Judgment/physiology
MH - Language Tests
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Mental Recall/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Phonetics
MH - Reaction Time
MH - *Semantics
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5362309
MID - NIHMS828388
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Aging
OT - *FMRI
OT - *Language comprehension
OT - *Lexical competition
OT - *Phonology
OT - *Semantics
EDAT- 2016/12/17 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/10 06:00
CRDT- 2016/12/17 06:00
PHST- 2016/01/31 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/10/25 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/10/26 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/12/17 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/12/17 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(16)30390-6 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.10.016 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2016 Dec;93(Pt A):189-199. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.10.016. Epub 2016 Oct 29.

PMID- 27974471
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170612
LR - 20181113
IS - 1758-5368 (Electronic)
IS - 1079-5014 (Linking)
VI - 72
IP - 1
DP - 2017 Jan
TI - 50 Years of Cognitive Aging Theory.
PG - 1-6
AB - OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this Introduction to the Journal of
Gerontology:
Psychological Sciences special issue on "50 Years of Cognitive Aging Theory"
are
to provide a brief overview of cognitive aging research prior to 1965 and to
highlight significant developments in cognitive aging theory over the last 50
years. METHOD: Historical and recent theories of cognitive aging were
reviewed,
with a particular focus on those not directly covered by the articles
included in
this special issue. RESULTS: Prior to 1965, cognitive aging research was
predominantly descriptive, identifying what aspects of intellectual
functioning
are affected in older compared with younger adults. Since the mid-1960s,
there
has been an increasing interest in how and why specific components of
cognitive
domains are differentially affected in aging and a growing focus on cognitive
aging neuroscience. DISCUSSION: Significant advances have taken place in our
theoretical understanding of how and why certain components of cognitive
functioning are or are not affected by aging. We also know much more now than
we
did 50 years ago about the underlying neural mechanisms of these changes. The
next 50 years undoubtedly will bring new theories, as well as new tools
(e.g.,
neuroimaging advances, neuromodulation, and technology), that will further
our
understanding of cognitive aging.
CI - (c) The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The
Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions,
please
e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
FAU - Anderson, Nicole D
AU - Anderson ND
AD - Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
nanderson@research.baycrest.org.
AD - Department of Psychiatry and.
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Craik, Fergus I M
AU - Craik FI
AD - Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
LA - eng
PT - Editorial
PT - Introductory Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci
JT - The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social
sciences
JID - 9508483
SB - AIM
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Attention/physiology
MH - Brain/physiology
MH - Cognitive Aging/*physiology/*psychology
MH - Cognitive Reserve/physiology
MH - Executive Function/physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Inhibition (Psychology)
MH - Intelligence Tests
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - Reference Values
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5156496
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Attention
OT - Cognition
OT - Cognitive neuroscience
OT - Executive function
OT - Language
OT - Memory
OT - Neuropsychology
OT - Social cognition
OT - Technology
OT - Theory
EDAT- 2016/12/16 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/13 06:00
CRDT- 2016/12/16 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/21 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/08/04 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/12/16 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/12/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/06/13 06:00 [medline]
AID - gbw108 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/geronb/gbw108 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2017 Jan;72(1):1-6. doi:
10.1093/geronb/gbw108.

PMID- 27960006
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180124
LR - 20181113
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 59
IP - 6
DP - 2016 Dec 1
TI - Experiments on Auditory-Visual Perception of Sentences by Users of
Unilateral,
Bimodal, and Bilateral Cochlear Implants.
PG - 1505-1519
LID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0312 [doi]
AB - Purpose: Five experiments probed auditory-visual (AV) understanding of
sentences
by users of cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Sentence material was presented
in
auditory (A), visual (V), and AV test conditions to listeners with normal
hearing
and CI users. Results: (a) Most CI users report that most of the time, they
have
access to both A and V information when listening to speech. (b) CI users did
not
achieve better scores on a task of speechreading than did listeners with
normal
hearing. (c) Sentences that are easy to speechread provided 12 percentage
points
more gain to speech understanding than did sentences that were difficult. (d)
Ease of speechreading for sentences is related to phrase familiarity. (e)
Users
of bimodal CIs benefit from low-frequency acoustic hearing even when V cues
are
available, and a second CI adds to the benefit of a single CI when V cues are
available. (f) V information facilitates lexical segmentation by improving
the
recognition of the number of syllables produced and the relative strength of
these syllables. Conclusions: Our data are consistent with the view that V
information improves CI users' ability to identify syllables in the acoustic
stream and to recognize their relative juxtaposed strengths. Enhanced
syllable
resolution allows better identification of word onsets, which, when combined
with
place-of-articulation information from visible consonants, improves lexical
access.
FAU - Dorman, Michael F
AU - Dorman MF
AD - Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Tempe.
FAU - Liss, Julie
AU - Liss J
AD - Arizona State University, Tempe.
FAU - Wang, Shuai
AU - Wang S
AD - Arizona State University, Tempe.
FAU - Berisha, Visar
AU - Berisha V
AD - Arizona State University, Tempe.
FAU - Ludwig, Cimarron
AU - Ludwig C
AD - Arizona State University, Tempe.
FAU - Natale, Sarah Cook
AU - Natale SC
AD - Arizona State University, Tempe.
LA - eng
GR - R01 DC006859/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 DC010494/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 DC010821/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - *Cochlear Implants
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Loss/*psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Humans
MH - Language Tests
MH - *Lipreading
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pattern Recognition, Physiological
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - *Visual Perception
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5399766
EDAT- 2016/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/25 06:00
CRDT- 2016/12/14 06:00
PHST- 2015/09/08 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/04 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/25 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/12/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2593625 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0312 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2016 Dec 1;59(6):1505-1519. doi:
10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0312.

PMID- 27939367
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170508
LR - 20180216
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 95
DP - 2017 Jan 27
TI - Naming unique entities in the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia
and
Alzheimer's disease: Towards a better understanding of the semantic
impairment.
PG - 11-20
LID - S0028-3932(16)30447-X [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.12.009 [doi]
AB - While the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is
characterized by a predominant semantic memory impairment, episodic memory
impairments are the clinical hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However,
AD
patients also present with semantic deficits, which are more severe for
semantically unique entities (e.g. a famous person) than for common concepts
(e.g. a beaver). Previous studies in these patient populations have largely
focused on famous-person naming. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate if these
impairments also extend to other semantically unique entities such as famous
places and famous logos. In this study, 13 AD patients, 9 svPPA patients, and
12
cognitively unimpaired elderly subjects (CTRL) were tested with a picture-
naming
test of non-unique entities (Boston Naming Test) and three experimental tests
of
semantically unique entities assessing naming of famous persons, places, and
logos. Both clinical groups were overall more impaired at naming semantically
unique entities than non-unique entities. Naming impairments in AD and svPPA
extended to the other types of semantically unique entities, since a
CTRL>AD>svPPA pattern was found on the performance of all naming tests.
Naming
famous places and famous persons appeared to be most impaired in svPPA, and
both
specific and general semantic knowledge for these entities were affected in
these
patients. Although AD patients were most significantly impaired on famous-
person
naming, only their specific semantic knowledge was impaired, while general
knowledge was preserved. Post-hoc neuroimaging analyses also showed that
famous-person naming impairments in AD correlated with atrophy in the
temporo-parietal junction, a region functionally associated with lexical
access.
In line with previous studies, svPPA patients' impairment in both naming and
semantic knowledge suggest a more profound semantic impairment, while naming
impairments in AD may arise to a greater extent from impaired lexical access,
even though semantic impairment for specific knowledge is also present. These
results highlight the critical importance of developing and using a variety
of
semantically-unique-entity naming tests in neuropsychological assessments of
patients with neurodegenerative diseases, which may unveil different patterns
of
lexical-semantic deficits.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Montembeault, M
AU - Montembeault M
AD - Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de geriatrie de Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3W 1W5; Departement de psychologie, Universite de
Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7. Electronic address:
maxime.montembeault@umontreal.ca.
FAU - Brambati, S M
AU - Brambati SM
AD - Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de geriatrie de Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3W 1W5; Departement de psychologie, Universite de
Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7. Electronic address:
simona.maria.brambati@umontreal.ca.
FAU - Joubert, S
AU - Joubert S
AD - Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de geriatrie de Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3W 1W5; Departement de psychologie, Universite de
Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7. Electronic address: sven.joubert@umontreal.ca.
FAU - Boukadi, M
AU - Boukadi M
AD - Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de geriatrie de Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3W 1W5; Departement de psychologie, Universite de
Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7. Electronic address:
mariem.boukadi@umontreal.ca.
FAU - Chapleau, M
AU - Chapleau M
AD - Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de geriatrie de Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3W 1W5; Departement de psychologie, Universite de
Montreal,
Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7. Electronic address:
marianne.chapleau@umontreal.ca.
FAU - Laforce, R Jr
AU - Laforce RJ
AD - Centre de recherche du Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec,
QC,
Canada G1J 1Z4; Faculte de medecine, Departement de readaptation, Universite
Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6. Electronic address:
robert.laforce@fmed.ulaval.ca.
FAU - Wilson, M A
AU - Wilson MA
AD - Faculte de medecine, Departement de readaptation, Universite Laval, Quebec,
QC,
Canada G1V 0A6; Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en sante
mentale
de Quebec, Quebec, QC, Canada G1J 2G3. Electronic address:
maximiliano.wilson@fmed.ulaval.ca.
FAU - Macoir, J
AU - Macoir J
AD - Faculte de medecine, Departement de readaptation, Universite Laval, Quebec,
QC,
Canada G1V 0A6; Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en sante
mentale
de Quebec, Quebec, QC, Canada G1J 2G3. Electronic address:
joel.macoir@fmed.ulaval.ca.
FAU - Rouleau, I
AU - Rouleau I
AD - Departement de psychologie, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal, QC,
Canada
H3C 3P8. Electronic address: rouleau.isabelle@uqam.ca.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20161207
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*diagnostic imaging/*psychology
MH - Aphasia, Primary Progressive/*diagnostic imaging/*psychology
MH - Atrophy
MH - Brain/*diagnostic imaging
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language Tests
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Organ Size
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Semantics
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Alzheimer's disease
OT - *Lexical access
OT - *Naming
OT - *Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia
OT - *Semantically unique entities
OT - *Semantics
EDAT- 2016/12/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/10 06:00
CRDT- 2016/12/13 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/06 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/11/29 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/12/06 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/12/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/12/13 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(16)30447-X [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.12.009 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2017 Jan 27;95:11-20. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.12.009. Epub 2016 Dec 7.

PMID- 27939187
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170508
LR - 20180216
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 95
DP - 2017 Jan 27
TI - Statistical learning of an auditory sequence and reorganization of acquired
knowledge: A time course of word segmentation and ordering.
PG - 1-10
LID - S0028-3932(16)30443-2 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.12.006 [doi]
AB - Previous neural studies have supported the hypothesis that statistical
learning
mechanisms are used broadly across different domains such as language and
music.
However, these studies have only investigated a single aspect of statistical
learning at a time, such as recognizing word boundaries or learning word
order
patterns. In this study, we neutrally investigated how the two levels of
statistical learning for recognizing word boundaries and word ordering could
be
reflected in neuromagnetic responses and how acquired statistical knowledge
is
reorganised when the syntactic rules are revised. Neuromagnetic responses to
the
Japanese-vowel sequence (a, e, i, o, and u), presented every .45s, were
recorded
from 14 right-handed Japanese participants. The vowel order was constrained
by a
Markov stochastic model such that five nonsense words (aue, eao, iea, oiu,
and
uoi) were chained with an either-or rule: the probability of the forthcoming
word
was statistically defined (80% for one word; 20% for the other word) by the
most
recent two words. All of the word transition probabilities (80% and 20%) were
switched in the middle of the sequence. In the first and second quarters of
the
sequence, the neuromagnetic responses to the words that appeared with higher
transitional probability were significantly reduced compared with those that
appeared with a lower transitional probability. After switching the word
transition probabilities, the response reduction was replicated in the last
quarter of the sequence. The responses to the final vowels in the words were
significantly reduced compared with those to the initial vowels in the last
quarter of the sequence. The results suggest that both within-word and
between-word statistical learning are reflected in neural responses. The
present
study supports the hypothesis that listeners learn larger structures such as
phrases first, and they subsequently extract smaller structures, such as
words,
from the learned phrases. The present study provides the first
neurophysiological
evidence that the correction of statistical knowledge requires more time than
the
acquisition of new statistical knowledge.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Daikoku, Tatsuya
AU - Daikoku T
AD - Department of Clinical Laboratory, Graduate School of Medicine, The
University of
Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan.
FAU - Yatomi, Yutaka
AU - Yatomi Y
AD - Department of Clinical Laboratory, Graduate School of Medicine, The
University of
Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan.
FAU - Yumoto, Masato
AU - Yumoto M
AD - Department of Clinical Laboratory, Graduate School of Medicine, The
University of
Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. Electronic address:
yumoto-tky@umin.ac.jp.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20161206
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation/methods
MH - Adult
MH - Brain/*physiology
MH - Evoked Potentials
MH - Female
MH - Functional Laterality/physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetoencephalography
MH - Male
MH - Markov Chains
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Models, Statistical
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Probability Learning
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/physiology
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Time Factors
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Magnetoencephalography
OT - *Markov process
OT - *Statistical learning
OT - *Word ordering
OT - *Word segmentation
EDAT- 2016/12/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/10 06:00
CRDT- 2016/12/13 06:00
PHST- 2015/06/25 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/11/23 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/12/05 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/12/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/12/13 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(16)30443-2 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.12.006 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2017 Jan 27;95:1-10. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.12.006. Epub 2016 Dec 6.

PMID- 27936265
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180124
LR - 20181113
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 59
IP - 6
DP - 2016 Dec 1
TI - Verbal Working Memory in Older Adults: The Roles of Phonological Capacities
and
Processing Speed.
PG - 1520-1532
LID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0404 [doi]
AB - Purpose: This study examined the potential roles of phonological sensitivity
and
processing speed in age-related declines of verbal working memory. Method:
Twenty
younger and 25 older adults with age-normal hearing participated. Two
measures of
verbal working memory were collected: digit span and serial recall of words.
Processing speed was indexed using response times during those tasks. Three
other
measures were also obtained, assessing phonological awareness, processing,
and
recoding. Results: Forward and reverse digit spans were similar across
groups.
Accuracy on the serial recall task was poorer for older than for younger
adults,
and response times were slower. When response time served as a covariate, the
age
effect for accuracy was reduced. Phonological capacities were equivalent
across
age groups, so we were unable to account for differences across age groups in
verbal working memory. Nonetheless, when outcomes for only older adults were
considered, phonological awareness and processing speed explained significant
proportions of variance in serial recall accuracy. Conclusion: Slowing in
processing abilities accounts for the primary trajectory of age-related
declines
in verbal working memory. However, individual differences in phonological
capacities explain variability among individual older adults.
FAU - Nittrouer, Susan
AU - Nittrouer S
AD - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State
University,
ColumbusCurrently affiliated with the University of Florida, Gainesville.
FAU - Lowenstein, Joanna H
AU - Lowenstein JH
AD - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State
University,
ColumbusCurrently affiliated with the University of Florida, Gainesville.
FAU - Wucinich, Taylor
AU - Wucinich T
AD - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State
University,
Columbus.
FAU - Moberly, Aaron C
AU - Moberly AC
AD - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State
University,
Columbus.
LA - eng
GR - R01 DC000633/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - UL1 TR001070/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Cognitive Aging
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Tests
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Phonetics
MH - Reaction Time
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5399767
EDAT- 2016/12/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/25 06:00
CRDT- 2016/12/10 06:00
PHST- 2015/11/23 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/22 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/12/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/25 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/12/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2593300 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0404 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2016 Dec 1;59(6):1520-1532. doi:
10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0404.

PMID- 27924453
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180709
LR - 20180709
IS - 1931-7565 (Electronic)
IS - 1931-7557 (Linking)
VI - 11
IP - 6
DP - 2017 Dec
TI - Functional dedifferentiation and reduced task-related deactivations underlie
the
age-related decline of prospective memory.
PG - 1873-1884
LID - 10.1007/s11682-016-9661-z [doi]
AB - Prospective memory (PM) refers to the ability to remember to execute an
intention
at the appropriate moment in the future, which can be performed either at the
appearance of an event (event-based, EBPM) or after a certain amount of time
(time-based, TBPM). PM is generally impaired during aging but the cerebral
substrates of this decline have been little investigated. Using functional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), we investigated the neural bases of PM in
20
young and 20 healthy older adults. They were proposed a task of semantic
categorisation of pictures (ongoing task). For some blocks, participants only
had
to perform this ongoing task while, for others, a PM instruction was added.
In
this case, a supplementary answer in response to a specific colour of border
for
EBPM or at specific time intervals for TBPM was expected. PM, and more
particularly TBPM, declined in older adults. For both PM conditions, older
adults
recruited additional brain areas, but also showed reduced deactivations of
other
regions. These results are discussed in light of models of the aging brain.
FAU - Gonneaud, Julie
AU - Gonneaud J
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
FAU - Lecouvey, Gregory
AU - Lecouvey G
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
FAU - Groussard, Mathilde
AU - Groussard M
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
FAU - Gaubert, Malo
AU - Gaubert M
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
FAU - Landeau, Brigitte
AU - Landeau B
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
FAU - Mezenge, Florence
AU - Mezenge F
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
FAU - de La Sayette, Vincent
AU - de La Sayette V
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
AD - CHU de Caen, Service de Neurologie, 14000, Caen, France.
FAU - Eustache, Francis
AU - Eustache F
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
FAU - Desgranges, Beatrice
AU - Desgranges B
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
FAU - Rauchs, Geraldine
AU - Rauchs G
AD - Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, PSL Research University, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de
Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Memoire Humaine, 14000, Caen,
France.
rauchs@cyceron.fr.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Brain Imaging Behav
JT - Brain imaging and behavior
JID - 101300405
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*physiology/*psychology
MH - Brain/diagnostic imaging/*physiology
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Episodic
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Models, Neurological
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Reaction Time
MH - Semantics
MH - Visual Perception/physiology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Event-based
OT - Functional MRI
OT - Healthy aging
OT - Prospective memory
OT - Time-based
EDAT- 2016/12/08 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/10 06:00
CRDT- 2016/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/08 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1007/s11682-016-9661-z [doi]
AID - 10.1007/s11682-016-9661-z [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain Imaging Behav. 2017 Dec;11(6):1873-1884. doi: 10.1007/s11682-016-9661-
z.

PMID- 27883290
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180706
LR - 20180706
IS - 1744-4128 (Electronic)
IS - 1382-5585 (Linking)
VI - 25
IP - 1
DP - 2018 Jan
TI - Behavioral evidence for a differential modulation of semantic processing and
lexical production by aging: a full linear mixed-effects modeling approach.
PG - 1-22
LID - 10.1080/13825585.2016.1257100 [doi]
AB - The effect of normal aging on lexical production and semantic processing was
evaluated in 72 healthy participants. Four tasks were used, picture naming
(PN),
picture categorization (PC), numerical judgment (NJ), and color judgment
(CJ).
The dependence of reaction time (RT) and correct responses with age was
accounted
by mixed-effects models. Participants underwent neuropsychological testing
for
verbal, executive, and memory functions. The RTs increase significantly with
age
for all tasks. After parceling out the non-specific cognitive decline, as
reflected by the NJ task, the RT for the PN task decreases with age.
Behavioral
data were interpreted in relation with neuropsychological scores. Our results
suggest that (a) naming becomes more automatic and semantic processing
slightly
more difficult with age, and (b) a non-specific general slowdown of cognitive
processing occurs with age. Lexical production remained unaltered, based on
compensatory automatic processes. This study also suggests a possible
slowdown of
semantic processing, even in normal aging.
FAU - Boudiaf, Naila
AU - Boudiaf N
AD - a Universite Grenoble Alpes , LPNC , Grenoble , France.
AD - b CNRS, LPNC UMR 5105 , Grenoble , France.
FAU - Laboissiere, Rafael
AU - Laboissiere R
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2180-9250
AD - a Universite Grenoble Alpes , LPNC , Grenoble , France.
AD - b CNRS, LPNC UMR 5105 , Grenoble , France.
FAU - Cousin, Emilie
AU - Cousin E
AD - a Universite Grenoble Alpes , LPNC , Grenoble , France.
AD - b CNRS, LPNC UMR 5105 , Grenoble , France.
AD - d UMS IRMaGe, IRM 3T Recherche , Universite Grenoble Alpes , Grenoble ,
France.
FAU - Fournet, Nathalie
AU - Fournet N
AD - a Universite Grenoble Alpes , LPNC , Grenoble , France.
AD - c Universite Savoie Mont Blanc , LPNC , Chambery , France.
FAU - Krainik, Alexandre
AU - Krainik A
AD - d UMS IRMaGe, IRM 3T Recherche , Universite Grenoble Alpes , Grenoble ,
France.
AD - e GIN-Neuroimagerie Fonctionnelle et Perfusion Cerebrale , Universite
Grenoble
Alpes , Grenoble , France.
FAU - Baciu, Monica
AU - Baciu M
AD - a Universite Grenoble Alpes , LPNC , Grenoble , France.
AD - b CNRS, LPNC UMR 5105 , Grenoble , France.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20161124
PL - United States
TA - Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn
JT - Neuropsychology, development, and cognition. Section B, Aging,
neuropsychology
and cognition
JID - 9614434
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - Cohort Studies
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Judgment
MH - Linear Models
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Psycholinguistics
MH - Reaction Time
MH - *Semantics
MH - *Speech
MH - Visual Perception
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Aging
OT - full linear mixed-effect modeling
OT - healthy
OT - picture naming (PN)
OT - semantic processing
EDAT- 2016/11/25 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/07 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/25 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/25 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/07 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/25 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/13825585.2016.1257100 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn. 2018 Jan;25(1):1-22. doi:
10.1080/13825585.2016.1257100. Epub 2016 Nov 24.

PMID- 27859630
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180405
LR - 20180405
IS - 1551-6709 (Electronic)
IS - 0364-0213 (Linking)
VI - 41
IP - 5
DP - 2017 Jul
TI - Does Environmental Experience Shape Spatial Cognition? Frames of Reference
Among
Ancash Quechua Speakers (Peru).
PG - 1274-1298
LID - 10.1111/cogs.12458 [doi]
AB - Previous studies have shown that language contributes to humans' ability to
orient using landmarks and shapes their use of frames of reference (FoRs) for
memory. However, the role of environmental experience in shaping spatial
cognition has not been investigated. This study addresses such a possibility
by
examining the use of FoRs in a nonverbal spatial memory task among residents
of
an Andean community in Peru. Participants consisted of 97 individuals from
Ancash
Quechua-speaking households (8-77 years of age) who spoke Quechua and/or
Spanish
and varied considerably with respect to the extent of their experience in the
surrounding landscape. The results demonstrated that environmental experience
was
the only factor significantly related to the preference for allocentric FoRs.
The
study thus shows that environmental experience can play a role alongside
language
in shaping habits of spatial representation, and it suggests a new direction
of
inquiry into the relationships among language, thought, and experience.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.
FAU - Shapero, Joshua A
AU - Shapero JA
AD - Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20161117
PL - United States
TA - Cogn Sci
JT - Cognitive science
JID - 7708195
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Child
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - *Environment
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Peru
MH - Space Perception/physiology
MH - Spatial Behavior/*physiology
MH - Spatial Learning/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Anthropology
OT - Culture
OT - Ethnography
OT - Frames of reference
OT - Language and thought
OT - Linguistics
OT - Spatial language and cognition
OT - Spatial reasoning
EDAT- 2016/11/20 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/06 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/19 06:00
PHST- 2015/04/20 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/20 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/05/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/11/20 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/06 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/19 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/cogs.12458 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cogn Sci. 2017 Jul;41(5):1274-1298. doi: 10.1111/cogs.12458. Epub 2016 Nov
17.

PMID- 27844295
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180611
LR - 20181113
IS - 1531-5320 (Electronic)
IS - 1069-9384 (Linking)
VI - 24
IP - 4
DP - 2017 Aug
TI - Semantic priming, not repetition priming, is to blame for false hearing.
PG - 1194-1204
LID - 10.3758/s13423-016-1185-4 [doi]
AB - Contextual and sensory information are combined in speech perception.
Conflict
between the two can lead to false hearing, defined as a high-confidence
misidentification of a spoken word. Rogers, Jacoby, and Sommers (Psychology
and
Aging, 27(1), 33-45, 2012) found that older adults are more susceptible to
false
hearing than are young adults, using a combination of semantic priming and
repetition priming to create context. In this study, the type of context
(repetition vs. sematic priming) responsible for false hearing was examined.
Older and young adult participants read and listened to a list of paired
associates (e.g., ROW-BOAT) and were told to remember the pairs for a later
memory test. Following the memory test, participants identified words masked
in
noise that were preceded by a cue word in the clear. Targets were
semantically
associated to the cue (e.g., ROW-BOAT), unrelated to the cue (e.g., JAW-
PASS), or
phonologically related to a semantic associate of the cue (e.g., ROW-GOAT).
How
often each cue word and its paired associate were presented prior to the
memory
test was manipulated (0, 3, or 5 times) to test effects of repetition
priming.
Results showed repetitions had no effect on rates of context-based listening
or
false hearing. However, repetition did significantly increase sensory
information
as a basis for metacognitive judgments in young and older adults. This
pattern
suggests that semantic priming dominates as the basis for false hearing and
highlights context and sensory information operating as qualitatively
different
bases for listening and metacognition.
FAU - Rogers, Chad S
AU - Rogers CS
AD - Department of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO,
USA.
rogersc@ent.wustl.edu.
AD - Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University in St. Louis, 660 South
Euclid, Box 8115, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. rogersc@ent.wustl.edu.
LA - eng
GR - T32 AG000030/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - Dean's Dissertation Fellowship/Washington University in St. Louis
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Psychon Bull Rev
JT - Psychonomic bulletin & review
JID - 9502924
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Aging
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Repetition Priming
MH - *Semantics
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5429986
MID - NIHMS830036
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Cognitive aging
OT - False memory
OT - Metamemory
OT - Speech perception
EDAT- 2016/11/16 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/12 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/16 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/12 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.3758/s13423-016-1185-4 [doi]
AID - 10.3758/s13423-016-1185-4 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Psychon Bull Rev. 2017 Aug;24(4):1194-1204. doi: 10.3758/s13423-016-1185-4.

PMID- 27829310
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180307
LR - 20180307
IS - 1744-411X (Electronic)
IS - 1380-3395 (Linking)
VI - 39
IP - 6
DP - 2017 Aug
TI - Traumatic brain injury and alcohol/substance abuse: A Bayesian meta-analysis
comparing the outcomes of people with and without a history of abuse.
PG - 547-562
LID - 10.1080/13803395.2016.1248812 [doi]
AB - Alcohol and substance (drugs and/or alcohol) abuse are major risk factors for
traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, it remains unclear whether outcomes
differ
for those with and without a history of preinjury abuse. A meta-analysis was
performed to examine this issue. The PubMed, Embase, and PsycINFO databases
were
searched for research that compared the neuroradiological, cognitive, or
psychological outcomes of adults with and without a documented history of
alcohol
and/or substance abuse who sustained nonpenetrating TBIs. Data from 22
studies
were analyzed using a random-effects model: Hedges's g effect sizes measured
the
mean difference in outcomes of individuals with/without a history of
preinjury
abuse, and Bayes factors assessed the probability that the outcomes differed.
Patients with a history of alcohol and/or substance abuse had poorer
neuroradiological outcomes, including reduced hippocampal (g = -0.82) and
gray
matter volumes (g = -0.46 to -0.82), and enlarged cerebral ventricles (g =
-0.73
to -0.80). There were limited differences in cognitive outcomes: Executive
functioning (g = -0.51) and memory (g = -0.39 to -0.43) were moderately
affected,
but attention and reasoning were not. The findings for fine motor ability,
construction, perception, general cognition, and language were inconclusive.
Postinjury substance and alcohol use (g = -0.97 to -1.07) and emotional
functioning (g = -0.29 to -0.44) were worse in those with a history of
alcohol
and/or substance abuse (psychological outcomes). This study highlighted the
type
and extent of post-TBI differences between persons with and without a history
of
alcohol or substance abuse, many of which may hamper recovery. However,
variation
in the criteria for premorbid abuse, limited information regarding the
history of
abuse, and an absence of preinjury baseline data prevented an assessment of
whether the differences predated the TBI, occurred as a result of ongoing
alcohol/substance abuse, or reflected the cumulative impact of
alcohol/substance
abuse and TBI.
FAU - Unsworth, David J
AU - Unsworth DJ
AD - a School of Psychology , University of Adelaide , Adelaide , SA , Australia.
FAU - Mathias, Jane L
AU - Mathias JL
AD - a School of Psychology , University of Adelaide , Adelaide , SA , Australia.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Meta-Analysis
PT - Review
DEP - 20161110
PL - England
TA - J Clin Exp Neuropsychol
JT - Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology
JID - 8502170
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Alcoholism/complications/psychology/*therapy
MH - Bayes Theorem
MH - Brain Injuries, Traumatic/complications/psychology/*therapy
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Substance-Related Disorders/complications/psychology/*therapy
MH - Treatment Outcome
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Alcohol abuse
OT - Drug abuse
OT - Meta-analysis
OT - Outcomes
OT - Substance abuse
OT - Traumatic brain injury
EDAT- 2016/11/11 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/08 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/11 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/11 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/08 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/11 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/13803395.2016.1248812 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2017 Aug;39(6):547-562. doi:
10.1080/13803395.2016.1248812. Epub 2016 Nov 10.

PMID- 27815773
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180709
LR - 20181113
IS - 1931-7565 (Electronic)
IS - 1931-7557 (Linking)
VI - 11
IP - 6
DP - 2017 Dec
TI - The neural correlates of priming emotion and reward systems for conflict
processing in alcoholics.
PG - 1751-1768
LID - 10.1007/s11682-016-9651-1 [doi]
AB - Emotional dysregulation in alcoholism (ALC) may result from disturbed
inhibitory
mechanisms. We therefore tested emotion and alcohol cue reactivity and
inhibitory
processes using negative priming. To test the neural correlates of cue
reactivity
and negative priming, 26 ALC and 26 age-matched controls underwent functional
MRI
performing a Stroop color match-to-sample task. In cue reactivity trials,
task-irrelevant emotion and alcohol-related pictures were interspersed
between
color samples and color words. In negative priming trials, pictures primed
the
semantic content of an alcohol or emotion Stroop word. Behaviorally, both
groups
showed response facilitation to picture cue trials and response inhibition to
primed trials. For cue reactivity to emotion and alcohol pictures, ALC showed
midbrain-limbic activation. By contrast, controls activated frontoparietal
executive control regions. Greater midbrain-hippocampal activation in ALC
correlated with higher amounts of lifetime alcohol consumption and higher
anxiety. With negative priming, ALC exhibited frontal cortical but not
midbrain-hippocampal activation, similar to the pattern observed in controls.
Higher frontal activation to alcohol-priming correlated with less craving and
to
emotion-priming with fewer depressive symptoms. The findings suggest that
neurofunctional systems in ALC can be primed to deal with upcoming emotion-
and
alcohol-related conflict and can overcome the prepotent midbrain-limbic cue
reactivity response.
FAU - Schulte, T
AU - Schulte T
AD - Neuroscience Program, Biosciences Division, SRI International, Menlo Park,
CA,
94025-3493, USA. til@stanford.edu.
AD - Pacific Graduate School of Psychology, Palo Alto University, Palo Alto, CA,
USA.
til@stanford.edu.
FAU - Jung, Y-C
AU - Jung YC
AD - Deptartment of Psychiatry & Beh. Sci, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
AD - Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South
Korea.
FAU - Sullivan, E V
AU - Sullivan EV
AD - Deptartment of Psychiatry & Beh. Sci, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
FAU - Pfefferbaum, A
AU - Pfefferbaum A
AD - Neuroscience Program, Biosciences Division, SRI International, Menlo Park,
CA,
94025-3493, USA.
AD - Deptartment of Psychiatry & Beh. Sci, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
FAU - Serventi, M
AU - Serventi M
AD - Neuroscience Program, Biosciences Division, SRI International, Menlo Park,
CA,
94025-3493, USA.
AD - Deptartment of Psychiatry & Beh. Sci, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
FAU - Muller-Oehring, E M
AU - Muller-Oehring EM
AD - Neuroscience Program, Biosciences Division, SRI International, Menlo Park,
CA,
94025-3493, USA.
AD - Deptartment of Psychiatry & Beh. Sci, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
LA - eng
GR - R01 AA018022/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United States
GR - AA012388/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GR - AA023165/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GR - R01 AA012388/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United States
GR - U01 AA017923/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United States
GR - K05 AA017168/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AA023165/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United States
GR - AA018022/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GR - AA017923/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GR - AA017168/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Brain Imaging Behav
JT - Brain imaging and behavior
JID - 101300405
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Alcoholism/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology/*psychology
MH - Brain/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - Conflict (Psychology)
MH - Cues
MH - Emotions/*physiology
MH - Executive Function/physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Reaction Time
MH - Repetition Priming/*physiology
MH - *Reward
MH - Semantics
MH - Stroop Test
MH - Visual Perception/physiology
PMC - PMC5418124
MID - NIHMS828084
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Alcohol and emotion
OT - Cue reactivity
OT - Executive control
OT - Functional MRI
OT - Midbrain-limbic
OT - Priming
EDAT- 2016/11/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/10 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/06 06:00
PMCR- 2018/12/01 00:00
PHST- 2018/12/01 00:00 [pmc-release]
PHST- 2016/11/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1007/s11682-016-9651-1 [doi]
AID - 10.1007/s11682-016-9651-1 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain Imaging Behav. 2017 Dec;11(6):1751-1768. doi: 10.1007/s11682-016-9651-
1.

PMID- 27814562
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171107
LR - 20171213
IS - 1973-8102 (Electronic)
IS - 0010-9452 (Linking)
VI - 85
DP - 2016 Dec
TI - Gender differences in category-specificity do not reflect innate
dispositions.
PG - 46-53
LID - S0010-9452(16)30269-6 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.09.022 [doi]
AB - It is well established that certain categories of objects are processed more
efficiently than others in specific tasks; a phenomenon known as
category-specificity in perceptual and conceptual processing. In the last two
decades there have also been several reports of gender differences in
category-specificity. In the present experiments we test the proposition that
such gender differences have an evolutionary origin. If they do, we would
expect
them to emerge even when the population tested comprises young individuals
raised
in a gender-equality oriented society. Contrary to this expectation we find
no
evidence of gender differences in category-specificity in a relatively large
sample (N = 366) drawn from such a population; and this despite the fact that
both tasks applied (object decision and superordinate categorization) gave
rise
to reliable category-effects. We suggest that a plausible account of this
discrepancy is that previous reports of gender differences may have reflected
differences in familiarity originating from socially-based gender roles.
CI - Copyright A(c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Gerlach, Christian
AU - Gerlach C
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. Electronic
address: cgerlach@health.sdu.dk.
FAU - Gainotti, Guido
AU - Gainotti G
AD - Center for Neuropsychological Research and Department of Neurosciences,
Institute
of Neurology Policlinico Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome, Italy;
Department
of Clinical and Behavioral Neurology, IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, Rome,
Italy.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20161015
PL - Italy
TA - Cortex
JT - Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior
JID - 0100725
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Decision Making/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - Personality/physiology
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - *Semantics
MH - *Sex Characteristics
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Category-effects
OT - *Evolution
OT - *Gender differences
OT - *Semantics
OT - *Visual object processing
EDAT- 2016/11/05 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/08 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/05 06:00
PHST- 2016/01/26 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/18 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/09/20 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/11/05 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/08 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/05 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0010-9452(16)30269-6 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.09.022 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cortex. 2016 Dec;85:46-53. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.09.022. Epub 2016 Oct
15.

PMID- 27813459
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170606
LR - 20181113
IS - 1744-4144 (Electronic)
IS - 1385-4046 (Linking)
VI - 31
IP - 3
DP - 2017 Apr
TI - Marked brain asymmetry with intact cognitive functioning in idiopathic
Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal analysis.
PG - 654-675
LID - 10.1080/13854046.2016.1251973 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: A 71-year-old (MN) with an 11-year history of left onset tremor
diagnosed as Parkinson's disease (PD) completed longitudinal brain magnetic
resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing. MRI scans showed an
asymmetric caudate nucleus (right < left volume). We describe this asymmetry
at
baseline and the progression over time relative to other subcortical gray,
frontal white matter, and cortical gray matter regions of interest. Isolated
structural changes are compared to MN's cognitive profiles. METHOD: MN
completed
yearly MRIs and neuropsychological assessments. For comparison, left onset PD
(n
= 15) and non-PD (n = 43) peers completed the same baseline protocol. All MRI
scans were processed with FreeSurfer and the FMRIB Software Library to
analyze
gray matter structures and frontal fractional anisotropy (FA) metrics.
Processing
speed, working memory, language, verbal memory, abstract reasoning,
visuospatial,
and motor functions were examined using reliable change methods. RESULTS: At
baseline, MN had striatal volume and frontal lobe thickness asymmetry
relative to
peers with mild prefrontal white matter FA asymmetry. Over time only MN's
right
caudate nucleus showed accelerated atrophy. Cognitively, MN had slowed
psychomotor speed and visuospatial-linked deficits with mild visuospatial
working
memory declines longitudinally. CONCLUSIONS: This is a unique report using
normative neuroimaging and neuropsychology to describe an individual
diagnosed
with PD who had striking striatal asymmetry followed secondarily by cortical
thickness asymmetry and possible frontal white matter asymmetry. His decline
and
variability in visual working memory could be linked to ongoing atrophy of
his
right caudate nucleus.
FAU - Tanner, Jared J
AU - Tanner JJ
AD - a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
AD - b Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration , University of
Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
FAU - Levy, Shellie-Anne
AU - Levy SA
AD - a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
AD - b Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration , University of
Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
FAU - Schwab, Nadine A
AU - Schwab NA
AD - a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
AD - b Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration , University of
Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
FAU - Hizel, Loren P
AU - Hizel LP
AD - a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
AD - b Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration , University of
Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
FAU - Nguyen, Peter T
AU - Nguyen PT
AD - a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
AD - b Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration , University of
Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
FAU - Okun, Michael S
AU - Okun MS
AD - a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
AD - b Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration , University of
Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
FAU - Price, Catherine C
AU - Price CC
AD - a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
AD - b Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration , University of
Florida ,
Gainesville , FL , USA.
LA - eng
GR - UL1 TR000064/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
GR - K23 NS060660/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
GR - P30 AG028740/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - UL1 TR001427/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 NS082386/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
PT - Case Reports
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20161104
PL - England
TA - Clin Neuropsychol
JT - The Clinical neuropsychologist
JID - 8806548
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Anisotropy
MH - *Cognition
MH - Disease Progression
MH - Female
MH - Frontal Lobe/diagnostic imaging
MH - *Functional Laterality
MH - Gray Matter/diagnostic imaging
MH - Humans
MH - Language Tests
MH - Longitudinal Studies
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Memory
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - Mental Processes
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neostriatum/diagnostic imaging
MH - Parkinson Disease/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology/*psychology
MH - Psychomotor Performance
MH - Space Perception
MH - White Matter/diagnostic imaging
PMC - PMC5334434
MID - NIHMS826578
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Neuroimaging
OT - *executive function
OT - *memory
OT - *movement disorders
OT - *white matter
EDAT- 2016/11/05 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/07 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/05 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/05 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/06/07 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/05 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/13854046.2016.1251973 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Clin Neuropsychol. 2017 Apr;31(3):654-675. doi:
10.1080/13854046.2016.1251973.
Epub 2016 Nov 4.

PMID- 27809791
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20161222
LR - 20181113
IS - 1471-2377 (Electronic)
IS - 1471-2377 (Linking)
VI - 16
IP - 1
DP - 2016 Nov 3
TI - The Parkin'Play study: protocol of a phase II randomized controlled trial to
assess the effects of a health game on cognition in Parkinson's disease.
PG - 209
AB - BACKGROUND: In Parkinson's disease (PD), cognitive impairment is an important
non-motor symptom heralding the development of dementia. Effective treatments
to
slow down the rate of cognitive decline in PD patients with mild cognitive
impairment are lacking. Here, we describe the design of the Parkin'Play
study,
which assesses the effects of a cognitive health game intervention on
cognition
in PD. METHODS/DESIGN: This study is a multicentre, phase-II, open-randomized
clinical trial that aims to recruit 222 PD patients with mild cognitive
impairment. Eligible patients have PD, Hoehn & Yahr stages I-III, are aged
between 40 and 75 years, and have cognitive impairment but no dementia. The
intervention group (n = 111) will be trained using a web-based health game
targeting multiple cognitive domains. The control group (n = 111) will be
placed
on a waiting list. In order to increase compliance the health game adapts to
the
subjects' performance, is enjoyable, and can be played at home. From each
group,
20 patients will undergo fMRI to test for potential functional brain changes
underlying treatment. The primary outcome after 12 weeks of training is
cognitive
function, as assessed by a standard neuropsychological assessment battery and
an
online cognitive assessment. The neuropsychological assessment battery covers
the
following domains: executive function, memory, visual perception,
visuoconstruction and language. A compound score for overall cognitive
function
will be calculated as the mean score of all test Z-scores based on the
distribution of scores for both groups taken together. Secondary outcomes at
follow-up visits up to 24 weeks include various motor and non-motor symptoms,
compliance, and biological endpoints (fMRI). DISCUSSION: This study aims at
evaluating whether a cognitive intervention among PD patients leads to an
increased cognitive performance on targeted domains. Strengths of this study
are
a unique web-based health game intervention, the large sample size, a control
group without intervention and innovations designed to increase compliance.
TRIAL
REGISTRATION: NTR5637 on 7-jan-2016.
FAU - van de Weijer, Sjors C F
AU - van de Weijer SC
AD - Department of Neurology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht
UMC+,
P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
FAU - Duits, Annelien A
AU - Duits AA
AD - Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Maastricht University Medical
Center,
Maastricht, The Netherlands.
FAU - Bloem, Bastiaan R
AU - Bloem BR
AD - Department of Neurology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The
Netherlands.
AD - Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
FAU - Kessels, Roy P
AU - Kessels RP
AD - Department of Medical Psychology, Radboud University Medical Center,
Nijmegen,
The Netherlands.
AD - Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
FAU - Jansen, Jacobus F A
AU - Jansen JF
AD - Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht,
The
Netherlands.
AD - School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht,
The
Netherlands.
FAU - Kohler, Sebastian
AU - Kohler S
AD - School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht,
The
Netherlands.
FAU - Tissingh, Gerrit
AU - Tissingh G
AD - Department of Neurology, Zuyderland Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands.
FAU - Kuijf, Mark L
AU - Kuijf ML
AD - Department of Neurology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht
UMC+,
P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ, Maastricht, The Netherlands. mark.kuijf@mumc.nl.
LA - eng
PT - Clinical Trial, Phase II
PT - Journal Article
PT - Multicenter Study
PT - Randomized Controlled Trial
DEP - 20161103
PL - England
TA - BMC Neurol
JT - BMC neurology
JID - 100968555
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology/psychology/*therapy
MH - Executive Function
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Memory
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Parkinson Disease/complications/*psychology
MH - Treatment Outcome
MH - *Video Games
MH - Visual Perception
PMC - PMC5093943
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Cognitive functions
OT - Health game
OT - Mild cognitive impairment
OT - Parkinson disease
OT - RCT
EDAT- 2016/11/05 06:00
MHDA- 2016/12/23 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/05 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/28 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/10/20 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/11/05 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/12/23 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/05 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1186/s12883-016-0731-z [doi]
AID - 10.1186/s12883-016-0731-z [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - BMC Neurol. 2016 Nov 3;16(1):209. doi: 10.1186/s12883-016-0731-z.

PMID- 27651170
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170629
LR - 20180126
IS - 1090-2147 (Electronic)
IS - 0278-2626 (Linking)
VI - 110
DP - 2016 Dec
TI - Lexical-semantic deficits in processing food and non-food items.
PG - 120-130
LID - S0278-2626(16)30197-X [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.bandc.2016.08.007 [doi]
AB - The study of category specific deficits in brain-damaged patients has been
instrumental in explaining how knowledge about different types of objects is
organized in the brain. Much of this research focused on testing putative
semantic sensory/functional subsystems that could explain the observed
dissociations in performance between living things (e.g., animals and
fruits/vegetables) and non-living things (e.g., tools). As neuropsychological
patterns that did not fit the original living/non-living distinction were
observed, an alternative organization of semantic memory in domains
constrained
by evolutionary pressure was hypothesized. However, the category of food,
that
contains both living-natural items, such as an apple, and nonliving-
manufactured
items as in the case of a hamburger, has never been systematically
investigated.
As such, food category could turn out to be very useful to test whether the
brain
organizes the knowledge about food in sensory/functional subsystems, in a
specific domain, or whether both approaches might need to be integrated. In
the
present study we tested the ability of patients with Alzheimer dementia (AD)
and
with Primary Progressive Aphasias (PPA) as well as healthy controls to
perform a
confrontation naming task, a categorization task, and a comprehension of
edible
(natural and manufactured food) and non edible items (tools and non-edible
natural things) task (Tasks 1-3). The same photographs of natural and
manufactured food were presented together with a description of food's
sensory or
functional property that could be either congruent or incongruent with that
particular food (Task 4). Patients were overall less accurate than healthy
individuals, and PPA patients were generally more impaired than AD patients,
especially on the naming task. Food tended to be processed better than non-
food
in two out of three tasks (categorization and comprehension tasks). Patient
groups showed no difference in naming food and non-food items, while controls
were more accurate with non-food than food (controlling for the linguistic
variables and calorie content). AD patients named manufactured food more
accurately than natural food (with PPA and controls showing no difference).
Recognition of food and, to some extent, of manufactured food seems to be
more
resilient to brain damage, possibly by virtue of its survival relevance.
Furthermore, on Task 4 patients showed an advantage for the sensory-natural
pairs
over sensory-manufactured combination. Overall, findings do not fit an
existing
model of semantic memory and suggest that properties intrinsic to the food
items
(such as the level of transformation and the calorie content) or even to the
participants like the Body Mass Index (as shown in another study reviewed
here)
should be considered.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Rumiati, Raffaella I
AU - Rumiati RI
AD - Neuroscience and Society Laboratory, SISSA, Trieste, Italy. Electronic
address:
rumiati@sissa.it.
FAU - Foroni, Francesco
AU - Foroni F
AD - Neuroscience and Society Laboratory, SISSA, Trieste, Italy.
FAU - Pergola, Giulio
AU - Pergola G
AD - Neuroscience and Society Laboratory, SISSA, Trieste, Italy; Universita degli
Studi di Bari 'Aldo Moro', Italy.
FAU - Rossi, Paola
AU - Rossi P
AD - Universita Cattolica, Milan, Italy.
FAU - Silveri, Maria Caterina
AU - Silveri MC
AD - Universita degli Studi di Bari 'Aldo Moro', Italy.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160917
PL - United States
TA - Brain Cogn
JT - Brain and cognition
JID - 8218014
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*physiopathology
MH - Aphasia, Primary Progressive/*physiopathology
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - Concept Formation/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - *Food
MH - Humans
MH - Knowledge
MH - Male
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology
MH - Semantics
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Alzheimer's dementia
OT - *Appetite
OT - *Fronto-temporal dementia
OT - *Semantic knowledge
OT - *Visual recognition
EDAT- 2016/11/05 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/01 06:00
CRDT- 2016/09/22 06:00
PHST- 2015/06/05 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/07/25 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/08/16 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/11/05 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/01 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/09/22 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0278-2626(16)30197-X [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.bandc.2016.08.007 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain Cogn. 2016 Dec;110:120-130. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2016.08.007. Epub 2016
Sep
17.

PMID- 27762581
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171228
LR - 20181113
IS - 1939-1285 (Electronic)
IS - 0278-7393 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 4
DP - 2017 Apr
TI - Reading sky and seeing a cloud: On the relevance of events for perceptual
simulation.
PG - 579-590
LID - 10.1037/xlm0000318 [doi]
AB - Previous research has shown that processing words with an up/down association
(e.g., bird, foot) can influence the subsequent identification of visual
targets
in congruent location (at the top/bottom of the screen). However, as
facilitation
and interference were found under similar conditions, the nature of the
underlying mechanisms remained unclear. We propose that word comprehension
relies
on the perceptual simulation of a prototypical event involving the entity
denoted
by a word in order to provide a general account of the different findings. In
3
experiments, participants had to discriminate between 2 target pictures
appearing
at the top or the bottom of the screen by pressing the left versus right
button.
Immediately before the targets appeared, they saw an up/down word belonging
to
the target's event, an up/down word unrelated to the target, or a spatially
neutral control word. Prime words belonging to target event facilitated
identification of targets at a stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) of 250 ms
(Experiment 1), but only when presented in the vertical location where they
are
typically seen, indicating that targets were integrated in the simulations
activated by the prime words. Moreover, at the same SOA, there was a robust
facilitation effect for targets appearing in their typical location
regardless of
the prime type. However, when words were presented for 100 ms (Experiment 2)
or
800 ms (Experiment 3), only a location nonspecific priming effect was found,
suggesting that the visual system was not activated. Implications for
theories of
semantic processing are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Ostarek, Markus
AU - Ostarek M
AD - Experimental Psychology Department, Division of Psychology and Language
Sciences,
University College London.
FAU - Vigliocco, Gabriella
AU - Vigliocco G
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-1138-7904
AD - Experimental Psychology Department, Division of Psychology and Language
Sciences,
University College London.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20161020
PL - United States
TA - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn
JT - Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
JID - 8207540
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - *Association
MH - *Comprehension
MH - Cues
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - Psychomotor Performance/physiology
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - *Reading
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5378009
EDAT- 2016/11/04 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/29 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/04 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/04 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/04 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2016-50683-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/xlm0000318 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2017 Apr;43(4):579-590. doi:
10.1037/xlm0000318.
Epub 2016 Oct 20.

PMID- 26962960
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171127
LR - 20180702
IS - 1939-1285 (Electronic)
IS - 0278-7393 (Linking)
VI - 42
IP - 11
DP - 2016 Nov
TI - Listening to accented speech in a second language: First language and age of
acquisition effects.
PG - 1774-1797
AB - Bilingual speakers must acquire the phonemic inventory of 2 languages and
need to
recognize spoken words cross-linguistically; a demanding job potentially made
even more difficult due to dialectal variation, an intrinsic property of
speech.
The present work examines how bilinguals perceive second language (L2)
accented
speech and where accommodation to dialectal variation takes place. Dialectal
effects were analyzed at different levels: An AXB discrimination task tapped
phonetic-phonological representations, an auditory lexical-decision task
tested
for effects in accessing the lexicon, and an auditory priming task looked for
semantic processing effects. Within that central focus, the goal was to see
whether perceptual adjustment at a given level is affected by 2 main
linguistic
factors: bilinguals' first language and age of acquisition of the L2. Taking
advantage of the cross-linguistic situation of the Basque language,
bilinguals
with different first languages (Spanish or French) and ages of acquisition of
Basque (simultaneous, early, or late) were tested. Our use of multiple tasks
with
multiple types of bilinguals demonstrates that in spite of very similar
discrimination capacity, French-Basque versus Spanish-Basque simultaneous
bilinguals' performance on lexical access significantly differed. Similarly,
results of the early and late groups show that the mapping of
phonetic-phonological information onto lexical representations is a more
demanding process that accentuates non-native processing difficulties. L1 and
AoA
effects were more readily overcome in semantic processing; accented variants
regularly created priming effects in the different groups of bilinguals.
(PsycINFO Database Record
CI - (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Larraza, Saioa
AU - Larraza S
AD - Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception.
FAU - Samuel, Arthur G
AU - Samuel AG
AD - BCBL, Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language.
FAU - Onederra, Miren Lourdes
AU - Onederra ML
AD - Department of Linguistics and Basque Studies, University of the Basque
Country.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160310
PL - United States
TA - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn
JT - Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
JID - 8207540
SB - IM
MH - Aging/psychology
MH - Critical Period (Psychology)
MH - Discrimination (Psychology)
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Multilingualism
MH - *Phonetics
MH - Psychological Tests
MH - Reaction Time
MH - Repetition Priming
MH - Semantics
MH - *Speech Perception
EDAT- 2016/11/04 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/29 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/11 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/04 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/03/11 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2016-12337-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/xlm0000252 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2016 Nov;42(11):1774-1797. doi:
10.1037/xlm0000252.
Epub 2016 Mar 10.

PMID- 27806352
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180221
LR - 20180905
IS - 1421-9700 (Electronic)
IS - 1420-3030 (Linking)
VI - 21 Suppl 1
DP - 2016
TI - Aging, Cognitive Decline and Hearing Loss: Effects of Auditory Rehabilitation
and
Training with Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants on Cognitive Function and
Depression among Older Adults.
PG - 21-28
AB - A growing interest in cognitive effects associated with speech and hearing
processes is spreading throughout the scientific community essentially guided
by
evidence that central and peripheral hearing loss is associated with
cognitive
decline. For the present research, 125 participants older than 65 years of
age
(105 with hearing impairment and 20 with normal hearing) were enrolled,
divided
into 6 groups according to their degree of hearing loss and assessed to
determine
the effects of the treatment applied. Patients in our research program
routinely
undergo an extensive audiological and cognitive evaluation protocol providing
results from the Digit Span test, Stroop color-word test, Montreal Cognitive
Assessment and Geriatric Depression Scale, before and after rehabilitation.
Data
analysis was performed for a cross-sectional and longitudinal study of the
outcomes for the different treatment groups. Each group demonstrated
improvement
after auditory rehabilitation or training on short- and long-term memory
tasks,
level of depression and cognitive status scores. Auditory rehabilitation by
cochlear implants or hearing aids is effective also among older adults
(median
age of 74 years) with different degrees of hearing loss, and enables positive
improvements in terms of social isolation, depression and cognitive
performance.
CI - (c) 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.
FAU - Castiglione, Alessandro
AU - Castiglione A
AD - Department of Neurosciences and Complex Operative Unit of Otolaryngology,
University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy.
FAU - Benatti, Alice
AU - Benatti A
FAU - Velardita, Carmelita
AU - Velardita C
FAU - Favaro, Diego
AU - Favaro D
FAU - Padoan, Elisa
AU - Padoan E
FAU - Severi, Daniele
AU - Severi D
FAU - Pagliaro, Michela
AU - Pagliaro M
FAU - Bovo, Roberto
AU - Bovo R
FAU - Vallesi, Antonino
AU - Vallesi A
FAU - Gabelli, Carlo
AU - Gabelli C
FAU - Martini, Alessandro
AU - Martini A
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20161103
PL - Switzerland
TA - Audiol Neurootol
JT - Audiology & neuro-otology
JID - 9606930
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - *Aging
MH - Cochlear Implantation/*methods
MH - Cochlear Implants
MH - Cognition
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/*psychology
MH - Correction of Hearing Impairment/*methods
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - Deafness/psychology/rehabilitation
MH - Depression/*psychology
MH - Female
MH - Hearing
MH - *Hearing Aids
MH - Hearing Loss/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Humans
MH - Longitudinal Studies
MH - Male
MH - Severity of Illness Index
MH - Speech
MH - Speech Perception
EDAT- 2016/11/03 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/22 06:00
CRDT- 2016/11/03 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/22 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/11/03 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 000448350 [pii]
AID - 10.1159/000448350 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Audiol Neurootol. 2016;21 Suppl 1:21-28. doi: 10.1159/000448350. Epub 2016
Nov 3.

PMID- 27732718
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180123
LR - 20181030
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 59
IP - 5
DP - 2016 Oct 1
TI - Interrelationships Between Working Memory, Processing Speed, and Language
Development in the Age Range 2-4 years.
PG - 1146-1158
LID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0322 [doi]
AB - Purpose: This study explored associations between working memory and language
in
children aged 2-4 years. Method: Seventy-seven children aged 24-30 months
were
assessed on tests measuring language, visual cognition, verbal working memory
(VWM), phonological short-term memory (PSTM), and processing speed. A
standardized test of receptive and expressive language was used as the
outcomes
measure 18 months later. Results: There were moderate-to-strong longitudinal
bivariate relationships between the 3 processing measures and language
outcomes.
Early VWM showed the strongest bivariate relationship with both later
expressive
(r = .71) and receptive language (r = .72). In a hierarchical multiple
regression
analysis, adding early VWM, PSTM, and processing speed improved prediction of
receptive and expressive language outcomes (12%-13% additional variance)
compared
with models consisting only of early receptive or expressive language, parent
education, and age. Conclusions: Unique associations in hierarchical
regression
analyses were demonstrated between VWM at age two years and receptive and
expressive language skills at age four, and between early processing speed
and
later receptive language. However, early PSTM did not predict unique variance
in
language outcomes, as it shared variance with other measures.
FAU - Newbury, Jayne
AU - Newbury J
AD - University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
FAU - Klee, Thomas
AU - Klee T
AD - University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
FAU - Stokes, Stephanie F
AU - Stokes SF
AD - University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
FAU - Moran, Catherine
AU - Moran C
AD - University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - *Child Development
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Cognition
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language
MH - Longitudinal Studies
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Phonetics
MH - Psychology, Child
MH - Regression Analysis
MH - *Thinking
MH - Visual Perception
EDAT- 2016/10/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/24 06:00
CRDT- 2016/10/13 06:00
PHST- 2015/09/14 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/05 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/10/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/24 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/10/13 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2569729 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0322 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2016 Oct 1;59(5):1146-1158. doi:
10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0322.

PMID- 27575597
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180123
LR - 20181113
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 59
IP - 5
DP - 2016 Oct 1
TI - Dyslexia Limits the Ability to Categorize Talker Dialect.
PG - 900-914
LID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0106 [doi]
AB - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the underlying
phonological impairment in dyslexia is associated with a deficit in
categorizing
regional dialects. Method: Twenty adults with dyslexia, 20 school-age
children
with dyslexia, and 40 corresponding control listeners with average reading
ability listened to sentences produced by multiple talkers (both sexes)
representing two dialects: Midland dialect in Ohio (same as listeners'
dialect)
and Southern dialect in Western North Carolina. Participants' responses were
analyzed using signal detection theory. Results: Listeners with dyslexia were
less sensitive to talker dialect than listeners with average reading ability.
Children were less sensitive to dialect than adults. Under stimulus
uncertainty,
listeners with average reading ability were biased toward Ohio dialect,
whereas
listeners with dyslexia were unbiased in their responses. Talker sex
interacted
with sensitivity and bias differently for listeners with dyslexia than for
listeners with average reading ability. The correlations between dialect
sensitivity and phonological memory scores were strongest for adults with
dyslexia. Conclusions: The results imply that the phonological deficit in
dyslexia arises from impaired access to intact phonological representations
rather than from poorly specified representations. It can be presumed that
the
impeded access to implicit long-term memory representations for indexical
(dialect) information is due to less efficient operations in working memory,
including deficiencies in utilizing talker normalization processes.
FAU - Long, Gayle Beam
AU - Long GB
AD - The Ohio State University, Columbus.
FAU - Fox, Robert Allen
AU - Fox RA
AD - The Ohio State University, Columbus.
FAU - Jacewicz, Ewa
AU - Jacewicz E
AD - The Ohio State University, Columbus.
LA - eng
GR - R01 DC006871/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Child
MH - Dyslexia/*psychology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language
MH - Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5345562
EDAT- 2016/10/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/24 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/31 06:00
PHST- 2015/03/18 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/01/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/10/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/24 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/08/31 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2548262 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0106 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2016 Oct 1;59(5):900-914. doi:
10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0106.

PMID- 27732041
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170817
LR - 20181113
IS - 1931-1559 (Electronic)
IS - 0894-4105 (Linking)
VI - 31
IP - 2
DP - 2017 Feb
TI - Leveraging the test effect to improve maintenance of the gains achieved
through
cognitive rehabilitation.
PG - 220-228
LID - 10.1037/neu0000318 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: An important aspect of the rehabilitation of cognitive and
linguistic
function subsequent to brain injury is the maintenance of learning beyond the
time of initial treatment. Such maintenance is often not satisfactorily
achieved.
Additional practice, or overtraining, may play a key role in long-term
maintenance. In particular, the literature on learning in cognitively intact
persons has suggested that it is testing, and not studying, that contributes
to
maintenance of learning. The present study investigates the hypothesis that
continuing to test relearned words in persons with anomia will lead to
significantly greater maintenance compared with continuing to study relearned
words. METHOD: The current study combines overtraining with the variable of
test
versus study in examining the effects of overtesting and overstudying on
maintenance of word finding in 3 persons with aphasia. First, treatment
successfully reestablished the connections between known items and their
names.
Once the connections were reestablished (i.e., items could be named
successfully), each item was placed into 1 of 4 overtraining conditions: test
and
study, only test, only study, or no longer test or study. Maintenance was
probed
at 1 month and 4 months following the end of overtraining. RESULTS: The
results
are consistent with an advantage of testing compared with studying. All 3
participants showed significantly greater maintenance for words that were
overtested than for words that were overstudied. This testing benefit
persisted
at 1 month and 4 months after completion of the treatment. In fact, there was
no
clear evidence for any benefit of overstudying. CONCLUSIONS: The present
study
demonstrates that overtesting, but not overstudying, leads to lasting
maintenance
of language rehabilitation gains in patients with anomia. The implications
for
the design of other treatment protocols are immense. (PsycINFO Database
Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Friedman, Rhonda B
AU - Friedman RB
AD - Department of Neurology, Center for Aphasia Research and Rehabilitation,
Georgetown University Medical Center.
FAU - Sullivan, Kelli L
AU - Sullivan KL
AD - Department of Neurology, Center for Aphasia Research and Rehabilitation,
Georgetown University Medical Center.
FAU - Snider, Sarah F
AU - Snider SF
AD - Department of Neurology, Center for Aphasia Research and Rehabilitation,
Georgetown University Medical Center.
FAU - Luta, George
AU - Luta G
AD - Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Biomathematics, Georgetown
University Medical Center.
FAU - Jones, Kevin T
AU - Jones KT
AD - Department of Neurology, Center for Aphasia Research and Rehabilitation,
Georgetown University Medical Center.
LA - eng
GR - TL1 TR001431/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Webcasts
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20161010
PL - United States
TA - Neuropsychology
JT - Neuropsychology
JID - 8904467
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Anomia/*diagnosis/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Cognition Disorders/diagnosis/psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - Female
MH - Follow-Up Studies
MH - Humans
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Overlearning
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual
MH - *Practice (Psychology)
MH - *Psychological Tests
MH - *Retention (Psychology)
MH - *Verbal Learning
MH - Vocabulary
PMC - PMC5606155
MID - NIHMS905494
EDAT- 2016/10/28 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/18 06:00
CRDT- 2016/10/13 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/28 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/18 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/10/13 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2016-48462-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/neu0000318 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychology. 2017 Feb;31(2):220-228. doi: 10.1037/neu0000318. Epub 2016
Oct
10.

PMID- 27438869
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180117
LR - 20180117
IS - 1538-4667 (Electronic)
IS - 0196-0202 (Linking)
VI - 37
IP - 6
DP - 2016 Nov/Dec
TI - Development of the Word Auditory Recognition and Recall Measure: A Working
Memory
Test for Use in Rehabilitative Audiology.
PG - e360-e376
AB - OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to develop the Word Auditory
Recognition and Recall Measure (WARRM) and to conduct the inaugural
evaluation of
the performance of younger adults with normal hearing, older adults with
normal
to near-normal hearing, and older adults with pure-tone hearing loss on the
WARRM. DESIGN: The WARRM is a new test designed for concurrently assessing
word
recognition and auditory working memory performance in adults who may have
pure-tone hearing loss. The test consists of 100 monosyllabic words based on
widely used speech-recognition test materials. The 100 words are presented in
recall set sizes of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 items, with 5 trials in each set size.
The
WARRM yields a word-recognition score and a recall score. The WARRM was
administered to all participants in three listener groups under two
processing
conditions in a mixed model (between-subjects, repeated measures) design. The
between-subjects factor was group, with 48 younger listeners with normal
audiometric thresholds (younger listeners with normal hearing [YNH]), 48
older
listeners with normal thresholds through 3000 Hz (older listeners with normal
hearing [ONH]), and 48 older listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (older
listeners with hearing loss [OHL]). The within-subjects factor was WARRM
processing condition (no additional task or with an alphabet judgment task).
The
associations between results on the WARRM test and results on a battery of
other
auditory and memory measures were examined. RESULTS: Word-recognition
performance
on the WARRM was not affected by processing condition or set size and was
near
ceiling for the YNH and ONH listeners (99 and 98%, respectively) with both
groups
performing significantly better than the OHL listeners (83%). The recall
results
were significantly better for the YNH, ONH, and OHL groups with no processing
(93, 84, and 75%, respectively) than with the alphabet processing (86, 77,
and
70%). In both processing conditions, recall was best for YNH, followed by
ONH,
and worst for OHL listeners. WARRM recall scores were significantly
correlated
with other memory measures. In addition, WARRM recall scores were correlated
with
results on the Words-In-Noise (WIN) test for the OHL listeners in the no
processing condition and for ONH listeners in the alphabet processing
condition.
Differences in the WIN and recall scores of these groups are consistent with
the
interpretation that the OHL listeners found listening to be sufficiently
demanding to affect recall even in the no processing condition, whereas the
ONH
group listeners did not find it so demanding until the additional alphabet
processing task was added. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate the
feasibility of incorporating an auditory memory test into a word-recognition
test
to obtain measures of both word recognition and working memory
simultaneously.
The correlation of WARRM recall with scores from other memory measures is
evidence of construct validity. The observation of correlations between the
WIN
thresholds with each of the older groups and recall scores in certain
processing
conditions suggests that recall depends on listeners' word-recognition
abilities
in noise in combination with the processing demands of the task. The recall
score
provides additional information beyond the pure-tone audiogram and
word-recognition scores that may help rehabilitative audiologists assess the
listening abilities of patients with hearing loss.
FAU - Smith, Sherri L
AU - Smith SL
AD - 1Audiologic Rehabilitation Laboratory, Auditory Vestibular Research
Enhancement
Award Program, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Mountain Home, Tennessee,
USA;
2Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, East Tennessee State
University, Johnson City, Tennessee, USA; 3Department of Psychology,
University
of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada; 4Toronto Rehabilitation Institute,
University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 5Rotman Research
Institute,
Baycrest Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and 6Linneaus Centre HEAD,
Linkoping
University, Sweden.
FAU - Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen
AU - Pichora-Fuller MK
FAU - Alexander, Genevieve
AU - Alexander G
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Ear Hear
JT - Ear and hearing
JID - 8005585
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Audiometry, Pure-Tone
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/*physiopathology/psychology/rehabilitation
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Short-Term
MH - *Mental Recall
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Pattern Recognition, Physiological
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2016/10/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/18 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/21 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/18 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/07/21 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000329 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Ear Hear. 2016 Nov/Dec;37(6):e360-e376. doi: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000329.

PMID- 27743882
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180319
LR - 20180416
IS - 1878-5891 (Electronic)
IS - 0378-5955 (Linking)
VI - 349
DP - 2017 Jun
TI - Effects of noise on speech recognition: Challenges for communication by
service
members.
PG - 76-89
LID - S0378-5955(16)30351-3 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.heares.2016.10.004 [doi]
AB - Speech communication often takes place in noisy environments; this is an
urgent
issue for military personnel who must communicate in high-noise environments.
The
effects of noise on speech recognition vary significantly according to the
sources of noise, the number and types of talkers, and the listener's hearing
ability. In this review, speech communication is first described as it
relates to
current standards of hearing assessment for military and civilian
populations.
The next section categorizes types of noise (also called maskers) according
to
their temporal characteristics (steady or fluctuating) and perceptive effects
(energetic or informational masking). Next, speech recognition difficulties
experienced by listeners with hearing loss and by older listeners are
summarized,
and questions on the possible causes of speech-in-noise difficulty are
discussed,
including recent suggestions of "hidden hearing loss". The final section
describes tests used by military and civilian researchers, audiologists, and
hearing technicians to assess performance of an individual in recognizing
speech
in background noise, as well as metrics that predict performance based on a
listener and background noise profile. This article provides readers with an
overview of the challenges associated with speech communication in noisy
backgrounds, as well as its assessment and potential impact on functional
performance, and provides guidance for important new research directions
relevant
not only to military personnel, but also to employees who work in high noise
environments.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Le Prell, Colleen G
AU - Le Prell CG
AD - The University of Texas at Dallas, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences,
USA.
Electronic address: colleen.leprell@utdallas.edu.
FAU - Clavier, Odile H
AU - Clavier OH
AD - Creare, Hanover, NJ, USA.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
DEP - 20161012
PL - Netherlands
TA - Hear Res
JT - Hearing research
JID - 7900445
SB - IM
MH - Audiometry, Speech
MH - Ear Protective Devices
MH - Environmental Monitoring
MH - Hearing
MH - Hearing Loss/diagnosis/physiopathology/psychology
MH - Humans
MH - Military Personnel/*psychology
MH - Noise, Occupational/*adverse effects/prevention & control
MH - Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects/prevention & control
MH - *Perceptual Masking
MH - Persons With Hearing Impairments/psychology
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Speech
MH - *Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Communication
OT - *Hearing-in-noise
OT - *Hidden hearing loss
OT - *Military
OT - *Noise exposure
OT - *Occupational noise
OT - *Service member
OT - *Speech
EDAT- 2016/10/23 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/20 06:00
CRDT- 2016/10/17 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/10/05 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/10/11 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/10/23 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/20 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/10/17 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0378-5955(16)30351-3 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.heares.2016.10.004 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Hear Res. 2017 Jun;349:76-89. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2016.10.004. Epub 2016
Oct
12.

PMID- 27616158
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170510
LR - 20170510
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 91
DP - 2016 Oct
TI - Is the time course of lexical activation and competition in spoken word
recognition affected by adult aging? An event-related potential (ERP) study.
PG - 451-464
LID - S0028-3932(16)30344-X [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.09.007 [doi]
AB - Adult aging is associated with decreased accuracy for recognizing speech,
particularly in noisy backgrounds and for high neighborhood density words,
which
sound similar to many other words. In the current study, the time course of
neighborhood density effects in young and older adults was compared using
event-related potentials (ERP) and behavioral responses in a lexical decision
task for spoken words and nonwords presented either in quiet or in noise.
Target
items sounded similar either to many or to few other words (neighborhood
density)
but were balanced for the frequency of their component sounds (phonotactic
probability). Behavioral effects of density were similar across age groups,
but
the event-related potential effects of density differed as a function of age
group. For young adults, density modulated the amplitude of both the N400 and
the
later P300 or late positive complex (LPC). For older adults, density
modulated
only the amplitude of the P300/LPC. Thus, spreading activation to the
semantics
of lexical neighbors, indexed by the N400 density effect, appears to be
reduced
or delayed in adult aging. In contrast, effects of density on P300/LPC
amplitude
were present in both age groups, perhaps reflecting attentional allocation to
items that resemble few words in the mental lexicon. The results constitute
the
first evidence that ERP effects of neighborhood density are affected by adult
aging. The age difference may reflect either a unitary density effect that is
delayed by approximately 150ms in older adults, or multiple processes that
are
differentially affected by aging.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Hunter, Cynthia R
AU - Hunter CR
AD - Language Perception Laboratory, Department of Psychology, State University of
New
York at Buffalo, USA. Electronic address: cynthunt@indiana.edu.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160908
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*physiology
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Decision Making/physiology
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Evoked Potentials/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Phonetics
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/physiology
MH - *Semantics
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Time Factors
MH - *Vocabulary
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Aging
OT - *Event-related potential
OT - *Lexical competition
OT - *Neighborhood density
OT - *Processing speed
OT - *Spoken word recognition
EDAT- 2016/10/23 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/11 06:00
CRDT- 2016/09/13 06:00
PHST- 2016/02/28 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/09/05 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/09/07 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/10/23 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/05/11 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/09/13 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0028-3932(16)30344-X [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.09.007 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2016 Oct;91:451-464. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.09.007. Epub 2016 Sep 8.

PMID- 27454152
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170214
LR - 20170214
IS - 1464-0619 (Electronic)
IS - 1354-6805 (Linking)
VI - 21
IP - 4
DP - 2016 Jul
TI - Is this my voice or yours? The role of emotion and acoustic quality in self-
other
voice discrimination in schizophrenia.
PG - 335-353
AB - INTRODUCTION: Impairments in self-other voice discrimination have been
consistently reported in schizophrenia, and associated with the severity of
auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs). This study probed the interactions
between
voice identity, voice acoustic quality, and semantic valence in a self-other
voice discrimination task in schizophrenia patients compared with healthy
subjects. The relationship between voice identity discrimination and AVH
severity
was also explored. METHODS: Seventeen chronic schizophrenia patients and 19
healthy controls were asked to read aloud a list of adjectives characterised
by
emotional or neutral content. Participants' voice was recorded in the first
session. In the behavioural task, 840 spoken words differing in identity
(self/non-self), acoustic quality (undistorted/distorted), and semantic
valence
(negative/positive/neutral) were presented. Participants indicated if the
words
were spoken in their own voice, another person's voice, or were unsure.
RESULTS:
Patients were less accurate than controls in the recognition of self-
generated
speech with negative content only. Impaired recognition of negative
self-generated speech was associated with AVH severity ("voices conversing").
CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that abnormalities in higher order
processes
(evaluation of the salience of a speech stimulus) modulate impaired self-
other
voice discrimination in schizophrenia. Abnormal processing of negative
self-generated speech may play a role in the experience of AVH.
FAU - Pinheiro, Ana P
AU - Pinheiro AP
AD - a Laboratory of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry , Harvard Medical
School,
& Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Brockton V.A. Medical Center
Psychiatry , Brockton , MA , USA.
AD - b Neuropsychophysiology Laboratory, CIPsi , School of Psychology, University
of
Minho , Braga , Portugal.
AD - c Faculty of Psychology , University of Lisbon , Lisbon , Portugal.
FAU - Rezaii, Neguine
AU - Rezaii N
AD - a Laboratory of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry , Harvard Medical
School,
& Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Brockton V.A. Medical Center
Psychiatry , Brockton , MA , USA.
FAU - Rauber, Andreia
AU - Rauber A
AD - d Computational Linguistics Department , University of Tubingen , Tubingen ,
Germany.
FAU - Niznikiewicz, Margaret
AU - Niznikiewicz M
AD - a Laboratory of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry , Harvard Medical
School,
& Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Brockton V.A. Medical Center
Psychiatry , Brockton , MA , USA.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160725
PL - England
TA - Cogn Neuropsychiatry
JT - Cognitive neuropsychiatry
JID - 9713497
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - *Emotions
MH - Female
MH - Hallucinations/*psychology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Schizophrenia/*complications
MH - *Schizophrenic Psychology
MH - Semantics
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - *Voice
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Schizophrenia
OT - auditory hallucinations
OT - emotion
OT - self
OT - voice
EDAT- 2016/10/18 06:00
MHDA- 2017/02/15 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/26 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/18 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/02/15 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/07/26 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/13546805.2016.1208611 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cogn Neuropsychiatry. 2016 Jul;21(4):335-353. doi:
10.1080/13546805.2016.1208611.
Epub 2016 Jul 25.

PMID- 27732024
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170313
LR - 20181113
IS - 1939-1846 (Electronic)
IS - 0021-843X (Linking)
VI - 125
IP - 7
DP - 2016 Oct
TI - Nonverbal short-term serial order memory in autism spectrum disorder.
PG - 886-893
AB - To clarify the role of item and order memory in the serial recall of adults
with
autism spectrum disorder (ASD), we carried out 2 experiments in which adults
with
ASD and comparison participants matched on chronological age and verbal IQ
saw
sequences of 7 dots appear sequentially in a 3 x 4 grid. In Experiment 1
(serial
recall), they had to recall the locations and the presentation order of the
dots
by tapping locations on an empty grid. In Experiment 2, (order
reconstruction)
the studied dots were provided at test and participants had to touch them in
their order of appearance at study. Experiment 1 revealed diminished item and
order recall in the ASD group; Experiment 2 revealed diminished order recall
only
when verbal IQ was controlled. The results support the view that people with
ASD
have particular difficulty with serial order recall but may use their
language
ability to achieve better serial recall performance. (PsycINFO Database
Record
CI - (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Bowler, Dermot M
AU - Bowler DM
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-9884-0627
AD - Devon Autism and ADHD Service, Department of Psychology, City, University of
London.
FAU - Poirier, Marie
AU - Poirier M
AD - Devon Autism and ADHD Service, Department of Psychology, City, University of
London.
FAU - Martin, Jonathan S
AU - Martin JS
AD - Devon Partnership NHS Trust.
FAU - Gaigg, Sebastian B
AU - Gaigg SB
AD - Department of Psychology, City, University of London.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - J Abnorm Psychol
JT - Journal of abnormal psychology
JID - 0034461
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Autism Spectrum Disorder/*psychology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Mental Recall
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Serial Learning
MH - Visual Perception
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5070914
EDAT- 2016/10/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/03/14 06:00
CRDT- 2016/10/13 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/13 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/10/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/03/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - 2016-47529-003 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/abn0000203 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Abnorm Psychol. 2016 Oct;125(7):886-893. doi: 10.1037/abn0000203.

PMID- 27697085
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171128
LR - 20180914
IS - 1469-8978 (Electronic)
IS - 0033-2917 (Linking)
VI - 47
IP - 2
DP - 2017 Jan
TI - Poor stimulus discriminability as a common neuropsychological deficit between
ADHD and reading ability in young children: a moderated mediation model.
PG - 255-266
LID - 10.1017/S0033291716002531 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is frequently
associated with poorer reading ability; however, the specific
neuropsychological
domains linking this co-occurrence remain unclear. This study evaluates
information-processing characteristics as possible neuropsychological links
between ADHD symptoms and RA in a community-based sample of children and
early
adolescents with normal IQ (70). METHOD: The participants (n = 1857, aged 6-
15
years, 47% female) were evaluated for reading ability (reading single words
aloud) and information processing [stimulus discriminability in the two-
choice
reaction-time task estimated using diffusion models]. ADHD symptoms were
ascertained through informant (parent) report using the Development and
Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA). Verbal working memory (VWM; digit span
backwards),
visuospatial working memory (VSWM, Corsi Blocks backwards), sex,
socioeconomic
status, and IQ were included as covariates. RESULTS: In a moderated mediation
model, stimulus discriminability mediated the effect of ADHD on reading
ability.
This indirect effect was moderated by age such that a larger effect was seen
among younger children. CONCLUSION: The findings support the hypothesis that
ADHD
and reading ability are linked among young children via a neuropsychological
deficit related to stimulus discriminability. Early interventions targeting
stimulus discriminability might improve symptoms of inattention/hyperactivity
and
reading ability.
FAU - Lucio, P S
AU - Lucio PS
AD - Department of Psychiatry,Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP),Sao
Paulo,Brazil.
FAU - Salum, G A
AU - Salum GA
AD - National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents
(INCT-CNPq),Sao Paulo,Brazil.
FAU - Rohde, L A
AU - Rohde LA
AD - National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents
(INCT-CNPq),Sao Paulo,Brazil.
FAU - Swardfager, W
AU - Swardfager W
AD - Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology,University of Toronto,Toronto,Canada.
FAU - Gadelha, A
AU - Gadelha A
AD - National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents
(INCT-CNPq),Sao Paulo,Brazil.
FAU - Vandekerckhove, J
AU - Vandekerckhove J
AD - Department of Cognitive Sciences and Department of Statistics,University of
California,Irvine, CA,USA.
FAU - Pan, P M
AU - Pan PM
AD - Department of Psychiatry,Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP),Sao
Paulo,Brazil.
FAU - Polanczyk, G V
AU - Polanczyk GV
AD - National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents
(INCT-CNPq),Sao Paulo,Brazil.
FAU - do Rosario, M C
AU - do Rosario MC
AD - National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents
(INCT-CNPq),Sao Paulo,Brazil.
FAU - Jackowski, A P
AU - Jackowski AP
AD - Department of Psychiatry,Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP),Sao
Paulo,Brazil.
FAU - Mari, J J
AU - Mari JJ
AD - Department of Psychiatry,Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP),Sao
Paulo,Brazil.
FAU - Cogo-Moreira, H
AU - Cogo-Moreira H
AD - Department of Psychiatry,Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP),Sao
Paulo,Brazil.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20161004
PL - England
TA - Psychol Med
JT - Psychological medicine
JID - 1254142
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/*physiopathology
MH - Child
MH - Discrimination (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Dyslexia/*physiopathology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - *Reading
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *ADHD
OT - *diffusion model
OT - *moderated-mediation
OT - *reading ability
EDAT- 2016/10/05 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/29 06:00
CRDT- 2016/10/05 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/05 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/10/05 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0033291716002531 [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S0033291716002531 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Psychol Med. 2017 Jan;47(2):255-266. doi: 10.1017/S0033291716002531. Epub
2016
Oct 4.

PMID- 27690132
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171128
LR - 20180418
IS - 1872-7123 (Electronic)
IS - 0165-1781 (Linking)
VI - 246
DP - 2016 Dec 30
TI - Deficits in metaphor but not in idiomatic processing are related to verbal
hallucinations in patients with psychosis.
PG - 101-112
LID - S0165-1781(16)30350-X [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.09.024 [doi]
AB - There is scant evidence that the verbal cognitive deficits observed in
patients
with psychosis are related to auditory verbal hallucinations. The
understanding
of metaphors and idiomatic expressions was investigated in a cohort of 90
patients with active psychosis, and in 44 healthy controls. The Psychotic
Symptom
Rating Scales (PSYRATS: verbal hallucinations subscale) was used to measure
the
current verbal hallucinations episode; a subscore of the Launay-Slade
Hallucination Scale was used to measure long-term propensity to auditory
verbal
hallucination-like experiences (HLEs) in the sample. The concurrent influence
of
education, IQ, and cognitive functioning in memory, attention, fluency, and
processing speed on metaphor and idioms processing was investigated. Patients
performed worse than healthy controls on all neuropsychological measures.
Metaphor, but not idioms processing was poorer in patients with verbal
hallucinations (n=46) when compared to patients without verbal hallucinations
in
the current episode (n=44). By taking into account confounding variables, the
ability to produce explanations of metaphors was related to scores on the
verbal
HLEs in the whole sample of patients. Metaphor-comprehension deficit was
related
to the occurrence of auditory verbal hallucinations in patients with
psychosis,
suggesting that abnormal pragmatic inferential abilities have an impact on
the
mechanisms that cause hallucinatory experiences.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Siddi, Sara
AU - Siddi S
AD - Section of Clinical Psychology, Department of Education, Psychology, and
Philosophy, University of Cagliari, Italy; Research and Development Unit,
Parc
Sanitari Sant Joan de Deu, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain, CIBERSAM; Faculty of
Medicine, University of Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address:
sara.siddi@pssjd.org.
FAU - Petretto, Donatella Rita
AU - Petretto DR
AD - Section of Clinical Psychology, Department of Education, Psychology, and
Philosophy, University of Cagliari, Italy.
FAU - Scanu, Rosanna
AU - Scanu R
AD - Section of Clinical Psychology, Department of Education, Psychology, and
Philosophy, University of Cagliari, Italy.
FAU - Burrai, Caterina
AU - Burrai C
AD - Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment Service I, Department of Mental Health,
ASL
Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
FAU - Baita, Antonella
AU - Baita A
AD - Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment Service I, Department of Mental Health,
ASL
Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
FAU - Trincas, Pierfranco
AU - Trincas P
AD - Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment Service II, Department of Mental Health,
ASL
Cagliari, Cagliary, Italy.
FAU - Trogu, Emanuela
AU - Trogu E
AD - Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment Service II, Department of Mental Health,
ASL
Cagliari, Cagliary, Italy.
FAU - Campus, Liliana
AU - Campus L
AD - Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment Service I, Department of Mental Health,
ASL
Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
FAU - Contu, Augusto
AU - Contu A
AD - Head, Department of Mental Health, ASL Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
FAU - Preti, Antonio
AU - Preti A
AD - Section of Clinical Psychology, Department of Education, Psychology, and
Philosophy, University of Cagliari, Italy; Genneruxi Medical Center,
Cagliari,
Italy.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160919
PL - Ireland
TA - Psychiatry Res
JT - Psychiatry research
JID - 7911385
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Hallucinations/*physiopathology
MH - Humans
MH - *Language
MH - Male
MH - *Metaphor
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
MH - Psychotic Disorders/*physiopathology
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Hallucinations
OT - *Metaphor comprehension
OT - *Psychosis
EDAT- 2016/10/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/29 06:00
CRDT- 2016/10/01 06:00
PHST- 2016/02/25 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/09/16 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/09/18 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/10/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/10/01 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0165-1781(16)30350-X [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.09.024 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Psychiatry Res. 2016 Dec 30;246:101-112. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.09.024.
Epub 2016 Sep 19.

PMID- 27687156
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180207
LR - 20180319
IS - 1465-3656 (Electronic)
IS - 1355-4794 (Linking)
VI - 22
IP - 6
DP - 2016 Dec
TI - Measuring the representational space of music with fMRI: a case study with
Sting.
PG - 548-557
LID - 10.1080/13554794.2016.1216572 [doi]
AB - Functional brain imaging has revealed much about the neuroanatomical
substrates
of higher cognition, including music, language, learning, and memory. The
technique lends itself to studying of groups of individuals. In contrast, the
nature of expert performance is typically studied through the examination of
exceptional individuals using behavioral case studies and retrospective
biography. Here, we combined fMRI and the study of an individual who is a
world-class expert musician and composer in order to better understand the
neural
underpinnings of his music perception and cognition, in particular, his
mental
representations for music. We used state of the art multivoxel pattern
analysis
(MVPA) and representational dissimilarity analysis (RDA) in a fixed set of
brain
regions to test three exploratory hypotheses with the musician Sting: (1)
Composing would recruit neutral structures that are both unique and
distinguishable from other creative acts, such as composing prose or visual
art;
(2) listening and imagining music would recruit similar neural regions,
indicating that musical memory shares anatomical substrates with music
listening;
(3) the MVPA and RDA results would help us to map the representational space
for
music, revealing which musical pieces and genres are perceived to be similar
in
the musician's mental models for music. Our hypotheses were confirmed. The
act of
composing, and even of imagining elements of the composed piece separately,
such
as melody and rhythm, activated a similar cluster of brain regions, and were
distinct from prose and visual art. Listened and imagined music showed high
similarity, and in addition, notable similarity/dissimilarity patterns
emerged
among the various pieces used as stimuli: Muzak and Top 100/Pop songs were
far
from all other musical styles in Mahalanobis distance (Euclidean
representational
space), whereas jazz, R&B, tango and rock were comparatively close. Closer
inspection revealed principaled explanations for the similarity clusters
found,
based on key, tempo, motif, and orchestration.
FAU - Levitin, Daniel J
AU - Levitin DJ
AD - a Department of Psychology , McGill University , Montreal , Canada.
FAU - Grafton, Scott T
AU - Grafton ST
AD - b Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences , University of California
at
Santa Barbara , Santa Barbara , CA , USA.
LA - eng
PT - Case Reports
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160812
PL - England
TA - Neurocase
JT - Neurocase
JID - 9511374
RN - S88TT14065 (Oxygen)
SB - IM
EIN - Neurocase. 2016 Dec;22(6):i. PMID: 28001645
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - *Brain Mapping
MH - Cerebral Cortex/diagnostic imaging
MH - Humans
MH - Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
MH - Imagination/*physiology
MH - *Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Music
MH - Oxygen/blood
MH - Space Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *MVPA
OT - *Music cognition
OT - *case studies
OT - *mental imagery
OT - *neuroimaging
EDAT- 2016/10/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/08 06:00
CRDT- 2016/10/01 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/08 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/10/01 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/13554794.2016.1216572 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neurocase. 2016 Dec;22(6):548-557. doi: 10.1080/13554794.2016.1216572. Epub
2016
Aug 12.

PMID- 27683956
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180309
LR - 20180309
IS - 1744-4128 (Electronic)
IS - 1382-5585 (Linking)
VI - 24
IP - 4
DP - 2017 Jul
TI - Emotional prosody effects on verbal memory in older and younger adults.
PG - 408-417
LID - 10.1080/13825585.2016.1219690 [doi]
AB - Prosody, or the way things are said, can modify the meaning of utterances
making
qualitatively different affective prosodies useful for understanding how
auditory
affective information is processed and remembered. In this study, we
collected
behavioral data from 225 younger (M age = 20.8 years, SD = 2.5 years; 119
males)
and 225 older adults (M age = 71.6 years, SD = 6.5 years; 119 males) in order
to
examine age differences in emotional prosody effects on verbal memory.
Participants were randomly divided into three subgroups according to
different
prosody listening conditions (positive, negative, and neutral) and prosody
effects on a yes-no recognition memory task were investigated. The results
showed
how older adults who listened to the story read with a neutral prosody
remembered
more words than those who listened to the same story with a positive or
negative
prosody. Younger adults showed no valence effects. Our findings highlighted
an
age and affective prosody interaction that affects remembering in older
adults
alone.
FAU - Fairfield, Beth
AU - Fairfield B
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5237-8230
AD - a Department of Psychological, Health and Territorial Sciences , University
of
Chieti , Chieti , Italy.
FAU - Di Domenico, Alberto
AU - Di Domenico A
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9962-2891
AD - a Department of Psychological, Health and Territorial Sciences , University
of
Chieti , Chieti , Italy.
FAU - Serricchio, Sonia
AU - Serricchio S
AD - a Department of Psychological, Health and Territorial Sciences , University
of
Chieti , Chieti , Italy.
FAU - Borella, Erika
AU - Borella E
AD - b Department of General Psychology , University of Padua , Padua , Italy.
FAU - Mammarella, Nicola
AU - Mammarella N
AD - a Department of Psychological, Health and Territorial Sciences , University
of
Chieti , Chieti , Italy.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160810
PL - United States
TA - Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn
JT - Neuropsychology, development, and cognition. Section B, Aging,
neuropsychology
and cognition
JID - 9614434
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - *Emotions
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Memory
MH - *Psycholinguistics
MH - Psychological Tests
MH - Random Allocation
MH - *Speech
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Aging
OT - emotion
OT - memory
OT - prosody
OT - recognition
EDAT- 2016/09/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/10 06:00
CRDT- 2016/09/30 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/09/30 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/13825585.2016.1219690 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn. 2017 Jul;24(4):408-417. doi:
10.1080/13825585.2016.1219690. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

PMID- 27632378
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171102
LR - 20180612
IS - 1939-2222 (Electronic)
IS - 0022-1015 (Linking)
VI - 145
IP - 12
DP - 2016 Dec
TI - Impaired generalization of speaker identity in the perception of familiar and
unfamiliar voices.
PG - 1604-1614
AB - In 2 behavioral experiments, we explored how the extraction of identity-
related
information from familiar and unfamiliar voices is affected by naturally
occurring vocal flexibility and variability, introduced by different types of
vocalizations and levels of volitional control during production. In a first
experiment, participants performed a speaker discrimination task on vowels,
volitional (acted) laughter, and spontaneous (authentic) laughter from 5
unfamiliar speakers. We found that performance was significantly impaired for
spontaneous laughter, a vocalization produced under reduced volitional
control.
We additionally found that the detection of identity-related information
fails to
generalize across different types of nonverbal vocalizations (e.g., laughter
vs.
vowels) and across mismatches in volitional control within vocalization pairs
(e.g., volitional laughter vs. spontaneous laughter), with performance levels
indicating an inability to discriminate between speakers. In a second
experiment,
we explored whether personal familiarity with the speakers would afford
greater
accuracy and better generalization of identity perception. Using new stimuli,
we
largely replicated our previous findings: whereas familiarity afforded a
consistent performance advantage for speaker discriminations, the
experimental
manipulations impaired performance to similar extents for familiar and
unfamiliar
listener groups. We discuss our findings with reference to prototype-based
models
of voice processing and suggest potential underlying mechanisms and
representations of familiar and unfamiliar voice perception. (PsycINFO
Database
Record
CI - (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Lavan, Nadine
AU - Lavan N
AD - Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London.
FAU - Scott, Sophie K
AU - Scott SK
AD - Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London.
FAU - McGettigan, Carolyn
AU - McGettigan C
AD - Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London.
LA - eng
GR - 090961/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160915
PL - United States
TA - J Exp Psychol Gen
JT - Journal of experimental psychology. General
JID - 7502587
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Female
MH - Generalization (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Voice
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2016/09/16 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/03 06:00
CRDT- 2016/09/16 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/09/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2016-44354-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/xge0000223 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Exp Psychol Gen. 2016 Dec;145(12):1604-1614. doi: 10.1037/xge0000223. Epub
2016
Sep 15.

PMID- 27589015
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171127
LR - 20181113
IS - 1708-8186 (Electronic)
IS - 1499-2027 (Linking)
VI - 55
IP - 11
DP - 2016 Nov
TI - Hearing impairment, cognition and speech understanding: exploratory factor
analyses of a comprehensive test battery for a group of hearing aid users,
the
n200 study.
PG - 623-42
LID - 10.1080/14992027.2016.1219775 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: The aims of the current n200 study were to assess the structural
relations between three classes of test variables (i.e. HEARING, COGNITION
and
aided speech-in-noise OUTCOMES) and to describe the theoretical implications
of
these relations for the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model. STUDY
SAMPLE:
Participants were 200 hard-of-hearing hearing-aid users, with a mean age of
60.8
years. Forty-three percent were females and the mean hearing threshold in the
better ear was 37.4 dB HL. DESIGN: LEVEL1 factor analyses extracted one
factor
per test and/or cognitive function based on a priori conceptualizations. The
more
abstract LEVEL 2 factor analyses were performed separately for the three
classes
of test variables. RESULTS: The HEARING test variables resulted in two LEVEL
2
factors, which we labelled SENSITIVITY and TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE; the
COGNITIVE
variables in one COGNITION factor only, and OUTCOMES in two factors, NO
CONTEXT
and CONTEXT. COGNITION predicted the NO CONTEXT factor to a stronger extent
than
the CONTEXT outcome factor. TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and SENSITIVITY were
associated with COGNITION and all three contributed significantly and
independently to especially the NO CONTEXT outcome scores (R(2) = 0.40).
CONCLUSIONS: All LEVEL 2 factors are important theoretically as well as for
clinical assessment.
FAU - Ronnberg, Jerker
AU - Ronnberg J
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Lunner, Thomas
AU - Lunner T
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - c Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - d Eriksholm Research Centre , Oticon A/S, Rortangvej 20, 3070 Snekkersten ,
Denmark .
FAU - Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning
AU - Ng EH
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Lidestam, Bjorn
AU - Lidestam B
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Zekveld, Adriana Agatha
AU - Zekveld AA
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - e Section Ear & Hearing, Dept. of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and
EMGO
Institute, VU University Medical Center , Amsterdam , The Netherlands .
FAU - Sorqvist, Patrik
AU - Sorqvist P
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - f Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering , University
of
Gavle , Gavle , Sweden .
FAU - Lyxell, Bjorn
AU - Lyxell B
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Traff, Ulf
AU - Traff U
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Yumba, Wycliffe
AU - Yumba W
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Classon, Elisabet
AU - Classon E
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Hallgren, Mathias
AU - Hallgren M
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - c Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Larsby, Birgitta
AU - Larsby B
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - c Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Signoret, Carine
AU - Signoret C
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen
AU - Pichora-Fuller MK
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - g Department of Psychology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Ontario ,
Canada .
AD - h The Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network , Toronto ,
Ontario , Canada , and.
AD - i The Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Hospital , Toronto , Ontario ,
Canada.
FAU - Rudner, Mary
AU - Rudner M
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Danielsson, Henrik
AU - Danielsson H
AD - a Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
FAU - Stenfelt, Stefan
AU - Stenfelt S
AD - b Linnaeus Centre HEAD , Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping
University , Linkoping , Sweden .
AD - c Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , Linkoping University ,
Linkoping , Sweden .
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160902
PL - England
TA - Int J Audiol
JT - International journal of audiology
JID - 101140017
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Audiometry, Pure-Tone
MH - Auditory Threshold
MH - *Cognition
MH - Comprehension
MH - Correction of Hearing Impairment/*instrumentation/*psychology
MH - Executive Function
MH - Female
MH - Hearing
MH - *Hearing Aids
MH - Hearing Disorders/diagnosis/physiopathology/*psychology/*therapy
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Noise/adverse effects
MH - Perceptual Masking
MH - Persons With Hearing Impairments/*psychology/*rehabilitation
MH - *Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
PMC - PMC5044772
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Hearing impairment
OT - *cognition
OT - *context
OT - *executive functions
OT - *outcome
OT - *phonology
OT - *temporal fine structure
OT - *working memory capacity
EDAT- 2016/09/03 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/29 06:00
CRDT- 2016/09/03 06:00
PHST- 2016/09/03 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/09/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/29 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1080/14992027.2016.1219775 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Int J Audiol. 2016 Nov;55(11):623-42. doi: 10.1080/14992027.2016.1219775.
Epub
2016 Sep 2.

PMID- 27580733
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180205
LR - 20181113
IS - 1430-2772 (Electronic)
IS - 0340-0727 (Linking)
VI - 81
IP - 5
DP - 2017 Sep
TI - Familiar units prevail over statistical cues in word segmentation.
PG - 990-1003
LID - 10.1007/s00426-016-0793-y [doi]
AB - In language acquisition research, the prevailing position is that listeners
exploit statistical cues, in particular transitional probabilities between
syllables, to discover words of a language. However, other cues are also
involved
in word discovery. Assessing the weight learners give to these different cues
leads to a better understanding of the processes underlying speech
segmentation.
The present study evaluated whether adult learners preferentially used known
units or statistical cues for segmenting continuous speech. Before the
exposure
phase, participants were familiarized with part-words of a three-word
artificial
language. This design allowed the dissociation of the influence of
statistical
cues and familiar units, with statistical cues favoring word segmentation and
familiar units favoring (nonoptimal) part-word segmentation. In Experiment 1,
performance in a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) task between words and
part-words revealed part-word segmentation (even though part-words were less
cohesive in terms of transitional probabilities and less frequent than
words). By
contrast, an unfamiliarized group exhibited word segmentation, as usually
observed in standard conditions. Experiment 2 used a syllable-detection task
to
remove the likely contamination of performance by memory and strategy effects
in
the 2AFC task. Overall, the results suggest that familiar units overrode
statistical cues, ultimately questioning the need for computation mechanisms
of
transitional probabilities (TPs) in natural language speech segmentation.
FAU - Poulin-Charronnat, Benedicte
AU - Poulin-Charronnat B
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3244-6747
AD - Universite Bourgogne Franche-Comte, LEAD-CNRS UMR5022, F-21000, Dijon,
France.
benedicte.poulin@u-bourgogne.fr.
FAU - Perruchet, Pierre
AU - Perruchet P
AD - Universite Bourgogne Franche-Comte, LEAD-CNRS UMR5022, F-21000, Dijon,
France.
FAU - Tillmann, Barbara
AU - Tillmann B
AD - CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Auditory
Cognition
and Psychoacoustics Team, Universite of Lyon I, Lyon, France.
FAU - Peereman, Ronald
AU - Peereman R
AD - Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS UMR5105, LPNC, F-38000, Grenoble, France.
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160831
PL - Germany
TA - Psychol Res
JT - Psychological research
JID - 0435062
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - *Cues
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language Development
MH - Male
MH - Memory/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Phonetics
MH - Probability
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
EDAT- 2016/09/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/06 06:00
CRDT- 2016/09/02 06:00
PHST- 2015/10/13 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/08/10 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/09/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/06 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/09/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1007/s00426-016-0793-y [doi]
AID - 10.1007/s00426-016-0793-y [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Psychol Res. 2017 Sep;81(5):990-1003. doi: 10.1007/s00426-016-0793-y. Epub
2016
Aug 31.

PMID- 27566326
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171023
LR - 20180906
IS - 1943-393X (Electronic)
IS - 1943-3921 (Linking)
VI - 78
IP - 8
DP - 2016 Nov
TI - Does increasing the intelligibility of a competing sound source interfere
more
with speech comprehension in older adults than it does in younger adults?
PG - 2655-2677
AB - A previous study (Schneider, Daneman, Murphy, & Kwong See, 2000) found that
older
listeners' decreased ability to recognize individual words in a noisy
auditory
background was responsible for most, if not all, of the comprehension
difficulties older adults experience when listening to a lecture in a
background
of unintelligible babble. The present study investigated whether the use of a
more intelligible distracter (a competing lecture) might reveal an increased
susceptibility to distraction in older adults. The results from Experiments 1
and
2 showed that both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired older adults performed
poorer than younger adults when everyone was tested in identical listening
situations. However, when the listening situation was individually adjusted
to
compensate for age-related differences in the ability to recognize individual
words in noise, age-related difference in comprehension disappeared.
Experiment 3
compared the masking effects of a single-talker competing lecture to a babble
of
12 voices directly after adjusting for word recognition. The results showed
that
the competing lecture interfered more than did the babble for both younger
and
older listeners. Interestingly, an increase in the level of noise had a
deleterious effect on listening when the distractor was babble but had no
effect
when it was a competing lecture. These findings indicated that the speech
comprehension difficulties of healthy older adults in noisy backgrounds
primarily
reflect age-related declines in the ability to recognize individual words.
FAU - Lu, Zihui
AU - Lu Z
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga
Rd,
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, L5L 1C6.
FAU - Daneman, Meredyth
AU - Daneman M
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga
Rd,
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, L5L 1C6.
FAU - Schneider, Bruce A
AU - Schneider BA
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga
Rd,
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, L5L 1C6. bruce.schneider@utoronto.ca.
LA - eng
GR - MOP-15359/CIHR/Canada
GR - TEA-12497/CIHR/Canada
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - Atten Percept Psychophys
JT - Attention, perception & psychophysics
JID - 101495384
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation/methods
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aged
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Auditory Perception/physiology
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Hearing/physiology
MH - Hearing Loss/physiopathology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Noise
MH - Perceptual Masking/physiology
MH - Reading
MH - Speech
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
MH - Vocabulary
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Informational masking
OT - *Sensory and cognitive aging
OT - *Speech comprehension
EDAT- 2016/08/28 06:00
MHDA- 2017/10/24 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/28 06:00
PHST- 2016/08/28 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/10/24 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/08/28 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.3758/s13414-016-1193-5 [doi]
AID - 10.3758/s13414-016-1193-5 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Atten Percept Psychophys. 2016 Nov;78(8):2655-2677. doi:
10.3758/s13414-016-1193-5.

PMID- 27544643
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171030
LR - 20180529
IS - 1096-0457 (Electronic)
IS - 0022-0965 (Linking)
VI - 152
DP - 2016 Dec
TI - Toddlers' sensitivity to within-word coarticulation during spoken word
recognition: Developmental differences in lexical competition.
PG - 136-148
LID - S0022-0965(16)30100-X [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.07.012 [doi]
AB - To understand speech, listeners need to be able to decode the speech stream
into
meaningful units. However, coarticulation causes phonemes to differ based on
their context. Because coarticulation is an ever-present component of the
speech
stream, it follows that listeners may exploit this source of information for
cues
to the identity of the words being spoken. This research investigates the
development of listeners' sensitivity to coarticulation cues below the level
of
the phoneme in spoken word recognition. Using a looking-while-listening
paradigm,
adults and 2- and 3-year-old children were tested on coarticulation cues that
either matched or mismatched the target. Both adults and children predicted
upcoming phonemes based on anticipatory coarticulation to make decisions
about
word identity. The overall results demonstrate that coarticulation cues are a
fundamental component of children's spoken word recognition system. However,
children did not show the same resolution as adults of the mismatching
coarticulation cues and competitor inhibition, indicating that children's
processing systems are still developing.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Zamuner, Tania S
AU - Zamuner TS
AD - Department of Linguistics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5,
Canada.
Electronic address: tzamuner@uottawa.ca.
FAU - Moore, Charlotte
AU - Moore C
AD - Department of Linguistics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5,
Canada.
FAU - Desmeules-Trudel, Felix
AU - Desmeules-Trudel F
AD - Department of Linguistics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5,
Canada.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160818
PL - United States
TA - J Exp Child Psychol
JT - Journal of experimental child psychology
JID - 2985128R
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - Auditory Perception
MH - Child
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Cues
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Language
MH - Male
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Coarticulation
OT - *Eye-tracking
OT - *Language processing
OT - *Lexical competition
OT - *Spoken word recognition
OT - *Vowel nasalization
EDAT- 2016/08/22 06:00
MHDA- 2017/10/31 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/22 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/24 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/07/24 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/07/25 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/08/22 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/10/31 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/08/22 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0022-0965(16)30100-X [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.07.012 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Exp Child Psychol. 2016 Dec;152:136-148. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.07.012.
Epub
2016 Aug 18.

PMID- 27532489
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170901
LR - 20181113
IS - 1525-5069 (Electronic)
IS - 1525-5050 (Linking)
VI - 63
DP - 2016 Oct
TI - Mapping the neuropsychological profile of temporal lobe epilepsy using
cognitive
network topology and graph theory.
PG - 9-16
LID - S1525-5050(16)30300-6 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2016.07.030 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: Normal cognitive function is defined by harmonious interaction
among
multiple neuropsychological domains. Epilepsy has a disruptive effect on
cognition, but how diverse cognitive abilities differentially interact with
one
another compared with healthy controls (HC) is unclear. This study used graph
theory to analyze the community structure of cognitive networks in adults
with
temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) compared with that in HC. METHODS:
Neuropsychological assessment was performed in 100 patients with TLE and 82
HC.
For each group, an adjacency matrix was constructed representing pair-wise
correlation coefficients between raw scores obtained in each possible test
combination. For each cognitive network, each node corresponded to a
cognitive
test; each link corresponded to the correlation coefficient between tests.
Global
network structure, community structure, and node-wise graph theory properties
were qualitatively assessed. RESULTS: The community structure in patients
with
TLE was composed of fewer, larger, more mixed modules, characterizing three
main
modules representing close relationships between the following: 1) aspects of
executive function (EF), verbal and visual memory, 2) speed and fluency, and
3)
speed, EF, perception, language, intelligence, and nonverbal memory.
Conversely,
controls exhibited a relative division between cognitive functions,
segregating
into more numerous, smaller modules consisting of the following: 1) verbal
memory, 2) language, perception, and intelligence, 3) speed and fluency, and
4)
visual memory and EF. Overall node-wise clustering coefficient and efficiency
were increased in TLE. SIGNIFICANCE: Adults with TLE demonstrate a less clear
and
poorly structured segregation between multiple cognitive domains. This
panorama
suggests a higher degree of interdependency across multiple cognitive domains
in
TLE, possibly indicating compensatory mechanisms to overcome functional
impairments.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Kellermann, Tanja S
AU - Kellermann TS
AD - Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston,
SC,
United States. Electronic address: kellerma@musc.edu.
FAU - Bonilha, Leonardo
AU - Bonilha L
AD - Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina,
Charleston,
SC, United States.
FAU - Eskandari, Ramin
AU - Eskandari R
AD - Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston,
SC,
United States.
FAU - Garcia-Ramos, Camille
AU - Garcia-Ramos C
AD - Department of Neurology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, United States.
FAU - Lin, Jack J
AU - Lin JJ
AD - Department of Neurology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, United
States.
FAU - Hermann, Bruce P
AU - Hermann BP
AD - Department of Neurology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, United States.
LA - eng
GR - K23 NS060993/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 NS037738/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
GR - UL1 TR000062/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
GR - UL1 TR000427/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20160815
PL - United States
TA - Epilepsy Behav
JT - Epilepsy & behavior : E&B
JID - 100892858
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe/*psychology
MH - Executive Function/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Intelligence/physiology
MH - Language
MH - Male
MH - Memory/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5048539
MID - NIHMS806925
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Cognitive network
OT - *Graph theory
OT - *Temporal lobe epilepsy
COIS- None of the authors has any conflict of interest to disclose.
EDAT- 2016/08/18 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/02 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/18 06:00
PHST- 2015/11/09 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/07/01 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/07/24 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/08/18 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/09/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/08/18 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1525-5050(16)30300-6 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2016.07.030 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Epilepsy Behav. 2016 Oct;63:9-16. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2016.07.030. Epub 2016
Aug
15.

PMID- 27522944
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170925
LR - 20170925
IS - 1873-4588 (Electronic)
IS - 0892-1997 (Linking)
VI - 31
IP - 2
DP - 2017 Mar
TI - The Identification of High-pitched Sung Vowels in Sense and Nonsense Words by
Professional Singers and Untrained Listeners.
PG - 252.e1-252.e14
LID - S0892-1997(16)30034-0 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.07.008 [doi]
AB - High-pitched sung vowels may be considered phonetically "underspecified"
because
of (i) the tuning of the F1 to the f0 accompanying pitch raising and (ii) the
wide harmonic spacing of the voice source resulting in the undersampling of
the
vocal tract transfer function. Therefore, sung vowel intelligibility is
expected
to decrease as the f0 increases. Based on the literature of speech
perception, it
is often suggested that sung vowels are better perceived if uttered in
consonantal (CVC) context than in isolation even at high f0. The results for
singing, however, are contradictory. In the present study, we further
investigate
this question. We compare vowel identification in sense and nonsense CVC
sequences and show that the positive effect of the context disappears if the
number of legal choices in a perception test is similar in both conditions,
meaning that any positive effect of the CVC context may only stem from the
smaller number of possible responses, i.e., from higher probabilities.
Additionally, it is also tested whether the training in production (i.e.,
singing
training) may also lead to a perceptual advantage of the singers over
nonsingers
in the identification of high-pitched sung vowels. The results show no
advantage
of this kind.
CI - Copyright (c) 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All
rights
reserved.
FAU - Deme, Andrea
AU - Deme A
AD - Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest,
Hungary. Electronic address: deme.andrea@nytud.mta.hu.
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160811
PL - United States
TA - J Voice
JT - Journal of voice : official journal of the Voice Foundation
JID - 8712262
SB - IM
MH - Acoustics
MH - Adult
MH - Audiometry
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Judgment
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Music
MH - *Occupations
MH - *Phonetics
MH - *Pitch Perception
MH - Psychoacoustics
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Singing
MH - Sound Spectrography
MH - *Voice Quality
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Consonant environment
OT - High-pitched singing
OT - Sung vowel
OT - Trained listener
OT - Vowel identification
EDAT- 2016/08/16 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/26 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/16 06:00
PHST- 2016/02/06 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/07/08 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/07/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/08/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/09/26 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/08/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0892-1997(16)30034-0 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.07.008 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Voice. 2017 Mar;31(2):252.e1-252.e14. doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.07.008.
Epub
2016 Aug 11.

PMID- 27502425
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170823
LR - 20181113
IS - 1471-2202 (Electronic)
IS - 1471-2202 (Linking)
VI - 17
IP - 1
DP - 2016 Aug 8
TI - Olfactory perception of chemically diverse molecules.
PG - 55
LID - 10.1186/s12868-016-0287-2 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Understanding the relationship between a stimulus and how it is
perceived reveals fundamental principles about the mechanisms of sensory
perception. While this stimulus-percept problem is mostly understood for
color
vision and tone perception, it is not currently possible to predict how a
given
molecule smells. While there has been some progress in predicting the
pleasantness and intensity of an odorant, perceptual data for a larger number
of
diverse molecules are needed to improve current predictions. Towards this
goal,
we tested the olfactory perception of 480 structurally and perceptually
diverse
molecules at two concentrations using a panel of 55 healthy human subjects.
RESULTS: For each stimulus, we collected data on perceived intensity,
pleasantness, and familiarity. In addition, subjects were asked to apply 20
semantic odor quality descriptors to these stimuli, and were offered the
option
to describe the smell in their own words. Using this dataset, we replicated
several previous correlations between molecular features of the stimulus and
olfactory perception. The number of sulfur atoms in a molecule was correlated
with the odor quality descriptors "garlic," "fish," and "decayed," and large
and
structurally complex molecules were perceived to be more pleasant. We
discovered
a number of correlations in intensity perception between molecules. We show
that
familiarity had a strong effect on the ability of subjects to describe a
smell.
Many subjects used commercial products to describe familiar odorants,
highlighting the role of prior experience in verbal reports of olfactory
perception. Nonspecific descriptors like "chemical" were applied frequently
to
unfamiliar odorants, and unfamiliar odorants were generally rated as neither
pleasant nor unpleasant. CONCLUSIONS: We present a very large psychophysical
dataset and use this to correlate molecular features of a stimulus to
olfactory
percept. Our work reveals robust correlations between molecular features and
perceptual qualities, and highlights the dominant role of familiarity and
experience in assigning verbal descriptors to odorants.
FAU - Keller, Andreas
AU - Keller A
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-5491-2214
AD - Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, 1230
York
Avenue, Box 63, New York, NY, 10065, USA.
FAU - Vosshall, Leslie B
AU - Vosshall LB
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-6060-8099
AD - Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, 1230
York
Avenue, Box 63, New York, NY, 10065, USA. Leslie.Vosshall@rockefeller.edu.
AD - Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York, USA.
Leslie.Vosshall@rockefeller.edu.
AD - Kavli Neural Systems Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, USA.
Leslie.Vosshall@rockefeller.edu.
LA - eng
GR - UL1 RR024143/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20160808
PL - England
TA - BMC Neurosci
JT - BMC neuroscience
JID - 100966986
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Datasets as Topic
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Odorants
MH - *Olfactory Perception
MH - Physical Stimulation
MH - Psychophysics
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Semantics
MH - Structure-Activity Relationship
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC4977894
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Cheminformatics
OT - *Odor descriptors
OT - *Olfaction
OT - *Perceptual familiarity
OT - *Perceptual variability
OT - *Psychophysics
OT - *Structure-odor-relationship
EDAT- 2016/08/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/24 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/10 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/23 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/07/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/08/10 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/08/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/24 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1186/s12868-016-0287-2 [doi]
AID - 10.1186/s12868-016-0287-2 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - BMC Neurosci. 2016 Aug 8;17(1):55. doi: 10.1186/s12868-016-0287-2.

PMID- 27497285
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180501
LR - 20180814
IS - 1460-2199 (Electronic)
IS - 1047-3211 (Linking)
VI - 27
IP - 8
DP - 2017 Aug 1
TI - Componential Network for the Recognition of Tool-Associated Actions: Evidence
from Voxel-based Lesion-Symptom Mapping in Acute Stroke Patients.
PG - 4139-4152
LID - 10.1093/cercor/bhw226 [doi]
AB - The study aimed to elucidate areas involved in recognizing tool-associated
actions, and to characterize the relationship between recognition and active
performance of tool use.We performed voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping in a
prospective cohort of 98 acute left-hemisphere ischemic stroke patients (68
male,
age mean +/- standard deviation, 65 +/- 13 years; examination 4.4 +/- 2 days
post-stroke). In a video-based test, patients distinguished correct tool-
related
actions from actions with spatio-temporal (incorrect grip, kinematics, or
tool
orientation) or conceptual errors (incorrect tool-recipient matching, e.g.,
spreading jam on toast with a paintbrush). Moreover, spatio-temporal and
conceptual errors were determined during actual tool use.Deficient
spatio-temporal error discrimination followed lesions within a dorsal network
in
which the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and the lateral temporal cortex
(sLTC)
were specifically relevant for assessing functional hand postures and
kinematics,
respectively. Conversely, impaired recognition of conceptual errors resulted
from
damage to ventral stream regions including anterior temporal lobe.
Furthermore,
LTC and IPL lesions impacted differently on action recognition and active
tool
use, respectively.In summary, recognition of tool-associated actions relies
on a
componential network. Our study particularly highlights the dissociable roles
of
LTC and IPL for the recognition of action kinematics and functional hand
postures, respectively.
CI - (c) The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights
reserved.
For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
FAU - Martin, Markus
AU - Martin M
AD - Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences, Medical Center,
University of
Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im
Breisgau, Germany.
AD - BrainLinks-BrainTools Cluster of Excellence, University of Freiburg, 79110
Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
FAU - Dressing, Andrea
AU - Dressing A
AD - Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences, Medical Center,
University of
Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im
Breisgau, Germany.
AD - BrainLinks-BrainTools Cluster of Excellence, University of Freiburg, 79110
Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
FAU - Bormann, Tobias
AU - Bormann T
AD - Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences, Medical Center,
University of
Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im
Breisgau, Germany.
FAU - Schmidt, Charlotte S M
AU - Schmidt CSM
AD - Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences, Medical Center,
University of
Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im
Breisgau, Germany.
AD - BrainLinks-BrainTools Cluster of Excellence, University of Freiburg, 79110
Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
FAU - Kummerer, Dorothee
AU - Kummerer D
AD - Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences, Medical Center,
University of
Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im
Breisgau, Germany.
FAU - Beume, Lena
AU - Beume L
AD - Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences, Medical Center,
University of
Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im
Breisgau, Germany.
AD - BrainLinks-BrainTools Cluster of Excellence, University of Freiburg, 79110
Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
FAU - Saur, Dorothee
AU - Saur D
AD - Language and Aphasia Laboratory, Department of Neurology, Medical Center,
University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
FAU - Mader, Irina
AU - Mader I
AD - BrainLinks-BrainTools Cluster of Excellence, University of Freiburg, 79110
Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Department of Neuroradiology, Medical Center, University of Freiburg, 79106
Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
FAU - Rijntjes, Michel
AU - Rijntjes M
AD - Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences, Medical Center,
University of
Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im
Breisgau, Germany.
FAU - Kaller, Christoph P
AU - Kaller CP
AD - Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences, Medical Center,
University of
Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im
Breisgau, Germany.
AD - BrainLinks-BrainTools Cluster of Excellence, University of Freiburg, 79110
Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
FAU - Weiller, Cornelius
AU - Weiller C
AD - Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences, Medical Center,
University of
Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
AD - Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg im
Breisgau, Germany.
AD - BrainLinks-BrainTools Cluster of Excellence, University of Freiburg, 79110
Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - Cereb Cortex
JT - Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)
JID - 9110718
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Apraxias/diagnostic imaging/etiology/physiopathology/psychology
MH - Brain/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology
MH - Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Female
MH - Hand/physiopathology
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Motion Perception/*physiology
MH - Motor Skills/*physiology
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Prospective Studies
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Stroke/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *VLSM
OT - *action recognition
OT - *apraxia
OT - *stroke
OT - *tool use
EDAT- 2016/08/09 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/02 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/02 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/06/29 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/08/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
AID - bhw226 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/cercor/bhw226 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cereb Cortex. 2017 Aug 1;27(8):4139-4152. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhw226.

PMID- 27455184
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170821
LR - 20171124
IS - 1939-0599 (Electronic)
IS - 0012-1649 (Linking)
VI - 52
IP - 8
DP - 2016 Aug
TI - Does facial expression recognition provide a toehold for the development of
emotion understanding?
PG - 1182-91
LID - 10.1037/dev0000144 [doi]
AB - The authors explored predictions from basic emotion theory (BET) that facial
emotion expression recognition skills are insular with respect to their own
development, and yet foundational to the development of emotional
perspective-taking skills. Participants included 417 preschool children for
whom
estimates of these 2 emotion understanding variables and receptive language
skills were obtained at 2 time points, separated by 24 weeks. Path results
for
autoregressive cross-lagged structural equation models revealed support for
the
BET predictions for younger preschoolers (ages 36 to 48 months). In contrast,
results for older preschoolers (ages 49 to 67 months) revealed bidirectional
influences between receptive language and emotion understanding consistent
with
constructionist theories of emotion. Findings support a hybrid model in which
associations between receptive language and emotion understanding skills are
initially nonsignificant and become significant over time. The implications
of
emotion expression recognition as an early toehold for the development of
more
advanced emotion understanding skills are discussed. (PsycINFO Database
Record
CI - (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Strand, Paul S
AU - Strand PS
AD - Department of Psychology, Washington State University.
FAU - Downs, Andrew
AU - Downs A
AD - Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Portland.
FAU - Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina
AU - Barbosa-Leiker C
AD - College of Nursing, Washington State University.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Dev Psychol
JT - Developmental psychology
JID - 0260564
SB - IM
MH - Child
MH - *Child Development
MH - Child Psychiatry
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - *Comprehension
MH - Early Intervention (Education)
MH - *Emotions
MH - *Facial Recognition
MH - Humans
MH - Longitudinal Studies
MH - *Models, Psychological
MH - Models, Statistical
MH - Psychological Tests
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - United States
EDAT- 2016/07/28 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/22 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/26 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/07/28 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/22 06:00 [medline]
AID - 2016-35995-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/dev0000144 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Dev Psychol. 2016 Aug;52(8):1182-91. doi: 10.1037/dev0000144.

PMID- 27428877
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171227
LR - 20180801
IS - 1939-1285 (Electronic)
IS - 0278-7393 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 2
DP - 2017 Feb
TI - Disentangling the developmental trajectories of letter position and letter
identity coding using masked priming.
PG - 250-258
LID - 10.1037/xlm0000293 [doi]
AB - Masked transposed-letter (TL) priming effects have been used to index letter
position processing over the course of reading development. Whereas some
studies
have reported an increase in TL priming over development, others have
reported a
decrease. These findings have led to the development of 2 somewhat
contradictory
accounts of letter position development: the lexical tuning hypothesis and
the
multiple-route model. One factor that may be contributing to these
discrepancies
is the use of baseline primes that substitute letters in the target word,
which
may confound the effect of changes in letter position processing over
development
with those of letter identity. The present study included an identity prime
(e.g., listen-LISTEN), in addition to the standard two-substituted-letter
(2SL;
e.g., lidfen-LISTEN) and all-letter-different (ALD; e.g., rodfup-LISTEN)
baselines, to remove the potential confound between letter position and
letter
identity information in determining the effect of the TL prime. Priming
effects
were measured in a lexical decision task administered to children aged 7-12
and a
group of university students. Using inverse transformed response times,
targets
preceded by a TL prime were responded to significantly faster than those
preceded
by 2SL and ALD primes, and priming remained stable across development. In
contrast, targets preceded by a TL prime were responded to significantly
slower
than those preceded by an ID prime, and this reaction-time cost increased
significantly over development, with adults showing the largest cost. These
findings are consistent with a lexical tuning account of letter position
development, and are inconsistent with the multiple-route model. (PsycINFO
Database Record
CI - (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Kezilas, Yvette
AU - Kezilas Y
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-5403-6111
AD - Department of Cognitive Science, ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and
its
Disorders, Macquarie University.
FAU - McKague, Meredith
AU - McKague M
AD - Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne.
FAU - Kohnen, Saskia
AU - Kohnen S
AD - Department of Cognitive Science, ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and
its
Disorders, Macquarie University.
FAU - Badcock, Nicholas A
AU - Badcock NA
AD - Department of Cognitive Science, ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and
its
Disorders, Macquarie University.
FAU - Castles, Anne
AU - Castles A
AD - Department of Cognitive Science, ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and
its
Disorders, Macquarie University.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160718
PL - United States
TA - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn
JT - Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
JID - 8207540
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aging/*physiology
MH - Child
MH - Decision Making/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Perceptual Masking/*physiology
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - Reading
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2016/07/19 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/28 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/19 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/19 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/28 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/07/19 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 2016-34973-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/xlm0000293 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2017 Feb;43(2):250-258. doi:
10.1037/xlm0000293.
Epub 2016 Jul 18.

PMID- 27398805
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170719
LR - 20181113
IS - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI - 11
IP - 7
DP - 2016
TI - An Independent Psychometric Evaluation of the PROMS Measure of Music
Perception
Skills.
PG - e0159103
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0159103 [doi]
AB - The Profile of Music Perception Skills (PROMS) is a recently developed
measure of
perceptual music skills which has been shown to have promising psychometric
properties. In this paper we extend the evaluation of its brief version to
three
kinds of validity using an individual difference approach. The brief PROMS
displays good discriminant validity with working memory, given that it does
not
correlate with backward digit span (r = .04). Moreover, it shows promising
criterion validity (association with musical training (r = .45), musicianship
status (r = .48), and self-rated musical talent (r = .51)). Finally, its
convergent validity, i.e. relation to an unrelated measure of music
perception
skills, was assessed by correlating the brief PROMS to harmonic closure
judgment
accuracy. Two independent samples point to good convergent validity of the
brief
PROMS (r = .36; r = .40). The same association is still significant in one of
the
samples when including self-reported music skill in a partial correlation
(rpartial = .30; rpartial = .17). Overall, the results show that the brief
version of the PROMS displays a very good pattern of construct validity.
Especially its tuning subtest stands out as a valuable part for music skill
evaluations in Western samples. We conclude by briefly discussing the choice
faced by music cognition researchers between different musical aptitude
measures
of which the brief PROMS is a well evaluated example.
FAU - Kunert, Richard
AU - Kunert R
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0203-2108
AD - Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
AD - Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and
Behavior,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
FAU - Willems, Roel M
AU - Willems RM
AD - Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and
Behavior,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
AD - Radboud University Nijmegen, Centre for Language Studies, Nijmegen, The
Netherlands.
FAU - Hagoort, Peter
AU - Hagoort P
AD - Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
AD - Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and
Behavior,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160711
PL - United States
TA - PLoS One
JT - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - *Auditory Perception
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Music
MH - Psychometrics/*methods
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC4939943
EDAT- 2016/07/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/20 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/12 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/19 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/06/27 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/07/12 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/07/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/20 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0159103 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-15825 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - PLoS One. 2016 Jul 11;11(7):e0159103. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159103.
eCollection 2016.

PMID- 27389800
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171002
LR - 20181113
IS - 1973-8102 (Electronic)
IS - 0010-9452 (Linking)
VI - 82
DP - 2016 Sep
TI - Reading words and other people: A comparison of exception word, familiar face
and
affect processing in the left and right temporal variants of primary
progressive
aphasia.
PG - 147-163
LID - S0010-9452(16)30145-9 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.05.014 [doi]
AB - Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) typically presents with
left-hemisphere predominant rostral temporal lobe (rTL) atrophy and the most
significant complaints within the language domain. Less frequently, patients
present with right-hemisphere predominant temporal atrophy coupled with
marked
impairments in processing of famous faces and emotions. Few studies have
objectively compared these patient groups in both domains and therefore it is
unclear to what extent the syndromes overlap. Clinically diagnosed svPPA
patients
were characterized as left- (n = 21) or right-predominant (n = 12) using
imaging
and compared along with 14 healthy controls. Regarding language, our primary
focus was upon two hallmark features of svPPA; confrontation naming and
surface
dyslexia. Both groups exhibited naming deficits and surface dyslexia although
the
impairments were more severe in the left-predominant group. Familiarity
judgments
on famous faces and affect processing were more profoundly impaired in the
right-predominant group. Our findings suggest that the two syndromes overlap
significantly but that early cases at the tail ends of the continuum
constitute a
challenge for current clinical criteria. Correlational neuroimaging analyses
implicated a mid portion of the left lateral temporal lobe in exception word
reading impairments in line with proposals that this region is an interface
between phonology and semantic knowledge.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Binney, Richard J
AU - Binney RJ
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: Richard.Binney@Temple.edu.
FAU - Henry, Maya L
AU - Henry ML
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Babiak, Miranda
AU - Babiak M
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Pressman, Peter S
AU - Pressman PS
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Santos-Santos, Miguel A
AU - Santos-Santos MA
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Narvid, Jared
AU - Narvid J
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Mandelli, Maria Luisa
AU - Mandelli ML
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Strain, Paul J
AU - Strain PJ
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Miller, Bruce L
AU - Miller BL
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Rankin, Katherine P
AU - Rankin KP
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Rosen, Howard J
AU - Rosen HJ
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa
AU - Gorno-Tempini ML
AD - Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California,
San
Francisco, CA, USA.
LA - eng
GR - P50 AG023501/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - K24 AG045333/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG029577/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - U01 AG052943/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - P01 AG019724/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG032306/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 NS050915/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
GR - K24 DC015544/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20160609
PL - Italy
TA - Cortex
JT - Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior
JID - 0100725
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aphasia, Primary Progressive/diagnostic imaging/pathology/*psychology
MH - Facial Recognition/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology
MH - *Reading
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - *Social Perception
MH - Temporal Lobe/diagnostic imaging/pathology
PMC - PMC4969161
MID - NIHMS794307
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Anterior temporal lobe
OT - *Primary progressive aphasia
OT - *Semantic dementia
OT - *Social cognition
OT - *Surface dyslexia
EDAT- 2016/07/09 06:00
MHDA- 2017/10/03 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/09 06:00
PHST- 2016/02/26 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/05/03 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/05/18 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/07/09 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/07/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/10/03 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0010-9452(16)30145-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.05.014 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cortex. 2016 Sep;82:147-163. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.05.014. Epub 2016 Jun
9.

PMID- 27377221
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180202
LR - 20181113
IS - 1095-9572 (Electronic)
IS - 1053-8119 (Linking)
VI - 142
DP - 2016 Nov 15
TI - Temporo-parietal connectivity uniquely predicts reading change from childhood
to
adolescence.
PG - 126-134
LID - S1053-8119(16)30305-6 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.06.055 [doi]
AB - Previous research has shown that left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG)
is a
core node in the semantic network, and cross-sectional studies have shown
that
activation in this region changes developmentally and is related to skill
measured concurrently. However, it is not known how functional connectivity
with
this region changes developmentally, and whether functional connectivity is
related to future gains in reading. We conducted a longitudinal functional
magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in 30 typically developing children
(aged
8-15) to examine whether initial brain measures, including activation and
connectivity, can predict future behavioral improvement in a semantic
judgment
task. Participants were scanned on entering the study (time 1, T1) and a
follow-up period of 2years (time 2, T2). Character pairs were arranged in a
continuous variable according to association strength (i.e. strong versus
weak),
and participants were asked to determine if these visually presented pairs
were
related in meaning. Our results demonstrated greater developmental changes
from
time 1 to time 2 for weaker association pairs in the left pMTG for the
children
(aged 8-11) as compared to the adolescents (aged 12-15). Moreover, the
results
showed greater developmental changes from time 1 to time 2 for weaker
association
pairs in connectivity between the pMTG and inferior parietal lobule (IPL) for
the
children as compared to the adolescents. Furthermore, a hierarchical stepwise
regression model revealed that connectivity between the pMTG and IPL in weak
association pairs was uniquely predictive of behavioral improvement from time
1
to time 2 for the children, but not the adolescents. Taken together, the
activation results suggest relatively rapid development before adolescence of
semantic representations in the pMTG. Moreover, the connectivity results of
pMTG
with IPL tentatively suggest that early development of semantic
representations
may be facilitated by enhanced engagement of phonological short-term memory.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Lee, Shu-Hui
AU - Lee SH
AD - Department of Psychology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
FAU - Booth, James R
AU - Booth JR
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Texas
at
Austin, Austin, TX, USA. Electronic address: j-booth@austin.utexas.edu.
FAU - Chou, Tai-Li
AU - Chou TL
AD - Department of Psychology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan;
Neurobiology and Cognitive Science Center, National Taiwan University,
Taipei,
Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Brain and Mind Sciences, National Taiwan
University, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Linguistics, National
Taiwan
University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: tlchou25@ntu.edu.tw.
LA - eng
GR - R01 HD042049/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160702
PL - United States
TA - Neuroimage
JT - NeuroImage
JID - 9215515
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adolescent Development/*physiology
MH - Child
MH - Child Development/*physiology
MH - Connectome/*methods
MH - Female
MH - Follow-Up Studies
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Parietal Lobe/diagnostic imaging/*physiology
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology
MH - *Reading
MH - Semantics
MH - Temporal Lobe/diagnostic imaging/*physiology
PMC - PMC5159335
MID - NIHMS802833
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Association strength
OT - Connectivity
OT - Longitudinal
OT - Semantic
OT - fMRI
EDAT- 2016/07/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/03 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/06 06:00
PHST- 2015/11/03 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/06/28 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/06/30 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/07/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/07/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S1053-8119(16)30305-6 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.06.055 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuroimage. 2016 Nov 15;142:126-134. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.06.055.
Epub
2016 Jul 2.

PMID- 27372647
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180129
LR - 20180131
IS - 1875-8908 (Electronic)
IS - 1387-2877 (Linking)
VI - 53
IP - 4
DP - 2016 Jun 30
TI - Neurocognitive Deficits Distinguishing Mild Dementia with Lewy Bodies from
Mild
Alzheimer's Disease are Associated with Parkinsonism.
PG - 1277-85
LID - 10.3233/JAD-160294 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: The cognitive profile of mild dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)
versus
mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) has not been extensively studied, and the
relation
of cognitive deficits to the core diagnostic criteria for DLB (fluctuations,
visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism) remains poorly understood.
OBJECTIVE: To
compare the cognitive profile in patients with mild DLB to patients with mild
AD
and investigate the relation between cognitive deficits distinguishing DLB
from
AD and the core diagnostic features in DLB. METHODS: Patients with mild
dementia
were recruited from the southwestern part of Norway and patients diagnosed
with
probable AD (n = 113) or probable DLB (n = 77) were included. The DLB core
diagnostic symptoms were assessed using standardized clinical measures, and
standardized neurocognitive tests assessing attention, language, memory, and
visuospatial functions were administered. Univariate and multivariate
comparisons
of cognitive tests were performed, and tests distinguishing between AD and
DLB
were subjected to correlational analyses with the core diagnostic symptoms.
RESULTS: DLB patients performed worse than AD patients on test of
visuoconstruction, but not visual perception and on all tests involving
attention
and executive functions, except verbal fluency. The multivariate model
distinguished between DLB and AD with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity
of
82%. Tests where DLB performed worse than AD were highly correlated with
degree
of parkinsonism, but not with cognitive fluctuations or visual
hallucinations.
CONCLUSIONS: The cognitive profile in mild DLB can be useful in
distinguishing AD
from DLB. The strong relation between relative deficits in DLB and
parkinsonism
warrants further studies.
FAU - Bronnick, Kolborn
AU - Bronnick K
AD - Institute of Health, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger,
Stavanger, Norway.
AD - Centre for Age-Related Medicine, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger,
Norway.
FAU - Breitve, Monica H
AU - Breitve MH
AD - Department of Research and Innovation, Helse-Fonna HF, Haugesund Norway.
AD - Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen,
Bergen, Norway.
FAU - Rongve, Arvid
AU - Rongve A
AD - Department of Research and Innovation, Helse-Fonna HF, Haugesund Norway.
AD - Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen,
Bergen, Norway.
FAU - Aarsland, Dag
AU - Aarsland D
AD - Centre for Age-Related Medicine, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger,
Norway.
AD - Department of Old age psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology &
Neuroscience, King's College London.
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Alzheimers Dis
JT - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
JID - 9814863
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Alzheimer Disease/complications/*diagnosis/*psychology
MH - Cognition Disorders/complications/*diagnosis/etiology
MH - Diagnosis, Differential
MH - Female
MH - Follow-Up Studies
MH - Humans
MH - Lewy Body Disease/complications/*diagnosis/*psychology
MH - Longitudinal Studies
MH - Male
MH - Multivariate Analysis
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Parkinsonian Disorders/*complications/diagnosis/psychology
MH - Sensitivity and Specificity
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Alzheimer's disease
OT - *Lewy body dementia
OT - *cognition
OT - *dementia
OT - *parkinsonism
EDAT- 2016/07/04 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/30 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/04 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/04 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/07/04 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - JAD160294 [pii]
AID - 10.3233/JAD-160294 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Alzheimers Dis. 2016 Jun 30;53(4):1277-85. doi: 10.3233/JAD-160294.

PMID- 27369179
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR - 20180702
IS - 1520-8524 (Electronic)
IS - 0001-4966 (Linking)
VI - 139
IP - 6
DP - 2016 Jun
TI - Integration of partial information for spoken and written sentence
recognition by
older listeners.
PG - EL240
LID - 10.1121/1.4954634 [doi]
AB - Older adults have difficulty understanding speech in challenging listening
environments. Combining multisensory signals may facilitate speech
recognition.
This study measured recognition of interrupted spoken and written sentences
by
older adults for different preserved stimulus proportions. Unimodal
performance
was first examined when only interrupted text or speech stimuli were
presented.
Multimodal performance with concurrently presented text and speech stimuli
was
tested with delayed and simultaneous participant responses. Older listeners
performed better in unimodal speech-only compared to text-only conditions
across
all proportions preserved. Performance was also better in delayed multimodal
conditions. Comparison to a younger sample suggests age-related amodal
processing
declines.
FAU - Smith, Kimberly G
AU - Smith KG
AD - Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of South Alabama,
5721
USA Drive North, Mobile, Alabama 36688, USA kimberlysmith@southalabama.edu.
FAU - Fogerty, Daniel
AU - Fogerty D
AD - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South
Carolina,
1224 Sumter Street, Suite 300, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA
dfogerty@mailbox.sc.edu.
LA - eng
GR - R03 DC012506/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - J Acoust Soc Am
JT - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
JID - 7503051
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - Audiometry, Pure-Tone
MH - Audiometry, Speech
MH - Auditory Threshold
MH - Comprehension
MH - Humans
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Noise/adverse effects
MH - Perceptual Masking
MH - *Reading
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Time Factors
MH - *Writing
EDAT- 2016/07/03 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/03 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/03 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/07/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1121/1.4954634 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 Jun;139(6):EL240. doi: 10.1121/1.4954634.

PMID- 27356983
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170904
LR - 20181113
IS - 1573-2835 (Electronic)
IS - 0091-0627 (Linking)
VI - 45
IP - 2
DP - 2017 Feb
TI - Reading Comprehension in Boys with ADHD: The Mediating Roles of Working
Memory
and Orthographic Conversion.
PG - 273-287
LID - 10.1007/s10802-016-0171-7 [doi]
AB - Reading comprehension difficulties in children with ADHD are well
established;
however, limited information exists concerning the cognitive mechanisms that
contribute to these difficulties and the extent to which they interact with
one
another. The current study examines two broad cognitive processes known to be
involved in children's reading comprehension abilities-(a) working memory
(i.e.,
central executive processes [CE], phonological short-term memory [PH STM],
and
visuospatial short-term memory [VS STM]) and (b) orthographic conversion
(i.e.,
conversion of visually presented text to a phonological code)-to elucidate
their
unique and interactive contribution to ADHD-related reading comprehension
differences. Thirty-one boys with ADHD-combined type and 30 typically
developing
(TD) boys aged 8 to 12 years (M = 9.64, SD = 1.22) were administered multiple
counterbalanced tasks assessing WM and orthographic conversion processes.
Relative to TD boys, boys with ADHD exhibited significant deficits in PH STM
(d =
-0.70), VS STM (d = -0.92), CE (d = -1.58), and orthographic conversion (d =
-0.93). Bias-corrected, bootstrapped mediation analyses revealed that CE and
orthographic conversion processes modeled separately mediated ADHD-related
reading comprehension differences partially, whereas PH STM and VS STM did
not.
CE and orthographic conversion modeled jointly mediated ADHD-related reading
comprehension differences fully wherein orthographic conversion's large
magnitude
influence on reading comprehension occurred indirectly through CE's impact on
the
orthographic system. The findings suggest that adaptive cognitive
interventions
designed to improve reading-related outcomes in children with ADHD may
benefit by
including modules that train CE and orthographic conversion processes
independently and interactively.
FAU - Friedman, Lauren M
AU - Friedman LM
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 4111 Pictor Lane
Psychology Bldg 99, Orlando, FL, 32816, USA.
FAU - Rapport, Mark D
AU - Rapport MD
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 4111 Pictor Lane
Psychology Bldg 99, Orlando, FL, 32816, USA. mdrapport@gmail.com.
FAU - Raiker, Joseph S
AU - Raiker JS
AD - Department of Psychology, Florida International University, 11200 S.W. 8th
St.
AHC 1, Room 239, Miami, FL, 33199, USA.
FAU - Orban, Sarah A
AU - Orban SA
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 4111 Pictor Lane
Psychology Bldg 99, Orlando, FL, 32816, USA.
FAU - Eckrich, Samuel J
AU - Eckrich SJ
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, 4111 Pictor Lane
Psychology Bldg 99, Orlando, FL, 32816, USA.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - J Abnorm Child Psychol
JT - Journal of abnormal child psychology
JID - 0364547
SB - IM
MH - Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/*physiopathology
MH - Child
MH - Comprehension/*physiology
MH - Executive Function/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term/*physiology
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - *Reading
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
OT - *Executive functions
OT - *Orthographic conversion
OT - *Reading comprehension
OT - *Working memory
EDAT- 2016/07/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/05 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/01 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/09/05 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/07/01 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1007/s10802-016-0171-7 [doi]
AID - 10.1007/s10802-016-0171-7 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2017 Feb;45(2):273-287. doi: 10.1007/s10802-016-0171-
7.

PMID- 27355764
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180117
LR - 20180117
IS - 1538-4667 (Electronic)
IS - 0196-0202 (Linking)
VI - 37 Suppl 1
DP - 2016 Jul-Aug
TI - Using Speech Recall in Hearing Aid Fitting and Outcome Evaluation Under
Ecological Test Conditions.
PG - 145S-54S
LID - 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000294 [doi]
AB - In adaptive Speech Reception Threshold (SRT) tests used in the audiological
clinic, speech is presented at signal to noise ratios (SNRs) that are lower
than
those generally encountered in real-life communication situations. At higher,
ecologically valid SNRs, however, SRTs are insensitive to changes in hearing
aid
signal processing that may be of benefit to listeners who are hard of
hearing.
Previous studies conducted in Swedish using the Sentence-final Word
Identification and Recall test (SWIR) have indicated that at such SNRs, the
ability to recall spoken words may be a more informative measure. In the
present
study, a Danish version of SWIR, known as the Sentence-final Word
Identification
and Recall Test in a New Language (SWIRL) was introduced and evaluated in two
experiments. The objective of experiment 1 was to determine if the Swedish
results demonstrating benefit from noise reduction signal processing for
hearing
aid wearers could be replicated in 25 Danish participants with mild to
moderate
symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. The objective of experiment 2 was to
compare direct-drive and skin-drive transmission in 16 Danish users of
bone-anchored hearing aids with conductive hearing loss or mixed
sensorineural
and conductive hearing loss. In experiment 1, performance on SWIRL improved
when
hearing aid noise reduction was used, replicating the Swedish results and
generalizing them across languages. In experiment 2, performance on SWIRL was
better for direct-drive compared with skin-drive transmission conditions.
These
findings indicate that spoken word recall can be used to identify benefits
from
hearing aid signal processing at ecologically valid, positive SNRs where SRTs
are
insensitive.
FAU - Lunner, Thomas
AU - Lunner T
AD - 1Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linnaeus Centre HEAD,
Swedish
Institute for Disability Research, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden;
2Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark; and 3Oticon
Medical
A/S, Smorum, Denmark.
FAU - Rudner, Mary
AU - Rudner M
FAU - Rosenbom, Tove
AU - Rosenbom T
FAU - Agren, Jessica
AU - Agren J
FAU - Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning
AU - Ng EH
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Ear Hear
JT - Ear and hearing
JID - 8005585
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Denmark
MH - Female
MH - *Hearing Aids
MH - Hearing Loss, Conductive/*rehabilitation
MH - Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/*rehabilitation
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - *Mental Recall
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Noise
MH - Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
MH - Prosthesis Fitting/*methods
MH - Signal-To-Noise Ratio
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Speech Reception Threshold Test
EDAT- 2016/06/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/18 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/30 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/06/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/18 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000294 [doi]
AID - 00003446-201607001-00017 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Ear Hear. 2016 Jul-Aug;37 Suppl 1:145S-54S. doi:
10.1097/AUD.0000000000000294.

PMID- 27355607
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171016
LR - 20180608
IS - 1464-0627 (Electronic)
IS - 0264-3294 (Linking)
VI - 32
IP - 7-8
DP - 2015 Oct-Dec
TI - Declining object recognition performance in semantic dementia: A case for
stored
visual object representations.
PG - 412-26
LID - 10.1080/02643294.2016.1164679 [doi]
AB - The role of the semantic system in recognizing objects is a matter of debate.
Connectionist theories argue that it is impossible for a participant to
determine
that an object is familiar to them without recourse to a semantic hub;
localist
theories state that accessing a stored representation of the visual features
of
the object is sufficient for recognition. We examine this issue through the
longitudinal study of two cases of semantic dementia, a neurodegenerative
disorder characterized by a progressive degradation of the semantic system.
The
cases in this paper do not conform to the "common" pattern of object
recognition
performance in semantic dementia described by Rogers, T. T., Lambon Ralph, M.
A.,
Hodges, J. R., & Patterson, K. (2004). Natural selection: The impact of
semantic
impairment on lexical and object decision. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 21,
331-352., and show no systematic relationship between severity of semantic
impairment and success in object decision. We argue that these data are
inconsistent with the connectionist position but can be easily reconciled
with
localist theories that propose stored structural descriptions of objects
outside
of the semantic system.
FAU - Tree, Jeremy J
AU - Tree JJ
AD - a Department of Psychology , Swansea University , Swansea , UK.
FAU - Playfoot, David
AU - Playfoot D
AD - b Department of Psychology, Sociology and Politics , Sheffield Hallam
University
, Sheffield , UK.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - England
TA - Cogn Neuropsychol
JT - Cognitive neuropsychology
JID - 8411889
SB - IM
MH - Female
MH - Frontotemporal Dementia/*physiopathology/*psychology
MH - Humans
MH - Longitudinal Studies
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Models, Neurological
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Semantics
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Semantic dementia
OT - *object recognition
OT - *over-regular object test
EDAT- 2016/06/30 06:00
MHDA- 2016/06/30 06:01
CRDT- 2016/06/30 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/06/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/06/30 06:01 [medline]
AID - 10.1080/02643294.2016.1164679 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cogn Neuropsychol. 2015 Oct-Dec;32(7-8):412-26. doi:
10.1080/02643294.2016.1164679.

PMID- 27350288
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180131
LR - 20181025
IS - 1744-411X (Electronic)
IS - 1380-3395 (Linking)
VI - 38
IP - 10
DP - 2016 Dec
TI - The influence of reading direction on hemianopic reading disorders.
PG - 1077-83
LID - 10.1080/13803395.2016.1189884 [doi]
AB - UNLABELLED: Hemianopic reading impairment is a consequence of a visual field
defect to either the right or the left side and is characterized by an
increased
reading time and reduced reading performance. Depending on the side of the
visual
field defect, reading will be affected differently: Patients suffering from a
visual field defect to the right side have noticeable difficulties in reading
fluently with slowing. Patients suffering from a visual field defect to the
left
usually struggle to find the beginning of a line and read more fluently. It
was
suggested in the literature that changing the reading direction from
horizontal
to vertical may be a training strategy to reduce reading problems in patients
with hemianopia. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of
reading
direction on reading speed in patients with left- or right-sided visual field
defects and in healthy controls. METHOD: In 13 patients with hemianopia and
in 13
age-matched controls, reading speed was calculated for texts in standard as
well
as in clockwise rotated orientation of 90, 180, and 270 degrees . RESULTS: In
both groups, text rotation reduced reading speed compared to standard
reading.
Patients with left-sided hemianopia had the greatest reduction after text
rotation. Patients with right-sided hemianopia had the smallest speed
reduction
in 90 degrees vertically rotated texts. CONCLUSIONS: Text rotation has
different
effects in left- or right-sided hemianopia patients. For patients with left-
sided
heminanopia, rotation of the text may not be a helpful training strategy, for
right-sided hemianopia vertical rotation of the text of 90 degrees may be a
beneficial training strategy to reduce reading deficits.
FAU - de Jong, Denise
AU - de Jong D
AD - a Perception and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Neurology and
Clinical
Research , Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern ,
Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - b Division of Cognitive and Restorative Neurology, Department of Neurology ,
Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - d Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory , University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
FAU - Kaufmann-Ezra, Sigal
AU - Kaufmann-Ezra S
AD - b Division of Cognitive and Restorative Neurology, Department of Neurology ,
Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
FAU - Meichtry, Jurka R
AU - Meichtry JR
AD - a Perception and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Neurology and
Clinical
Research , Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern ,
Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - b Division of Cognitive and Restorative Neurology, Department of Neurology ,
Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - d Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory , University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
FAU - von Arx, Sebastian
AU - von Arx S
AD - a Perception and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Neurology and
Clinical
Research , Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern ,
Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - b Division of Cognitive and Restorative Neurology, Department of Neurology ,
Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
FAU - Cazzoli, Dario
AU - Cazzoli D
AD - a Perception and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Neurology and
Clinical
Research , Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern ,
Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - c Gerontechnology and Rehabilitation Group , University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
FAU - Gutbrod, Klemens
AU - Gutbrod K
AD - b Division of Cognitive and Restorative Neurology, Department of Neurology ,
Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - d Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory , University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
FAU - Muri, Rene M
AU - Muri RM
AD - a Perception and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Neurology and
Clinical
Research , Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern ,
Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - b Division of Cognitive and Restorative Neurology, Department of Neurology ,
Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - c Gerontechnology and Rehabilitation Group , University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
AD - d Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory , University of Bern , Bern ,
Switzerland.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160628
PL - England
TA - J Clin Exp Neuropsychol
JT - Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology
JID - 8502170
SB - IM
MH - Cognition/physiology
MH - Dyslexia/*physiopathology
MH - Female
MH - Hemianopsia/*physiopathology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Orientation/physiology
MH - *Reading
MH - Visual Field Tests
MH - Visual Fields/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Hemianopia
OT - *Reading orientation
OT - *Reading speed
OT - *Visual field defects
EDAT- 2016/06/29 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/01 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/29 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/29 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/06/29 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1080/13803395.2016.1189884 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2016 Dec;38(10):1077-83. doi:
10.1080/13803395.2016.1189884. Epub 2016 Jun 28.

PMID- 27346168
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180119
LR - 20180522
IS - 1469-7661 (Electronic)
IS - 1355-6177 (Linking)
VI - 22
IP - 7
DP - 2016 Aug
TI - Impact of Personality on Cognitive Aging: A Prospective Cohort Study.
PG - 765-76
LID - 10.1017/S1355617716000527 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the association between
personality factors and age-related longitudinal cognitive performance, and
explore interactions of stress-proneness with apolipoprotein E (APOE)
varepsilon4, a prevalent risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS: A
total of 510 neuropsychiatrically healthy residents of Maricopa County
recruited
through media ads (mean age 57.6+/-10.6 years; 70% women; mean education
15.8+/-2.4 years; 213 APOE varepsilon4 carriers) had neuropsychological
testing
every 2 years (mean duration follow-up 9.1+/-4.4 years), and the complete
Neuroticism Extraversion Openness Personality Inventory-Revised. Several
tests
were administered within each of the following cognitive domains: memory,
executive skills, language, visuospatial skills, and general cognition.
Primary
effects on cognitive trajectories and APOE varepsilon4 interactions were
ascertained with quadratic models. RESULTS: With personality factors treated
as
continuous variables, Neuroticism was associated with greater decline, and
Conscientiousness associated with reduced decline consistently across tests
in
memory and executive domains. With personality factors trichotomized, the
associations of Neuroticism and Conscientiousness were again highly
consistent
across tests within memory and to a lesser degree executive domains. While
age-related memory decline was greater in APOE varepsilon4 carriers as a
group
than varepsilon4 noncarriers, verbal memory decline was mitigated in
varepsilon4
carriers with higher Conscientiousness, and visuospatial perception and
memory
decline was mitigated in varepsilon4 carriers with higher Openness.
CONCLUSIONS:
Neuroticism and Conscientiousness were associated with changes in
longitudinal
performances on tests sensitive to memory and executive skills. APOE
interactions
were less consistent. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that
have
suggested that personality factors, particularly Neuroticism and
Conscientiousness are associated with cognitive aging patterns. (JINS, 2016,
22,
765-776).
FAU - Caselli, Richard J
AU - Caselli RJ
AD - 1Department of Neurology,Mayo Clinic Arizona,Scottsdale,Arizona.
FAU - Dueck, Amylou C
AU - Dueck AC
AD - 2Department of Biostatistics,Mayo Clinic Arizona,Scottsdale,Arizona.
FAU - Locke, Dona E C
AU - Locke DE
AD - 3Division of Psychology,Mayo Clinic Arizona,Scottsdale,Arizona.
FAU - Henslin, Bruce R
AU - Henslin BR
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-0539-585X
AD - 4Department of Research,Mayo Clinic Arizona,Scottsdale,Arizona.
FAU - Johnson, Travis A
AU - Johnson TA
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-2716-2440
AD - 4Department of Research,Mayo Clinic Arizona,Scottsdale,Arizona.
FAU - Woodruff, Bryan K
AU - Woodruff BK
AD - 1Department of Neurology,Mayo Clinic Arizona,Scottsdale,Arizona.
FAU - Hoffman-Snyder, Charlene
AU - Hoffman-Snyder C
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-1482-556X
AD - 1Department of Neurology,Mayo Clinic Arizona,Scottsdale,Arizona.
FAU - Geda, Yonas E
AU - Geda YE
AD - 5Department of Psychiatry,Mayo Clinic Arizona,Scottsdale,Arizona.
LA - eng
GR - P30 AG019610/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG031581/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20160627
PL - England
TA - J Int Neuropsychol Soc
JT - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS
JID - 9503760
RN - 0 (Apolipoprotein E4)
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Apolipoprotein E4/genetics
MH - Cognitive Aging/*physiology
MH - *Conscience
MH - Executive Function/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuroticism/*physiology
MH - Personality/*physiology
MH - Prospective Studies
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Aging
OT - *Alzheimer disease
OT - *Apolipoprotein E
OT - *Memory
OT - *Mild cognitive impairment
OT - *Psychological stress
EDAT- 2016/06/28 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/20 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/28 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/28 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/06/28 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/20 06:00 [medline]
AID - S1355617716000527 [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S1355617716000527 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2016 Aug;22(7):765-76. doi:
10.1017/S1355617716000527.
Epub 2016 Jun 27.

PMID- 27336805
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170227
LR - 20170227
IS - 1543-3641 (Electronic)
IS - 1543-3633 (Linking)
VI - 29
IP - 2
DP - 2016 Jun
TI - The Zurich Maxi Mental Status Inventory (ZuMAX): Test-Retest Reliability and
Discriminant Validity in Stroke Survivors.
PG - 78-90
LID - 10.1097/WNN.0000000000000094 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine discriminant validity and test-retest reliability of
the
Zurich maxi mental status inventory (ZuMAX) in patients with stroke.
BACKGROUND:
The ZuMAX is a novel domain-specific cognitive assessment tool to screen for
disturbances in neuropsychological function. The test can be used in stroke
rehabilitation to estimate severity of cognitive impairment. Because evidence
for
validity and reliability is lacking, the tool's clinical use is limited.
METHODS:
We administered the ZuMAX in a test-retest design to 33 community-dwelling
stroke
survivors, and once to 35 healthy controls matched for age and sex. RESULTS:
We
found significant group differences in subscores for the cognitive domains of
executive functions and language as well as total score (P=0.001 to 0.004);
we
did not find group differences for the domains of praxia (defined as the
ability
to perform purposeful actions), visual perception and construction, or
learning
and memory. Test-retest reliability of the total score was good (intraclass
correlation coefficient=0.81), with the individual domain subscores ranging
from
poor to fair (0.59 to 0.79). The ZuMAX could detect changes in patients with
low
smallest detectable differences in executive functions, language, and praxia
(0.05 to 1.49) and total score (0.09). CONCLUSION: The ZuMAX has moderate to
good
test-retest reliability. Furthermore, the tool might discriminate between
healthy
persons and chronic stroke survivors on three of five subscales. The ZuMAX
shows
promise in measuring neuropsychological disturbances in stroke survivors;
however, further trials are required with larger samples.
FAU - Tobler-Ammann, Bernadette C
AU - Tobler-Ammann BC
AD - *Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Research Center, Directorate of
Research
and Education, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
parallelNeuropsychology, Department of Neurology, University Hospital Zurich,
Zurich, Switzerland double daggerInstitute of Human Movement Sciences and
Sport,
Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Eidgenossische Technische
Hochschule (ETH) Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), Zurich,
Switzerland daggerDepartment of Epidemiology, Care and Public Health Research
Institute (CAPHRI) School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht
University, Maastricht, The Netherlands section signCentre for Evidence Based
Physiotherapy, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
FAU - de Bruin, Eling D
AU - de Bruin ED
FAU - Brugger, Peter
AU - Brugger P
FAU - de Bie, Rob A
AU - de Bie RA
FAU - Knols, Ruud H
AU - Knols RH
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Validation Studies
PL - United States
TA - Cogn Behav Neurol
JT - Cognitive and behavioral neurology : official journal of the Society for
Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology
JID - 101167278
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology/*psychology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Mental Status Schedule/*standards
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Stroke/complications/*psychology
MH - Stroke Rehabilitation
MH - Survivors/*psychology
EDAT- 2016/06/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/02/28 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/24 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/06/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/02/28 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/WNN.0000000000000094 [doi]
AID - 00146965-201606000-00003 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cogn Behav Neurol. 2016 Jun;29(2):78-90. doi: 10.1097/WNN.0000000000000094.

PMID- 27329178
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180730
LR - 20180801
IS - 1708-8186 (Electronic)
IS - 1499-2027 (Linking)
VI - 56
IP - sup2
DP - 2017
TI - Results using the OPAL strategy in Mandarin speaking cochlear implant
recipients.
PG - S74-S85
LID - 10.1080/14992027.2016.1190872 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of an experimental pitch-coding
strategy
for improving recognition of Mandarin lexical tone in cochlear implant (CI)
recipients. DESIGN: Adult CI recipients were tested on recognition of
Mandarin
tones in quiet and speech-shaped noise at a signal-to-noise ratio of +10 dB;
Mandarin sentence speech-reception threshold (SRT) in speech-shaped noise;
and
pitch discrimination of synthetic complex-harmonic tones in quiet. Two
versions
of the experimental strategy were examined: (OPAL) linear (1:1) mapping of
fundamental frequency (F0) to the coded modulation rate; and (OPAL+)
transposed
mapping of high F0s to a lower coded rate. Outcomes were compared to results
using the clinical ACE strategy. STUDY SAMPLE: Five Mandarin speaking users
of
Nucleus(R) cochlear implants. RESULTS: A small but significant benefit in
recognition of lexical tones was observed using OPAL compared to ACE in
noise,
but not in quiet, and not for OPAL+ compared to ACE or OPAL in quiet or
noise.
Sentence SRTs were significantly better using OPAL+ and comparable using OPAL
to
those using ACE. No differences in pitch discrimination thresholds were
observed
across strategies. CONCLUSIONS: OPAL can provide benefits to Mandarin lexical
tone recognition in moderately noisy conditions and preserve perception of
Mandarin sentences in challenging noise conditions.
FAU - Vandali, Andrew E
AU - Vandali AE
AD - a The Hearing CRC , Carlton , Victoria , Australia.
AD - b The Bionics Institute , East Melbourne , Victoria , Australia , and.
FAU - Dawson, Pam W
AU - Dawson PW
AD - a The Hearing CRC , Carlton , Victoria , Australia.
AD - c Cochlear Ltd , East Melbourne , Victoria , Australia.
FAU - Arora, Komal
AU - Arora K
AD - a The Hearing CRC , Carlton , Victoria , Australia.
AD - c Cochlear Ltd , East Melbourne , Victoria , Australia.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160622
PL - England
TA - Int J Audiol
JT - International journal of audiology
JID - 101140017
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aged
MH - Auditory Threshold
MH - China
MH - Cochlear Implantation/*instrumentation
MH - *Cochlear Implants
MH - Electric Stimulation
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Noise/adverse effects
MH - Perceptual Masking
MH - Persons With Hearing Impairments/*psychology/rehabilitation
MH - *Phonetics
MH - Pitch Discrimination
MH - *Pitch Perception
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Speech Acoustics
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Speech Reception Threshold Test
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Mandarin perception
OT - *cochlear implant
OT - *lexical tone
OT - *pitch coding
EDAT- 2016/06/23 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/31 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/23 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/23 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/31 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/06/23 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/14992027.2016.1190872 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Int J Audiol. 2017;56(sup2):S74-S85. doi: 10.1080/14992027.2016.1190872. Epub
2016 Jun 22.

PMID- 27298765
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171030
LR - 20181113
IS - 2213-1582 (Electronic)
IS - 2213-1582 (Linking)
VI - 11
DP - 2016
TI - Face shape and face identity processing in behavioral variant fronto-temporal
dementia: A specific deficit for familiarity and name recognition of famous
faces.
PG - 368-377
LID - S2213-1582(16)30043-2 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.nicl.2016.03.001 [doi]
AB - Deficits in face processing have been described in the behavioral variant of
fronto-temporal dementia (bvFTD), primarily regarding the recognition of
facial
expressions. Less is known about face shape and face identity processing.
Here we
used a hierarchical strategy targeting face shape and face identity
recognition
in bvFTD and matched healthy controls. Participants performed 3
psychophysical
experiments targeting face shape detection (Experiment 1), unfamiliar face
identity matching (Experiment 2), familiarity categorization and famous face-
name
matching (Experiment 3). The results revealed group differences only in
Experiment 3, with a deficit in the bvFTD group for both familiarity
categorization and famous face-name matching. Voxel-based morphometry
regression
analyses in the bvFTD group revealed an association between grey matter
volume of
the left ventral anterior temporal lobe and familiarity recognition, while
face-name matching correlated with grey matter volume of the bilateral
ventral
anterior temporal lobes. Subsequently, we quantified familiarity-specific and
name-specific recognition deficits as the sum of the celebrities of which
respectively only the name or only the familiarity was accurately recognized.
Both indices were associated with grey matter volume of the bilateral
anterior
temporal cortices. These findings extent previous results by documenting the
involvement of the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL) in familiarity detection
and
the right ATL in name recognition deficits in fronto-temporal lobar
degeneration.
FAU - De Winter, Francois-Laurent
AU - De Winter FL
AD - Laboratory for Translational Neuropsychiatry, Research Group Psychiatry,
Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Old
Age
Psychiatry, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Timmers, Dorien
AU - Timmers D
AD - Department of Old Age Psychiatry, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven,
Belgium;
Department of Neurology, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwziekenhuis Aalst-Asse-Ninove, Aalst,
Belgium.
FAU - de Gelder, Beatrice
AU - de Gelder B
AD - Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht
University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
FAU - Van Orshoven, Marc
AU - Van Orshoven M
AD - Department of Neurology, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwziekenhuis Aalst-Asse-Ninove, Aalst,
Belgium.
FAU - Vieren, Marleen
AU - Vieren M
AD - Department of Neurology, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwziekenhuis Aalst-Asse-Ninove, Aalst,
Belgium.
FAU - Bouckaert, Miriam
AU - Bouckaert M
AD - Department of Neurology, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwziekenhuis Aalst-Asse-Ninove, Aalst,
Belgium.
FAU - Cypers, Gert
AU - Cypers G
AD - Department of Neurology, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwziekenhuis Aalst-Asse-Ninove, Aalst,
Belgium.
FAU - Caekebeke, Jo
AU - Caekebeke J
AD - Department of Neurology, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwziekenhuis Aalst-Asse-Ninove, Aalst,
Belgium.
FAU - Van de Vliet, Laura
AU - Van de Vliet L
AD - Laboratory for Translational Neuropsychiatry, Research Group Psychiatry,
Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Goffin, Karolien
AU - Goffin K
AD - Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology,
KU
Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Van Laere, Koen
AU - Van Laere K
AD - Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology,
KU
Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Sunaert, Stefan
AU - Sunaert S
AD - Translational MRI, Department of Imaging and Pathology, KU Leuven, Leuven,
Belgium.
FAU - Vandenberghe, Rik
AU - Vandenberghe R
AD - Laboratory for Cognitive Neurology, Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven, &
Department of Neurology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Vandenbulcke, Mathieu
AU - Vandenbulcke M
AD - Laboratory for Translational Neuropsychiatry, Research Group Psychiatry,
Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Old
Age
Psychiatry, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Van den Stock, Jan
AU - Van den Stock J
AD - Laboratory for Translational Neuropsychiatry, Research Group Psychiatry,
Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Old
Age
Psychiatry, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160310
PL - Netherlands
TA - Neuroimage Clin
JT - NeuroImage. Clinical
JID - 101597070
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Association
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - Dementia/*complications
MH - Facial Expression
MH - Female
MH - Functional Laterality
MH - Humans
MH - Imaging, Three-Dimensional
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Names
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - Perceptual Disorders/diagnostic imaging/*etiology
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Regression Analysis
MH - Statistics, Nonparametric
MH - Temporal Lobe/diagnostic imaging/*pathology
PMC - PMC4893012
EDAT- 2016/06/15 06:00
MHDA- 2017/10/31 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/15 06:00
PHST- 2015/10/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/01/22 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/03/01 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/06/15 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/06/15 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/10/31 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1016/j.nicl.2016.03.001 [doi]
AID - S2213-1582(16)30043-2 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - Neuroimage Clin. 2016 Mar 10;11:368-377. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2016.03.001.
eCollection 2016.

PMID- 27280873
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180119
LR - 20180319
IS - 1558-9102 (Electronic)
IS - 1092-4388 (Linking)
VI - 59
IP - 3
DP - 2016 Jun 1
TI - Seeing the Talker's Face Improves Free Recall of Speech for Young Adults With
Normal Hearing but Not Older Adults With Hearing Loss.
PG - 590-9
LID - 10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-15-0014 [doi]
AB - PURPOSE: Seeing the talker's face improves speech understanding in noise,
possibly releasing resources for cognitive processing. We investigated
whether it
improves free recall of spoken two-digit numbers. METHOD: Twenty younger
adults
with normal hearing and 24 older adults with hearing loss listened to and
subsequently recalled lists of 13 two-digit numbers, with alternating male
and
female talkers. Lists were presented in quiet as well as in stationary and
speech-like noise at a signal-to-noise ratio giving approximately 90%
intelligibility. Amplification compensated for loss of audibility. RESULTS:
Seeing the talker's face improved free recall performance for the younger but
not
the older group. Poorer performance in background noise was contingent on
individual differences in working memory capacity. The effect of seeing the
talker's face did not differ in quiet and noise. CONCLUSIONS: We have argued
that
the absence of an effect of seeing the talker's face for older adults with
hearing loss may be due to modulation of audiovisual integration mechanisms
caused by an interaction between task demands and participant
characteristics. In
particular, we suggest that executive task demands and interindividual
executive
skills may play a key role in determining the benefit of seeing the talker's
face
during a speech-based cognitive task.
FAU - Rudner, Mary
AU - Rudner M
FAU - Mishra, Sushmit
AU - Mishra S
FAU - Stenfelt, Stefan
AU - Stenfelt S
FAU - Lunner, Thomas
AU - Lunner T
FAU - Ronnberg, Jerker
AU - Ronnberg J
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - J Speech Lang Hear Res
JT - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
JID - 9705610
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - *Facial Recognition
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Loss/*psychology
MH - Hearing Tests
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - *Mental Recall
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Noise
MH - Reading
MH - Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2016/06/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/20 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/10 06:00
PHST- 2015/01/14 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2015/11/18 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/06/10 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/06/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/20 06:00 [medline]
AID - 2528560 [pii]
AID - 10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-15-0014 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2016 Jun 1;59(3):590-9. doi:
10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-15-0014.

PMID- 27262177
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171103
LR - 20181113
IS - 1878-108X (Electronic)
IS - 0166-2236 (Linking)
VI - 39
IP - 7
DP - 2016 Jul
TI - The Neural Consequences of Age-Related Hearing Loss.
PG - 486-497
LID - S0166-2236(16)30036-4 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.tins.2016.05.001 [doi]
AB - During hearing, acoustic signals travel up the ascending auditory pathway
from
the cochlea to auditory cortex; efferent connections provide descending
feedback.
In human listeners, although auditory and cognitive processing have sometimes
been viewed as separate domains, a growing body of work suggests they are
intimately coupled. Here, we review the effects of hearing loss on neural
systems
supporting spoken language comprehension, beginning with age-related
physiological decline. We suggest that listeners recruit domain general
executive
systems to maintain successful communication when the auditory signal is
degraded, but that this compensatory processing has behavioral consequences:
even
relatively mild levels of hearing loss can lead to cascading cognitive
effects
that impact perception, comprehension, and memory, leading to increased
listening
effort during speech comprehension.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Peelle, Jonathan E
AU - Peelle JE
AD - Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis,
MO,
USA. Electronic address: peellej@ent.wustl.edu.
FAU - Wingfield, Arthur
AU - Wingfield A
AD - Volen National Center for Complex Systems, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA,
USA.
Electronic address: wingfiel@brandeis.edu.
LA - eng
GR - R01 AG019714/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG038490/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 DC014281/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Review
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160601
PL - England
TA - Trends Neurosci
JT - Trends in neurosciences
JID - 7808616
SB - IM
MH - Aging/physiology/psychology
MH - Animals
MH - Auditory Cortex/*physiopathology
MH - Hearing Loss/*physiopathology/psychology
MH - Humans
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
PMC - PMC4930712
MID - NIHMS788142
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *auditory cortex
OT - *language
OT - *listening effort
OT - *speech comprehension
EDAT- 2016/06/06 06:00
MHDA- 2017/11/04 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/06 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/14 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/05/04 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/05/09 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/06/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/06/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/11/04 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0166-2236(16)30036-4 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.tins.2016.05.001 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Trends Neurosci. 2016 Jul;39(7):486-497. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2016.05.001.
Epub
2016 Jun 1.

PMID- 27240480
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180117
LR - 20180415
IS - 1878-5891 (Electronic)
IS - 0378-5955 (Linking)
VI - 337
DP - 2016 Jul
TI - Auditory training improves auditory performance in cochlear implanted
children.
PG - 89-95
LID - 10.1016/j.heares.2016.05.003 [doi]
LID - S0378-5955(16)30049-1 [pii]
AB - UNLABELLED: While the positive benefits of pediatric cochlear implantation on
language perception skills are now proven, the heterogeneity of outcomes
remains
high. The understanding of this heterogeneity and possible strategies to
minimize
it is of utmost importance. Our scope here is to test the effects of an
auditory
training strategy, "sound in Hands", using playful tasks grounded on the
theoretical and empirical findings of cognitive sciences. Indeed, several
basic
auditory operations, such as auditory scene analysis (ASA) are not trained in
the
usual therapeutic interventions in deaf children. However, as they constitute
a
fundamental basis in auditory cognition, their development should imply
general
benefit in auditory processing and in turn enhance speech perception. The
purpose
of the present study was to determine whether cochlear implanted children
could
improve auditory performances in trained tasks and whether they could develop
a
transfer of learning to a phonetic discrimination test. MATERIAL AND METHODS:
Nineteen prelingually unilateral cochlear implanted children without
additional
handicap (4-10 year-olds) were recruited. The four main auditory cognitive
processing (identification, discrimination, ASA and auditory memory) were
stimulated and trained in the Experimental Group (EG) using Sound in Hands.
The
EG followed 20 training weekly sessions of 30 min and the untrained group was
the
control group (CG). Two measures were taken for both groups: before training
(T1)
and after training (T2). RESULTS: EG showed a significant improvement in the
identification, discrimination and auditory memory tasks. The improvement in
the
ASA task did not reach significance. CG did not show any significant
improvement
in any of the tasks assessed. Most importantly, improvement was visible in
the
phonetic discrimination test for EG only. Moreover, younger children
benefited
more from the auditory training program to develop their phonetic abilities
compared to older children, supporting the idea that rehabilitative care is
most
efficient when it takes place early on during childhood. These results are
important to pinpoint the auditory deficits in CI children, to gather a
better
understanding of the links between basic auditory skills and speech
perception
which will in turn allow more efficient rehabilitative programs.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Roman, Stephane
AU - Roman S
AD - CHU AP HM, ENT Children, 264 rue Saint Pierre, France. Electronic address:
sroman@ap-hm.fr.
FAU - Rochette, Francoise
AU - Rochette F
AD - LEAD CNRS UMR 5022, Dijon, France.
FAU - Triglia, Jean-Michel
AU - Triglia JM
AD - ENT Department, Timone Children Hospital, Marseille, France.
FAU - Schon, Daniele
AU - Schon D
AD - INSERM U1106, Marseille, France.
FAU - Bigand, Emmanuel
AU - Bigand E
AD - LEAD CNRS UMR 5022, Dijon, France.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160527
PL - Netherlands
TA - Hear Res
JT - Hearing research
JID - 7900445
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - *Auditory Perception
MH - Child
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Cochlear Implantation
MH - *Cochlear Implants
MH - Cognition
MH - Deafness/*rehabilitation/*surgery
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language Development
MH - Learning
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Speech Perception
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Auditory to speech transfer
OT - *Cochlear implant
OT - *Hearing impairment auditory training
EDAT- 2016/06/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/18 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/01 06:00
PHST- 2016/02/03 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/29 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/05/09 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/06/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/06/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/18 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0378-5955(16)30049-1 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.heares.2016.05.003 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Hear Res. 2016 Jul;337:89-95. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2016.05.003. Epub 2016
May
27.

PMID- 27221597
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180119
LR - 20181113
IS - 1469-7661 (Electronic)
IS - 1355-6177 (Linking)
VI -22
IP -6
DP -2016 Jul
TI -Visual Perceptual Organization Ability in Autopsy-Verified Dementia with Lewy
Bodies and Alzheimer's Disease.
PG - 609-19
LID - 10.1017/S1355617716000436 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES: Prominent impairment of visuospatial processing is a feature of
dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and diagnosis of this impairment may help
clinically distinguish DLB from Alzheimer's disease (AD). The current study
compared autopsy-confirmed DLB and AD patients on the Hooper Visual
Organization
Test (VOT), a test that requires perceptual and mental reorganization of
parts of
an object into an identifiable whole. The VOT may be particularly sensitive
to
DLB since it involves integration of visual information processed in separate
dorsal and ventral visual "streams". METHODS: Demographically similar DLB
(n=28),
AD (n=115), and normal control (NC; n=85) participants were compared on the
VOT
and additional neuropsychological tests. Patient groups did not differ in
dementia severity at time of VOT testing. High and Low AD-Braak stage DLB
subgroups were compared to examine the influence of concomitant AD pathology
on
VOT performance. RESULTS: Both patient groups were impaired compared to NC
participants. VOT scores of DLB patients were significantly lower than those
of
AD patients. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the VOT for
patients
versus controls was good, but marginal for DLB versus AD. High-Braak and
low-Braak DLB patients did not differ on the VOT, but High-Braak DLB
performed
worse than Low-Braak DLB on tests of episodic memory and language.
CONCLUSIONS:
Visual perceptual organization ability is more impaired in DLB than AD but
not
strongly diagnostic. The disproportionate severity of this visual perceptual
deficit in DLB is not related to degree of concomitant AD pathology, which
suggests that it might primarily reflect Lewy body pathology. (JINS, 2016,
22,
609-619).
FAU - Mitolo, Micaela
AU - Mitolo M
AD - 1Fondazione San Camillo Ospedale - IRCCS,Venice,Italy.
FAU - Hamilton, Joanne M
AU - Hamilton JM
AD - 2Department of Neurosciences,University of California San Diego,San
Diego,California.
FAU - Landy, Kelly M
AU - Landy KM
AD - 2Department of Neurosciences,University of California San Diego,San
Diego,California.
FAU - Hansen, Lawrence A
AU - Hansen LA
AD - 2Department of Neurosciences,University of California San Diego,San
Diego,California.
FAU - Galasko, Douglas
AU - Galasko D
AD - 2Department of Neurosciences,University of California San Diego,San
Diego,California.
FAU - Pazzaglia, Francesca
AU - Pazzaglia F
AD - 6Department of Psychology,University of Padua,Padua,Italy.
FAU - Salmon, David P
AU - Salmon DP
AD - 2Department of Neurosciences,University of California San Diego,San
Diego,California.
LA - eng
GR - P50 AG005131/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG012963/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20160525
PL - England
TA - J Int Neuropsychol Soc
JT - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS
JID - 9503760
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Alzheimer Disease/diagnosis/*physiopathology
MH - Autopsy
MH - Humans
MH - Lewy Body Disease/diagnosis/*physiopathology
MH - Neuropsychological Tests/*standards
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
PMC - PMC5802394
MID - NIHMS937905
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Alzheimer's disease
OT - *Dementia
OT - *Dementia with Lewy Bodies
OT - *Visual organization
OT - *Visuoperceptual deficit
OT - *Visuospatial deficit
EDAT- 2016/05/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/20 06:00
CRDT- 2016/05/26 06:00
PHST- 2016/05/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/05/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/20 06:00 [medline]
AID - S1355617716000436 [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S1355617716000436 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2016 Jul;22(6):609-19. doi:
10.1017/S1355617716000436.
Epub 2016 May 25.

PMID- 27212057
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170426
LR - 20171218
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 87
DP - 2016 Jul 1
TI - On the relationship between auditory cognition and speech intelligibility in
cochlear implant users: An ERP study.
PG - 169-81
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.05.019 [doi]
LID - S0028-3932(16)30169-5 [pii]
AB - There is a high degree of variability in speech intelligibility outcomes
across
cochlear-implant (CI) users. To better understand how auditory cognition
affects
speech intelligibility with the CI, we performed an electroencephalography
study
in which we examined the relationship between central auditory processing,
cognitive abilities, and speech intelligibility. Postlingually deafened CI
users
(N=13) and matched normal-hearing (NH) listeners (N=13) performed an oddball
task
with words presented in different background conditions (quiet, stationary
noise,
modulated noise). Participants had to categorize words as living (targets) or
non-living entities (standards). We also assessed participants' working
memory
(WM) capacity and verbal abilities. For the oddball task, we found lower hit
rates and prolonged response times in CI users when compared with NH
listeners.
Noise-related prolongation of the N1 amplitude was found for all
participants.
Further, we observed group-specific modulation effects of event-related
potentials (ERPs) as a function of background noise. While NH listeners
showed
stronger noise-related modulation of the N1 latency, CI users revealed
enhanced
modulation effects of the N2/N4 latency. In general, higher-order processing
(N2/N4, P3) was prolonged in CI users in all background conditions when
compared
with NH listeners. Longer N2/N4 latency in CI users suggests that these
individuals have difficulties to map acoustic-phonetic features to lexical
representations. These difficulties seem to be increased for speech-in-noise
conditions when compared with speech in quiet background. Correlation
analyses
showed that shorter ERP latencies were related to enhanced speech
intelligibility
(N1, N2/N4), better lexical fluency (N1), and lower ratings of listening
effort
(N2/N4) in CI users. In sum, our findings suggest that CI users and NH
listeners
differ with regards to both the sensory and the higher-order processing of
speech
in quiet as well as in noisy background conditions. Our results also revealed
that verbal abilities are related to speech processing and speech
intelligibility
in CI users, confirming the view that auditory cognition plays an important
role
for CI outcome. We conclude that differences in auditory-cognitive processing
contribute to the variability in speech performance outcomes observed in CI
users.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Finke, Mareike
AU - Finke M
AD - Department of Otolaryngology, Hannover Medical School, Germany; Cluster of
Excellence "Hearing4all", Germany. Electronic address:
Finke.Mareike@mh-hannover.de.
FAU - Buchner, Andreas
AU - Buchner A
AD - Department of Otolaryngology, Hannover Medical School, Germany; Cluster of
Excellence "Hearing4all", Germany.
FAU - Ruigendijk, Esther
AU - Ruigendijk E
AD - Cluster of Excellence "Hearing4all", Germany; Department of Dutch, University
of
Oldenburg, Germany.
FAU - Meyer, Martin
AU - Meyer M
AD - Neuroplasticity and Learning in the Healthy Aging Brain, Psychological
Institute,
University of Zurich, Switzerland; Cognitive Psychology Unit (CPU),
University of
Klagenfurt, Austria.
FAU - Sandmann, Pascale
AU - Sandmann P
AD - Cluster of Excellence "Hearing4all", Germany; Department of Neurology,
Hannover
Medical School, Germany; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of
Cologne, Germany.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160519
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation/methods
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Brain/*physiopathology
MH - *Cochlear Implants
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - Electroencephalography
MH - Evoked Potentials
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Loss/*physiopathology/*rehabilitation
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Language Tests
MH - Male
MH - Memory, Short-Term
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Speech Discrimination Tests
MH - Speech Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Cochlear implant
OT - *Electroencephalography
OT - *Event-related potentials
OT - *Listening effort
OT - *Speech intelligibility
OT - *Verbal ability
EDAT- 2016/05/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/27 06:00
CRDT- 2016/05/24 06:00
PHST- 2015/09/30 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/05/09 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/05/18 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/05/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/05/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/04/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0028-3932(16)30169-5 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.05.019 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2016 Jul 1;87:169-81. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.05.019. Epub 2016 May 19.

PMID- 27206313
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170428
LR - 20170428
IS - 1873-7838 (Electronic)
IS - 0010-0277 (Linking)
VI - 153
DP - 2016 Aug
TI - Orthographic units in the absence of visual processing: Evidence from
sublexical
structure in braille.
PG - 161-74
LID - 10.1016/j.cognition.2016.03.021 [doi]
LID - S0010-0277(16)30076-2 [pii]
AB - Reading relies on the recognition of units larger than single letters and
smaller
than whole words. Previous research has linked sublexical structures in
reading
to properties of the visual system, specifically on the parallel processing
of
letters that the visual system enables. But whether the visual system is
essential for this to happen, or whether the recognition of sublexical
structures
may emerge by other means, is an open question. To address this question, we
investigate braille, a writing system that relies exclusively on the tactile
rather than the visual modality. We provide experimental evidence
demonstrating
that adult readers of (English) braille are sensitive to sublexical units.
Contrary to prior assumptions in the braille research literature, we find
strong
evidence that braille readers do indeed access sublexical structure, namely
the
processing of multi-cell contractions as single orthographic units and the
recognition of morphemes within morphologically-complex words. Therefore, we
conclude that the recognition of sublexical structure is not exclusively tied
to
the visual system. However, our findings also suggest that there are aspects
of
morphological processing on which braille and print readers differ, and that
these differences may, crucially, be related to reading using the tactile
rather
than the visual sensory modality.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Fischer-Baum, Simon
AU - Fischer-Baum S
AD - Department of Psychology, Rice University, United States. Electronic address:
simon.j.fischer-baum@rice.edu.
FAU - Englebretson, Robert
AU - Englebretson R
AD - Department of Linguistics, Rice University, United States.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160518
PL - Netherlands
TA - Cognition
JT - Cognition
JID - 0367541
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - *Blindness
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Linguistics
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pattern Recognition, Physiological
MH - *Reading
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Sensory Aids
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Braille
OT - *Morphology
OT - *Orthographic representation
OT - *Reading
OT - *Sublexical structure
EDAT- 2016/05/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/30 06:00
CRDT- 2016/05/21 06:00
PHST- 2015/12/09 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/03/21 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/03/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/05/21 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/05/21 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/04/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0010-0277(16)30076-2 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cognition.2016.03.021 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Cognition. 2016 Aug;153:161-74. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2016.03.021. Epub
2016
May 18.

PMID- 27193033
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171211
LR - 20181113
IS - 2044-5423 (Electronic)
IS - 2044-5415 (Linking)
VI - 26
IP - 5
DP - 2017 May
TI - Cognitive tests predict real-world errors: the relationship between drug name
confusion rates in laboratory-based memory and perception tests and
corresponding
error rates in large pharmacy chains.
PG - 395-407
LID - 10.1136/bmjqs-2015-005099 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Drug name confusion is a common type of medication error and a
persistent threat to patient safety. In the USA, roughly one per thousand
prescriptions results in the wrong drug being filled, and most of these
errors
involve drug names that look or sound alike. Prior to approval, drug names
undergo a variety of tests to assess their potential for confusability, but
none
of these preapproval tests has been shown to predict real-world error rates.
OBJECTIVES: We conducted a study to assess the association between error
rates in
laboratory-based tests of drug name memory and perception and real-world drug
name confusion error rates. METHODS: Eighty participants, comprising doctors,
nurses, pharmacists, technicians and lay people, completed a battery of
laboratory tests assessing visual perception, auditory perception and short-
term
memory of look-alike and sound-alike drug name pairs (eg,
hydroxyzine/hydralazine). RESULTS: Laboratory test error rates (and other
metrics) significantly predicted real-world error rates obtained from a
large,
outpatient pharmacy chain, with the best-fitting model accounting for 37% of
the
variance in real-world error rates. Cross-validation analyses confirmed these
results, showing that the laboratory tests also predicted errors from a
second
pharmacy chain, with 45% of the variance being explained by the laboratory
test
data. CONCLUSIONS: Across two distinct pharmacy chains, there is a strong and
significant association between drug name confusion error rates observed in
the
real world and those observed in laboratory-based tests of memory and
perception.
Regulators and drug companies seeking a validated preapproval method for
identifying confusing drug names ought to consider using these simple tests.
By
using a standard battery of memory and perception tests, it should be
possible to
reduce the number of confusing look-alike and sound-alike drug name pairs
that
reach the market, which will help protect patients from potentially harmful
medication errors.
CI - Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where
not
already granted under a licence) please go to
http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.
FAU - Schroeder, Scott R
AU - Schroeder SR
AD - Center for Communication and Health, Department of Communication Studies,
Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
FAU - Salomon, Meghan M
AU - Salomon MM
AD - Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA.
FAU - Galanter, William L
AU - Galanter WL
AD - Department of Medicine, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA.
FAU - Schiff, Gordon D
AU - Schiff GD
AD - Department of General Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston,
Massachusetts, USA.
FAU - Vaida, Allen J
AU - Vaida AJ
AD - Institute for Safe Medication Practices, Horsham, Pennsylvania, USA.
FAU - Gaunt, Michael J
AU - Gaunt MJ
AD - Institute for Safe Medication Practices, Horsham, Pennsylvania, USA.
FAU - Bryson, Michelle L
AU - Bryson ML
AD - Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago,
Illinois, USA.
FAU - Rash, Christine
AU - Rash C
AD - Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago,
Illinois, USA.
FAU - Falck, Suzanne
AU - Falck S
AD - Department of Medicine, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA.
FAU - Lambert, Bruce L
AU - Lambert BL
AD - Center for Communication and Health, Department of Communication Studies,
Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
LA - eng
GR - U19 HS021093/HS/AHRQ HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
DEP - 20160518
PL - England
TA - BMJ Qual Saf
JT - BMJ quality & safety
JID - 101546984
RN - 0 (Pharmaceutical Preparations)
SB - H
CIN - BMJ Qual Saf. 2017 May;26(5):357-359. PMID: 27555615
MH - Adult
MH - Auditory Perception
MH - *Cognition
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Logistic Models
MH - Male
MH - Medication Errors/prevention & control/*psychology
MH - Memory
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Perception
MH - *Pharmaceutical Preparations
MH - Pharmacies
MH - Phonetics
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH - *Terminology as Topic
MH - United States
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5530327
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Human error
OT - *Human factors
OT - *Medication safety
OT - *Patient safety
EDAT- 2016/05/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2016/05/20 06:00
PHST- 2015/11/29 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/21 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/04/22 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/05/20 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/12 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/05/20 06:00 [entrez]
AID - bmjqs-2015-005099 [pii]
AID - 10.1136/bmjqs-2015-005099 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - BMJ Qual Saf. 2017 May;26(5):395-407. doi: 10.1136/bmjqs-2015-005099. Epub
2016
May 18.

PMID- 27174518
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170426
LR - 20171218
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 87
DP - 2016 Jul 1
TI - The role of vision in the neural representation of unique entities.
PG - 144-56
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.05.007 [doi]
LID - S0028-3932(16)30158-0 [pii]
AB - Famous places and famous people are different from their common counterparts
in
that we have unique knowledge about individual items, including specific
knowledge about their visual appearance and other sensory properties.
Previous
studies have shown that the processing of unique entities selectively
activates a
network of brain regions that includes the bilateral anterior temporal lobes
(ATL), posterior cingulate cortex and adjacent medial precuneus
(PCC/medPrec),
medial prefrontal cortex (medPFC), and temporal-parietal junction (TPJ). The
degree to which these regions represent visual properties associated with
famous
people/places is unknown. Here we compared fMRI responses in congenitally and
sighted individuals to test whether visual experience contributes to the
development of unique-entity responses in these regions. Names of unique
entities
(famous places, famous people) and generic items (daily scenes such as
"bridge",
face parts) were presented aurally to 13 congenitally blind and 16 sighted
participants. Sighted participants additionally viewed corresponding
photographs.
We found that bilateral PCC/medPrec, medPFC, left TPJ, left ATL and right
superior frontal gyrus were more strongly activated by pictures of unique
entities compared to generic items. Importantly, all regions showed similar
selectivity for unique entities in both groups when only names were
presented.
Furthermore, resting-state functional connectivity analysis revealed that
these
regions were tightly interconnected in both groups. Together, these results
provide evidence for a visually-independent brain network underlying unique
entity processing.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights
reserved.
FAU - Wang, Xiaoying
AU - Wang X
AD - National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and
IDG/McGovern
Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875,
China.
FAU - Peelen, Marius V
AU - Peelen MV
AD - Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, 38068 Rovereto, Italy.
FAU - Han, Zaizhu
AU - Han Z
AD - National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and
IDG/McGovern
Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875,
China.
FAU - Caramazza, Alfonso
AU - Caramazza A
AD - Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, 38068 Rovereto, Italy;
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, United
States.
FAU - Bi, Yanchao
AU - Bi Y
AD - National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and
IDG/McGovern
Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875,
China.
Electronic address: ybi@bnu.edu.cn.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160510
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - Blindness/*physiopathology
MH - Brain/*physiology/*physiopathology
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - Famous Persons
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Judgment/physiology
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Names
MH - Neural Pathways/physiology/physiopathology
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Rest
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Anterior temporal lobe
OT - *Congenitally blind
OT - *Precuneus
OT - *Unique entity
OT - *Visual experience
EDAT- 2016/05/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/27 06:00
CRDT- 2016/05/14 06:00
PHST- 2016/01/18 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/05/02 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/05/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/05/14 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/05/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/04/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0028-3932(16)30158-0 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.05.007 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2016 Jul 1;87:144-56. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.05.007. Epub 2016 May 10.

PMID- 27150707
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170512
LR - 20180216
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 90
DP - 2016 Sep
TI - Temporal lobe contribution to perceptual function: A tale of three patient
groups.
PG - 33-45
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.05.002 [doi]
LID - S0028-3932(16)30150-6 [pii]
AB - There has been growing recognition of the contribution of medial and anterior
temporal lobe structures to non-mnemonic functions, such as perception. To
evaluate the nature of this contribution, we contrast the perceptual
performance
of three patient groups, all of whom have a perturbation of these temporal
lobe
structures. Specifically, we compare the profile of patients with focal
hippocampal (HC) lesions, those with more extensive lesions to the medial
temporal lobe (MTL) that include HC and perirhinal cortex (PrC), and those
with
congenital prosopagnosia (CP), whose deficit has been attributed to the
disconnection of the anterior temporal lobe from more posterior structures.
All
participants completed a range of'oddity' tasks in which, on each trial, they
determined which of four visual stimuli in a display was the'odd-one-out'.
There
were five stimulus categories including faces, scenes, objects (high and low
ambiguity) and squares of different sizes. Comparisons were conducted
separately
for the HC, MTL and CP groups against their matched control groups and then
the
group data were compared to each other directly. The group profiles were
easily
differentiable. Whereas the HC group stood out for its difficulty in
discriminating scenes and the CP group stood out for its disproportionate
difficulty in discriminating faces with milder effects for scenes and high
ambiguity objects, the MTL group evinced a more general discrimination
deficit
for faces, scenes and high ambiguity objects. The group differences highlight
distinct profiles for each of the three groups and distinguish the signature
perceptual impairments following more extended temporal lobe alterations. In
the
recent reconsideration of the role of the hippocampus and neocortex,
Moscovitch
and colleagues (Moscovitch et al., 2016) note that the medial temporal lobe
structures play a role in non-mnemonic functions, such as perception, problem
solving, decision-making and language. Here, we address this exact issue,
specifically with respect to perception, and we dedicate this paper to Morris
Moscovitch in recognition of his profound contribution to science, to his
students and to his colleagues.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Behrmann, M
AU - Behrmann M
AD - Department of Psychology and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition,
Carnegie
Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA 15213-3890, United States. Electronic
address:
behrmann@cmu.edu.
FAU - Lee, A C H
AU - Lee AC
AD - Rotman Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada M6A 2E1; Department of
Psychology
(Scarborough), University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M1C 1A4.
FAU - Geskin, J Z
AU - Geskin JZ
AD - Department of Psychology and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition,
Carnegie
Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA 15213-3890, United States.
FAU - Graham, K S
AU - Graham KS
AD - Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre and School of Psychology,
Cardiff University, Maindy Road, Cardiff CF24 4HQ, UK.
FAU - Barense, M D
AU - Barense MD
AD - Rotman Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada M6A 2E1; Department of
Psychology
(St George), University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3G3.
LA - eng
GR - MOP-115148/CIHR/Canada
GR - G1002149/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
GR - BB/1007091/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United
Kingdom
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
DEP - 20160502
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
RN - Prosopagnosia, hereditary
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Analysis of Variance
MH - Brain Injuries/diagnostic imaging/pathology/*physiopathology
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - Discrimination (Psychology)
MH - Female
MH - Hippocampus/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Perceptual Disorders/etiology/pathology
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - Prosopagnosia/*congenital/diagnostic imaging/pathology
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Temporal Lobe/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Amnesia
OT - *Congenital prosopagnosia
OT - *Hippocampus
OT - *Medial temporal lobe
OT - *Perception
OT - *Perirhinal cortex
OT - *Visual discrimination
EDAT- 2016/05/07 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/13 06:00
CRDT- 2016/05/07 06:00
PHST- 2016/01/21 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/04/08 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/05/02 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/05/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/05/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/05/13 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0028-3932(16)30150-6 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.05.002 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2016 Sep;90:33-45. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.05.002.
Epub 2016 May 2.

PMID- 27115239
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180123
LR - 20180919
IS - 2157-3107 (Electronic)
IS - 1050-0545 (Linking)
VI - 27
IP - 4
DP - 2016 Apr
TI - Development of a Pitch Discrimination Screening Test for Preschool Children.
PG - 281-92
LID - 10.3766/jaaa.14052 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: There is a critical need for tests of auditory discrimination for
young children as this skill plays a fundamental role in the development of
speaking, prereading, reading, language, and more complex auditory processes.
Frequency discrimination is important with regard to basic sensory processing
affecting phonological processing, dyslexia, measurements of intelligence,
auditory memory, Asperger syndrome, and specific language impairment.
PURPOSE:
This study was performed to determine the clinical feasibility of the Pitch
Discrimination Test (PDT) to screen the preschool child's ability to
discriminate
some of the acoustic demands of speech perception, primarily pitch
discrimination, without linguistic content. The PDT used brief speech
frequency
tones to gather normative data from preschool children aged 3 to 5 yrs.
RESEARCH
DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was used to gather data regarding the pitch
discrimination abilities of a sample of typically developing preschool
children,
between 3 and 5 yrs of age. The PDT consists of ten trials using two pure
tones
of 100-msec duration each, and was administered in an AA or AB forced-choice
response format. STUDY SAMPLE: Data from 90 typically developing preschool
children between the ages of 3 and 5 yrs were used to provide normative data.
DATA ANALYSIS: Nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-testing was used to examine the
effects of age as a continuous variable on pitch discrimination. The
Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine the significance of age on
performance
on the PDT. Spearman rank was used to determine the correlation of age and
performance on the PDT. RESULTS: Pitch discrimination of brief tones improved
significantly from age 3 yrs to age 4 yrs, as well as from age 3 yrs to the
age
4- and 5-yrs group. Results indicated that between ages 3 and 4 yrs,
children's
auditory discrimination of pitch improved on the PDT. The data showed that
children can be screened for auditory discrimination of pitch beginning with
age
4 yrs. CONCLUSIONS: The PDT proved to be a time efficient, feasible tool for
a
simple form of frequency discrimination screening in the preschool population
before the age where other diagnostic tests of auditory processing disorders
can
be used.
CI - American Academy of Audiology.
FAU - Abramson, Maria Kulick
AU - Abramson MK
AD - Hear Now, Laguna Niguel, CA.
FAU - Lloyd, Peter J
AU - Lloyd PJ
AD - Division of Rheumatology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA.
LA - eng
PT - Evaluation Studies
PT - Journal Article
PL - Canada
TA - J Am Acad Audiol
JT - Journal of the American Academy of Audiology
JID - 9114646
SB - IM
MH - Audiometry, Pure-Tone
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH - Feasibility Studies
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Intelligence/physiology
MH - Language Development Disorders/physiopathology
MH - Male
MH - Pitch Discrimination/*physiology
MH - Reading
MH - Speech Discrimination Tests
MH - Speech Perception/physiology
EDAT- 2016/04/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/24 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/27 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/27 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/24 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.3766/jaaa.14052 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Am Acad Audiol. 2016 Apr;27(4):281-92. doi: 10.3766/jaaa.14052.

PMID- 27112461
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170904
LR - 20181113
IS - 1532-5946 (Electronic)
IS - 0090-502X (Linking)
VI - 44
IP - 6
DP - 2016 Aug
TI - Thinking about a limited future enhances the positivity of younger and older
adults' recall: Support for socioemotional selectivity theory.
PG - 869-82
LID - 10.3758/s13421-016-0612-0 [doi]
AB - Compared with younger adults, older adults have a relative preference to
attend
to and remember positive over negative information. This is known as the
"positivity effect," and researchers have typically evoked socioemotional
selectivity theory to explain it. According to socioemotional selectivity
theory,
as people get older they begin to perceive their time left in life as more
limited. These reduced time horizons prompt older adults to prioritize
achieving
emotional gratification and thus exhibit increased positivity in attention
and
recall. Although this is the most commonly cited explanation of the
positivity
effect, there is currently a lack of clear experimental evidence
demonstrating a
link between time horizons and positivity. The goal of the current research
was
to address this issue. In two separate experiments, we asked participants to
complete a writing activity, which directed them to think of time as being
either
limited or expansive (Experiments 1 and 2) or did not orient them to think
about
time in a particular manner (Experiment 2). Participants were then shown a
series
of emotional pictures, which they subsequently tried to recall. Results from
both
studies showed that regardless of chronological age, thinking about a limited
future enhanced the relative positivity of participants' recall. Furthermore,
the
results of Experiment 2 showed that this effect was not driven by changes in
mood. Thus, the fact that older adults' recall is typically more positive
than
younger adults' recall may index naturally shifting time horizons and goals
with
age.
FAU - Barber, Sarah J
AU - Barber SJ
AD - Department of Psychology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway
Avenue,
San Francisco, CA, 94132, USA. barber@sfsu.edu.
FAU - Opitz, Philipp C
AU - Opitz PC
AD - Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los
Angeles, CA, USA.
FAU - Martins, Bruna
AU - Martins B
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA,
USA.
FAU - Sakaki, Michiko
AU - Sakaki M
AD - School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading,
Reading, UK.
AD - Kochi University of Technology, Kami, Japan.
FAU - Mather, Mara
AU - Mather M
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA,
USA.
LA - eng
GR - R01 AG025340/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG038043/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG046464/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - Mem Cognit
JT - Memory & cognition
JID - 0357443
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Emotions/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Mental Recall/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Psychological Theory
MH - Thinking/*physiology
MH - *Time
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC4976023
MID - NIHMS792877
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Aging
OT - *Emotion
OT - *Memory
OT - *Positivity effect
OT - *Socioemotional selectivity theory
OT - *Time perception
EDAT- 2016/04/27 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/05 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/27 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/27 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/09/05 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.3758/s13421-016-0612-0 [doi]
AID - 10.3758/s13421-016-0612-0 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Mem Cognit. 2016 Aug;44(6):869-82. doi: 10.3758/s13421-016-0612-0.

PMID- 27106333
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180205
LR - 20180205
IS - 1520-8524 (Electronic)
IS - 0001-4966 (Linking)
VI - 139
IP - 4
DP - 2016 Apr
TI - Gradient of learnability in teaching English pronunciation to Korean
learners.
PG - 1859
LID - 10.1121/1.4945716 [doi]
AB - This paper aims to propose a gradient of learnability as a criterion for
setting
priorities in pronunciation teaching. A total of 40 Korean subjects (mostly
aged
12 year) were tested on their discrimination ability of English sounds before
and
after participating in a high variability phonetic training (HVPT) program
for 4
weeks. This study shows highly promising results for pronunciation teaching
with
the HVPT method. First, lower level learners show greater improvements in
phoneme
discrimination ability compared to upper level learners. Second, consonants
are
better discriminated than vowels and greater improvements are seen with
consonant
contrasts than with vowels that have a lower functional load. Third, many of
the
sounds with high functional load have a high learnability. Fourth, greater
improvements are seen with sounds that are poorly identified before the
training
than sounds that are well-identified. Fifth, young learners also benefit from
the
HVPT, much like highly motivated adult learners. A learnability gradient was
established on the basis of the phoneme learnability index and the pairwise
learnability index. On the basis of the constructed gradient of learnability
and
the concept of functional load, a set of priorities was provided for teaching
English pronunciation to young Korean learners.
FAU - Lee, Ho-Young
AU - Lee HY
AD - Department of Linguistics, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu,
Seoul, South Korea.
FAU - Hwang, Hyosung
AU - Hwang H
AD - Department of Linguistics, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu,
Seoul, South Korea.
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - J Acoust Soc Am
JT - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
JID - 7503051
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Audiometry, Speech
MH - Child
MH - *Discrimination (Psychology)
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Learning
MH - Male
MH - *Multilingualism
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Speech Acoustics
MH - *Teaching
MH - Time Factors
MH - *Voice Quality
EDAT- 2016/04/24 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/06 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/24 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/06 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1121/1.4945716 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 Apr;139(4):1859. doi: 10.1121/1.4945716.

PMID- 27106318
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180129
LR - 20181113
IS - 1520-8524 (Electronic)
IS - 0001-4966 (Linking)
VI - 139
IP - 4
DP - 2016 Apr
TI - Audiovisual speech perception development at varying levels of perceptual
processing.
PG - 1713
LID - 10.1121/1.4945590 [doi]
AB - This study used the auditory evaluation framework [Erber (1982). Auditory
Training (Alexander Graham Bell Association, Washington, DC)] to characterize
the
influence of visual speech on audiovisual (AV) speech perception in adults
and
children at multiple levels of perceptual processing. Six- to eight-year-old
children and adults completed auditory and AV speech perception tasks at
three
levels of perceptual processing (detection, discrimination, and recognition).
The
tasks differed in the level of perceptual processing required to complete
them.
Adults and children demonstrated visual speech influence at all levels of
perceptual processing. Whereas children demonstrated the same visual speech
influence at each level of perceptual processing, adults demonstrated greater
visual speech influence on tasks requiring higher levels of perceptual
processing. These results support previous research demonstrating multiple
mechanisms of AV speech processing (general perceptual and speech-specific
mechanisms) with independent maturational time courses. The results suggest
that
adults rely on both general perceptual mechanisms that apply to all levels of
perceptual processing and speech-specific mechanisms that apply when making
phonetic decisions and/or accessing the lexicon. Six- to eight-year-old
children
seem to rely only on general perceptual mechanisms across levels. As
expected,
developmental differences in AV benefit on this and other recognition tasks
likely reflect immature speech-specific mechanisms and phonetic processing in
children.
FAU - Lalonde, Kaylah
AU - Lalonde K
AD - Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, 200 South
Jordan
Avenue, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA.
FAU - Holt, Rachael Frush
AU - Holt RF
AD - Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Ohio State University, 110 Pressey
Hall, 1070 Carmack Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.
LA - eng
GR - T32 DC000012/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
GR - T32 DC005361/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - J Acoust Soc Am
JT - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
JID - 7503051
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation/methods
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aging/psychology
MH - Audiometry, Speech
MH - Auditory Threshold
MH - Child
MH - Child Language
MH - *Cues
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Phonetics
MH - Photic Stimulation/methods
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Signal Detection, Psychological
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - *Visual Perception
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC4826374
EDAT- 2016/04/24 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/30 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/24 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1121/1.4945590 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 Apr;139(4):1713. doi: 10.1121/1.4945590.

PMID- 27106310
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180129
LR - 20180129
IS - 1520-8524 (Electronic)
IS - 0001-4966 (Linking)
VI - 139
IP - 4
DP - 2016 Apr
TI - Speech rate effects on the processing of conversational speech across the
adult
life span.
PG - 1618
LID - 10.1121/1.4944032 [doi]
AB - This study investigates the effect of speech rate on spoken word recognition
across the adult life span. Contrary to previous studies, conversational
materials with a natural variation in speech rate were used rather than
lab-recorded stimuli that are subsequently artificially time-compressed. It
was
investigated whether older adults' speech recognition is more adversely
affected
by increased speech rate compared to younger and middle-aged adults, and
which
individual listener characteristics (e.g., hearing, fluid cognitive
processing
ability) predict the size of the speech rate effect on recognition
performance.
In an eye-tracking experiment, participants indicated with a mouse-click
which
visually presented words they recognized in a conversational fragment. Click
response times, gaze, and pupil size data were analyzed. As expected, click
response times and gaze behavior were affected by speech rate, indicating
that
word recognition is more difficult if speech rate is faster. Contrary to
earlier
findings, increased speech rate affected the age groups to the same extent.
Fluid
cognitive processing ability predicted general recognition performance, but
did
not modulate the speech rate effect. These findings emphasize that earlier
results of age by speech rate interactions mainly obtained with artificially
speeded materials may not generalize to speech rate variation as encountered
in
conversational speech.
FAU - Koch, Xaver
AU - Koch X
AD - Center for Language Studies, Radboud University, Erasmusplein 1, 6525 HT,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
FAU - Janse, Esther
AU - Janse E
AD - Center for Language Studies, Radboud University, Erasmusplein 1, 6525 HT,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - United States
TA - J Acoust Soc Am
JT - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
JID - 7503051
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - Audiometry, Pure-Tone
MH - Auditory Threshold
MH - Cognition
MH - Eye Movements
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Periodicity
MH - Psychoacoustics
MH - Reaction Time
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Speech Acoustics
MH - Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Time Factors
MH - Visual Perception
MH - Young Adult
EDAT- 2016/04/24 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/30 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/24 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1121/1.4944032 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 Apr;139(4):1618. doi: 10.1121/1.4944032.
PMID- 27096282
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170213
LR - 20170213
IS - 2327-9109 (Electronic)
IS - 2327-9095 (Linking)
VI - 24
IP - 2
DP - 2017 Mar-Apr
TI - Parallel Picture-Naming Tests: Development and Psychometric Properties for
Farsi-Speaking Adults.
PG - 100-107
LID - 10.1080/23279095.2015.1107562 [doi]
AB - The present study describes the development and validation of two parallel
picture-naming tests (PPNTs) as neuropsychological tools for evaluating word
retrieval disorders in Farsi-speaking adults with and without aphasia. The
development phase used the distributions of psycholinguistic variables (word
frequency or age of acquisition) to select test items. Each parallel test
consists of 109 line-drawings assigned to concrete nouns that were arranged
in
order of increasing difficulty. Assessment of content validity indicated that
all
items were quite or highly relevant and clear. The psychometric features were
tested on 30 normal adults and 10 matched individuals with aphasia. The
results
showed appropriate criterion validity. Parallel tests allowed discrimination
by
subjects with and without naming difficulties. The tests were internally
consistent. Each test form showed reasonable test-retest reliability. The
correlation between the scores from both test forms indicated good parallel
reliability. The cut-off point at which the tests reached the highest level
of
sensitivity and specificity was observed to be 86 correct responses. The
percentage of correct responses for each item correlated strongly with
frequency,
age of acquisition, and name agreement. The overall findings support the
validity
and reliability of the PPNTs and suggest that these tests are appropriate for
use
in research and for clinical purposes.
FAU - Tahanzadeh, Behnoosh
AU - Tahanzadeh B
AD - a Department of Speech Therapy , School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University
of
Medical Sciences , Tehran , Iran.
FAU - Soleymani, Zahra
AU - Soleymani Z
AD - a Department of Speech Therapy , School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University
of
Medical Sciences , Tehran , Iran.
FAU - Jalaie, Shohre
AU - Jalaie S
AD - b Biostatistics, Department of physiotherapy , School of Rehabilitation,
Tehran
University of Medical Sciences , Tehran , Iran.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160420
PL - United States
TA - Appl Neuropsychol Adult
JT - Applied neuropsychology. Adult
JID - 101584082
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aphasia/*diagnosis
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Iran
MH - Male
MH - Mental Recall/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests/*standards
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology
MH - Psychometrics/*instrumentation
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Semantics
MH - Sensitivity and Specificity
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Aphasia
OT - Farsi
OT - neuropsychological tests
OT - picture naming
OT - reliability
OT - validity
EDAT- 2016/04/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/02/14 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/21 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/21 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/02/14 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/04/21 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1080/23279095.2015.1107562 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Appl Neuropsychol Adult. 2017 Mar-Apr;24(2):100-107. doi:
10.1080/23279095.2015.1107562. Epub 2016 Apr 20.

PMID- 27070044
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170105
LR - 20181113
IS - 1096-4657 (Electronic)
IS - 0361-073X (Linking)
VI - 42
IP - 3
DP - 2016
TI - Visual Acuity does not Moderate Effect Sizes of Higher-Level Cognitive Tasks.
PG - 221-63
LID - 10.1080/0361073X.2016.1156964 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: Declining visual capacities in older adults have
been
posited as a driving force behind adult age differences in higher-order
cognitive
functions (e.g., the "common cause" hypothesis of Lindenberger & Baltes,
1994,
Psychology and Aging, 9, 339-355). McGowan, Patterson, and Jordan (2013,
Experimental Aging Research, 39, 70-79) also found that a surprisingly large
number of published cognitive aging studies failed to include adequate
measures
of visual acuity. However, a recent meta-analysis of three studies (La Fleur
and
Salthouse, 2014, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21, 1202-1208) failed to find
evidence that visual acuity moderated or mediated age differences in higher-
level
cognitive processes. In order to provide a more extensive test of whether
visual
acuity moderates age differences in higher-level cognitive processes, we
conducted a more extensive meta-analysis of topic. METHODS: Using results
from
456 studies, we calculated effect sizes for the main effect of age across
four
cognitive domains (attention, executive function, memory, and
perception/language) separately for five levels of visual acuity criteria (no
criteria, undisclosed criteria, self-reported acuity, 20/80-20/31, and 20/30
or
better). RESULTS: As expected, age had a significant effect on each cognitive
domain. However, these age effects did not further differ as a function of
visual
acuity criteria. CONCLUSION: The current meta-analytic, cross-sectional
results
suggest that visual acuity is not significantly related to age group
differences
in higher-level cognitive performance-thereby replicating La Fleur and
Salthouse
(2014). Further efforts are needed to determine whether other measures of
visual
functioning (e.g., contrast sensitivity, luminance) affect age differences in
cognitive functioning.
FAU - Houston, James R
AU - Houston JR
AD - a Department of Psychology , The University of Akron , Akron , Ohio , USA.
FAU - Bennett, Ilana J
AU - Bennett IJ
AD - b Department of Neurobiology and Behavior , University of California , Irvine
,
Irvine California , USA.
FAU - Allen, Philip A
AU - Allen PA
AD - a Department of Psychology , The University of Akron , Akron , Ohio , USA.
FAU - Madden, David J
AU - Madden DJ
AD - c Brain Imaging and Analysis Center , Duke University Medical Center , Durham
,
North Carolina , USA.
LA - eng
GR - R00 AG047334/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - AG047334/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - K99 AG047334/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - R01 AG039684/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
GR - AG039684/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Meta-Analysis
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - Exp Aging Res
JT - Experimental aging research
JID - 7603335
SB - IM
MH - Aging/*psychology
MH - Attention
MH - *Cognition
MH - Executive Function
MH - Humans
MH - Memory
MH - Perception
MH - *Visual Acuity
PMC - PMC4902024
MID - NIHMS791616
EDAT- 2016/04/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/01/06 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/13 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/13 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/01/06 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1080/0361073X.2016.1156964 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Exp Aging Res. 2016;42(3):221-63. doi: 10.1080/0361073X.2016.1156964.

PMID- 27060946
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170130
LR - 20180131
IS - 1875-8908 (Electronic)
IS - 1387-2877 (Linking)
VI - 52
IP - 1
DP - 2016 Mar 5
TI - Glutamine and Glutamate Complex, as Measured by Functional Magnetic Resonance
Spectroscopy, Alters During Face-Name Association Task in Patients with Mild
Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease.
PG - 145-59
LID - 10.3233/JAD-150877 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: The metabolite response during a memory task in Alzheimer's
disease
(AD) patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the metabolite changes in
subjects with AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and cognitively
normal (CN) elderly during a memory task using functional magnetic resonance
spectroscopy (fMRS). METHODS: This study involved 23 young normal controls
(YC),
24 CN elderly, 24 aMCI, and 24 mild and probable AD individuals. fMRS data
were
acquired at the precuneus and posterior cingulate brain regions during a
face-name association task. Statistical analyses of quantified metabolites
were
performed to evaluate differences of the metabolite values between the
stimulation conditions and among the four subject groups. Receiver operating
curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether the metabolic changes after
functional activations can differentiate the subject groups. RESULT:
Glutamine
and glutamate complex (Glx) was statistically significantly different between
the
fixation and repeat conditions in aMCI (p = 0.0492) as well as between the
fixation and the novel conditions in the AD (p = 0.0412) group. The total
N-acetylaspartate (tNAA) was statistically significantly different among the
four
subject groups in the fixation condition (DF = 3, F = 7.673, p < 0.001), the
novel condition (DF = 3, F = 6.945, p < 0.001), and the repeat condition (DF
= 3,
F = 7.127, p < 0.001). tNAA, tCr, and mIns could be used to differentiate CN
from
aMCI. Furthermore, tNAA, tCr, Glx, and Glu could also differentiate CN from
AD,
and aMCI from AD. CONCLUSION: Glx was altered during a stimulation that may
be
used to evaluate neuronal dysfunction in a demented patient. tNAA and tCr
were
reduced in patients with AD.
FAU - Jahng, Geon-Ho
AU - Jahng GH
AD - Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College
of
Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Gangdong-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Oh, Janghoon
AU - Oh J
AD - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University,
Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Lee, Do-Wan
AU - Lee DW
AD - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical
Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-
Gu,
Seoul, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Kim, Hyug-Gi
AU - Kim HG
AD - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University,
Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Rhee, Hak Young
AU - Rhee HY
AD - Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College
of
Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Gangdong-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Shin, Wonchul
AU - Shin W
AD - Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College
of
Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Gangdong-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Paik, Jong-Woo
AU - Paik JW
AD - Department of Mental Health, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of
Medicine,
Kyung Hee University, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Lee, Kyung Mi
AU - Lee KM
AD - Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine,
Kyung Hee University, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Park, Soonchan
AU - Park S
AD - Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College
of
Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Gangdong-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Choe, Bo-Young
AU - Choe BY
AD - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical
Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-
Gu,
Seoul, Republic of Korea.
FAU - Ryu, Chang-Woo
AU - Ryu CW
AD - Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College
of
Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Gangdong-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Alzheimers Dis
JT - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
JID - 9814863
RN - 0RH81L854J (Glutamine)
RN - 3KX376GY7L (Glutamic Acid)
SB - IM
EIN - J Alzheimers Dis. 2016 Jul 13;53(2):745. PMID: 27434286
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*metabolism
MH - Brain/*metabolism
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - Cognitive Dysfunction/*metabolism
MH - Cohort Studies
MH - Face
MH - Female
MH - Glutamic Acid/*metabolism
MH - Glutamine/*metabolism
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
MH - Male
MH - Mental Status Schedule
MH - Names
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Pattern Recognition, Physiological/*physiology
MH - ROC Curve
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Alzheimer-s disease
OT - functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy
OT - glutamine and glutamate complex (Glx)
OT - mild cognitive impairment
OT - total N-acetylaspartate (tNAA)
EDAT- 2016/04/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/11 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/11 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/01/31 06:00 [medline]
AID - JAD150877 [pii]
AID - 10.3233/JAD-150877 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Alzheimers Dis. 2016 Mar 5;52(1):145-59. doi: 10.3233/JAD-150877.

PMID- 27060523
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170508
LR - 20181113
IS - 1460-2156 (Electronic)
IS - 0006-8950 (Linking)
VI - 139
IP - Pt 6
DP - 2016 Jun
TI - Core auditory processing deficits in primary progressive aphasia.
PG - 1817-29
LID - 10.1093/brain/aww067 [doi]
AB - The extent to which non-linguistic auditory processing deficits may
contribute to
the phenomenology of primary progressive aphasia is not established. Using
non-linguistic stimuli devoid of meaning we assessed three key domains of
auditory processing (pitch, timing and timbre) in a consecutive series of 18
patients with primary progressive aphasia (eight with semantic variant, six
with
non-fluent/agrammatic variant, and four with logopenic variant), as well as
28
age-matched healthy controls. We further examined whether performance on the
psychoacoustic tasks in the three domains related to the patients' speech and
language and neuropsychological profile. At the group level, patients were
significantly impaired in the three domains. Patients had the most marked
deficits within the rhythm domain for the processing of short sequences of up
to
seven tones. Patients with the non-fluent variant showed the most pronounced
deficits at the group and the individual level. A subset of patients with the
semantic variant were also impaired, though less severely. The patients with
the
logopenic variant did not show any significant impairments. Significant
deficits
in the non-fluent and the semantic variant remained after partialling out
effects
of executive dysfunction. Performance on a subset of the psychoacoustic tests
correlated with conventional verbal repetition tests. In sum, a core central
auditory impairment exists in primary progressive aphasia for non-linguistic
stimuli. While the non-fluent variant is clinically characterized by a motor
speech deficit (output problem), perceptual processing of tone sequences is
clearly deficient. This may indicate the co-occurrence in the non-fluent
variant
of a deficit in working memory for auditory objects. Parsimoniously we
propose
that auditory timing pathways are altered, which are used in common for
processing acoustic sequence structure in both speech output and acoustic
input.
CI - (c) The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the
Guarantors of Brain.
FAU - Grube, Manon
AU - Grube M
AD - 1 Institute of Neuroscience, Medical School, Newcastle University,
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK 2 Machine Learning Group, Department of Computer
Science,
Berlin Institute of Technology, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Bruffaerts, Rose
AU - Bruffaerts R
AD - 3 Laboratory for Cognitive Neurology, KU Leuven Department of Neurosciences,
Belgium 4 Neurology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Schaeverbeke, Jolien
AU - Schaeverbeke J
AD - 3 Laboratory for Cognitive Neurology, KU Leuven Department of Neurosciences,
Belgium 4 Neurology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Neyens, Veerle
AU - Neyens V
AD - 3 Laboratory for Cognitive Neurology, KU Leuven Department of Neurosciences,
Belgium.
FAU - De Weer, An-Sofie
AU - De Weer AS
AD - 3 Laboratory for Cognitive Neurology, KU Leuven Department of Neurosciences,
Belgium.
FAU - Seghers, Alexandra
AU - Seghers A
AD - 3 Laboratory for Cognitive Neurology, KU Leuven Department of Neurosciences,
Belgium 4 Neurology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Bergmans, Bruno
AU - Bergmans B
AD - 4 Neurology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Dries, Eva
AU - Dries E
AD - 3 Laboratory for Cognitive Neurology, KU Leuven Department of Neurosciences,
Belgium 4 Neurology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Griffiths, Timothy D
AU - Griffiths TD
AD - 1 Institute of Neuroscience, Medical School, Newcastle University,
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK 6 Wellcome Centre for Neuroimaging, University
College
London, UK.
FAU - Vandenberghe, Rik
AU - Vandenberghe R
AD - 3 Laboratory for Cognitive Neurology, KU Leuven Department of Neurosciences,
Belgium 4 Neurology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
7
Alzheimer Research Centre KU Leuven, Leuven research Institute for
Neuroscience
and Disease, University of Leuven, Belgium
rik.vandenberghe@uz.kuleuven.ac.be.
LA - eng
GR - 091593/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160409
PL - England
TA - Brain
JT - Brain : a journal of neurology
JID - 0372537
SB - AIM
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Aphasia, Primary Progressive/diagnosis/diagnostic imaging/*physiopathology
MH - Auditory Perception/*physiology
MH - Case-Control Studies
MH - Cues
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuroimaging
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Psychoacoustics
PMC - PMC4892752
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *pitch
OT - *progressive non-fluent aphasia
OT - *rhythm
OT - *semantic dementia
OT - *timbre
EDAT- 2016/04/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/05/10 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/10 06:00
PHST- 2015/07/06 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/02/12 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/04/10 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/05/10 06:00 [medline]
AID - aww067 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/brain/aww067 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain. 2016 Jun;139(Pt 6):1817-29. doi: 10.1093/brain/aww067. Epub 2016 Apr
9.

PMID- 27049878
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180205
LR - 20181113
IS - 1744-4128 (Electronic)
IS - 1382-5585 (Linking)
VI - 23
IP - 6
DP - 2016 Nov
TI - The effectiveness of unitization in mitigating age-related relational
learning
impairments depends on existing cognitive status.
PG - 667-90
LID - 10.1080/13825585.2016.1158235 [doi]
AB - Binding relations among items in the transverse patterning (TP) task is
dependent
on the integrity of the hippocampus and its extended network. Older adults
have
impaired TP learning, corresponding to age-related reductions in hippocampal
volumes. Unitization is a training strategy that can mitigate TP impairments
in
amnesia by reducing reliance on hippocampal-dependent relational binding and
increasing reliance on fused representations. Here we examined whether
healthy
older adults and those showing early signs of cognitive decline would also
benefit from unitization. Although both groups of older adults had
neuropsychological performance within the healthy range, their TP learning
differed both under standard and unitized training conditions. Healthy older
adults with impaired TP learning under standard training benefited from
unitized
training. Older adults who failed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA)
showed
greater impairments under standard conditions, and showed no evidence of
improvement with unitization. These individuals' failures to benefit from
unitization may be a consequence of early deficits not seen in older adults
who
pass the MoCA.
FAU - D'Angelo, Maria C
AU - D'Angelo MC
AD - a Rotman Research Institute , Baycrest , Toronto , Canada.
FAU - Smith, Victoria M
AU - Smith VM
AD - b Department of Psychology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.
FAU - Kacollja, Arber
AU - Kacollja A
AD - a Rotman Research Institute , Baycrest , Toronto , Canada.
FAU - Zhang, Felicia
AU - Zhang F
AD - b Department of Psychology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.
FAU - Binns, Malcolm A
AU - Binns MA
AD - a Rotman Research Institute , Baycrest , Toronto , Canada.
AD - b Department of Psychology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.
FAU - Barense, Morgan D
AU - Barense MD
AD - a Rotman Research Institute , Baycrest , Toronto , Canada.
AD - b Department of Psychology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.
FAU - Ryan, Jennifer D
AU - Ryan JD
AD - a Rotman Research Institute , Baycrest , Toronto , Canada.
AD - b Department of Psychology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.
LA - eng
GR - MOP-115148/CIHR/Canada
GR - MOP-126003/CIHR/Canada
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160406
PL - United States
TA - Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn
JT - Neuropsychology, development, and cognition. Section B, Aging,
neuropsychology
and cognition
JID - 9614434
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aging/*physiology/psychology
MH - Association Learning/*physiology
MH - Cognition/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory Disorders/*physiopathology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - Predictive Value of Tests
MH - Semantics
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC4926786
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Cognitive aging
OT - *hippocampus
OT - *relational memory
OT - *transverse patterning
OT - *unitization
EDAT- 2016/04/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/06 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/07 06:00
PHST- 2016/04/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/06 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1080/13825585.2016.1158235 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn. 2016 Nov;23(6):667-90. doi:
10.1080/13825585.2016.1158235. Epub 2016 Apr 6.

PMID- 27045450
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170629
LR - 20180126
IS - 1090-2147 (Electronic)
IS - 0278-2626 (Linking)
VI - 105
DP - 2016 Jun
TI - Effects of paired-object affordance in search tasks across the adult
lifespan.
PG - 22-33
LID - 10.1016/j.bandc.2016.03.009 [doi]
LID - S0278-2626(16)30026-4 [pii]
AB - The study investigated the processes underlying the retrieval of action
information about functional object pairs, focusing on the contribution of
procedural and semantic knowledge. We further assessed whether the retrieval
of
action knowledge is affected by task demands and age. The contribution of
procedural knowledge was examined by the way objects were selected,
specifically
whether active objects were selected before passive objects. The contribution
of
semantic knowledge was examined by manipulating the relation between targets
and
distracters. A touchscreen-based search task was used testing young, middle-
aged,
and elderly participants. Participants had to select by touching two targets
among distracters using two search tasks. In an explicit action search task,
participants had to select two objects which afforded a mutual action (e.g.,
functional pair: hammer-nail). Implicit affordance perception was tested
using a
visual color-matching search task; participants had to select two objects
with
the same colored frame. In both tasks, half of the colored targets also
afforded
an action. Overall, middle-aged participants performed better than young and
elderly participants, specifically in the action task. Across participants in
the
action task, accuracy was increased when the distracters were semantically
unrelated to the functional pair, while the opposite pattern was observed in
the
color task. This effect was enhanced with increased age. In the action task
all
participants utilized procedural knowledge, i.e., selected the active object
before the passive object. This result supports the dual-route account from
vision to action. Semantic knowledge contributed to both the action and the
color
task, but procedural knowledge associated with the direct route was primarily
retrieved when the task was action-relevant. Across the adulthood lifespan,
the
data show inverted U-shaped effects of age on the retrieval of action
knowledge.
Age also linearly increased the involvement of the indirect (semantic) route
and
the integration of information of the direct and the indirect routes in
selection
processes.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Wulff, Melanie
AU - Wulff M
AD - School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15
2TT,
UK. Electronic address: drmelaniewulff@gmail.com.
FAU - Stainton, Alexandra
AU - Stainton A
AD - School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15
2TT,
UK.
FAU - Rotshtein, Pia
AU - Rotshtein P
AD - School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15
2TT,
UK.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160402
PL - United States
TA - Brain Cogn
JT - Brain and cognition
JID - 8218014
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Attention/*physiology
MH - Female
MH - Human Development/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Knowledge
MH - Male
MH - Mental Recall/*physiology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Psychomotor Performance/*physiology
MH - Semantics
MH - Space Perception/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Action knowledge
OT - *Ageing
OT - *Attention
OT - *Conceptual knowledge
OT - *Conceptual search
OT - *Dual route to action
OT - *Lifespan
OT - *Objects
OT - *Paired-object affordance
OT - *Perception
OT - *Tools
OT - *Visual search
EDAT- 2016/04/06 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/01 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/06 06:00
PHST- 2015/08/07 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/02/13 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/03/27 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/04/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/04/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0278-2626(16)30026-4 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.bandc.2016.03.009 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Brain Cogn. 2016 Jun;105:22-33. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2016.03.009. Epub 2016
Apr
2.

PMID- 27003216
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170201
LR - 20181113
IS - 1875-8908 (Electronic)
IS - 1387-2877 (Linking)
VI - 52
IP - 2
DP - 2016 Mar 16
TI - Phenomenological Reliving and Visual Imagery During Autobiographical Recall
in
Alzheimer's Disease.
PG - 421-31
LID - 10.3233/JAD-151122 [doi]
AB - Multiple studies have shown compromise of autobiographical memory and
phenomenological reliving in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated
various
phenomenological features of autobiographical memory to determine their
relative
vulnerability in AD. To this aim, participants with early AD and cognitively
normal older adult controls were asked to retrieve an autobiographical event
and
rate on a five-point scale metacognitive judgments (i.e., reliving, back in
time,
remembering, and realness), component processes (i.e., visual imagery,
auditory
imagery, language, and emotion), narrative properties (i.e., rehearsal and
importance), and spatiotemporal specificity (i.e., spatial details and
temporal
details). AD participants showed lower general autobiographical recall than
controls, and poorer reliving, travel in time, remembering, realness, visual
imagery, auditory imagery, language, rehearsal, and spatial detail-a decrease
that was especially pronounced for visual imagery. Yet, AD participants
showed
high rating for emotion and importance. Early AD seems to compromise many
phenomenological features, especially visual imagery, but also seems to
preserve
some other features.
FAU - El Haj, Mohamad
AU - El Haj M
AD - Laboratoire SCALab UMR CNRS 9193 - University of Lille, France.
FAU - Kapogiannis, Dimitrios
AU - Kapogiannis D
AD - Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD, USA.
FAU - Antoine, Pascal
AU - Antoine P
AD - Laboratoire SCALab UMR CNRS 9193 - University of Lille, France.
LA - eng
GR - Z99 AG999999/NULL/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
GR - ZIA AG000975-08/NULL/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Alzheimers Dis
JT - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
JID - 9814863
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Alzheimer Disease/*psychology
MH - Depression
MH - Emotions
MH - Executive Function
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - *Imagination
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Episodic
MH - *Mental Recall
MH - *Metacognition
MH - *Perception
MH - Psychological Tests
PMC - PMC5147522
MID - NIHMS810419
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Alzheimer's disease
OT - autobiographical memory
OT - autonoetic consciousness
OT - phenomenological reliving
OT - visual imagery
EDAT- 2016/03/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/02/02 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/23 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/23 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/03/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/02/02 06:00 [medline]
AID - JAD151122 [pii]
AID - 10.3233/JAD-151122 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Alzheimers Dis. 2016 Mar 16;52(2):421-31. doi: 10.3233/JAD-151122.

PMID- 27001029
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170428
LR - 20171113
IS - 1873-3514 (Electronic)
IS - 0028-3932 (Linking)
VI - 85
DP - 2016 May
TI - Similar exemplar pooling processes underlie the learning of facial identity
and
handwriting style: Evidence from typical observers and individuals with
Autism.
PG - 169-76
LID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.03.017 [doi]
LID - S0028-3932(16)30088-4 [pii]
AB - Considerable research has addressed whether the cognitive and neural
representations recruited by faces are similar to those engaged by other
types of
visual stimuli. For example, research has examined the extent to which
objects of
expertise recruit holistic representation and engage the fusiform face area.
Little is known, however, about the domain-specificity of the exemplar
pooling
processes thought to underlie the acquisition of familiarity with particular
facial identities. In the present study we sought to compare observers'
ability
to learn facial identities and handwriting styles from exposure to multiple
exemplars. Crucially, while handwritten words and faces differ considerably
in
their topographic form, both learning tasks share a common exemplar pooling
component. In our first experiment, we find that typical observers' ability
to
learn facial identities and handwriting styles from exposure to multiple
exemplars correlates closely. In our second experiment, we show that
observers
with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are impaired at both learning tasks. Our
findings suggest that similar exemplar pooling processes are recruited when
learning facial identities and handwriting styles. Models of exemplar pooling
originally developed to explain face learning, may therefore offer valuable
insights into exemplar pooling across a range of domains, extending beyond
faces.
Aberrant exemplar pooling, possibly resulting from structural differences in
the
inferior longitudinal fasciculus, may underlie difficulties recognising
familiar
faces often experienced by individuals with ASD, and leave observers overly
reliant on local details present in particular exemplars.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Ipser, Alberta
AU - Ipser A
AD - Department of Psychology, City University London, UK.
FAU - Ring, Melanie
AU - Ring M
AD - Department of Psychology, City University London, UK.
FAU - Murphy, Jennifer
AU - Murphy J
AD - Department of Psychology, City University London, UK.
FAU - Gaigg, Sebastian B
AU - Gaigg SB
AD - Department of Psychology, City University London, UK.
FAU - Cook, Richard
AU - Cook R
AD - Department of Psychology, City University London, UK. Electronic address:
Richard.Cook.1@city.ac.uk.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160318
PL - England
TA - Neuropsychologia
JT - Neuropsychologia
JID - 0020713
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Autistic Disorder/*physiopathology
MH - Brain Mapping
MH - *Face
MH - Female
MH - *Handwriting
MH - Humans
MH - Learning/physiology
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - Photic Stimulation
MH - Reaction Time/physiology
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Autism Spectrum Disorder
OT - *Averaging
OT - *Exemplar variance
OT - *Face learning
OT - *Handwriting
EDAT- 2016/03/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/30 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/23 06:00
PHST- 2015/12/21 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/03/16 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2016/03/17 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/03/23 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/03/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/04/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0028-3932(16)30088-4 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.03.017 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychologia. 2016 May;85:169-76. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.03.017. Epub 2016 Mar 18.

PMID- 26995150
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170926
LR - 20170926
IS - 0013-7006 (Print)
IS - 0013-7006 (Linking)
VI - 43
IP - 1
DP - 2017 Feb
TI - [Slowing down the flow of facial information enhances facial scanning in
children
with autism spectrum disorders: A pilot eye tracking study].
PG - 32-40
LID - S0013-7006(16)00037-3 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.encep.2016.02.005 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: Face and gaze avoidance are among the most characteristic and
salient
symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Studies using eye tracking
highlighted early and lifelong ASD-specific abnormalities in attention to
face
such as decreased attention to internal facial features. These specificities
could be partly explained by disorders in the perception and integration of
rapid
and complex information such as that conveyed by facial movements and more
broadly by biological and physical environment. Therefore, we wish to test
whether slowing down facial dynamics may improve the way children with ASD
attend
to a face. METHODS: We used an eye tracking method to examine gaze patterns
of
children with ASD aged 3 to 8 (n=23) and TD controls (n=29) while viewing the
face of a speaker telling a story. The story was divided into 6 sequences
that
were randomly displayed at 3 different speeds, i.e. a real-time speed (RT), a
slow speed (S70=70% of RT speed), a very slow speed (S50=50% of RT speed).
S70
and S50 were displayed thanks to software called Logiral, aimed at slowing
down
visual and auditory stimuli simultaneously and without tone distortion. The
visual scene was divided into four regions of interest (ROI): eyes region;
mouth
region; whole face region; outside the face region. The total time, number
and
mean duration of visual fixations on the whole visual scene and the four ROI
were
measured between and within the two groups. RESULTS: Compared to TD children,
children with ASD spent significantly less time attending to the visual
scenes
and, when they looked at the scene, they spent less time scanning the
speaker's
face in general and her mouth in particular, and more time looking outside
facial
area. Within the ASD group mean duration of fixation increased on the whole
scene
and particularly on the mouth area, in R50 compared to RT. Children with mild
autism spent more time looking at the face than the two other groups of ASD
children, and spent more time attending to the face and mouth as well as
longer
mean duration of visual fixation on mouth and eyes, at slow speeds (S50
and/or
S70) than at RT one. CONCLUSIONS: Slowing down facial dynamics enhances
looking
time on face, and particularly on mouth and/or eyes, in a group of 23
children
with ASD and particularly in a small subgroup with mild autism. Given the
crucial
role of reading the eyes for emotional processing and that of lip-reading for
language processing, our present result and other converging ones could pave
the
way for novel socio-emotional and verbal rehabilitation methods for autistic
population. Further studies should investigate whether increased attention to
face and particularly eyes and mouth is correlated to emotional/social and/or
verbal/language improvements.
CI - Copyright (c) 2016 L'Encephale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All
rights reserved.
FAU - Charrier, A
AU - Charrier A
AD - EA 3273, centre de recherche en psychologie de la connaissance, du langage et
de
l'emotion (PsyCLE), Aix-Marseille universite, 13621 Aix-en-Provence, France.
FAU - Tardif, C
AU - Tardif C
AD - EA 3273, centre de recherche en psychologie de la connaissance, du langage et
de
l'emotion (PsyCLE), Aix-Marseille universite, 13621 Aix-en-Provence, France.
FAU - Gepner, B
AU - Gepner B
AD - Laboratoire de neurobiologie des interactions cellulaires et
neurophysiopathologie (NICN), UMR CNRS 7259, faculte de medecine Marseille
Nord,
Aix-Marseille universite, 13344 Marseille, France. Electronic address:
bruno.gepner@univ-amu.fr.
LA - fre
PT - Journal Article
TT - Amelioration de l'exploration visuelle d'un visage par des enfants avec
autisme
grace au ralentissement de la dynamique faciale : une etude preliminaire en
oculometrie.
DEP - 20160316
PL - France
TA - Encephale
JT - L'Encephale
JID - 7505643
SB - IM
MH - Attention/*physiology
MH - *Autism Spectrum Disorder/physiopathology/psychology
MH - Child
MH - Child, Preschool
MH - *Face
MH - Female
MH - Fixation, Ocular/*physiology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Pilot Projects
MH - Pursuit, Smooth/*physiology
MH - Recognition (Psychology)/physiology
MH - Time Factors
MH - Visual Perception/*physiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Attention to face
OT - Autism spectrum disorders
OT - Autisme
OT - Dynamique faciale
OT - Eye tracking
OT - Facial dynamics
OT - Fixation visuelle
OT - Oculometrie
OT - Ralentissement
OT - Slow down
EDAT- 2016/03/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/28 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/21 06:00
PHST- 2014/04/09 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2015/12/02 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/03/21 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/09/28 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2016/03/21 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0013-7006(16)00037-3 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.encep.2016.02.005 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Encephale. 2017 Feb;43(1):32-40. doi: 10.1016/j.encep.2016.02.005. Epub 2016
Mar
16.

PMID- 26987816
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180130
LR - 20180208
IS - 1741-203X (Electronic)
IS - 1041-6102 (Linking)
VI - 28
IP - 7
DP - 2016 Jul
TI - Facial emotion recognition and its relationship to cognition and depressive
symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease.
PG - 1165-79
LID - 10.1017/S104161021600034X [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Impairments in facial emotion recognition (FER) have been
detected in
patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Presently, we aim at assessing
differences
in emotion recognition performance in PD patient groups with and without mild
forms of cognitive impairment (MCI) compared to healthy controls. METHODS:
Performance on a concise emotion recognition test battery (VERT-K) of three
groups of 97 PD patients was compared with an age-equivalent sample of 168
healthy controls. Patients were categorized into groups according to two
well-established classifications of MCI according to Petersen's (cognitively
intact vs. amnestic MCI, aMCI, vs. non-amnestic MCI, non-aMCI) and Litvan's
(cognitively intact vs. single-domain MCI, sMCI, vs. multi-domain MCI, mMCI)
criteria. Patients and controls underwent individual assessments using a
comprehensive neuropsychological test battery examining attention, executive
functioning, language, and memory (Neuropsychological Test Battery Vienna,
NTBV),
the Beck Depression Inventory, and a measure of premorbid IQ (WST). RESULTS:
Cognitively intact PD patients and patients with MCI in PD (PD-MCI) showed
significantly worse emotion recognition performance when compared to healthy
controls. Between-groups effect sizes were substantial, showing non-trivial
effects in all comparisons (Cohen's ds from 0.31 to 1.22). Moreover, emotion
recognition performance was higher in women, positively associated with
premorbid
IQ and negatively associated with age. Depressive symptoms were not related
to
FER. CONCLUSIONS: The present investigation yields further evidence for
impaired
FER in PD. Interestingly, our data suggest FER deficits even in cognitively
intact PD patients indicating FER dysfunction prior to the development of
overt
cognitive dysfunction. Age showed a negative association whereas IQ showed a
positive association with FER.
FAU - Pietschnig, J
AU - Pietschnig J
AD - Department of Applied Psychology: Health, Development, Enhancement and
Intervention,Faculty of Psychology,University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
FAU - Schroder, L
AU - Schroder L
AD - Department of Applied Psychology: Health, Development, Enhancement and
Intervention,Faculty of Psychology,University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
FAU - Ratheiser, I
AU - Ratheiser I
AD - Department of Applied Psychology: Health, Development, Enhancement and
Intervention,Faculty of Psychology,University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
FAU - Kryspin-Exner, I
AU - Kryspin-Exner I
AD - Department of Applied Psychology: Health, Development, Enhancement and
Intervention,Faculty of Psychology,University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
FAU - Pfluger, M
AU - Pfluger M
AD - Department of Neurology,Medical University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
FAU - Moser, D
AU - Moser D
AD - Department of Neurology,Medical University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
FAU - Auff, E
AU - Auff E
AD - Department of Neurology,Medical University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
FAU - Pirker, W
AU - Pirker W
AD - Department of Neurology,Medical University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
FAU - Pusswald, G
AU - Pusswald G
AD - Department of Neurology,Medical University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
FAU - Lehrner, J
AU - Lehrner J
AD - Department of Neurology,Medical University of Vienna,Vienna,Austria.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
DEP - 20160318
PL - England
TA - Int Psychogeriatr
JT - International psychogeriatrics
JID - 9007918
SB - IM
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aged
MH - Austria
MH - Cognition
MH - Depression/diagnosis
MH - *Emotions
MH - Facial Recognition
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Mental Status and Dementia Tests
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - *Parkinson Disease/diagnosis/psychology
MH - Sex Factors
MH - Statistics as Topic
MH - Task Performance and Analysis
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Parkinson's disease
OT - *facial emotion recognition
OT - *mild cognitive impairment
EDAT- 2016/03/19 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/19 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/19 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/03/19 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/31 06:00 [medline]
AID - S104161021600034X [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S104161021600034X [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Int Psychogeriatr. 2016 Jul;28(7):1165-79. doi: 10.1017/S104161021600034X.
Epub
2016 Mar 18.

PMID- 26936574
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20161213
LR - 20181113
IS - 1520-8524 (Electronic)
IS - 0001-4966 (Linking)
VI - 139
IP - 2
DP - 2016 Feb
TI - Nonlinear frequency compression: Influence of start frequency and input
bandwidth
on consonant and vowel recognition.
PG - 938-57
LID - 10.1121/1.4941916 [doi]
AB - By varying parameters that control nonlinear frequency compression (NFC),
this
study examined how different ways of compressing inaudible mid- and/or
high-frequency information at lower frequencies influences perception of
consonants and vowels. Twenty-eight listeners with mild to moderately severe
hearing loss identified consonants and vowels from nonsense syllables in
noise
following amplification via a hearing aid simulator. Low-pass filtering and
the
selection of NFC parameters fixed the output bandwidth at a frequency
representing a moderately severe (3.3 kHz, group MS) or a mild-to-moderate
(5.0
kHz, group MM) high-frequency loss. For each group (n = 14), effects of six
combinations of NFC start frequency (SF) and input bandwidth [by varying the
compression ratio (CR)] were examined. For both groups, the 1.6 kHz SF
significantly reduced vowel and consonant recognition, especially as CR
increased; whereas, recognition was generally unaffected if SF increased at
the
expense of a higher CR. Vowel recognition detriments for group MS were
moderately
correlated with the size of the second formant frequency shift following NFC.
For
both groups, significant improvement (33%-50%) with NFC was confined to final
/s/
and /z/ and to some VCV tokens, perhaps because of listeners' limited
exposure to
each setting. No set of parameters simultaneously maximized recognition
across
all tokens.
FAU - Alexander, Joshua M
AU - Alexander JM
AD - Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West
Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA.
LA - eng
GR - RC1 DC010601/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL - United States
TA - J Acoust Soc Am
JT - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
JID - 7503051
SB - IM
MH - Acoustic Stimulation
MH - Acoustics
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - Audiometry, Speech
MH - Auditory Threshold
MH - Cues
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Loss/diagnosis/*psychology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Noise/adverse effects
MH - Nonlinear Dynamics
MH - Perceptual Masking
MH - *Pitch Perception
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Severity of Illness Index
MH - Sound Spectrography
MH - *Speech Acoustics
MH - *Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - *Voice Quality
PMC - PMC4769266
EDAT- 2016/03/05 06:00
MHDA- 2016/12/15 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/04 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/04 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/03/05 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/12/15 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1121/1.4941916 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 Feb;139(2):938-57. doi: 10.1121/1.4941916.

PMID- 26915472
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170721
LR - 20171124
IS - 1531-4995 (Electronic)
IS - 0023-852X (Linking)
VI - 126
IP - 10
DP - 2016 Oct
TI - Hearing loss and cognition in the Busselton Baby Boomer cohort: An
epidemiological study.
PG - 2367-75
LID - 10.1002/lary.25896 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine the relationship between peripheral
hearing
loss (HL) in baby boomers (better-ear measure) and cognitive function, taking
into account the impact of depression or cognitive reserve on this
relationship
and exploring binaural hearing. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective, epidemiology
study.
METHODS: Data from 1,969 participants aged 45 to 66 years were collected in
the
Busselton Healthy Ageing Study. Participants were assessed using pure-tone
air-conduction thresholds at octave frequencies (250; 500; 1,000; 2,000;
4,000;
and 8,000 Hz). Hearing loss was grouped using 1) pure-tone averages across 4
frequencies (500 to 4000Hz) in the better ear (BE4FA) or 2) latent profile
analysis (LPA) using all thresholds from both ears. Cognition was tested with
the
Cognitive Drug Research System, verbal fluency, and National Adult Reading
Test
(premorbid-IQ). Regression was used to determine the impact of HL relative to
no
HL on age and education-adjusted cognition, controlling for mood, sex, and
premorbid-IQ. RESULTS: According to BE4FA, 4.7% had mild (26-40 dB) HL; 0.8%
had
moderate (41-60 dB) HL; and 0.3% had severe (61-80 dB) HL. Based on the LPA,
20.5% had high-frequency HL; 7.8% had mid- to high-frequency HL; and 1.9% had
significant HL across all frequencies. The HL group was not a predictor of
cognitive performance in any domain using BE4FA and explained just 0.5% and
0.4%
of variance in continuity-of-attention and speed-of-memory retrieval using
LPA.
Critically, those with the worst hearing did not differ cognitively from
those
with the best. CONCLUSION: Hearing loss is not an important determinant of
contemporaneous attention, memory, or executive function in middle-aged
adults
once age, education, depression, cognitive reserve, and sex are controlled.
LEVEL
OF EVIDENCE: 4. Laryngoscope, 126:2367-2375, 2016.
CI - (c) 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society,
Inc.
FAU - Bucks, Romola S
AU - Bucks RS
AD - School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.
romola.bucks@uwa.edu.au.
FAU - Dunlop, Patrick D
AU - Dunlop PD
AD - School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.
FAU - Taljaard, Dunay Schmulian
AU - Taljaard DS
AD - Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia,
Crawley,
Australia.
AD - Audiology Department, Princess Margaret Hospital, Subiaco, Australia.
AD - Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Australia.
FAU - Brennan-Jones, Christopher G
AU - Brennan-Jones CG
AD - Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia,
Crawley,
Australia.
AD - Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Australia.
FAU - Hunter, Michael
AU - Hunter M
AD - Busselton Population Medical Research Institute, Busselton, Australia.
AD - School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Nedlands,
Australia.
FAU - Wesnes, Keith
AU - Wesnes K
AD - Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne,
Australia.
AD - Wesnes Cognition Ltd., Streatley on Thames, United Kingdom.
AD - Department of Psychology, University of Northumbria, Newcastle, United
Kingdom.
FAU - Eikelboom, Robert H
AU - Eikelboom RH
AD - Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia,
Crawley,
Australia.
AD - Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Australia.
AD - Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of
Pretoria,
Pretoria, South Africa.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160224
PL - United States
TA - Laryngoscope
JT - The Laryngoscope
JID - 8607378
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Attention
MH - Audiometry, Pure-Tone
MH - Auditory Threshold
MH - Australia/epidemiology
MH - Cognition Disorders/*epidemiology/psychology
MH - Cognitive Reserve
MH - Depression/psychology
MH - Female
MH - Hearing Loss/*psychology
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Memory
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Prospective Studies
MH - Regression Analysis
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - *Hearing impairment
OT - *aging
OT - *cognition
OT - *epidemiology
EDAT- 2016/02/27 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/22 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/27 06:00
PHST- 2015/12/31 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/02/27 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/02/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/22 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1002/lary.25896 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Laryngoscope. 2016 Oct;126(10):2367-75. doi: 10.1002/lary.25896. Epub 2016
Feb
24.

PMID- 26906426
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180118
LR - 20181113
IS - 1421-9972 (Electronic)
IS - 1021-7762 (Linking)
VI - 67
IP - 5
DP - 2015
TI - Familiarization Effects on Consonant Intelligibility in Dysarthric Speech.
PG - 245-52
LID - 10.1159/000444255 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND/AIMS: This study investigates the effects of familiarization on
naive
listeners' ability to identify consonants in dysarthric speech. METHODS: A
total
of 120 listeners (30 listeners/speaker) participated in experiments over a 6-
week
period. Listeners were randomly assigned to one of the three familiarization
conditions: a passive condition in which listeners heard audio recordings of
words, an active condition in which listeners heard audio recordings of words
while viewing the written material of words, and a control condition in which
listeners had no exposure to the audio signal prior to identification tasks.
RESULTS: Familiarization improved naive listeners' ability to identify
consonants
produced by a speaker with dysarthria. The active familiarization method
exhibited an advantage over the other conditions, in terms of the magnitude
and
rapidness of improvement. One-month delayed test scores were higher than
pre-familiarization scores, but the advantage of active familiarization was
not
present for all speakers. CONCLUSION: This study supports familiarization
benefits in enhancing consonant intelligibility in dysarthria and suggests
that
perceptual learning mechanisms be harnessed for developing effective
listener-oriented intervention techniques in the management of dysarthria.
Current findings call for further research on a familiarization protocol that
can
subserve segmental learning with maximum efficacy.
CI - (c) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.
FAU - Kim, Heejin
AU - Kim H
AD - Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois
at
Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Ill., USA.
LA - eng
GR - R03 DC012888/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/United States
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Randomized Controlled Trial
DEP - 20160224
PL - Switzerland
TA - Folia Phoniatr Logop
JT - Folia phoniatrica et logopaedica : official organ of the International
Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP)
JID - 9422792
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Cerebral Palsy/*diagnosis/rehabilitation
MH - Dysarthria/*diagnosis/rehabilitation
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Phonetics
MH - Reading
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - *Semantics
MH - *Speech Intelligibility
MH - *Speech Perception
MH - Speech Production Measurement
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC4914453
MID - NIHMS759537
EDAT- 2016/02/26 06:00
MHDA- 2016/02/26 06:01
CRDT- 2016/02/25 06:00
PMCR- 2017/02/24 00:00
PHST- 2017/02/24 00:00 [pmc-release]
PHST- 2016/02/25 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/02/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/02/26 06:01 [medline]
AID - 000444255 [pii]
AID - 10.1159/000444255 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Folia Phoniatr Logop. 2015;67(5):245-52. doi: 10.1159/000444255. Epub 2016
Feb
24.

PMID- 26901171
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170817
LR - 20180103
IS - 1931-1559 (Electronic)
IS - 0894-4105 (Linking)
VI - 30
IP - 7
DP - 2016 Oct
TI - Differences in visual naming performance between patients with temporal lobe
epilepsy associated with temporopolar lesions versus hippocampal sclerosis.
PG - 841-52
LID - 10.1037/neu0000269 [doi]
AB - OBJECTIVE: Naming difficulties are frequently observed in patients with
temporal
lobe epilepsy (TLE). Although damage/removal of regions of the anterior
temporal
neocortex including the temporal pole is considered critical for those
difficulties, 1 relevant hypothesis proposes that hippocampal damage also has
a
role. Our aim was to better understand the specific involvement of temporal
pole
and hippocampus in visual object naming. METHOD: We assessed 2 types of
patients
with TLE on a visual confrontation-naming task: patients with hippocampal
sclerosis (HS; n = 16) and patients with a lesion on the tip of the temporal
pole
that spared the hippocampus entirely (n = 18). A common battery of verbal and
nonverbal semantic tasks was administered and used as a semantic memory
background. Control group were 20 matched healthy participants. RESULTS:
Patients
with lesions on their temporal poles differed from patients with HS and
control
group on naming ability, proportion and rate of error type, and influence of
concept familiarity. Of note, naming performance was not affected by
hippocampal
damage. Using a Bayesian model averaging approach, we found that the number
of
omission errors distinguished patients with temporal pole damage from
patients
with HS and controls. This differential pattern occurred despite similar
impairment on the semantic memory background in both clinical groups.
CONCLUSION:
Current findings provide evidence that temporal pole damage produces or
contributes to naming impairment in TLE, while also suggesting that the
hippocampus is not critical for naming. They also highlight the importance of
error-type analysis when evaluating visual naming in TLE. (PsycINFO Database
Record
CI - (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).
FAU - Poch, Claudia
AU - Poch C
AD - Department of Biological and Health Psychology, Autonoma University of
Madrid.
FAU - Toledano, Rafael
AU - Toledano R
AD - Epilepsy Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital Ruber Internacional.
FAU - Jimenez-Huete, Adolfo
AU - Jimenez-Huete A
AD - Epilepsy Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital Ruber Internacional.
FAU - Garcia-Morales, Irene
AU - Garcia-Morales I
AD - Epilepsy Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital Ruber Internacional.
FAU - Gil-Nagel, Antonio
AU - Gil-Nagel A
AD - Epilepsy Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital Ruber Internacional.
FAU - Campo, Pablo
AU - Campo P
AD - Department of Basic Psychology, Autonoma University of Madrid.
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Webcasts
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160222
PL - United States
TA - Neuropsychology
JT - Neuropsychology
JID - 8904467
SB - IM
MH - Adult
MH - Anomia/*diagnosis/pathology/*psychology
MH - Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe/*diagnosis/pathology/*psychology
MH - Female
MH - Hippocampus/*pathology
MH - Humans
MH - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH - Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Sclerosis/diagnosis/pathology/psychology
MH - Semantics
MH - Spain
MH - Temporal Lobe/*pathology
EDAT- 2016/02/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/18 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/23 06:00
PHST- 2016/02/23 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/02/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/18 06:00 [medline]
AID - 2016-09362-001 [pii]
AID - 10.1037/neu0000269 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - Neuropsychology. 2016 Oct;30(7):841-52. doi: 10.1037/neu0000269. Epub 2016
Feb
22.

PMID- 26890745
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20161220
LR - 20161230
IS - 1875-8908 (Electronic)
IS - 1387-2877 (Linking)
VI - 51
IP - 2
DP - 2016
TI - Non-Verbal Episodic Memory Deficits in Primary Progressive Aphasias are
Highly
Predictive of Underlying Amyloid Pathology.
PG - 367-76
LID - 10.3233/JAD-150752 [doi]
AB - Diagnostic distinction of primary progressive aphasias (PPA) remains
challenging,
in particular for the logopenic (lvPPA) and nonfluent/agrammatic (naPPA)
variants. Recent findings highlight that episodic memory deficits appear to
discriminate these PPA variants from each other, as only lvPPA perform poorly
on
these tasks while having underlying amyloid pathology similar to that seen in
amnestic dementias like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most memory tests are,
however,
language based and thus potentially confounded by the prevalent language
deficits
in PPA. The current study investigated this issue across PPA variants by
contrasting verbal and non-verbal episodic memory measures while controlling
for
their performance on a language subtest of a general cognitive screen. A
total of
203 participants were included (25 lvPPA; 29 naPPA; 59 AD; 90 controls) and
underwent extensive verbal and non-verbal episodic memory testing, with a
subset
of patients (n = 45) with confirmed amyloid profiles as assessed by
Pittsburgh
Compound B and PET. The most powerful discriminator between naPPA and lvPPA
patients was a non-verbal recall measure (Rey Complex Figure delayed recall),
with 81% of PPA patients classified correctly at presentation. Importantly,
AD
and lvPPA patients performed comparably on this measure, further highlighting
the
importance of underlying amyloid pathology in episodic memory profiles. The
findings demonstrate that non-verbal recall emerges as the best discriminator
of
lvPPA and naPPA when controlling for language deficits in high load amyloid
PPA
cases.
FAU - Ramanan, Siddharth
AU - Ramanan S
AD - Department of Neurology, Manipal Hospitals, Bangalore, India.
FAU - Flanagan, Emma
AU - Flanagan E
AD - Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia.
FAU - Leyton, Cristian E
AU - Leyton CE
AD - Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia.
AD - Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its
Disorders,
Sydney, NSW, Australia.
AD - Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Villemagne, Victor L
AU - Villemagne VL
AD - The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of
Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
AD - Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Austin Health, Heidelberg,
VIC, Australia.
AD - Department of Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia.
FAU - Rowe, Christopher C
AU - Rowe CC
AD - Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Austin Health, Heidelberg,
VIC, Australia.
AD - Department of Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia.
FAU - Hodges, John R
AU - Hodges JR
AD - Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia.
AD - Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its
Disorders,
Sydney, NSW, Australia.
AD - School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Hornberger, Michael
AU - Hornberger M
AD - Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its
Disorders,
Sydney, NSW, Australia.
AD - Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.
LA - eng
GR - Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL - Netherlands
TA - J Alzheimers Dis
JT - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
JID - 9814863
RN - 0 (2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole)
RN - 0 (Amyloid)
RN - 0 (Aniline Compounds)
RN - 0 (Radiopharmaceuticals)
RN - 0 (Thiazoles)
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Alzheimer Disease/diagnosis/psychology
MH - Amyloid/*metabolism
MH - Aniline Compounds
MH - Aphasia, Primary Progressive/*diagnosis/*psychology
MH - Brain/*diagnostic imaging/*metabolism
MH - Diagnosis, Differential
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Logistic Models
MH - Male
MH - *Memory, Episodic
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Positron-Emission Tomography
MH - Radiopharmaceuticals
MH - Speech Perception
MH - Thiazoles
OTO - NOTNLM
OT - Logopenic progressive aphasia
OT - Pittsburgh Compound B
OT - memory
OT - primary progressive aphasia
OT - progressive nonfluent aphasia
EDAT- 2016/02/19 06:00
MHDA- 2016/12/21 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/19 06:00
PHST- 2016/02/19 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/02/19 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/12/21 06:00 [medline]
AID - JAD150752 [pii]
AID - 10.3233/JAD-150752 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO - J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;51(2):367-76. doi: 10.3233/JAD-150752.

PMID- 26879527
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20161219
LR - 20181113
IS - 2045-2322 (Electronic)
IS - 2045-2322 (Linking)
VI - 6
DP - 2016 Feb 16
TI - Detecting signatures of positive selection associated with musical aptitude
in
the human genome.
PG - 21198
LID - 10.1038/srep21198 [doi]
AB - Abilities related to musical aptitude appear to have a long history in human
evolution. To elucidate the molecular and evolutionary background of musical
aptitude, we compared genome-wide genotyping data (641 K SNPs) of 148 Finnish
individuals characterized for musical aptitude. We assigned signatures of
positive selection in a case-control setting using three selection methods:
haploPS, XP-EHH and FST. Gene ontology classification revealed that the
positive
selection regions contained genes affecting inner-ear development.
Additionally,
literature survey has shown that several of the identified genes were known
to be
involved in auditory perception (e.g. GPR98, USH2A), cognition and memory
(e.g.
GRIN2B, IL1A, IL1B, RAPGEF5), reward mechanisms (RGS9), and song perception
and
production of songbirds (e.g. FOXP1, RGS9, GPR98, GRIN2B). Interestingly,
genes
related to inner-ear development and cognition were also detected in a
previous
genome-wide association study of musical aptitude. However, the candidate
genes
detected in this study were not reported earlier in studies of musical
abilities.
Identification of genes related to language development (FOXP1 and VLDLR)
support
the popular hypothesis that music and language share a common genetic and
evolutionary background. The findings are consistent with the evolutionary
conservation of genes related to auditory processes in other species and
provide
first empirical evidence for signatures of positive selection for abilities
that
contribute to musical aptitude.
FAU - Liu, Xuanyao
AU - Liu X
AD - NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, National
University
of Singapore, Singapore 117456, Singapore.
AD - Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore,
Singapore 117597, Singapore.
FAU - Kanduri, Chakravarthi
AU - Kanduri C
AD - Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, 00014
University of Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Oikkonen, Jaana
AU - Oikkonen J
AD - Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, 00014
University of Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Karma, Kai
AU - Karma K
AD - DocMus Department, University of the Arts Helsinki, P.O. Box 86, 00251
Helsinki,
Finland.
FAU - Raijas, Pirre
AU - Raijas P
AD -
Joensuu Conservatory, Rantakatu 31, 80100 Joensuu, Finland.
FAU -
Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa
AU -
Ukkola-Vuoti L
AD -
Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, 00014
University of Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Teo, Yik-Ying
AU - Teo YY
AD - NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, National
University
of Singapore, Singapore 117456, Singapore.
AD - Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore,
Singapore 117597, Singapore.
FAU - Jarvela, Irma
AU - Jarvela I
AD - Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, 00014
University of Helsinki, Finland.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160216
PL - England
TA - Sci Rep
JT - Scientific reports
JID - 101563288
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Aged
MH - Aged, 80 and over
MH - *Aptitude
MH - Chromosome Mapping
MH - Female
MH - Gene Ontology
MH - *Genome, Human
MH - *Genome-Wide Association Study
MH - Genomics/methods
MH - Humans
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Music
MH - *Selection, Genetic
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC4754774
EDAT- 2016/02/18 06:00
MHDA- 2016/12/20 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/17 06:00
PHST- 2015/09/04 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/01/19 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/02/17 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/02/18 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/12/20 06:00 [medline]
AID - srep21198 [pii]
AID - 10.1038/srep21198 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO - Sci Rep. 2016 Feb 16;6:21198. doi: 10.1038/srep21198.

PMID- 26863023
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20160718
LR - 20181113
IS - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI - 11
IP - 2
DP - 2016
TI - Cultural Adaptation of the Portuguese Version of the "Sniffin' Sticks" Smell
Test: Reliability, Validity, and Normative Data.
PG - e0148937
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0148937 [doi]
AB - The cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Sniffin`Sticks test for
the
Portuguese population is described. Over 270 people participated in four
experiments. In Experiment 1, 67 participants rated the familiarity of
presented
odors and seven descriptors of the original test were adapted to a Portuguese
context. In Experiment 2, the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test was
administered to 203 healthy participants. Older age, male gender and active
smoking status were confirmed as confounding factors. The third experiment
showed
the validity of the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test in
discriminating
healthy controls from patients with olfactory dysfunction. In Experiment 4,
the
test-retest reliability for both the composite score (r71 = 0.86) and the
identification test (r71 = 0.62) was established (p<0.001). Normative data
for
the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test is provided, showing good
validity
and reliability and effectively distinguishing patients from healthy controls
with high sensitivity and specificity. The Portuguese version of
Sniffin`Sticks
test identification test is a clinically suitable screening tool in routine
outpatient Portuguese settings.
FAU - Ribeiro, Joao Carlos
AU - Ribeiro JC
AD - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Coimbra University Hospital (CHUC),
Coimbra,
Portugal.
AD - Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
AD - Centre of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, IBILI, Faculty of Medicine,
University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Simoes, Joao
AU - Simoes J
AD - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Coimbra University Hospital (CHUC),
Coimbra,
Portugal.
AD - Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Silva, Filipe
AU - Silva F
AD - Centre of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, IBILI, Faculty of Medicine,
University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Silva, Eduardo D
AU - Silva ED
AD - Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
AD - Centre of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, IBILI, Faculty of Medicine,
University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Hummel, Cornelia
AU - Hummel C
AD - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Dresden Medical School,
Dresden,
Germany.
FAU - Hummel, Thomas
AU - Hummel T
AD - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Dresden Medical School,
Dresden,
Germany.
FAU - Paiva, Antonio
AU - Paiva A
AD - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Coimbra University Hospital (CHUC),
Coimbra,
Portugal.
AD - Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160210
PL - United States
TA - PLoS One
JT - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB - IM
MH - Adolescent
MH - Adult
MH - Age Factors
MH - Aged
MH - Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
MH - *Culture
MH - Discrimination (Psychology)
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language
MH - Male
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Nonverbal Communication
MH - *Odorants
MH - Olfaction Disorders/*diagnosis/psychology
MH - Perceptual Disorders/*diagnosis/psychology
MH - Portugal
MH - *Recognition (Psychology)
MH - Reproducibility of Results
MH - Sensitivity and Specificity
MH - Sensory Thresholds
MH - Sex Factors
MH - Young Adult
PMC - PMC4749276
EDAT- 2016/02/11 06:00
MHDA- 2016/07/19 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/11 06:00
PHST- 2015/11/02 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/01/24 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/02/11 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/02/11 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/07/19 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0148937 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-15-47768 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - PLoS One. 2016 Feb 10;11(2):e0148937. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0148937.
eCollection 2016.

PMID- 26862915
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20160718
LR - 20181113
IS - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI - 11
IP - 2
DP - 2016
TI - Impaired Retention of Motor Learning of Writing Skills in Patients with
Parkinson's Disease with Freezing of Gait.
PG - e0148933
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0148933 [doi]
AB - BACKGROUND: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and freezing of gait (FOG)
suffer from more impaired motor and cognitive functioning than their non-
freezing
counterparts. This underlies an even higher need for targeted rehabilitation
programs in this group. However, so far it is unclear whether FOG affects the
ability for consolidation and generalization of motor learning and thus the
efficacy of rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hallmarks of motor
learning in people with FOG compared to those without by comparing the
effects of
an intensive motor learning program to improve handwriting. METHODS: Thirty
five
patients with PD, including 19 without and 16 with FOG received six weeks of
handwriting training consisting of exercises provided on paper and on a
touch-sensitive writing tablet. Writing training was based on single- and
dual-task writing and was supported by means of visual target zones. To
investigate automatization, generalization and retention of learning, writing
performance was assessed before and after training in the presence and
absence of
cues and dual tasking and after a six-week retention period. Writing
amplitude
was measured as primary outcome measure and variability of writing and dual-
task
accuracy as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Significant learning effects were
present on all outcome measures in both groups, both for writing under
single-
and dual-task conditions. However, the gains in writing amplitude were not
retained after a retention period of six weeks without training in the
patient
group without FOG. Furthermore, patients with FOG were highly dependent on
the
visual target zones, reflecting reduced generalization of learning in this
group.
CONCLUSIONS: Although short-term learning effects were present in both
groups,
generalization and retention of motor learning were specifically impaired in
patients with PD and FOG. The results of this study underscore the importance
of
individualized rehabilitation protocols.
FAU - Heremans, Elke
AU - Heremans E
AD - Neuromotor Rehabilitation Research Group-Department of Rehabilitation
Sciences-KU, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Nackaerts, Evelien
AU - Nackaerts E
AD - Neuromotor Rehabilitation Research Group-Department of Rehabilitation
Sciences-KU, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Vervoort, Griet
AU - Vervoort G
AD - Neuromotor Rehabilitation Research Group-Department of Rehabilitation
Sciences-KU, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Broeder, Sanne
AU - Broeder S
AD - Neuromotor Rehabilitation Research Group-Department of Rehabilitation
Sciences-KU, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Swinnen, Stephan P
AU - Swinnen SP
AD - Movement Control and Neuroplasticity Research Group-Department of
Kinesiology-KU,
Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Nieuwboer, Alice
AU - Nieuwboer A
AD - Neuromotor Rehabilitation Research Group-Department of Rehabilitation
Sciences-KU, Leuven, Belgium.
LA - eng
PT - Comparative Study
PT - Journal Article
PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20160210
PL - United States
TA - PLoS One
JT - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Agraphia/*etiology/rehabilitation
MH - Auditory Perception
MH - Biomechanical Phenomena
MH - Cues
MH - Female
MH - Gait Disorders, Neurologic/*etiology/physiopathology
MH - Hand/physiopathology
MH - Humans
MH - Learning Disorders/*etiology/physiopathology
MH - Male
MH - Memory Disorders/*etiology/physiopathology
MH - Middle Aged
MH - *Motor Skills
MH - Parietal Lobe/physiopathology
MH - Parkinson Disease/*complications/physiopathology/psychology/rehabilitation
MH - Psychomotor Performance/physiology
MH - Retention (Psychology)/*physiology
MH - *Writing
PMC - PMC4749123
EDAT- 2016/02/11 06:00
MHDA- 2016/07/19 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/11 06:00
PHST- 2015/12/04 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/01/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/02/11 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/02/11 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/07/19 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0148933 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-15-52795 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO - PLoS One. 2016 Feb 10;11(2):e0148933. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0148933.
eCollection 2016.

PMID- 26860719
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20161219
LR - 20161230
IS - 1576-6578 (Electronic)
IS - 0210-0010 (Linking)
VI - 62
IP - 4
DP - 2016 Feb 16
TI - [Neuropsychological study in patients with Parkinson's disease: the effects
of
deep brain stimulation].
PG - 152-6
AB - INTRODUCTION: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a disorder whose clinical
manifestations are observed in the motor and neuropsychological domain and
have
an impact on the patient's quality of life. Several scientific studies
evidence
the effectiveness of deep brain stimulation as treatment for the motor
symptoms,
but further research is required on the neuropsychological symptoms. AIM: To
analyse the existence of significant differences in neuropsychological
processes,
such as attention, memory, language, visuoperception and the executive
functions
in patients with PD prior to and following deep brain stimulation. PATIENTS
AND
METHODS: Our sample consisted of 20 patients of both sexes, aged 50-70 years,
with PD, who were treated by healthcare service providers in Medellin. These
subjects were administered the Continuous Performance Test and the Trail
Making
Test in order to assess attention, the Rey Complex Figure and Ardila memory
tests
to evaluate memory, the Boston and verbal fluency tests to assess language,
the
Rey Complex Figure Copy test for visuoperception, and the Wisconsin Card
Sorting
Test to appraise the executive functions. RESULTS: There are significant
differences between the scores before and after deep brain stimulation in
patients with PD on attention and memory. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of these
findings is relevant for the neuropsychological therapy of patients with PD.
FAU - de la Pena, Cristina
AU - de la Pena C
AD - Universidad de La Rioja, Logrono, Espana.
FAU - Fernandez-Medina, Juliana M
AU - Fernandez-Medina JM
AD - Instituto de Neurociencias y Neurorrehabilitacion Aplicada y Funcional,
Medellin,
Colombia.
FAU - Parra-Bolanos, Nicolas
AU - Parra-Bolanos N
AD - Instituto de Neurociencias y Neurorrehabilitacion Aplicada y Funcional,
Medellin,
Colombia.
FAU - Martinez-Restrepo, Oscar A
AU - Martinez-Restrepo OA
AD - Instituto de Neurociencias y Neurorrehabilitacion Aplicada y Funcional,
Medellin,
Colombia.
LA - spa
PT - Journal Article
TT - Estudio neuropsicologico en pacientes parkinsonianos: efectos de la
estimulacion
cerebral profunda.
PL - Spain
TA - Rev Neurol
JT - Revista de neurologia
JID - 7706841
SB - IM
MH - Aged
MH - Attention
MH - *Deep Brain Stimulation/psychology
MH - Executive Function
MH - Female
MH - Humans
MH - Language Disorders/etiology/therapy
MH - Male
MH - Memory Disorders/etiology/therapy
MH - Middle Aged
MH - Neuropsychological Tests
MH - Parkinson Disease/*psychology/therapy
MH - Speech Disorders/etiology/therapy
MH - Treatment Outcome
MH - Visual Perception
EDAT- 2016/02/11 06:00
MHDA- 2016/12/20 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/11 06:00
PHST- 2016/02/11 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/02/11 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/12/20 06:00 [medline]
AID - rn2015432 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO - Rev Neurol. 2016 Feb 16;62(4):152-6.

PMID- 26844420
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20160811
LR - 20160404
IS - 1096-0953 (Electronic)
IS - 0013-9351 (Linking)
VI - 147
DP - 2016 May
TI - Associations among environmental exposure to manganese, neuropsychological
performance, oxidative damage and kidney biomarkers in children.
PG - 32-43
LID - 10.1016/j.envres.2016.01.035 [doi]
LID - S0013-9351(16)30033-0 [pii]
AB - Environmental exposure to manganese (Mn) results in several toxic effects,
mainly
neurotoxicity. This study investigated associations among Mn exposure,
neuropsychological performance, biomarkers of oxidative damage and early
kidney
dysfunction in children aged 6-12 years old. Sixty-three children were
enrolled
in this study, being 43 from a rural area and 20 from an urban area.
Manganese
was quantified in blood (B-Mn), hair (H-Mn) and drinking water using
inductively
coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The neuropsychological functions
assessed were attention, perception, working memory, phonological awareness
and
executive functions - inhibition. The Intelligence quotient (IQ) was also
evaluated. The biomarkers malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls (PCO),
delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D), reactivation indexes with
dithiothreitol (ALA-RE/DTT) and ZnCl2 (ALA-RE/ZnCl2), non-protein thiol
groups,
as well as microalbuminuria (mALB) level and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase
(NAG) activity were assessed. The results demonstrated that Mn levels in
blood,
hair and drinking water were higher in rural children than in urban children
(p<0.01). Adjusted for potential confounding factors, IQ, age, gender and
parents' education, significant associations were observed mainly between B-
Mn
and visual attention (beta=0.649; p<0.001). Moreover, B-Mn was