Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 2

HOW TRAINING MATERIAL 2010/11    SESSION 4 

THE KNEE 

HISTORY 
 Pain: anterior knee , diffuse(degenerative or inflammatory disorders) or localized(mechanical disorder especially after 
injury.(maybe with remembrance of mechanism by patient) 
 Swelling: Localized or diffuse.  Time of appearance(immediately: heamarthrosis , or late: torn of meniscus). Chronic: 
synovitis or arthritis. 
 Stiffness: fluctuates? When it feels worse or better?  (early morning stiffness: inflammatory; stiffness after period of 
inactivity: osteoarthristis)  
 ‘Locking’: torn meniscus or loose body. (Unlocking: Obstructing objects has moved and joint can now move freely 
again.) 
 Deformity: unilateral or bilateral = valgus or varus, fixed flexion or hyperextension. (knock‐knees and bandy‐legs 
common in children and heal spontaneously when grown up) 
 Giving way: due to muscles weakness or mechanical disorder(torn meniscus or faulty patellar extensor mechanism) 
 Loss of function: diminishing walking distance, inability to run and difficulty going up and down steps. 

P/S: could be referred pain from hip disorder. 

SIGN WITH PATIENT UPRIGHT 

 Valgus or varus deformity 
 Walking pattern 
 
SIGN WIH PATIENT LYING SUPINE 

 Look 
 Position of knee: valgus or varus, partially flexed or hyperextended. 
 Swelling 
 Scars or sinuses , small lumps 
 Wasting of quadriceps(sign of joint disorder) 
 Visual impression measuring the girth of thigh at same level in each limb: fixed distance above the joint line or 
a hand’s breadth above the patella 
 
 Feel 
 Warmth comparison between 2 knees.  
 Temperature gradient by hand running down the limb( N: linear decrease in warmth from proximal to distal). 
 soft tissues and bony outlines for abnormal outlines and localized tenderness: knee is bent and examiner sits 
on the edge of couch facing the knee; place both hands over the front of knee to trace with fingers the 
anatomical outlines of joint margins, patellar ligament, collateral ligaments, iliotibial band and pes anserinus. 
Then, the knee is placed flat on couch and the edges of patellofemoral joint are palpated while pushing the 
patella first to one side then to other. 
 Synovial thickening is appreciated by placing knee in extension, grasp the edges of patella in a pincher made 
of thumb and middle finger, and tries to life the patella forwards ( N: grasp easily firmly; if thickened 
synovium it will slip off the edges of patella) 
 
 Move 
 Knee is flexed until the calf meets the ham, and extends completely with a snap (crepitus: sign of 
patellofemoral degeneration or wear). 
 
 
 
HOW TRAINING MATERIAL 2010/11    SESSION 4 
 Test of intra‐articular fluid 
a) Cross‐fluctuation (only with large joint effusion):hand compresses and empties the suprapatellar pouch while 
the right hand straddles the front of the oint below the patella; by squeezing with each hand alternatively, a 
fluid impulse is transmitted across the joint. 
b) Pattelar tap: suprapatellar pouch is compressed with the left hand, while the index finger of right hand 
pushes the patella sharply backwards. Positive test:  patella can be felt striking the femur and bouncing off 
again. 
c) Bulge test (useful when very little fluid is present): medial compartment is emptied by pressing n that side of 
the joint whilst at the same time the suprapatellar pouch is kept closed by the other hand; the first hand is 
then lifted away from the medial side and moved to the lateral side, which is then sharply compressed; a 
distinct ripple is seen on the flattened medial surface. 
d) Patellar hollow test: hollow appears lateral to patellar ligament when normal knee is flexed, and disappears 
with further flexion; with excess fluid, the hollow fills and disappears at a lesser angle of flexion. 
 
 Patellar test 
a) Patellar friction test: pain elicited by rubbing patella against the femoral trochlea or by pressing against 
patella and ask patient to contract quadriceps muscles. 
b) Apprehension test( diagnostic of recurrent patellar subluxation or dislocation): pressing the patella laterally 
with thumb while flexing the knee slightly may induce intense anxiety and resistance to further movement. 
 
 Test for ligamentous stability 
a) Medial and lateral ligaments: stressing the knee into valgus and varus by tucking patient’s foot under your 
arm and supporting the knee firmly with one hand on each side of joint; the leg is then angulated 
alternatively towards abduction and adduction. The test is perfomed at 30 degrees of flexion and again at full 
extension. ( torn or stretched collateral ligament if there is excessive angle with mediolateral movement) 
b) Cruciate ligaments: examine for abnormal gliding movement in AP plane. With both flexed 90 degrees and 
the feet resting on the couch, the upper tibia is inspected from the side; 
 if it’s upper end has dropped back, or can be gently pushed back, this indicates a tear of the posterior 
cruciate ligament(the ‘sag’ sign).  
 With the knee in the same position, foot is anchored by the examiner sitting on it (provided it is not 
painful); then using both hands, the upper end of the tibia is grasped firmly and rocked backwards 
and forwards to see if there is any AP glide (the drawer test) [p/s: make sure the hamstring is 
relaxed]. 
1. Positive anterior drawer sign: anterior cruciate laxity 
2. Positive posterior drawer sign: posterior cruciate laxity 
 
 Lachman test: patient’s knee is flexed 20 degrees; with one hand grasping the lower thigh and the 
other upper part of leg, the joint surfaces are shifted backwards and forwards upon each other. If 
the knee is stable, there should be no gliding. 
 
SIGN WITH PATIENT LYING PRONE 
 Scars or lumps in popliteal fossa 
 Swelling( midline: bulging capsule or one side: bursa) 
 Baker cyst 
 Palpable lump , pulsatile? Emptied into joint? 
 Appley’s test:  
a) Knee is flexed to 9‐ degrees and rotated while a compression force is applied. (grinding test: if a meniscus is 
torn).   
b) Distraction test: rotation is then repeated while the leg is pulled upwards with the surgeon’s knee holding the 
thigh down, producing increased pain if only there is ligament damage.