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PHYSICS I

DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE

ACTIVITY 1

FAMILIARIZATION OF APPARATUS AND


INSTRUMENTS USED IN PHYSICS LABORATORY

I. OBJECTIVE
1. To be familiar with the different apparatus and instruments used in Physics laboratory.

II. THEORY
Physics is both an experimental and a theoretical science. Much of the theories are
based on detailed experimental measurements. It would not be easy for scientist to
determine any quantities without the aid of different laboratory instruments.
Physics laboratory equipments comprise the various equipments, instruments,
apparatuses used to perform experiments in different branches of physics. Physics
laboratory equipments are needed and used in schools, colleges, research laboratories and
many other places where physics is studied and researched upon. The different disciplines
of physics are proved through experiments in a physics laboratory.

III. MATERIALS
Pencil Ruler
Eraser Different Apparatus in Physics

IV. PROCEDURE
1. Identify and sketch the apparatus that will be shown by your instructor.
2. Give the uses, description or principle of operations of each apparatus.

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PHYSICS I
DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE

DATA SHEET

ACTIVITY 1
FAMILIARIZATION OF APPARATUS AND
INSTRUMENTS USED IN PHYSICS LABORATORYORATORY

Name: _______________________________________ Date Performed: __________________


Course/Year/Section: ___________________________ Date Submitted: ___________________
Group No.: ___________________ Laboratory Instructor: _______________________________

DATA AND RESULTS:

Drawing Name Functions/Description

Ruler

Meter Stick

Steel Tape/ Tape


Measure

Triple Beam Balance

Spring Balance

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PHYSICS I
DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE

Drawing Name Functions/Description

Top Loading Balance

Vernier Caliper

Micrometer Caliper

Force Table

Model Balance

Set of Weights

Weight Hanger

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PHYSICS I
DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE

Drawing Name Functions/Description

Super Pulley

Dynamic Track

Dynamic Cart

Stopwatch/ Timer

Iron Stand

Projectile Launcher/Toy
Gun

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PHYSICS I
DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE

Drawing Name Functions/Description

Measurement Specimen

Atwood’s Machine

Angle Indicator

Protractor

GUIDE QUESTIONS:

1. Why do we need to be familiar with the different apparatus in laboratory?


2. How can we maintain the good condition of laboratory apparatus?

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PHYSICS I
DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE

EXPERIMENT 1

UNITS AND MEASUREMENT

I. OBJECTIVES
1. To learn and identify quantities and their relation.
2. To compare measurements in metric and English system.
3. To measure various dimensions of an object using ruler, vernier caliper and micrometer
caliper
4. To determine the volume and density of different materials

II. THEORY
Physics is an experimental science. Experiments require measurements and we
used numbers to describe the results of our measurements. Any numbers that is used to
measure quantitatively is called physical quantity.
When we measure quantity, we always compare it to some reference standard
which defines the unit of the quantity. To make the measurement accurate and reliable,
we need units of measurement that can be duplicated by observers in different locations.
The system of units commonly used is called metric system, but since 1960 it has been
known officially as International System or SI. Another system is the English system where
we used foot, pounds, etc.
Physical quantities can be basic like mass, length, time, etc. Combining two or more
of the basic quantities will result to derived quantities like area, volume, density, speed,
etc.

III. MATERIALS
1 Vernier Caliper 1 Micrometer Caliper
1 Ruler 1 Triple Beam Balance
1 Metal Ball 1 Spring Balance
1 Metal Block

IV. PROCEDURE
A. Determining the mass and weight
1. Prepare metal block and metal ball as specimens.
2. Using the triple beam balance, measure the mass of each specimen in grams.
3. Using a spring balance, determine the weight of each specimen in Newton.
Determine the mass by converting Newton into grams.

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PHYSICS I
DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE

___ N
g= x 1000
9.8m/s2
4. Compare the mass obtained in steps 1 and 2. Compute for the percent difference.
Record your data.
mass(spring balance) - mass(triple beam balance)
% difference = x 100
 mass(spring balance) + mass(triple beam balance) 
 
 2 
B. Determining area and volume
1. Measure carefully the side of the metal block using ruler. Take the reading in inch.
2. Repeat the measurement using the vernier caliper in centimeter.
3. Find the ratio of an inch to a centimeter and compare with the accepted ratio.
Compute for the percent error.
computed ratio - accepted ratio
% error = x 100
accepted ratio
4. Compute for the area and volume using both system of measurement. Compare
with the accepted ratio and compute for the percent error.
5. Repeat steps 1 to 4 but this time use a metal ball and measure its diameter.
6. Record your data.

C. Determining density
1. Transfer your data on mass and volume to the last table. Choose the most precise
data. Use the reading in triple beam balance and in vernier caliper.
2. Compute the experimental density. Compare with the accepted density.
mass,m
Experimental density =
volume,V
3. Record your data.

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PHYSICS I
DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE

DATA SHEET

EXPERIMENT 1
UNITS AND MEASUREMENT

Name: _______________________________________ Date Performed: __________________


Course/Year/Section: ___________________________ Date Submitted: ___________________
Group No.: ___________________ Laboratory Instructor: _______________________________

DATA AND RESULTS:

A. Determining mass and weight


Mass
Triple beam
Spring balance Percentage
Specimen balance
Difference
Weight
Mass (grams) Mass (grams)
(Newtons)
Block
Ball

B. Determining Area and Volume


Block
Ruler Vernier Computed True Percent
Dimensions
(inch) Caliper (cm) Ratio Ratio Error
Length 1 : 2.54
Width 1 : 2.54
Thickness 1 : 2.54
Area 1 : 6.45
Volume 1 : 16.39

Ball
Ruler Micrometer Computed True Percent
Dimensions
(inch) Caliper (cm) Ratio Ratio Error
Diameter 1 : 2.54
Volume 1 : 16.39

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PHYSICS I
DE LA SALLE HEALTH SCIENCES INSTITUTE

C. Determining density
Accepted
Mass Volume Experimental Percent
Specimen Density
(grams) (cm3) Density (g/cm3) Error
(g/cm3)
Block
Ball

GUIDE QUESTIONS:
1. Convert your mass in lb to kg.
2. Convert your age from years to days.
3. What are the factors that determine the density of an object?

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