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A STUDY ON CAPITAL BUDGETING WITH REFERENCE TO PICASTRA

LOGISTICS

ABSTRACT

The key function of the financial management is the selection of the most
profitable assortment of capital investment and it is the most important area of decision
making of the financial manger because any action taken by the manger in this area
affects the working and the profitability of the firm for many years to come.

The objective of the research is to study on the company's forecasting decision


through Capital budgeting technique through which the importance of capital budgeting
in an organization and to analyze the capital budgeting process to be adopted by the
company in order to take better investment decisions for various business projects.

Further, it caters information about cash inflows and outflows of various years.
Thus the comparison provides clear idea about investments and return on the same which
can be helpful for the years to come.

The analyses have been done by the data collected from income and expenditure
statements and separate investment report. Capital budgeting techniques like Net Present
Value method, Rate of Return method and Payback Period method are used to analyze the
collected data. Some other forecasting tools like standard deviation, Correlation analysis
and Trend analysis are used in this study

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER CONTENTS PAGE NO.

NO.

I INTRODUCTION

II COMPANY PROFILE

2.1 Industry Profile

2.2 Company Profile

III REVIEW OF LITERATURE

IV RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

4.1 Statement of the problem

4.2 Need for the study

4.3 Objectives of the study

4.4 Scope of the study

4.5 Research Design

4.6 Limitation of the study

4.7 Methods used for the Study

V DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

VI FINDINGS

VII SUGGESTIONS

VIII CONCLUSION

IX ANNEXURE

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BALANCESHEET

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TABLE CONTENTS

SLNO CONTENTS PAGE NO.

1 PAY BACK PERIOD

2 ACCOUNTING RATE OF RETURN (ARR)

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NET PRESENT VALUE
4 PROFITABILITY INDEX

STANDARD DEVIATION CALCULATION OF


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PROFIT AFTER TAX

STANDARD DEVIATION CALCULATION OF


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INVESTMENT

STANDARD DEVIATION CALCULATION OF


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REVENUE

CORRELATION CALCULATION OF REVENUE


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AND EBIT

CORRELATION CALCULATION OF SALES AND


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PAT

CORRELATION CALCULATION OF REVENUE


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AND EBIT

MEAN AND STANDARD DEVIATION FOR


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EXPENSES

12 TREND ANALYSIS -PAT

13 TREND ANALYSIS - EBIT

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CHART CONTENTS

SLNO CONTENTS PAGE NO.

1 PAY BACK PERIOD

2 ACCOUNTING RATE OF RETURN (ARR)

STANDARD DEVIATION CALCULATION OF


3
PROFIT AFTER TAX

STANDARD DEVIATION CALCULATION OF


4
INVESTMENT

STANDARD DEVIATION CALCULATION OF


5
REVENUE

CORRELATION CALCULATION OF REVENUE


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AND EBIT

CORRELATION CALCULATION OF SALES AND


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PAT

CORRELATION CALCULATION OF REVENUE


8
AND EBIT

MEAN AND STANDARD DEVIATION FOR


9
EXPENSES

10 TREND ANALYSIS -PAT

11 TREND ANALYSIS - EBIT

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CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY

Capital budgeting, which is also called “investment appraisal,” is the planning


process used to determine which of an organization’s long term investments. Capital
budgeting involves choosing projects that add value to the firm. This can involve almost
anything from acquiring a lot of land to purchasing a new truck or replacing old
machinery. Businesses, specifically corporations, are typically required, or at least
recommended, to undertake those projects which will increase profitability and thus
enhance shareholders' wealth.

When a firm is presented with a capital budgeting decision, one of its first tasks is
to determine whether or not the project will prove to be profitable. The net present
value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR) and payback period (PB) methods are the most
common approaches to project selection. Although an ideal capital budgeting solution is
such that all three metrics will indicate the same decision, these approaches will often
produce contradictory results. Depending on managements' preferences and selection
criteria, more emphasis will be put on one approach over another. Nonetheless, there are
common advantages and disadvantage associated with these widely
used valuation methods.

The firm's capital budgeting decision may be comprised of a number of distinct


decisions, each referred to as a project. A capital budgeting is a set of assets that are
contingent on one another and are considered together. Suppose a firm is
considering the production of a new product. It must make a decision of whether or
not to produce this new product. This capital project entails acquiring land, building
facilities, and purchasing production equipment. And this project may also require
the firm to increase its investment in its working capital -- inventory, cash, or
accounts receivable. Working capital is the collection of assets needed for day-to-day
operations that support a firm's long-term investments.

Nature of Capital Budgeting:


Capital budgeting is the process of making investment decisions in capital expenditures.
A capital expenditure may be defined as an expenditure the benefits of which are
expected to be received over period of time exceeding one year.

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The main characteristic of a capital expenditure is that the expenditure is incurred at one
point of time whereas benefits of the expenditure are realized at different points of time in
future. In simple language we may say that a capital expenditure is an expenditure
incurred for acquiring or improving the fixed assets, the benefits of which are expected to
be received over a number of years in future.

The following are some of the examples of capital expenditure:


(1) Cost of acquisition of permanent assets as land and building, plant and machinery,
goodwill, etc.

(2) Cost of addition, expansion, improvement or alteration in the fixed assets.

(3) Cost of replacement of permanent assets.

(4) Research and development project cost, etc.

Capital expenditure involves non-flexible long-term commitment of funds. Thus, capital


expenditure decisions are also called as long term investment decisions. Capital budgeting
involves the planning and control of capital expenditure. It is the process of deciding
whether or not to commit resources to a particular long term project whose benefits are to
be realized over a period of time, longer than one year. Capital budgeting is also known
as Investment Decision Making, Capital Expenditure Decisions, Planning Capital
Expenditure and Analysis of Capital Expenditure.

Charles T. Horngreen has defined capital budgeting as, “Capital budgeting is long term
planning for making and financing proposed capital outlays.”

According to G.C. Philippatos, “Capital budgeting is concerned with the allocation of the
firm’s scarce financial resources among the available market opportunities. The
consideration of investment opportunities involves the comparison of the expected future
streams of earnings from a project with the immediate and subsequent streams of earning
from a project, with the immediate and subsequent streams of expenditures for it”.

Richard and Greenlaw have referred to capital budgeting as acquiring inputs with long-
run return.

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In the words of Lynch, “Capital budgeting consists in planning development of available
capital for the purpose of maximizing the long term profitability of the concern.”

From the above description, it may be concluded that the important features which
distinguish capital budgeting decision from the ordinary day to day business
decisions are:
(1) Capital budgeting decisions involve the exchange of current funds for the benefits to
be achieved in future;

(2) The future benefits are expected to be realized over a series of years;

(3) The funds are invested in non-flexible and long term activities;

(4) They have a long term and significant effect on the profitability of the concern;

(5) They involve, generally, huge funds;

(6) They are irreversible decisions.

(7) They are ‘strategic’ investment decisions, involving large sums of money, major
departure from the past practices of the firm, significant change of the firm’s expected
earnings associated with high degree of risk, as compared to ‘tactical’ investment
decisions which involve a relatively small amount of funds that do not result in a major
departure from the past practices of the firm.

Need and Importance of Capital Budgeting:


Capital budgeting means planning for capital assets.

Capital budgeting decisions are vital to any organisation as they include the
decisions as to:
(a) Whether or not funds should be invested in long term projects such as setting of an
industry, purchase of plant and machinery etc.

(b) Analyze the proposal for expansion or creating additional capacities.

(c) To decide the replacement of permanent assets such as building and equipment’s.

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(d) To make financial analysis of various proposals regarding capital investments so as to
choose the best out of many alternative proposals.

The importance of capital budgeting can be well understood from the fact that an unsound
investment decision may prove to be fatal to the very existence of the concern.

The need, significance or importance of capital budgeting arises mainly due to the
following:
(1) Large Investments:
Capital budgeting decisions, generally, involve large investment of funds. But the funds
available with the firm are always limited and the demand for funds far exceeds the
resources. Hence, it is very important for a firm to plan and control its capital
expenditure.

(2) Long-term Commitment of Funds:


Capital expenditure involves not only large amount of funds but also funds for long-term
or more or less on permanent basis. The long-term commitment of funds increases the
financial risk involved in the investment decision. Greater the risk involved, greater is the
need for careful planning of capital expenditure, i.e. Capital budgeting.

(3) Irreversible Nature:


The capital expenditure decisions are of irreversible nature. Once the decision for
acquiring a permanent asset is taken, it becomes very difficult to dispose of these assets
without incurring heavy losses.

(4) Long-Term Effect on Profitability:


Capital budgeting decisions have a long-term and significant effect on the profitability of
a concern. Not only the present earnings of the firm are affected by the investments in
capital assets but also the future growth and profitability of the firm depends upon the
investment decision taken today. An unwise decision may prove disastrous and fatal to
the very existence of the concern. Capital budgeting is of utmost importance to avoid over
investment or under investment in fixed assets.

(5) Difficulties of Investment Decisions:


The long term investment decisions are difficult to be taken because:

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(i) Decision extends to a series of years beyond the current accounting period,

(ii) Uncertainties of future and

(iii) Higher degree of risk.

(6) National Importance:


Investment decision though taken by individual concern is of national importance because
it determines employment, economic activities and economic growth. Thus, we may say
that without using capital budgeting techniques a firm may involve itself in a losing
project. Proper timing of purchase, replacement, expansion and alternation of assets is
essential.

Limitations of Capital Budgeting:


Capital budgeting techniques suffer from the following limitations:
(1) All the techniques of capital budgeting presume that various investment proposals
under consideration are mutually exclusive which may not practically be true in some
particular circumstances.

(2) The techniques of capital budgeting require estimation of future cash inflows and
outflows. The future is always uncertain and the data collected for future may not be
exact. Obliviously the results based upon wrong data may not be good.

(3) There are certain factors like morale of the employees, goodwill of the firm, etc.,
which cannot be correctly quantified but which otherwise substantially influence the
capital decision.

(4) Urgency is another limitation in the evaluation of capital investment decisions.

(5) Uncertainty and risk pose the biggest limitation to the techniques of capital budgeting.

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CHAPTER II

INDUSTRY PROFILE

Industry Profile

The contribution from the movement of goods including freight transportation and
storage is about 90 per cent. Aggregate freight traffic is estimated at about 2-2.3 trillion
tonne kilometres. Road dominates the mode of freight transport mix and constitutes about
60 per cent of the total freight traffic. Rail and coastal shipping account for about 32 per
cent and 7 per cent, respectively, while the share of inland waterways transportation and
air is less than 1 per cent each.

Warehousing comprises industrial and agricultural storage. Of the total warehousing


space of about 1,800 million sq ft, the industrial and agricultural segments constitute
about 86 per cent and 14 per cent, respectively. Government organisations including Food
Corporation of India, Central Warehousing Corporation and the state warehousing
corporations account for about two-thirds of the agricultural warehousing segment1.
Warehousing also includes cold storage, comprising over 5,300 units; most of which are
concentrated in the states of Uttar Pradesh, Punjab and West Bengal. According to the
Ministry of Agriculture, at present, the cold chain capacity is about 9 million tonnes.

Logistics management is increasingly becoming a topic of interest among academia and


practitioners, since it may lead to reduced operational costs, improved delivery
performance and increased customer satisfaction levels. The global logistics industry is
estimated to be worth USD 300 billion. Though most of the large service providers are
headquartered in Europe, the biggest market is the US, which captures about one-third of
the world market. The global logistics industry is characterized by high costs of
operations, low margins, shortage of talent, infrastructural bottlenecks, demand from
clients for investing in technology and providing one-stop solutions to all their needs, and
consolidation through acquisitions, mergers and alliances. The logistics industry in India
is evolving rapidly and it is the interplay of infrastructure, technology and new types of
service providers that will define whether the industry is able to help its customers reduce

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their logistics costs and provide effective services (which are also growing). Changing
government policies on taxation and regulation of service providers are going to play an
important role in this process. Coordination across various government agencies requires
approval from multiple ministries and is a road block for multi modal transport in India.
At the firm level, the logistics focus is moving towards reducing cycle times in order to
add value to their customers. Consequently, better tools and strategies are being sought by
firms in order to enhance their decision making. In this paper, we provide a perspective
on these issues, outline some of the key challenges with the help of secondary
information, and describe some interesting initiatives that some are required to compete
through excellence in managing their logistics.

The Shipping and Logistics industry is in the mature phase of its life cycle, and will
continue growing in the coming years as the economy continues to expand. According to
IBIS World, the industry is expected to increase at an annualized rate of 2.6% until 2022.
As a whole, the industry has displayed a concerted effort to improve operating
efficiencies- to flexibly and quickly deliver goods and services to customers; growth,
therefore, is the result of larger firms acquiring and consolidating smaller players.
In recent years, the trend of consolidation has increased due in large part to increasing
external competition. Customer expectations are on the rise. As businesses and
individuals grow accustomed to today’s on-demand culture, shipping and logistics
companies face ever growing pressure to deliver goods and better service at lower costs.
While the industry currently faces increased competition from new market entrants using
similar business models, the sector has and will experience even greater pressure from the
very firms that supply its demand: the manufacturing, wholesale, retail, and warehousing
segments.

Increasingly, many customers are asking suppliers and manufacturers to deliver products
only when needed-reducing inventory on hand and freeing up capital to invest elsewhere.
For both 3PL and vertically integrated operations, technology has played a crucial role in
developing competitive business strategies. Surges e-commerce sales has caused an
increase in demand for items that must be warehoused, packed, and delivered efficiently.
As such, larger firms within the industry have sought to acquire tech start-ups to increase
their technological advantage in the marketplace. Suppliers and manufacturers must

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create or implement logistics software tools to optimize daily activities and handle the
routing and storage of inventory to meet each customer’s delivery requirements.

RISKS
According to major shipping and logistics firms, the main industry-specific risks are:
general economic conditions, changing commodity prices, the capital-intensive nature of
existing business models, increasing competition, changes in relationships with
customers, and changes in technology.

General Economic Conditions & Changing Commodity Prices


The industry is particularly susceptible to changes in macro-economic market conditions.
Demand for logistics services arises from the confidence and strength of clients’
businesses. Because of this, shipping and logistics demand may begin to wane before
market contractions, and will experience downward pressure for a short time after the
market recovers. Fuel prices are a major cost driver for the industry; the slightest changes
in commodity prices would adversely affect each firm’s profitability. Those firms relying
heavily on debt will be adversely affected by the Trump Administration’s proposed tax
plan. If implemented, a businesses’ ability to deduct interest from their taxes would be
capped at 30% of earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. Strong
consumption levels and trade growth will help increase freight demand; President
Trump’s nationalist stance on trade, backing out of NAFTA, and other political moves
will affect the industry.

Capital-Intensive Business Models, Increasing Competition & Changing Customer


Relationships

Many firms within the industry make significant investments into trailers, rental trucks,
etc.; These investments are typically made based off of near term forecasted customer
demand. As other retailers and other firms have sought to vertically integrate logistics
functions into their firms, traditional logistics firms who rely on a small number of
customers might be forced to write down those investments.

Changes in Technology

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Tesla, Toyota, U.S. Xpress, and Ryder have all made investments in alternative-energy
trucking solutions. However, some competitors are thinking outside the box to increase
profit margins. As such, existing players will need to acquire or develop similar
technologies to stay competitive. Belgian Post Office is currently testing the delivery of
shipments by private individuals. Its new app ‘bringr’ utilize s a crowdsource model to
connect manufacturers with self-employed couriers. In the U.S., tech companies like
Dolly and UberRUSH offer express services by connecting registered drivers directly
with clients.

OPPORTUNITIES
The main beneficiaries of these digitization and customer-centric trends are the firms who
are likely to gain market share through the purchase of smaller businesses, and increase
efficiency through the development or acquisition of tech start-ups. New entrants to the
industry are developing new business models to create value for their companies, without
the asset-heavy balance sheets and capital-intensive nature currently burdening logistics
companies.
The transition of companies toward providing vertically integrated logistics services has
placed pressure on large industry players to compete; These firms must increasingly
expand their logistics offerings, meaning that major providers in the U.S., such as FedEx,
U.S Xpress, Ryder, and others will continue to expand via acquisition.

Retailers and manufacturers looking to bring logistics in-house will need to acquire both
the infrastructure and the technology to run processes efficiently. Both 3PL and in-house
providers who intelligent use of technology to reduce costs via the automation of
processes will succeed in tomorrow’s marketplace. These firms need access to
technological innovation to maintain a competitive edge. Sustaining innovations in
technology could help firms manage their daily activities more efficiently, plan routes
more effectively, and decrease costs.

As computing becomes more ubiquitous, companies will be able to realize economies of


scale resulting from the direct increase in computing power. Big data within the supply
chain will create various opportunities; the gathering of data, analyzing existing
information to solve problems, sensing customer demand and respond quickly,
developing proprietary IP, etc. In 2017, market players increasingly turned toward the

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utilization of block chain to create such efficiencies. At its core, block chain is a ledger
technology that enables efficient and transparent exchange of data. The early
implementers of block chain will be large companies with vertically integrated logistics
operations that have a complex ecosystem comprising various interactions between
people and things. A transparent ledger such as block chain would improve an
organizations ability to track and trace shipments, and serialize products.

The trends and risks within the shipping and logistics industry will foster a healthy M&A
environment moving forward. In addition to traditional bolt-on acquisitions, 3PL and in-
house providers need software companies that offer scalable platforms for crowd-sharing,
technology routing, and smart warehousing solutions. Investment banks that position
themselves to provide advisory services catered to meet the industry’s need for
consolidation and innovation are sure to do well.

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COMPANY PROFILE

Picastra Logistics is your one stop shop - solution and your cargo to be delivered in a
timely manner. Logistic Companies have successfully revolutionized the freight services
in India. The company’s team of experienced logistics experts will give updates during
the product movement process. The company will complete the long paper-work, follow
up with the crew to find out the present position of the item and then going through the
tedious system of the respective port after reaching the destination.

Once the clients have contacted the team of freight professionals will get the privilege of
selecting the most efficient cargo delivery option to experience Shipping Project work
India at an affordable rate. Clients can comfortably choose between the air or ship freight
and get the products delivered as early as possible. Team is known for helping the ship
your product at any place in the world. The best thing about the services is that, clients
will get continuous update about the product position. This Project Movement India
service will help in timely customs clearance and then delivers the merchandise within
the deadline. The staffs are well trained and they offer a myriad of services from which
you may select the most suited one.

The freight option allows to select from the list of services, namely door to door services,
Air freight, import & export services, documentation handling & processing, insurance,
local air freight, cartage and delivery. Client may even check out the customized ship
freight services and transfer the good to any major international ports around the world.
Contact us as we are reliable and with years of experience ensures safe delivery of the
products within time.
Company believes that business is not measured purely in financial terms. It also believe
that the way they go about achieving their success is as important as success itself.
The Logistics division has strategically located facilities in all capital city ports and
provides road and rail container transport, customs and quarantine services, container
parks, intermodal terminals, warehousing and international freight forwarding.
Detailed information on these services, facility locations and contacts are contained under
the divisional tabs above.
Vision & Values

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They believe that their primary purpose is to connect people and products. Their vision
guides in the efforts to achieve this. And their values articulate what they stand for and
how they will act. Together they keep us focused on what is important: our people , their
customers, our shareholders and their wider community .
It also provides the framework for our mission: to harness our significant resources,
know-how and passion to deliver the optimal logistics solutions for our customers.

Our Vision

Our vision is to be:

 able to provide an unrivalled set of supply chain capabilities


 an integral component of their customer’s success
 a group of businesses that are individually excellent and collectively unbeatable
 creating sustainable value for our shareholders

Our Values

We value:

 integrity and trust


 safety
 continuous improvement
 teamwork
 being open and transparent

Our Core Beliefs

We believe that:

 all injuries are preventable and everyone has a right to go home safely
 people perform best when they are empowered, accountable and recognized
 if they show other people respect, they will be respected
 they will not always get things right and learning from our mistakes is part of their
progress
 how they go about achieving success is as important as success itself

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 they must act ethically and within the law
 Their customer’s success creates our success.

CORPORATE RESPONSUBILITY

They know the role of logistics within local communities is far-reaching - they
understand that the use of human and natural resources in meeting the business needs
impacts the people they work with, the communities we work in and the planet the
inhabit.

While they’re committed to creating sustainable value for their shareholders, they’re also
committed to expanding their business sustainably, with integrity and with respect for the
communities they work in.

SERVICES

Picastra Logistics invented the idea of connecting like port services into one operating
group and as the only Indian company to offer all international and land logistics services
in-house they retain control over the entire process.

At the top of their game, our highly-trained and experienced personnel are experts in their
own right. Competent and of high integrity, they constantly provide creative, innovative
and smart solutions to any shipping request.

Together their individual strengths have helped create a power-packed team who are
always on their toes. They live by the philosophy that the customer comes first, no matter
how demanding the request or how challenging the deadline.

1. Air freight Forwarding

2. Ocean Freight Forwarding

3. Contract Logistics

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4. Supply chain logistics

5. Warehousing & Distribution

6. Transport

7. Multi-Modal Transportation

AIR FREIGHT FORWARDING

We provide special handling services for sensitive freight - high value items, precision
equipment, dangerous goods and temperature controlled transportation.

Air Freight Import


Picastra Logistics offers a comprehensive, worldwide airfreight service, including
coordination of customer’s orders with overseas suppliers, consolidation, confirmation of
dispatch, pre-alert and arrival notices, Customs clearance & delivery.

Air Freight Export


Our team of experienced operators are trained in all aspects of export handling
requirements, including Customs Declaration, Quarantine Permit & Consular document
processing.

OCEAN FREIGHT FORWARDING

Frequent sailing services enable greater flexibility in managing the supply chain.

They offer a wide range of sea freight services, including Full Container Load (FCL) and
Less than Container Load (LCL) consolidation services and project cargo movement,
throughout their global network.

Sea Freight Import


Picastra Logistics offers a comprehensive, worldwide sea freight service, including
coordination of customer’s orders with suppliers, confirmation of dispatch, pre-alert and
arrival notices, Customs clearance & delivery.

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Sea Freight Export
Our experienced export team is well versed in all aspects of export sea freight shipping,
including specialised freight, temperature controlled items, dangerous goods and project
shipments.

CONTRACT LOGISTICS

They combine the skills and experience of our operations managers and supply chain
designers, to design, implement and operate logistics solutions that improve availability
while reducing inventory.

SUPPLY CHAIN LOGISTICS

Picastra Logistics' precise planning, execution and reporting skills set the industry
standard for supply chain logistics solutions. Their team will ascertain your business
goals and challenges and create innovative and cost-effective solutions in line with your
business strategies.

TRANSPORT

Picastra Logistics' 16+ prime movers and extensive range of trailers across all Chennai’s
key ports quickly and effectively move cargo from port to warehouses, retail stores, or
directly to your customer. Plus our outstanding IT capabilities capture and record every
freight movement.

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WAREHOUSING AND DISTRIBUTION

Picastra Logistics is a well-being supplier of Chennai-wide warehousing and distribution


solutions. They offer complete warehousing services including all modes of distributions,
FMCG import specialist services, customs services and an IT system for end-to-end
visibility. Most of their warehouses are located either on the port or at an inland port
location. By location alone, the ports-to-warehouse synergies are the best in the business.

MULTI- MODAL TRANSPORTATION

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This is a service provided under the Supply Chain Management solution tailored to the
specific customers, using a combination of road and rail transportation providing them
with the most cost effective way of moving their raw materials or finished goods.
Currently they are transporting plastic resin, steel billet, feldspar, clinker and gypsum
board.

To support the inter-modal transportation services, Infinity operates a number of


terminals and yards at strategic locations for loading/unloading activities as well as
container storage, servicing and cleaning.

LIQUID BULK PACKAGING

At the Picastra Logistics Group, they realise the need for highly specialised tanks for
liquid bulk packaging. Liquids such as food-based or non-hazardous chemicals and even
solids require a packaging that is durable, convenient and cost-effective.

In a nutshell, our services include:


• Dedicated services, door-to-door shipments, JIT deliveries
• Short and long-term storage
• Providing Spacekraft IBC with both domestic and export shipments of a wide variety of
solid and liquid products

FACILITIES

All Picastra Logistics assets are located to maximise efficiencies for their clients. Picastra
Logistics' multi-user terminals are all strategically located for port shuttles, interstate and
regional rail services. This allows a seamless connection to warehousing, depot and
container park facilities as well as all import and export movements.

And by operating 24/7 in our largest ports they can offer our clients unparalleled
synergies. This comprehensive network of owned facilities.

VALUE ADDED SERVICES

LEAD LOGISTICS PROVIDER

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As a Lead Logistics Provider we rely on our superior Information and Communication
Technology and our specialized resources to handle the extended supply chain and the
challenges of multiple suppliers and service providers across the globe.

ADVISORY AND CONSULTATION


They provide expert Advisory and Consultation in matters related to Customs formalities,
Certifications and Approvals by Other Governmental Agencies in all Export and Import
shipments. Together with their partners, they are able to do consultation on Project
Shipment, Cargo handling and transportation.

END TO END

Our End to End service provide peace of mind to the customers knowing that their cargo
would be picked up at their premises and delivered right up to their customers doorsteps.
They ensure the security and the integrity of the cargo and take care of the Customs
formalities from point of origin to the point of destination.

INTEGRATION

They believe in Integration to integrate their 8 core business effortlessly to serve and
meet the specific requirements of the customers. Customers should be able to enjoy a
seamless service through a single window from the rather than having to run around
communicating with various channels just to find out the status of the delivery.

TECHNOLOGY

Our state-of-the-art technology system provides unparalleled real-time, 24/7 tracking and
status. The technology we offer includes:

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 GPS-based Geofence technology

 Transport and warehouse visibility system

 Global track and trace system

Picastra Logistics operates one national system for all landside business operations. It is
updated in real time for 24/7 online tracking. Freight is tracked in real time with status
messages sent automatically based on Geofences and without driver activation. Any
customer can enjoy B2B interfaces on their operating systems with real-time data
updates.

SMART IN MOTION

Exceeding expectations by delivering extraordinary results

Picastra Logistics has a formidable track record in developing Smart supply chain
solutions for local and global clients across a multitude of industries. And by Smart a
mean sustainable, measurable, adaptable, resourceful and transformational solutions.
Solutions that drive performance, productivity and profitability.

They do this by forming powerful partnerships with their clients. By aligning their supply
chain to their business strategy. They identify hidden problems by knowing what to look
for and where to find them. They then integrate and harness the collective capabilities of
their supply chain, transforming them into profitable business opportunities.

By thinking and working smart, they’ve developed a new breed of sustainable supply
chains that are more efficient, effective, flexible and responsive to ever changing market
needs.

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CHAPTER III

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

CONCEPTUAL REVIEW

Capital as Limited Resource

The foremost importance is that the capital is a limited resource which is true of
any form of capital, whether it is raised through debt or equity. The firms always face the
constraint of capital rationing. This may result in the selection of less profitable
investment proposals if the budget allocation and utilization is the primary consideration.
So the management should make a careful decision whether a particular project is
economically acceptable and within the specified limits of the investments to be made
during a specified period of time. In the case of more than one project, management must
identify the combination of investment projects that will contribute to the value of the
firm and profitability. This, in essence, is the basis of capital budgeting.

In the form of either debt or equity, capital is a very limited resource. There is a
limit to the volume of credit that the banking system can create in the economy.
Commercial banks and other lending institutions have limited deposits from which they
can lend money to individuals, corporations, and governments. In addition, the Federal
Reserve System requires each bank to maintain part of its deposits as reserves. Having
limited resources to lend, lending institutions are selective in extending loans to their
customers. But even if a bank were to extend unlimited loans to a company, the
management of that company would need to consider the impact that increasing loans
would have on the overall cost of financing.

In reality, any firm has limited borrowing resources that should be allocated
among the best investment alternatives. One might argue that a company can issue an
almost unlimited amount of common stock to raise capital. Increasing the number of
share of company stock, however, will serve only to distribute the same amount of equity
among a greater number of shareholders. In other words, as the number of shares of a
company increases, the company ownership of the individual stockholder may
proportionally decrease.

24
The argument that capital is a limited resource is true of any form of capital,
whether debt or equity or retained earnings, accounts payable or notes payable, and so on.
Even the best known firm in an industry or a community can increase its borrowing up to
a certain limit. Once this point has been reached, the firm will either be denied more
credit or be charged a higher interest rate, making borrowing a less desirable way to raise
capital.

In capital budgeting, there are a number of different approaches that can be used to
evaluate any given project, and each approach has its own distinct advantages and
disadvantages.

All other things being equal, using internal rate of return (IRR) and net present value
(NPV) measurements to evaluate projects often results in the same findings. However,
there are a number of projects for which using IRR is not as effective as using NPV to
discount cash flows. IRR's major limitation is also its greatest strength: it uses one single
discount rate to evaluate every investment.

Although using one discount rate simplifies matters, there are a number of situations that
cause problems for IRR. If an analyst is evaluating two projects, both of which share a
common discount rate, predictable cash flows, equal risk, and a shorter time horizon, IRR
will probably work. The catch is that discount rates usually change substantially over
time. For example, think about using the rate of return on a T-bill in the last 20 years as a
discount rate. One-year T-bills returned between 1% and 12% in the last 20 years, so
clearly the discount rate is changing.

In reality, any firm has limited borrowing resources that should be allocated among the
best investment alternatives. One might argue that a company can issue an almost
unlimited amount of common stock to raise capital. Increasing the number of share of
company stock, however, will serve only to distribute the same amount of equity among a
greater number of shareholders. In other words, as the number of shares of a company
increases, the company ownership of the individual stockholder may proportionally
decrease.

25
The argument that capital is a limited resource is true of any form of capital,
whether debt or equity or retained earnings, accounts payable or notes payable, and so on.
Even the best known firm in an industry or a community can increase its borrowing up to
a certain limit. Once this point has been reached, the firm will either be denied more
credit or be charged a higher interest rate, making borrowing a less desirable way to raise
capital.

Research comprises defining and redefining problems, formulated hypothesis or


suggested solution, collections, organizing and evaluating data, making deductions and
searching for conclusions and at last carefully testing the conclusions to determine
whether they fit the formulating hypothesis.

Payback Period
Payback period is the time duration required to recoup the investment committed
to a project. Business enterprises following payback period use "stipulated payback
period", which acts as a standard for screening the project.

Computation of Payback Period


When the cash inflows are uniform the formula for payback period is cash outflow
divided by annual cash inflow
Computation of Payback Period
When the cash inflows are uneven, the cumulative cash inflows are to be
arrived at and then the payback period has to be calculated through interpolation.

• Here payback period is the time when cumulative cash inflows are equal to the
outflows.
Payback Reciprocal Rate
The payback period is stated in terms of years. This can be stated in terms of percentage
also. This is the payback reciprocal rate.

Reciprocal of payback period = [1/payback period] x 100

26
Decision Rules
A. Capital Rationing Situation
• Select the projects which have payback periods lower than or equivalent to the
stipulated payback period.
• Arrange these selected projects in increasing order of their respective payback
periods.
• Select those projects from the top of the list till the capital Budget are exhausted.

Decision Rules
C. Mutually Exclusive Projects
In the case of two mutually exclusive projects, the one with a lower payback period is
accepted, when the respective payback periods are less than or equivalent to the stipulated
payback period.
Determination of Stipulated Payback Period

• Stipulated payback period, broadly, depends on the nature of the


business/industry with respect to the product, technology used and speed at
which technological changes occur, rate of product obsolescence etc.

• Stipulated payback period is, thus, determined by the management's capacity


to evaluate the environment vis-a-vis the enterprise's products, markets and
distribution channels and identify the ideal-business design and specify the
time target.

Advantages of Payback Period

• It is easy to understand and apply. The concept of recovery is familiar to every


decision-maker.

• Business enterprises facing uncertainty - both of product and technology - will


benefit by the use of payback period method since the stress in this technique
is on early recovery of investment. So enterprises facing technological
obsolescence and product obsolescence - as in electronics/computer industry -
prefer payback period method.

27
• Liquidity requirement requires earlier cash flows. Hence, enterprises having
high liquidity requirement prefer this tool since it involves minimal waiting
time for recovery of cash outflows as the emphasis is on early recoupment of
investment.
Disadvantages of Payback Period

• The time value of money is ignored. For example, in the case of project

• A Rs.500 received at the end of 2nd and 3rd years is given same weightage.
Broadly a rupee received in the first year and during any other year within the
payback period is given same weight. But it is common knowledge that a rupee
received today has higher value than a rupee to be received in future.

• But this drawback can be set right by using the discounted payback period
method. The discounted payback period method looks at recovery of initial
investment after considering the time value of inflows.

Accounting Rate of Return


Accounting rate of return is the rate arrived at by expressing the average annual
net profit (after tax) as given in the income statement as a percentage of the total
investment or average investment. The accounting rate of return is based on accounting
profits. Accounting profits are different from the cash flows from a project and hence, in
many instances, accounting rate of return might not be used as a project evaluation
decision. Accounting rate of return does find a place in business decision making when
the returns expected are accounting profits and not merely the cash flows.

Computation of Accounting Rate of Return

• The accounting rate of return using total investment. Or Sometimes average rate
of return is calculated by using the following
Formula:
Where average investment = total investment divided by 2

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Decision Rules
A. Capital Rationing Situation

• Select the projects whose rates of return are higher than the cut-off rate
• Arrange them in the declining order of their rate of return and
• Select projects starting from the top of the list till the capital available is
exhausted.

B. No Capital Rationing Situation


Select all projects whose rate of return are higher than the cut-off rate.

C. Mutually Exclusive Projects


Select the one that offers highest rate of return.
Accounting Rate Of Return – Advantages

• It Is Easy To Calculate.
• The Percentage Return Is More Familiar To The Executives.

Accounting Rate of Return – Disadvantages

• The definition of cash inflows is erroneous; it takes into account profit after tax
only. It, therefore, fails to present the true return.

• Definition of investment is ambiguous and fluctuating. The decision could be


biased towards a specific project, could use average investment to double the rate
of return and thereby multiply the chances of its acceptances.

Net Present Value (NPV)


Net present value of an investment/project is the difference between present value
of cash inflows and cash outflows. The present values of cash flows are obtained at a
discount rate equivalent to the cost of capital.
Computation Of Net Present Value (NPV)

• Let 'b' be the cash outflow in period 't' where t = 0,1,2,....n

29
• 'B' be the present value of cash outflows

• 'c' be the cash inflow in period 't'=0,1,2,........n

• 'C' be the present value of cash inflows

• 'K' be the cost of capital

Computation Of Net Present Value (NPV)

• When the cash outflow is required for only one year i.e., in the present year, then
the Net present value is calculated as follows:

• "I" is the initial investment (cash outflow) required by the project.

Decision Rules

A. "Capital Rationing" situation

Select projects whose NPV is positive or equivalent to zero.


Arrange in the descending order of NPVs.
Select Projects starting from the list till the capital budget allows.

B. "No capital Rationing" Situation

Select every project whose NPV >= 0

C. Mutually Exclusive Projects

Select the one with a higher NPV.

30
Net Present Value (NPV) – Example
Assuming that the cost of capital is 6% for a project involving a lumpsum cash outflow of
Rs.8,200 and cash inflow of Rs.2,000 per annum for 5 years, the Net Present Value
calculations are as follows:
a) Present value of cash outflows Rs.8200 Ins of Technology Madras Indian Institute of

b) Present value of cash inflows

Susan F. Haka, Michigan State University, USA (2010) has studied

“Capital budgeting and investment appraisal” and historical appraisal of the


development of current capital budgeting practices and reviews capital budgeting
academic research. He has explained modern capital budgeting and its processes. In the
late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the industrial revolution was instrumental
in creating demand for capital budgeting processes and techniques. Academic research,
beginning in the late 1940s and early 1950s, is categorized by its focus on appraisal
techniques, individual decision-maker effects, organizational issues, and environmental
factors. Experimental, analytical, agency-based, survey-based, and case-based research is
reviewed. His study concluded with a compilation of issues identified by academic
research and a set of questions that have not yet been addressed.

Davina F. Jacobs (2010) is a senior economist in the Fiscal Affairs Department has done
a research on capital budgeting practices. His study argues that the key challenge in
government budgeting is to define an appropriate balance between current and capital
expenditures. Budgeting for government capital investment also remains not well
integrated into the formal budget preparation process in many countries. Hence, the
research has been prepared with an aim to provide an overview of past and current
budgeting practices for public investment. The study will also provide a comparison
between the budget practices between low-income countries and developed countries and
make a series of recommendations for how to ensure efficient integration of capital
planning and budget management in low-income countries.

Niels Hermes, Peter Smid and Lu Yao (2009) Faculty of Management and
Organization, University of Groningen and Faculty of Economics, University of
Groningen, The Netherlands, have made a study on “Capital budgeting practices: A
comparative study of the Netherlands and China”. The paper compares the use of capital

31
budgeting techniques of Dutch and Chinese firms, using data obtained from a survey
among 250 Dutch and 300 Chinese companies. It aims to analyze the use of capital
budgeting techniques by companies in both countries from a comparative perspective to
see whether economic development matters. The empirical analysis provides evidence
that Dutch Chief Financial Officers on average use more sophisticated capital budgeting
techniques than Chinese CFOs do. At the same, however, the result suggests that the
difference between Dutch and Chinese firms is smaller than expected based upon the
differences in the level of economic development between both countries, at least with
respect to the use of methods of estimating the cost of capital and the use of CAPM as the
method of estimating the cost of equity.

Forecasting for Environmental Decision Making - J. Scott Armstrong

Those making environmental decisions must not only characterize the present, they must
also forecast the future. They must do so for at least two reasons. First, if a no-action
alternative is pursued, they must consider whether current trends will be favorable
or unfavorable in the future. Second, if an intervention is pursued instead, they must
evaluate both its probable success given future trends and its impacts on the human and
natural environment. Forecasting, by which I mean explicit processes
for determining what is likely to happen in the future, can help address each of these
areas. Certain characteristics affect the selection and use of forecasting methods. First, the
concerns of environmental forecasting are often long term, which means that large
changes are likely. Second, environmental trends sometimes interact with one another and
lead to new concerns. And third. Interventions can also lead to unintended changes. This
chapter discusses forecasting methods that are relevant to environmental decision making,
suggests when they are useful, describes evidence on the efficacy of each method, and
provides references so readers can get details about the methods. A key consideration is
whether or not the forecasting methods are designed to assess the outcomes of
interventions. The chapter then examines issues related to presenting forecasts effectively.
Finally, it describes an audit procedure for determining whether the most appropriate
forecasting tools are being used.
A Framework for Forecasting
Figure 1 shows possible forecasting methods and how they relate to one another. The
figure is designed to represent all approaches to forecasting. The methods are organized

32
according to the types of knowledge. As one moves down the chart, the integration of
statistical and judgmental methods increases. Judgmental methods are split into those
involving one’s own behavior in given situations (intentions or role-playing) and expert
opinions. The intentions method asks people how they would act in a given situation.
Role-playing examines how people act in a situation where their actions arc influenced by
a role. Experts can be asked to make predictions about how others will act in given
situations. They can also identify analogous situations, and forecasts can be based on
extrapolations from those situations. Intentions and expert opinions can be quantified by
relating their “predictions” to various causal factors with, for example, regression
analysis. Expectations about one’s own behavior are referred to as conjoint analysis (e.g.,
given alternatives having a bundle of features that have been varied according to
an experimental plan). Expert opinions about the behavior of others (which can also be
based on an experimental design, but are often based on actual data) are referred to as
judgmental bootstrapping

JOURNALS

A Review of the Literature on Capital Budgeting and Investment Appraisal: Past,


Present, and Future Musings

Abstract
This chapter provides a historical appraisal of the development of current capital
budgeting practices and reviews capital budgeting academic research. In the late
eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the industrial revolution was instrumental in
creating demand for capital budgeting processes and techniques. Academic research,
beginning in the late 1940s and early 1950s, is categorized by its focus on appraisal
techniques, individual decision-maker effects, organizational issues, and environmental
factors. Experimental, analytical, agency-based, survey-based, and case-based research is
reviewed. The chapter concludes with a compilation of issues identified by academic
research and a set of questions that have not yet been addressed.

2. Capital Budgeting Theory and Practice: A Review and Agenda for Future
Research

Applied Economics and Finance Vol. 3, No. 2; May 2018

33
Lingesiya Kengatharan1 1Department of Financial Management, University of
Jaffna, Sri Lanka

The main purpose of this research was to delineate unearth lacunae in the extant capital
budgeting theory and practice during the last two decades and ipso facto become
springboard for future scholarships. Web of science search and iCat search were used to
locate research papers published during the last twenty years. Four criteria have been
applied in selection of research papers: be an empirical study, published in English
language, appeared in peer reviewed journal and full text research papers. These papers
were collected from multiple databases including OneFile (GALE), SciVerse
ScienceDirect (Elsevier), Informa - Taylor & Francis (CrossRef), Wiley (CrossRef),
Business (JSTOR), Arts & Sciences (JSTOR), Proquest ,MEDLINE (NLM), and Wiley
Online Library. Search parameters covered capital budgeting, capital budgeting decision,
capital budgeting theory, capital budgeting practices, capital budgeting methods, capital
budgeting models, capital budgeting tools, capital budgeting techniques, capital budgeting
process and investment decision. Thematic text analyses have been explored to analyses
them. Recent studies lent credence on the use of more sophisticated capital budgeting
techniques along with many capital budgeting tools for incorporating risk.
Notwithstanding, it drew a distinction between developed and developing countries.
Moreover, factors impinging on choice of capital budgeting practice were identified, and
bereft of behavioral finance and event study methodological approach were highlighted.
More extensive studies are imperative to build robust knowledge of capital budgeting
theory and practice in the chaotic environment. This research was well thought out in its
design and contributed by stating the known and unknown arena of capital budgeting
during the last two decades. This scholarship facilitates to academics, practitioners, policy
makers, and stakeholders of the company.

Recommendation

Many research scholars criticized that many researches on capital budgeting were opt-
testing the methods of capital budgeting and its practices. They were purely finding that
actual what methods were in practice. However, in practice, there are enormous factors
affecting the capital budgeting practice and it has ―country effect‖ too. In line up with
this argument, this research was well thought out in its design and become springboard
for future research. This study contributed by stating the known and unknown arena of

34
capital budgeting during the last two decades. In the cutting edge technology world, the
way of doing things have been changed and challenging. For example, decision support
system become more prevent in making decision and more advanced technological sphere
penetrates into assessing capital budgeting practices than ever before. Thus, this rese

THEORIES

Stewardship Theory Psaros (2009) states that similar to stakeholder theory, the views of
stewardship theory differ from agency theory. For example, stewardship theory does not
support the view that individuals are utility maximisers and also does not support the
assertion that all business decisions are based on economic considerations only. It asserts
that some business decisions are based on non-economic returns such as those related to
social status in the community. Donaldson and Davis (2003) add that some individuals
are motivated in their decisions by an intrinsic satisfaction in undertaking a task that
challenges them or/and achieving trust from peers and supervisors. The core of
stewardship theory is about how individuals rank their social needs in a community, such
as being accepted and valued by their peers and supervisors. Similar to executive
remuneration or compensation, ‘these needs help align the individual’s interests with their
organisation’s goals’. If the organisation maintains a good relationship with the
stakeholders, including the local community, individuals would want to make decisions
that identify them with the organisation because that would help promote their social
status in the community. If the individuals rank social status high on their list of needs,
then it would help them perform harder to achieve the organisation’s goal. Psaros (2009)
asserts that stewardship theory states that managers do not start out with the intention of
maximising their own utility at the expense of the interests of other stakeholders. In
support of stewardship theory, Kiel and Nicholson (2003, p. 190) state that ‘underlying
this rationale is the assertion that since managers are naturally trustworthy there will be
no major agency costs’. The acceptance of stewardship theory has adverse implications
on one theory that has become widely accepted, that having the chair of the board
independent of the CEO gives the organisation legitimacy for claiming to have an
efficient or sound financial management in place and hence improving the return on
equity (ROE) to the shareholders. However, Kiel and Nicholson (2007) state that their
findings support Boyd’s (1995) conclusion that the issue of CEO duality is explained
better if the size and complexity of the organisations are considered. In highly

35
entrepreneurial firms, for example in the humble beginnings of Microsoft and internet
companies the chairman-CEO duality may send a positive message to the market 30 2
Literature Review because it supports stewardship theory and enhances social status by
minimizing the agency cost. It can also lead to the organisation being seen as having a
clear leadership which may lead to better corporate performance.

Resource Dependent Theory

In addition to the studies investigating the relationship between board composition and
firm performance, sociologists have focussed on the relationship between the firm’s
social network and the firm’s performance. These studies formed the resource
dependency theory. The resource dependency theory explains how the firm’s success is
linked to its ability to control its external resources (Psaros 2011). The board of a
company plays several vital roles, such as providing advice to management on
operational and strategic issues and monitoring management. Besides these, it is also an
important link between the organisation and the external resources which an organisation
needs to maximise its performance (Hillman et al. 2007; Pfeffer and Salancik 2009). The
more control an organization has on external resources, the lower the costs of resources
and the higher the chances that the firm will minimise agency costs. The firm may then
maximise the use of resources to maximise the value of the firm. It will also help in
making strategic plans more workable and mitigate agency costs. If the success of the
organization depends on external resources, then having its members on the board of
directors of the resources company who can help to establish a relationship between the
organisation and the external resources improves the financial efficiency and management
of the organisation, reduces agency costs and hence maximises the value of the firm. It
also reduces uncertainty of accessing the resources, and external dependencies (Psaros
2011). Kiel and Nicholson (2009) argue that agency theory, stewardship theory and
resource dependence theory all play a vital role in determining what should be
appropriate corporate governance policies and structures.

36
CHAPTER IV

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

OBJECTIVES

Primary Objective

To study the performance of capital budgeting and to evaluate the data of capital
budgeting techniques in PICASTRA LOGISTICS.

Secondary Objective

 To study and ensure planning for future by setting up various budgets


 To know the budgeting operation in the company
 To analyze the elimination of wastages and increase in profitability.
 The analyse the correlation between Revenue and Sales
 To find out the standard deviation for Total assets

Evaluation of past projects and investment may cater valuable information to be


adapted in the future. Thus, planning for forthcoming days becomes easy. A clear view of
works done by different departments in the organization can be observed.

37
Need for the study

Companies are in a situation to invest a huge amount of money in order to take


their firm to a greater extends of growth. In this case, they have to take a sound
investment decision among various alternatives. If the investment decision taken up on a
project is not worth undertaking, the amount invested on a particular project would not
generate profit or value rather it creates loss to the firm. Hence, to increase wealth and
profit of the firm or to avoid loss, a sound procedure is needed. Thus, the need of capital
budgeting arises.

An efficient allocation of capital is the most important finance function in the


modern times. It involves decisions to commit the firm’s funds to the long term assets.
Capital budgeting or investment decisions are of considerable importance to the firm,
since they tend to determine its value by influencing its growth, profitability and risk.

The process of allocating budget for fixed investment opportunities is crucial


because they are generally long lived and not easily reversed once they are made. So we
can say that this is a strategic asset allocation process and management needs to use
capital budgeting techniques to determine which project will yield more return over a
period of time.

38
Scope of the Study

Duty of a financial manager is to choose investments with satisfactory cash flows


and rates of return. Therefore, a financial manager must be able to decide whether an
investment is worth undertaking and be able to choose intelligently between two or more
alternatives. To do this, a sound procedure to evaluate, compare, and select projects is
needed. This procedure is called Capital Budgeting.

Capital budgeting is the process of making investment decisions in capital


expenditures. A capital expenditure may be defined as an expenditure the benefits of
which are expected to be received over the period of time exceeding one year.

The study has been undertaken to understand the significance of capital budgeting
through which to analyze the performance of the capital budgeting.

 The study can help the organization to take investment decision in forthcoming
years

 It can be used as reference

 It will be helpful for fund allocation

39
Limitations of the Study

 The company’s certain information are kept secret


 The period of study restricted only to ten years.
 The study is based on the past records of the company.
 The study concentrates only on capital budgeting of the company

The whole study focuses on different kind of capital budgeting techniques. Though
these methods have sound advantages there are some computational problems and
disadvantages in adapting these techniques. Though NPV method is easy to use if
forecasted cash flows are known, in practice, it is quite difficult to obtain the estimates of
cash flows due to uncertainty. Discount rate is also difficult in practice to precisely
measure the discount rate. Further, caution needs to be applied in using the NPV method
when alternative projects with unequal lives, or under funds constraint are evaluated.
Ranking of investment projects as per the NPV rule is not independent of the discount
rates.

Likewise payback period method is not an appropriate method of measuring the


profitability of an investment project as it does not consider all cash inflows yielded by
the project. This method fails to consider the pattern of cash inflows. There is no rational
basis for setting a maximum payback period. It is generally a subjective decision.
Payback is not consistent with the objective of maximizing the market value of the firm’s
shares. Share values do not depend on payback periods of investment projects.

40
Research design

The research design is the conceptual structure within which research is


conducted; it constitutes the blueprint for the collection, measurement and analysis of
data. The research design is the arrangement o conditions for collections and analysis of
data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with economy in
procedure.

Descriptive Research

Descriptive research determines the relationship between two or more variables. It


includes surveys and fact finding enquiries of different kinds. The major purpose of
descriptive research is description of the state of affairs as it exists at present. The main
characteristics of this method are that the researcher has no control over the variables, he
can only report for the happening. The method of research utilized in descriptive research
is survey method of all kinds including comparative method and correlation method.

Source of Data

There are two types of data to be collected

 Primary data
 Secondary data
Primary data are those which are collected afresh and for the first time and thus
happen to the original in character.

Secondary data, the data that are already available, it refers to the data which have
already been collected and analyzed by someone else. The secondary data re collected
from company profile and website. Mostly the data used for the project are secondary
data.

41
Method for Analysis

Payback Period Method

The payback period is also called as pay off or payout period method. That
represents the period in which the total investment in permanent assets payback itself.
The method is based on the principle that every capital expenditure pays itself back
within a certain period out of the additional earnings generated from the capital assets.
Thus, it measures the period of time for the original cost of the project to be recovered
from the additional earnings of the project itself. Under this method, various investments
are ranked according to the length of their payback period in such a manner that the
investment with a shorter payback period is preferred to the one which has longer
payback period. It is exact amount of time required for a firm to recover its initial
investment in a project as calculated from cash flows.

The payback measures the length of time it takes a company to recover in cash its initial
investment. This concept can also be explained as the length of time it takes the project to
generate cash equal to the investment and pay the company back. It is calculated by
dividing the capital investment by the net annual cash flow. If the net annual cash flow is
not expected to be the same, the average of the net annual cash flows may be used.

The payback method is a one-sidedly derived number which tells a small amount about a
project's beginning phase, but it tells one close to nothing about the full lifetime of the
project. The effortlessness of calculating payback can possibly promote carelessness,
especially in the failure to incorporate all the costs linked with investing in a project, such
as training and maintenance. The payback method does not account for the time value of
money either, and is therefore considered an unsophisticated capital budgeting technique.
Even though the payback method has these cons associated with it, the simplicity of the
method can allow it to be used as a filter for those projects which should go on to a more
in-depth method, such as those explained below. If a project is not recommended based
on the payback method, then chances are pretty high the project should not even be
considered for the other methods.

42
Rate of Return Method

The method takes into account the earnings expected from the investment over
their whole life. It is known as accounting rate of return method for the reason that under
this method, the accounting concept of profit is used rather than cash inflows.

According to this method, various projects are ranked in order of the rate of
earnings or rate or returns. The project with the higher rate of return is selected as
compared to the one with lower rate of returns. This method can also be used to make
decision as to accepting or rejecting the proposal.

The IRR method is another sophisticated capital budgeting technique and is the
most widely used. It is, however, more complicated to calculate by hand, and a scientific
calculator or spreadsheet application may need to be used. Businesspeople typically
would rather see calculation results in the form of annual rates of return instead of actual
dollar returns. This allows them to really compare two or more projects for ranking
purposes to see which project is going to provide more bang for the buck. The IRR
method gives the rate of return result. This is especially important in our current
economic climate, where businesses are trying to cut costs and only invest in those
projects which will yield a higher rate of return.

Net Present Value Method

It is modern method of evaluating investment proposals. This method takes into


consideration the time value of money and attempts to calculate the return on investments
by introducing the factor of time element. The net present values of a inflows and
outflows of cash occurring during the entire life of the project is determined separately for
each year by discounting these flows by the firms cost of capital or predetermined rate.

Net Present Value measures the difference between present value of future cash inflows
generated by a project and cash outflows during a specific period of time. With a help of
net present value we can figure out an investment that is expected to generate positive
cash flows.

The NPV method does take into consideration the time value of money, so it is referred to
as a sophisticated capital budgeting technique. Therefore, everything is calculated based
of today's dollars. For example, if $300,000 is expected to be earned in year 5, then its

43
worth is $155,811 in today's dollars. This method is easier to calculate by hand than the
IRR method. In addition, the NPV method gives a more realistic solution due to the fact
that it takes into consideration that the firm reinvests intermediate cash flows at the
company's cost of capital rate, rather than the high rate specified by the IRR method. The
NPV method is the theoretically preferred method of capital budgeting techniques. (p.
429-430)

The NPV is considered less insightful because it does not measure the interest rates,
profitability, and other benefits relative to the amount invested. This means that NPV
gives one a measure of the expected dollar amount of money made from the proposed
project. Most often, financial managers want to see results measured in annual rate of
return, such as with the IRR method.

In order to calculate net present value (NPV), we first estimate the expected future cash
flows from a project under consideration. The next step is to calculate the present value of
these cash flows by applying the discounted cash flow (DCF) valuation procedures. Once
we have the estimated figures then we will estimate NPV as the difference between
present value of cash inflows and the cost of investment

Net Present Value measures the difference between present value of future cash inflows
generated by a project and cash outflows during a specific period of time. With a help of
net present value we can figure out an investment that is expected to generate positive
cash flows.

In order to calculate net present value (NPV), we first estimate the expected future cash
flows from a project under consideration. The next step is to calculate the present value of
these cash flows by applying the discounted cash flow (DCF) valuation procedures. Once
we have the estimated figures then we will estimate NPV as the difference between
present value of cash inflows and the cost of investment

44
Capital Budgeting Process

Evaluation of Capital budgeting project involves six steps:

 First, the cost of that particular project must be known.


 Second, estimates the expected cash out flows from the project, including residual
value of the asset at the end of its useful life.
 Third, riskiness of the cash flows must be estimated. This requires information
about the probability distribution of the cash outflows.
 Based on project’s riskiness, Management find outs the cost of capital at which
the cash out flows should be discounted.
 Next determine the present value of expected cash flows

4.6 Importance of Capital Budgeting Decisions


Capital budgeting is a process used to determine whether a firm’s proposed investments
or projects are worth undertaking or not. The process of allocating budget for fixed
investment opportunities is crucial because they are generally long lived and not easily
reversed once they are made. So we can say that this is a strategic asset allocation process
and management needs to use capital budgeting techniques to determine which project
will yield more return over a period of time.

The question arises why capital budgeting decisions are critical? The foremost
importance is that the capital is a limited resource which is true of any form of capital,
whether it is raised through debt or equity. The firms always face the constraint of capital
rationing

45
4.7 ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF CAPITAL BUDGETING
TECHNIQUES

Advantages

The payback method is popular with business analysts for several reasons. The first is its
simplicity. Most companies will use a team of employees with varied backgrounds to
evaluate capital projects. Using the payback method and reducing the evaluation to a
simple number of years is an easily understood concept. Identifying projects that provide
the fastest return on investment is particularly important for companies with limited cash
that need to recover their money as quickly as possible. Managers use the payback
method to make quick evaluations of projects with small investment. These small projects
do not necessarily involve a group of employees, and it is not necessary to conduct a
rigorous economic analysis.

Disadvantages

The payback method ignores the time value of money. The cash inflows from a project
may be irregular, with most of the return not occurring until well into the future. A project
could have an acceptable rate of return but still not meet the company's required
minimum payback period. The payback model does not consider cash inflows from a
project that may occur after the initial investment has been recovered. Most major capital
expenditures have a long life span and continue to provide income long after the payback
period. Since the payback method focuses on short-term profitability, an attractive project
could be overlooked if the payback period is the only consideration.

Capital Budgeting by Payback Period

The most-used method of capital budgeting is determining the payback period. The
company establishes an acceptable amount of time in which a successful investment can
repay the cost of capital to make it. Investment alternatives with too long a payback
period are rejected. Investment alternatives inside the payback period are evaluated on the
basis of the fastest payback. Payback method disadvantages include that it does not
account for the time value of money.

46
Net Present Value Capital Budgeting

In net present value capital budgeting, each of the competing alternatives for a firm’s
capital is assigned a discount rate to help determine the value today of expected future
returns. Stated another way, by determining the weighted average cost of capital over
time, also called the discount rate, a company can estimate the value today of the
expected cash flow from an investment of capital today. By comparing this net present
value of two or more possible uses of capital, the opportunity with the highest net present
value is the better alternative.

A disadvantage of the net present value method is the method's dependence on correctly
determining the discount rate. That calculation is subject to many variables that must be
estimated.

The Internal Rate of Return Method

An advantage of capital budgeting with the internal rate of return method is that the initial
calculations are easier to perform and understand for company executives who may not
have a financial background. Excel has an IRR calculation function.

The disadvantage of the IRR method is that it can yield abnormally high rates of return by
overestimating the value of reinvesting cash flow over time.

TOOLS USED FOR ANALYSIS:

1. Net present Value (NPV)


2. Payback Period (PBP)
3. Average rate of return (ARR)
4. Profitability Index (PI)
5. Correlation analysis
6. Standard Deviation
7. Mean
8. Trend Analysis

47
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

PAY BACK PERIOD

The payback measures the length of time it takes a company to recover in cash its initial
investment. This concept can also be explained as the length of time it takes the project to
generate cash equal to the investment and pay the company back. It is calculated by
dividing the capital investment by the net annual cash flow. If the net annual cash flow is
not expected to be the same, the average of the net annual cash flows may be used.

Initial Investment
Payback Period =
Cash Inflow per Period

CALCULATION OF ANNUAL CASH INFLOW

Year 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Total Sales 1606310970 1952574983 2062496269 2177381956 2371633523

Less: Costs 1555885007 1815614157 1961324252 2068196415 2286017710

EBDT 50425963 136960826 101172019 128327364 85615818

LESS: - 967090 - 10393113 12541810


Depreciation or
other
exceptional
items
EBT 50425963 135993136 101172019 117934251 73074008

LESS: Tax 17100966 100752605 (22354952) 38433857 26851541

PAT (Annual 33324997 35241131 123526969 79500394 46222467


Cash Inflow)

48
Payback Period Analysis

Year Initial investments Annual cash Inflow Payback period

2014 72368453 33324997 2.17

2015 175080399 35241131 4.97

2016 180236203 123526969 1.46

2017 46246000 79500394 0.58

2018 46246000 46222467 1.00

INTERPRETATION

The shorter the payback period, the sooner the company recovers its cash investment.
Whether a cash payback period is good or poor depends on the company's criteria for
evaluating projects. From the above it is inferred that the company have its highest pay
back on 2015 with 4.97 or 5 years.

The current year (2018) PBP is found to be 1 year. This shows that the company recovers
its investment in 1 year

49
Payback Period Analysis

4.97
5
4.5
4
3.5
3
2.5 2.17
2
1.5 1.46
1
0.5 1
0.58
0
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018

50
ACCOUNTING RATE OF RETURN (ARR)

ARR method uses accounting information as reveals by financial statements, to measure


the profitability of the investment proposals. It is also known as the return on investment.
Sometimes it is called as the Average rate of return.(ARR)

PAT

Average Rate of Return (ARR) = ------------------------------------------- * 100

Original Investment

Year PAT Initial investments Average Rate of


Return

2014 33324997 72368453 0.46

2015 35241131 175080399 0.20

2016 123526969 180236203 0.68

2017 79500394 46246000 1.72

2018 46222467 46246000 1.00

Inference:
The chart shows that, in the year 2015 the company had lower expected rate of return
than the minimum rate so the investment on the particular project can be reduced. In the
year 2017 the project has a higher rate of return than the minimum rate. Higher rate of
return indicates that investment made in the particular year has higher cash inflow in the
future. The Average rate of return for the year 2018 is reduced to 1 year.

51
ACCOUNTING RATE OF RETURN (ARR)

1.8
1.72
1.6

1.4

1.2

1
1
0.8
0.68
0.6 0.46
0.4
0.2
0.2
0
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018

52
NET PRESENT VALUE

Considering the time value of money is important when evaluating projects with different
costs, different cash flows, and different service lives. Discounted cash flow techniques,
such as the net present value method, consider the timing and amount of cash flows. To
use the net present value method, you will need to know the cash inflows, the cash
outflows, and the company's required rate of return on its investments. The required rate
of return becomes the discount rate used in the net present value calculation.

Formula

Present value = Cash flows * Present value of Re. 1 @ 10% discount using present value
table

Net present value = Present value of all cash inflows – present value of initial
investment.

Decision Rule:

Accept: NPV > Zero

Reject: NPV< Zero

53
Net Present Value Analysis

Year PAT Discounting present Present Value Present value of


value of Net Cash Initial
Table Flows investment
(Present value of Re.1
@ 10 %)
2014 33324997 0.909 30292422.27 65782923.78
2015 35241131 0.826 29109174.21 144616409.6

2016 123526969 0.751 92768753.72 135357388.5


2017 79500394 0.683 54298769.1 31586018
2018 46222467 0.621 28704152.01 28718766
235173271.3 406061505.8
TOTAL =

Calculation:

Present value of all cash flows 23, 51, 73, 271.3

Less: Present value of all Initial Investment 40, 60, 61,505.8

Net Present Value (20108-12) (17, 08, 88,234.5)

Interpretation

Above table clearly indicates that the Net Present Value for the five years from
2014 to 2018 is (17, 08, 88,234.5)

A negative NPV indicates that the project will probably be unprofitable and
therefore should be adjusted, if not abandoned altogether. NPV enables a management to
consider the time value of money it will invest. This concept holds that the value of
money increases with time because it can always earn interest in a savings account.
Therefore, any other investment of that money must be weighed against how the funds
would perform if simply deposited and saved.

54
PROFITABILITY INDEX

Profitability index (PI), also known as profit investment ratio (PIR) and value investment
ratio (VIR), is the ratio of payoff to investment of a proposed project. It is a useful tool
for ranking projects because it allows you to quantify the amount of value created per unit
of investment.

The ratio is calculated as follows:

Assuming that the cash flow calculated does not include the investment made in the
project, a profitability index of 1 indicates breakeven. Any value lower than one would
indicate that the project's PV is less than the initial investment. As the value of the
profitability index increases, so does the financial attractiveness of the proposed project.

Rules for selection or rejection of a project:

 If PI > 1 then accept the project


 If PI < 1 then reject the project

55
PAT Discounting present Present Value Present value
Year (Rs. In Crore) value of Net Cash of Initial
Table Flows investment
(Present value of Re.1
@ 10 %)

2014 33324997 0.909 30292422.27 65782923.78


2015 35241131 0.826 29109174.21 144616409.6
2016 123526969 0.751 92768753.72 135357388.5
2017 79500394 0.683 54298769.1 31586018
2018 46222467 0.621 28704152.01 28718766
406061505.8
TOTAL = 235173271.3

PROFITABILITY INDEX = PV OF CASH INFLOWS ÷ INITIAL INVESTMENT

PI = 235173271.3 ÷ 406061505.8

PI = 0.579

DECISION RULE:

Accept: PI >1

Reject: PI<1

INFERENCE:

PI is lesser than 1 so Reject the proposal

It indicates that for every one rupee investment there will be 0.579 loss

56
STANDARD DEVIATION

Statistical measure of the degree to which an individual value in a probability distribution


tends to vary from the mean of the distribution. From a normal distribution, one standard
deviation includes about 66% of the population; two standard deviations include about
95%.

STANDARD DEVIATION CALCULATION OF PROFIT AFTER TAX

(In Crores)

Year PAT (x) X2


= ∑ x/ 5 X=x-

2018 0.4622 0.63562 (0.17342) 0.0300744964

2017 0.7950 0.63562 0.15938 0.0254019844

2016 1.2353 0.63562 0.59968 0.3596161024

2015 0.3524 0.63562 (0.28322) 0.0802135684

2014 0.3332 0.63562 (0.30242) 0.0914578564

∑ X 3.1781 ∑ X2 0.586764008

∑ X2 / n-1 0.146691002

S.D = 0.3830026

57
0.4
0.359616102
0.35

0.3

0.25

0.2

0.15

0.1

0.05 0.030074496 0.080213568 0.091457856


0.025401984
0
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014

INFERENCE:

Standard deviation is used in determination of risk involved in an investment. PAT is


fluctuating throughout the period of study. PAT is high in 2016 with 1.2353 and very low
in 2014. The current year (2018) PAT is decreased to 0.4622 when compared to the
previous year (2017) with 0.7950.

The Standard Deviation for PAT is 0.3830026

Variance for PAT is 0.146691002

58
STANDARD DEVIATION CALCULATION OF INVESTMENT

(In Crores)

Year Investment (x) X2


=∑X/5 X=x-

2018 4.625 10.4038 (5.7788) 33.3945

2017 4.625 10.4038 (5.7788) 33.3945

2016 18.024 10.4038 7.6202 58.0674

2015 17.508 10.4038 7.1045 50.470

2014 7.237 10.4038 (3.1668) 10.029

∑ X 52.019 ∑ X2 185.355

∑ X2 / n-1 46.33875

S.D = 6.0872

59
60 58.0674

50 50.47

40
33.3945
33.3945
30

20

10
10.029
0
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014

INFERENCE:

The Investments of the company has been in the increasing rate till 2016. The company
has the same investment for the last 2 years 2017 and 2018. The investment of the
company has been decreased. In the year 2018 the Investment has been decreased to
4.625.

The standard deviation of Investment is 6.0872

The Variance is 46.33875

Standard deviation is applied to an investment to measure the investment's volatility.


Standard deviation is also known as historical volatility and is used by investors as a
gauge for the amount of expected volatility.

60
STANDARD DEVIATION CALCULATION OF REVENUE

(In Crores)

Year REVENUE (x) X2


=∑X/5 X=x-

2018 23.716 20.379 17.3598 301.368656

2017 21.965 20.379 15.6088 245.6346374

2016 20.625 20.379 14.2688 203.5986534

2015 19.526 20.379 13.1698 173.443632

2014 16.063 20.379 9.7068 94.22196624

∑ X 101.895 ∑ X2 1016.261545

∑ X2 / N 254.0654

S.D = 15.93943

61
REVENUE (X)

25 23.716
21.965
20.625
19.526
20
16.063
15

10

0
2018 2017 2016 2015 2014
REVENUE (X)

INFERENCE:

The greater the S.D, the greater will be the magnitude of the deviations of the values from
the mean. The S.D measures the variability of values. Revenue is in a increasing
position. Revenue is high in 2018 with 23.716 when compared to the previous year 2017
with 21.965.

The Standard Deviation for Revenue is 15.93943

The Variance is 254.0654

62
CORRELATION ANALYSIS

CORRELATION CALCULATION OF REVENUE AND EBIT

Year REVENUE (X) X2 EBIT(Y) Y2 XY

2018 23.716 562.4487 0.856 0.732736 20.3009

2017 21.965 482.4612 1.283 1.646089 28.1811

2016 20.625 425.3906 1.012 1.024144 20.8725

2015 19.526 381.2647 1.37 1.8769 26.75062

2014 16.063 258.02 0.504 0.504 8.095752

∑ = 101.895 2109.585 5.025 5.533885 104.2015

CORRELATION 0.449147

63
25
23.716
21.965
20 20.625
19.526

16.063
15

10

0.856 1.283 1.012 1.37


0 0.504
2018 2017 2016 2015 2014

REVENUE (X) EBIT(Y)

INFERENCE:

There is a high degree of correlation between Revenue and EBIT as the correlation value
0.449147 is more than 0.05. It measures the closeness of relationship between Revenue
and EBIT and they both have a positive correlation

64
CORRELATION CALCULATION OF SALES AND PAT

Year SALES (X) X2 PAT (Y) Y2 XY

2018 23.5 552.25 0.4622 0.21362884 10.8617

2017 21.8 475.24 0.7950 0.632025 17.331

2016 20.5 420.25 1.2353 1.52596609 25.32365

2015 18.3 334.89 0.3524 0.124102224 6.44892

2014 15.7 246.49 0.3332 0.11102224 5.23124

∑= 99.8 2029.12 3.1781 2.606828 65.19651

CORRELATION 0.377508531

65
CORRELATION CALCULATION OF SALES AND PAT- CHART

25
23.5
21.8
20 20.5
18.3

15.7
15

10

0.795 1.2353
0 0.4622 0.3524 0.3332
2018 2017 2016 2015 2014

SALES (X) PAT (Y)

INFERENCE:

There is a high degree of correlation between Sales and Profit after Tax because the
correlation value (0.377508531) is more than 0.05. It measures the closeness of
relationship between Sales and Profit after Tax and they both have a positive correlation.

66
CORRELATION CALCULATION OF EXPENSES AND PAT

Year EXPENSES (X) X2 PAT(Y) Y2 XY

2018 22.9 524.41 0.4622 0.21362884 10.58438

2017 20.7 428.49 0.7950 0.632025 16.4565

2016 19.6 384.16 1.2353 1.52596609 21.21188

2015 18.1 327.61 0.3524 0.124102224 6.41368

2014 15.5 240.25 0.3332 0.11102224 5.19792

∑= 96.80 1904.92 3.1781 2.606828 62.86436

CORRELATION 0.297873

67
CHART- CORRELATION CALCULATION OF EXPENSES AND PAT

25
22.9
20.7
20 19.6
18.1

15 15.5

10

0.795 1.2353
0 0.4622 0.3524 0.3332
2018 2017 2016 2015 2014

EXPENSES (X) PAT (Y)

INFERENCE:

There is a high degree of correlation between Expenses and PAT, the correlation value is
0.297873 above than 0.05. It measures the closeness of relationship between Expenses
and PAT and they both have a positive correlation.

68
MEAN

The Mean of a data set illustrates an average. To find the mean, add all of the numbers in
a data set and then divide by how many numbers given in the data set. The mean would
be significantly affected if one of the numbers in a data set is an outlier. The mean is a
good measure of central tendency to use when a data set doesn’t have any outliers

CALCULATION OF MEAN AND STANDARD DEVIATION FOR EXPENSES

i. CALCULATION OF MEAN FOR EXPENSES

YEAR EXPENSES( x)

2014 1555885007

2015 1815614877

2016 1961324252

2017 2068196415

2018 2286017710

∑ x= 9687038261

9687038261

= ---------------------------- = 1937407652

69
ii. CALCULATION OF STANDARD DEVIATION FOR EXPENSES

YEAR EXPENSES( x) (X- 1937407652) X2

2014 1.555885007 -0.381522645 0.145559529

2015 1.815614877 -0.121792775 0.01483348

2016 1.961324252 0.023916600 0.000572004

2017 2.068196415 0.130788763 0.017105701

2018 2.286017710 0.348610058 0.121528973

∑ x= 9.687038261 0.299599686

0.299599686

= ----------------------------------------

5-1

VARIANCE = 0.074899921 or 74, 89,921

STANDARD DEVIATION= 0.2736785 or 27, 36,785

70
CHART- EXPENSES

Expenses

2.28601771
2.068196415
1.961324252
1.815614877
1.555885007

2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Expenses

Inference:

From the above calculation,

The average Expenses for 5 years are found to be 1,93,74,07,652.

The Variance for expenses is found to be 0.074899921 or 74, 89,921

The Standard Deviation is found to be 0.2736785 or 27, 36,785

71
TREND ANALYSIS

Trend analysis is based on the idea that what has happened in the past gives traders an
idea of what will happen in the future. Trend analysis has a great advantage that it can
also be used to predict the future events. This is possible by forecasting the future cash
flow based on the data available of the past. With the help of trend analysis, you can
predict the future and track the variances to add performance.

Y=a+b(x)

TREND ANALYSIS -PAT

Y=a+b(x)
Year
PAT(y) x X2 xy

2014 0.3332 -2 4 -0.6664 0.4955

2015 0.3524 -1 1 -0.3524 0.56556

2016 1.2353 0 0 0 0.63562

2017 0.7950 1 1 0.795 0.70568

2018 0.4622 2 4 0.9244 0.77574

Σ y = 31.781 Σ x2=10 0.7006

Y=a +b (x)

a = Σy /n

b= Σxy / Σ x2

a= 0.63562

b= 0.07006

72
For: 2019

Let us assume x=3

Y=a + b(x)

Y= 6.3562 +0.0368737 *3

Y= 0.7462411

PAT

1.4

1.2 1.2353

0.8 0.795 0.77574


0.70568
0.6 0.63562
0.56556
0.4955
0.4622
0.4
0.3332 0.3524

0.2

0
2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

PAT(y) Y=a+b(x)

INTERPRETATION

 The PAT is increasing at an increasing rate for the all the five years. The company
has the highest PAT on 2016 with 1.2535
 The PAT trend is found to be increasing rate this is due to the gradual decrease of
expenses for the first 3 years. In the year 2018 the PAT is tend to decrease this is
due to the increase in the interest and expenses of the company.
 The PAT trend is decreasing so the company should take necessary steps to
increase the profit of the company by decreasing the expenses and debtors

73
EBIT

Y=a+b(x)
Year EBIT(y)
x X2 xy

2014 0.504 -2 4 -1.008 0.8776

2015 1.360 -1 1 -1.36 0.9403

2016 1.012 0 0 0 1.003

2017 1.283 1 1 1.283 1.0657

2018 0.856 2 4 1.712 1.1284

5.015 Σ x2=10 0.627

Y=a +b (x)

a = Σy /n

b= Σxy / Σ x2

a=1.003

b=0.0627

For: 2019

Let us assume x=3

Y=a + b(x)

Y= 1.003 +0.033*3

Y= 1.102

74
EBIT

1.6

1.4
1.36
1.283
1.2
1.1284
1.0657
1 1.012
1.003
0.9403
0.8776 0.856
0.8

0.6
0.504
0.4

0.2

0 EBIT(y) Y=a+b(x)
2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

INTERPRETATION

 The EBIT is fluctuating for the all the five years. The company has the highest
EBIT on 2015 with 13.60
 The EBIT trend is found to be increasing rate this is due to the gradual Increase of
Sales
 The EBIT trend is decreasing in 2018 this may due to increase in the expenses and
high interest.

75
FINDINGS

1. The current year (2018) PBP is found to be 1 year. This shows that
the company recovers its investment in 1 year

2. The Average rate of return for the year 2018 is reduced to 1 year
the Net Present Value for the five years from 2014 to 2018 is (17, 08,
88,234.5). A negative NPV indicates that the project will probably be
unprofitable and therefore should be adjusted, if not abandoned altogether.

3. PI is lesser than 1 so Reject the proposal. It indicates that for every


one rupee investment there will be 0.579 loss

4. The current year (2018) PAT is decreased to 4.622 when compared


to the previous year (2017) with 7.950.

5. The Standard Deviation for PAT is 3.425679518 and Variance for


PAT is 11.73528016

6. In the year 2018 the Investment has been decreased to 4.625.

7. The standard deviation of Investment is 6.089. The Variance is


37.071

8. Revenue is high in 2018 with 23.716 when compared to the


previous year 2017 with 21.965.

9. The Standard Deviation for Revenue is 14.25665841. The Variance


is 203.252309

10. There is a high degree of correlation between Revenue and EBIT


as the correlation value 0.449147 is more than 0.05. It measures the closeness of
relationship between Revenue and EBIT and they both have a positive correlation.

11. There is a high degree of correlation between Sales and Profit after
Tax because the correlation value (0.377508531) is more than 0.05. It measures
the closeness of relationship between Sales and Profit after Tax and they both
have a positive correlation.

76
12. There is a high degree of correlation between Expenses and PAT,
the correlation value is 0.288887458 above than 0.05. It measures the closeness of
relationship between Expenses and PAT and they both have a positive correlation.

13. The average Expenses for 5 years are found to be 1,93,74,07,652.

14. The Variance for expenses is found to be 0.074899921 or


74, 89,921

15. The Standard Deviation is found to be 0.2736785 or 27, 36,785

16. The PAT is increasing at an increasing rate for the all the five
years. The company has the highest PAT on 2016 with 1.2535

17. The PAT trend is found to be increasing rate this is due to the
gradual decrease of expenses for the first 3 years.

18. In the year 2018 the PAT is tend to decrease this is due to the
increase in the interest and expenses of the company.

19. The EBIT is fluctuating for the all the five years. The company has
the highest EBIT on 2015 with 1.360

20. The EBIT trend is found to be increasing rate this is due to the
gradual Increase of Sales

77
SUGGESTIONS

1. The shorter the payback period, the sooner the company recovers its cash
investment. Whether a cash payback period is good or poor depends on the
company's criteria for evaluating projects. Higher rate of return indicates that
investment made in the particular year has higher cash inflow in the future.
2. A negative NPV indicates that the project will probably be unprofitable and
therefore should be adjusted, if not abandoned altogether.
3. NPV enables a management to consider the time value of money it will invest.
This concept holds that the value of money increases with time because it can
always earn interest in a savings account. Therefore, any other investment of
that money must be weighed against how the funds would perform if simply
deposited and saved.

4. The PAT trend is decreasing so the company should take necessary steps to
increase the profit of the company by decreasing the expenses and debtors

5. The EBIT trend is decreasing in 2018 this may due to increase in the expenses
and high interest. So the company should take necessary actions to decrease
the expenses.

78
CONCLUSION

Capital budgeting or investment appraisal is the planning process used to


determine whether an organization’s long term investments such as new machinery,
replacement machinery, new plants, new products, and research development projects are
worth pursuing.

It is budget for major capital, or investment, expenditures. It is a process used to


determine whether a firm’s proposed investments or projects are worth undertaking or
not. The process of allocating budget for fixed investment opportunities is crucial because
they are generally long lived and not easily reversed once they are made. So we can say
that this is a strategic asset allocation process and management needs to use capital
budgeting techniques to determine which project will yield more return over a period of
time.

Through this study it is very clear that capital budgeting essentially involves evaluation of
the worth of capital investment proposals based on estimates of cash inflows and
outflows. The study emphases that efficient allocation of capital is the most important
finance function in the modern times. Thus, capital budgeting or investment decisions are
of considerable importance to the firm, since they tend to determine its value by
influencing its growth, profitability and risk. The analysis of payback period and Average
Rate of Returns conclude that management should take efforts to perform the capital
budget in efficient manner.

79
Consolidated five years Balance Sheet of PICASTRA LOGISTICS

Income and Expenditure

PARTICULARS 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018


Rs. Crore (Non-Annualised)

Total income 10.229 10.642 12.177 13.944 12.793


Sales 9.713 10.152 11.685 13.316 12.312
Industrial sales 9.713 10.152 11.685 13.316 12.312
Income from non-financial 0 0 0 0 0
services
Income from financial services 0.488 0.461 0.47 0.601 0.406
Interest 0.18 0.153 0.135 0.174 0.255

Dividends 0.19 .222 .25 0.098 .142


Treasury operations 0.118 0.086 0.085 0.329 0.009
Other income 0.017 0.012 0.012 0.014 0.055
Prior period income & 0.011 0.017 0.01 0.013 0.02
extraordinary income
Change in stock -0.029 0.189 0.383 -0.316 -0.075

Total expenses 9.379 9.942 11.677 12.893 11.824


Raw material expenses 4.161 4.423 5.596 6.715 5.205
Packaging expenses 0 0 0 0 0
Purchase of finished goods 0 0 0 0 0
Power, fuel & water charges 0.863 0.709 0.708 0.855 1.123
Compensation to employees 1.006 1.123 1.264 1.418 1.598
Indirect taxes 1.048 1.254 1.356 1.054 0.89
Royalties, technical know-how 0 0 0 0 0
fees, etc.
Lease rent & other rent 0.011 0.011 0.011 0.015 0.016
Repairs & maintenance 0.234 0.218 0.242 0.265 0.305
Insurance premium paid 0.031 0.027 0.02 0.014 0.029
Outsourced mfg. jobs (incl. job 0.224 0.346 0.489 0.351 0.308
works, etc.)
Outsourced professional jobs 0.005 0.008 0.007 0.01 0.01
Directors' fees 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002
Selling & distribution expenses 0.576 0.56 0.674 0.727 0.896
Travel expenses 0.153 0.177 0.187 0.208 0.186
Communication expenses 0.042 0.039 0.039 0.045 0.041
Printing & stationery expenses 0 0 0 0 0
Miscellaneous expenses 0.314 0.306 0.335 0.444 0.404

80
Other operational exp. of indl. 0 0 0 0 0
Enterprises
Other oper. exp. of non-fin. 0 0 0 0 0
service enterprises
Share of loss in 0 0 0 0 0
subsidiaries/JVs,etc.
Lease equalisation adjustment 0 0 0 0 0
Loss on securitisation of 0 0 0 0 0
assets/loans
Fee based financial service 0.015 0.017 0.022 0.025 0.021
expenses
Treasury operations expenses 0 0 0 0 0.064
Total provisions 0 0 0.003 0.025 0
Write-offs 0.006 0.007 0.011 0.004 0.001
Less: Expenses capitalized 0.026 0.03 0.074 0.072 0.029
Less: DRE & expenses charged to 0.024 0 0.03 0.047 0.036
others

Prior period & extraordinary 0 0.005 0.011 0 0.003


expenses
Interest paid 0.015 0.012 0.023 0.045 0.052
Financial charges on instruments 0 0 0 0 0
Expenses incurred on raising 0 0 0 0 0
deposits/debts
Depreciation 0.393 0.396 0.416 0.375 0.35
Amortisation 0 0 0 0 0
Provision for direct taxes 0.33 0.332 0.365 0.415 0.385
PAT 0.821 0.889 0.883 0.735 0.894

PBDITA 0.1559 0.1629 1.687 1.57 1.681


PBDTA 0.1544 0.1617 1.664 1.525 1.629
PBT 0.1151 0.1221 1.248 1.15 1.279

81
7.2 Investments Report

PARTICULARS 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018


Rs. Crore (Non-Annualised)
-
Investments 3.347 3.255 2.962 2.899 2.91
In equity shares 0.397 0.401 0.412 0.417 0.42
Group companies 0.223 0.223 0.223 0.219 0.219
Other than group companies 0.174 0.178 0.189 0.198 0.201
In debt instruments 0.776 0.636 0.565 0.352 0.116
Other than government 0.775 0.635 0.564 0.351 0.116
debentures/bonds
Other than group companies 0.775 0.635 0.564 0.351 0.116
In bonds/debentures of 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.01 0
government/local bodies
In mutual funds 2.159 2.225 1.99 2.161 0.238
Other than group companies 2.159 2.225 1.99 2.161 2.38
In others 0.024 0 0.004 0 0
Less: Provision for diminution in value 0.009 0.007 0.01 0.032 0.006
of investments

Book value of quoted investments 0.288 0.292 2.292 2.328 2.55


Market value of quoted investments 0.415 0.426 2.065 0.831 0.859
Marketable securities 2.447 2.517 2.292 2.328 2.55

82
Report Showing Appreciation of Profit

PARTICULARS 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Rs. Crore (Non-Annualised)


-
PBDITA 1.559 1.629 1.687 1.57 1.681
Depreciation 0.393 0.396 0.416 0.375 0.35
Amortisation 0 0 0 0 0

PBIT 1.166 1.233 1.271 1.195 1.331


Interest paid 0.015 0.012 0.023 0.045 0.052
Financial charges on 0 0 0 0 0
instruments
Fee based financial 0 0 0 0 0
services expenses

PBT 1.151 1.221 1.248 1.15 1.279


Provision for direct tax 0.33 0.332 0.365 0.415 0.385
Corporate tax 0.336 0.355 0.35 0.401 0.42
Deferred tax 0 0 0 0 0
Less: Deferred tax assets / 0.026 0.039 0.005 0.005 0.035
credit
Other direct tax 0.02 0.016 0.02 0.019 0
Fringe benefits tax 0.02 0.016 0.02 0.019 0

PAT 0.821 0.889 0.883 0.735 0.894

Prior period & extra- 0.011 0.017 0.01 0.013 0.02


ordinary income
Prior period & extra- 0 0.005 0.011 0 0.003
ordinary expenses
Net prior period & -0.011 -0.012 0.001 -0.013 -0.017
extraordinary transactions

PBDITA net of P&E 1.548 1.17 1.688 1.557 1.664


PBIT net of P&E 1.155 1.221 1.272 1.182 1.314
PBT net of P&E 1.14 1.209 1.249 1.137 1.2.62
PAT net of P&E 0.81 0.877 0.884 0.722 0.877

83
Distribution of profits (%)

PBDITA 100 100 100 100 100


Depreciation & 2.5208467 2.43093923 2.46591583 2.38853503 2.08209399
Amortisation
Financial charges 0.096215523 0.073664825 0.136336692 0.286624204 0.309339679
Tax 2.1167415 2.03806016 2.16360403 2.6433121 2.29030339
PAT 5.26619628 5.45733579 5.23414345 4.68152866 5.31826294

Non—provisions 0 0 0 0 0
Diminution in 0 0 0 0 0
investement
Sundry debtors 0 0 0 0 0
Loans & advances 0 0 0 0 0
including NPAs
Loans & advances to 0 0 0 0 0
group cos.
Interest expenses 0 0 0 0 0
Power expenses 0 0 0 0 0
Gratuity 0 0 0 0 0
Others 0 0 0 0 0

84