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An Example of Transformer Tap-changer Correct Adjustment

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An Example of Transformer Tap-changer Correct Adjustment

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Tap-Changer Adjustment

A 13800V/4160 V transformer has five taps on the primary winding giving -5%, -2 1/2 %,

nominal, +2 1/2 % and +5 % turns.

-5% , -2 1/2 %, nominal , +2 1/2 % and +5 % turns . An

An Example of Transformer Tap-changer Correct Adjustment

If, on-load, the secondary voltage reduces to 4050 V then, which tap, should be used to maintain 4160 V on-load (assuming the supply voltage remains constant)?

The following answer results:

To keep the secondary voltage at (or as close as possible to) 4160 V, either primary supply voltage or the HV winding tap position must be altered.

Examining the relationship:

V 1 /V 2 = N 1 /N 2 or V 1 ·N 2 = V 2 ·N 1 indicates that, to keep the equation in balance with primary voltage and secondary winding turns fixed, either V 2 or N 1 must be adjusted. Since the objective

is to raise V 2 back to nominal, then N 1 must be reduced.

An Example of Transformer Tap-changer Correct Adjustment

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To raise V 2 from 4050 to 4160V requires an increase in secondary volts of: 4160/4050 = 1.027 or 102.7 %. N 1 must be reduced to 1/1.027 = 0.974

or 102.7 % . N 1 must be reduced to 1/1.027 = 0.974 Figure 1 –

Figure 1 – Basic tap-changer

Therefore N 1 must be reduced by (1 – 0.974) = 0.026 or 2.6 %. Reducing N 1 by 2.6 % will accomplish the increase in secondary voltage output.

The nearest tap to select is -2 1/2% (see Figure 1).

How tap-changer works (VIDEO)

Reference: Science and Reactor Fundamentals – Electrical / CNSC Technical Training Group

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