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MACAJALAR BAY

INTEGRATED
COASTAL
MANAGEMENT
PLAN
MACAJALAR BAY
INTEGRATED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN
FOREWORD

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Written, edited, and compiled by:
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Hilly Ann Roa-Quiaoit
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MBDA Project Management Office (PMO)
Provincial Planning and Development Office (PPDO)
Capitol Compound, General Antonio Luna St.,
Cagayan de Oro City, PHILIPPINES

Email: mbda_pmo@yahoo.com
Website: macajalarbay.com

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan i


MESSAGES

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aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
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non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est
Name of Person Here
Position laborum. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in
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dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur
sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est
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non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat
Name of Person Here
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Office culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
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ii Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan iii
CONTENTS
Foreword i 5.3 NGA Projects and Programs
Messages ii 5.3.1 Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
Acknowledgments iii 5.3.2 Department of Environment and Natural Reources
5.3.3 RIDP NEDA
1 Integrated Coastal Management 5.4 Poverty Incidence
5.5 ICM Workshops Participants
1.1 Background and Rationale 5.6 Coral Reef Maps
1.2 Goals & Objectives of the ICM Plan 5.7 References
1.3 Scope and Duration of the Plan

2 Macajalar Bay Profile

2.1 Baywide Political Setting


2.2 Oceanographic Characteristic of Macajalar Bay
2.3 Landscape-Seascape Connectivity
2.4 Existing Legal and Management Framework (Macajalar Bay
Development Alliance)

3 Bay-Wide Situational Analysis



3.1 Major Coastal Ecosystems Resources
3.2 Interaction of Socio-ecological systems and Existing Threats
and Implications for Management
3.3 Vulnerability Assessment

4 The Management Plan and Implementation

4.1 Prioritization of Strategies and Actions


4.2 Cluster Unique Issues and Identified Management Strategies
4.3 MPA Networks
4.4 Baywide 5-Year Integrated Coastal Management Strategic Pathways

APPENDICES

5.1 SSS Tool and Results
5.1.1 SSS-GSIS of the Macajalar Bay Development Alliance
5.1.2 Sensitivity, LAC and Vulnerability scores in Macajalar Bay
using ICSEA-C-Change Tool
5.1.3 Marine Protected Areas
5.1.4 Cluster-Level 5-Year Work and Financial Plan
5.2 Process and Documentation
5.2.1. Process Highlights
5.2.2. Adoption and Legalization

iv Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


1.1. BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE

Coastal zones are one of the most susceptible areas to natural calamities and climate change.
Risks such as flooding, sea level rise, erosion, and extreme weather events are felt more
in the coastal communities and are affecting lives and livelihoods. Our coasts are also being
degraded due to human activities such as overfishing, use of illegal fishing methods, pollution,

1
and unregulated shoreline development. Since coastal zones are important sources of food
and livelihood, it is vital to maintain the a healthy environmental status ofin the area. The

CHAPTER
economic viability of businesses and enterprises, thriving livelihoods, as well as the well-
being of communities are dependent on a healthy coast. Thus, it is important to make use of
long-term management tools that enhances the protection of coastal resources, as well as to
increase the efficiency and sustainability of their uses.

Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) is the integration and coordination of various coastal
and marine management efforts, which addresses the governance of human activities affecting
the sustainable use of goods and services generated by coastal and marine ecosystems

Integrated
(as defined by the Partnerships in Environmental Management for the Seas of East Asia,
PEMSEA).

Put simply, ICM is a management tool that helps local governments to achieve social and
economic development targets in different areas, as opposed to a sectoral approach, which

Coastal
can lead to disconnected decisions that risk conflicts with other efforts. It aims for coordinated
application of the many policies affecting the coastal zone like preservation of nature,
aquaculture, fisheries, tourism, development of infrastructure and mitigation, adaptation to
climate change, and so much more. The national

Management
Table 1. Poverty Incidence per LGU in
government in fact declared CRM in EO 533 Macajalar Bay
and RA 8850 as the strategic and inherent
Poverty
function of any coastal local government to Municipality/City Incidence (%)
ensure the sustainability of its resources and City of Cagayan de Oro 7.7
environment. Alubijid 35.4
City of El Salvador 23.7
Balingasag 37.7
In response, the Macajalar Bay Development
Binuangan 28.7
Alliance (MBDA) was formed in 2008 through
Jasaan 26.1
a memorandum of agreement entered into Kinoguitan 27.6
by and among the LGUs of Cagayan de Oro Lagonglong 32.3
City, El Salvador City, Alubijid, Balingasag, Laguindingan 35.4
Binuangan, Jasaan, Kinoguitan, Lagonglong, Opol 14.3
Laguindingan, Opol, Salay, Sugbongcogon, Salay 27.9
Tagoloan, Villanueva and the Province of Sugbongcogon 40.6
Misamis Oriental. (see Table 1 for list of LGUs Tagoloan 14.0

and poverty incidences). One of its functions Villanueva 20.2

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 7


Chapter 1: Integrated Coastal Management

is to harmonize efforts and coordinate with concerned agencies on the protection and 1.2. GOALS & OBJECTIVES OF THE ICM PLAN
rehabilitation of the coastal resources and the implementation of ICM in Macajalar Bay.

For years the MBDA has incorporated ICM-related activities in its annual action plans to
ICM, also commonly known as ICZM (Integrated Coastal Zone Management) or CRM
address current issues that are threatening the bay. The MBDA, as part of its baywide ICM,
(Coastal Resource Management) here in the Philippines, manages the coasts in an integrated
also assisted the LGU members in the formulation of its respective ICM/ CRM Plans. As of
approach. The ICM process covers all aspects of the coastal zone, including geographical
this writing, all of the LGUs have existing drafts that could be further refined for adoption
and political boundaries, with the aim to achieve sustainability.
at the local level or for updating (Table 2). These plans will be consolidated to support the
The support of PEMSEA has already been evident since the early years of MBDA’s founding. baywide plan.
It has helped in the initial planning stages on ICM and in strengthening the alliance through
exposures to best practices from its other project areas in the country; and eventually leading In lieu of basing the baywide plans on the LGU CRM Plans, the MBDA has decided to
to the 2018-2019 project “Scaling up the Implementation of ICM in Macajalar Bay”. PEMSEA’s proceed on the formulation of the bay-wide ICM Plan working on baywide common issues
various ICM programs follows the Common Framework for Sustainable Development (SD) and problems and the corresponding strategic activities, programs and budgetary support.
of Coastal Areas through ICM implementation (Figure 1). This framework covers a system Likeiwse, the baywide plan will also facilitate in the development of the individual CRM Plans
of governance as well as five components of the sustainable aspects critical to achieving of the LGUs.
the overall goal of sustainable development (PEMSEA, 2011 ). Its adoption has been found
effective in other areas such as the Province of Batangas. For the Macajalar Bay ICM Plan,
the same framework will be used, ensuring that it would support and interrelate into the
local, provincial and national programs.
1.3. SCOPE AND DURATION OF THE PLAN

The Macajalar Bay ICM Plan covers the coastal waters of the cities of Cagayan de Oro and El
Salvador; and the towns of Alubijid, Balingasag, Binuangan, Jasaan, Kinoguitan, Lagonglong,
Laguindingan, Opol, Salay, Sugbongcogon, Tagoloan and Villanueva in the Province of
Misamis Oriental, which constitute Macajalar Bay. The plan outlines management strategies
to address issues and threats covering a period of 5 Calendar Years from 2019-2023.

Figure 1. Process-oriented Common Framework for Sustainable Development of Coastal Areas


through ICM Implementation

8 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 9
Chapter 1: Integrated Coastal Management

Table 2. Status of respective LGU CRM Plans basing on identified categories


(as of December 2017)
LGU Status of CRM Plan Year Covered
Type 1
None

Type 2
Alubijid • Draft only Not Specified
El Salvador • Draft only Not Specified
• On the process of
finalization
Opol • Draft only
Cagayan de Oro • Draft for finalization
Tagoloan • Draft only 2013-2022
Lagonglong • Draft subject for SB 2013 - 2020
approval
Salay • For finalization 2016-2021
Binuangan • Draft only
Sugbongcogon • For finalization 2015- 2020

Type 3
Balingasag • For updating
Villanueva • Adopted 2015-2025
Laguindingan • Adopted 2012-2016
• For updating
Kinoguitan • Adopted 2012-2019
• For updating

CRM Plan Categories

Type I – no CRM plan at all Type II – CRM draft for final- Type III – for updating or re-
ization, then adoption vision of CRM plan
- Come up with basic re-
quirements - Come up with the latest - Review of the existing
- Conduct community working version of the draft adopted CRM plan
consultation (soft copy) - Come up with revisions
Writeshop for CRM plan - Conduct writeshop to fi- or changes
nalize plan and update if
current information is avail-
able

10 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


2.1. BAYWIDE POLITICAL SETTING

Macajalar Bay, situated to the north of the province of Misamis Oriental in Region 10,
Philippines, is a deep-water bay of the Mindanao (Bohol) Sea; it is a 470 km2 embayment from
Laguindingan to Kinoguitan. It is one of the most important bays in the Philippines: not only
is it an important fishing ground, but it is also a major industrial hub in Northern Mindanao

2
whose contribution to the local, regional, and national economy has been recognized both
domestically and internationally.

CHAPTER
The bay is the fishing ground
of 12 coastal municipalities
and two cities. It is supporting
approximately 1,565,000
(2015 Census) coastal
inhabitants, estimated at
10,100 registered fisherfolks
(BFAR 2018).

Macajalar Bay Two decades ago, it ranks 1st


in commercial fisheries and
2nd in municipal fisheries

Profile
production in Region X
(ESCAP, 1996). A decade after,
the records for total fisheries
catch at BFAR-specified
Macajalar Bay fishing grounds
showed an increase in catch
in two consequent years from
2005-06 at 833,603 kg to
1,029,997 kg (BFAR R10,
2006). From 1980, however,
the municipal fisheries
Figure 2. Macajalar Bay and its coastal municipalities production showed a 25%
and cities.
decline (1980-90).

Macajalar Bay is situated in the middle of two other major fisheries grounds in the region,
Iligan Bay and Gingoog Bay, but it holds most of the heavy, medium and light industries
(e.g., EO 85_1993 Cagayan-Iligan Corridor Special Development Project, PD 538_1974
PHIVIDEC Industrial Authority, Philippine Sinter, Del Monte Philippines, Mindanao Container
Port, 210 Megawatt Mindanao Coal-Fired Power Plant).

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 13


Chapter 2: Macajalar Bay Profile

2.2. OCEANOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTIC OF The management implication of this study is also very relevant for the sustainable development
of the resources in the bay and the interconnectedness of the municipal/city waters. From
MACAJALAR BAY
the generated model, we can identify the ‘source’ reef – which refers to the area where
it contains larvae, eggs, hatchlings that would ensure recruitment and sustainable fishery
The oceanographic study of Macajalar Bay (Villanoy et al, in prep) was critically important in
of some important resources (e.g., like sea urchins, sea cucumber, mussels, etc.); and the
promoting the interconnectivity of the bay through science-backed information. This resulted
“sink“ reef - that receives the recruits. This supports the proposed network of marine
in more buy-ins from member LGUs in the baywide approach. The study generated a simulated
protected areas that will be established in the bay to ensure sustainable resources for the
modeling of the flow, movement and direction of the waters in the bay (see Figure 3).
people, prioritizing the “source” and “sink” reef areas. With this information, we can target
these key biodiversity areas for management which would have a significant impact in the
In general, transport of larvae within Macajalar Bay is from the eastern side of the bay towards
sustainable development of the bay
the western side. Strongest connections were found in the inner part of the Bay, in the
area bounded by Jasaan and Opol municipalities. Transport within this area was dominantly
westward, following the coast, but some short distance eastward transport was also detected.
This was the recorded trend for both active and passive modeling runs. The coastal “bump” 2.3. LANDSCAPE-SEASCAPE CONNECTIVITY
on the map near the Jasaan municipality also seemed to act as a transport barrier, as virtual
larvae from the outer eastern sites of Macajalar Bay (Kinoguitan to Balingasag) reached the
outer sites on the opposite side of the bay (El Salvador to Laguindigan) but not the inner part One of the more serious threats in Macajalar Bay is sedimentation in the coasts from upland
of the bay. soil erosion, which has detrimentally impacted the marine ecosystems over decades. There
exists a need for the coastal communities and stakeholders to integrate with the upland area
and link closely with the ridge and river communities in order to accomplish an integrated
management of the entire landscape-seascape.

Figure 4. The ridge to reef landscape-seacape of the Cagayan de Oro and Tagoloan Riverbasins
showing Macajalar Bay as the outlet of both riverbasins.

Macajalar Bay is the downstream and outlet of two major riverbasins in Northern Mindanao,
Figure 3. Connectivity schematic for Macajalar Bay and surrounding areas. the Cagayan de Oro and Tagoloan Riverbasins. The waters of both Cagayan and Tagoloan
Rivers that initially stream from the watersheds of the provinces of Misamis Oriental and

14 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 15
Chapter 2: Macajalar Bay Profile

Bukidnon and flows with its existing system of rivers, creeks and tributaries draining into the The MBDA actively promotes networking activities involving key stakeholders such as the
bay (Ridge to Reef in the Philippines, Roa-Quiaoit, 2011). private sector, nongovernment organizations (NGO), civil society, people’s organizations
(POs), the academe, and youth in order to encourage multisectoral and multi-agency
Both Riverbasins still has protected forested areas but also various land uses, such as agricultural cooperation in managing the bay.
farming, regular land clearing, eco-tourism and large-scale plantation which can become threats
to the lowland areas. Other destructive and human-invasive activities contributes such as Vision
mining and quarrying, illegal logging, and expansion of monocrop plantations cause, among
other things, soil erosion and pollution. Continuous sedimentation from the upland due to A strong, viable and well-managed alliance implementing genuine, responsive and relevant
ecological, social and economic programs, through knowledge building, strengthening
topography, rainfall, and human activities adversely affected the downstream environment.
empowerment and enhancing good governance with committed officers and staff, ably
supported by responsible stakeholders in the conservation, rehabilitation and sustainable
The Ridge-River-Reef (R3) initiative focuses on the interconnectivity of landscape and seascape, development of coastal resources in Macajalar Bay.
emphasizing cause and effect; where there is damaging activities in the forests, these flow
from the mountains, the rivers, and finally the bay. It will always equally if not more, affect Mission Statement
the aquatic environment in destructive ways. There is a need then to safeguard the upland
forests and rivers to be able to successfully protect and manage the bay. Thus, unless upland To adopt environmental conservation and management for sustainable development, thus,
ecosystems are integrated in rehabilitation activities, coastal protection will not be productive, improving the quality of life of the people in Misamis Oriental, Northern Mindanao.
especially given the threat of sedimentation and siltation in the coast for a number of years
already. Goals

1. To capacitate and strengthen its stakeholders to conserve and restore coastal


2.4. EXISTING LEGAL AND MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK ecosystems as key assets which support human well-being and security in Misamis
(MACAJALAR BAY DEVELOPMENT ALLIANCE) Oriental;
2. To formulate and implement policies and guidelines on Bay-wide Integrated Coastal
Resources Management Plan for Macajalar Bay with its stakeholders;
The Macajalar Bay Development Alliance
3. Install and enhance effective and sustainable mechanisms for coordination between
(MBDA) is composed of 15 coastal local
and among member-cities and municipalities;
government units surrounding the bay, 4. Ensure an integrated and sustainable management of the upland, lowland, river system
including the Provincial Government and coastal resources of the bay including solid waste management (ridge to river
of Misamis Oriental, 1 chartered city, 1 approach);
component city and the 12 municipalities
which are headed by their respective local
chief executives. It is one of the biggest
inter-LGU alliances in the Philippines.
MBDA was founded by the Xavier University
- McKeough Marine Center (XU-MMC)
through the leadership of then Director, Dr.
Hilly Ann Roa-Quiaoit during the latter part
of 2008. The establishment of the alliance
Figure 5. The Macajalar Bay Development Alli- was strengthened with the signing of a
ance logo symbolizes connectivity: the con- Memorandum of Agreement in which the
nectivity between and among the ecosystems
of the bay and the LGU members. parties agreed to work together and pool
their resources to ensure the sustainable
development of the bay.

16 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 17
Chapter 2: Macajalar Bay Profile

ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURE


Section 1. Organization. The MBDA, an alliance of twelve (12) municipalities, one (1) com-
ponent city, one (1) chartered city and the province of Misamis Oriental, aims to coor-
dinate efforts towards efficient and effective consolidated integrated coastal resources
management program. Forged through a Memorandum of Agreement, the MBDA is a
coordinating body to harmonize integrated coastal resource management efforts of the
twelve (12) municipalities, one (1) component city, one (1) chartered city and the prov-
ince of Misamis Oriental where Macajalar Bay is located.

Section 2. Structure. The MBDA shall be governed by a definite organizational structure


fitted to carry out provisions of the Memorandum of Agreement. The MBDA Council will
serve as the highest policy and decision–making body of the alliance. It will be headed by
a Chairperson duly elected by the council members through an election process provided
for in Article VI in Sections 1 and 2 of this Manual of Operations.

Within the MBDA Council, an Executive Committee of four (4) members will be formed
functioning as a Chairperson, Vice Chairperson, Secretary and Treasurer. The manner of
election for the members of the Executive Committee is contained in Section IV in Sec-
tions 1 and 2 namely “Election” and “Nomination and Voting”, respectively of this Manual
of Operations. The day to day operations of the MBDA will be supervised by a Program
Manager whose qualifications and procedure of hiring are provided in Article VI Section
1 “Hiring Procedures and Guidelines” of this Manual of Operations. Under the Program
Manager are the MBDA Clusters and Technical Working Groups (TWGs). Four (4) Clusters
Coordinators and five (5) TWG Program Officers.

Figure 6. The MBDA Organization and structure

MBDA desires to have a strong, practical and well-managed alliance putting into action
authentic, responsive and relevant ecological, social, and economic programs through
knowledge building, building up empowerment and bettering good governance. One of the
main goals of the Alliance is the formulation of a bay-wide Integrated Coastal Management
(ICM) plan for implementation of the member-LGUs.

18 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


3.1. MAJOR COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS RESOURCES

Macajalar Bay, the fishing ground of 12 local government units is now under serious threat
because of industrialization, rapid development and coastal migration. A comprehensive
assessment on the extent and condition of the major coastal ecosystems of Macajalar
Bay was a decade ago in 2008. The study covered mangrove forests, seagrass beds, and

3
coral reefs and are described in Figure 7 (Roa-Quiaoit et al, 2010). Howeer, there was no
comprehensive assessment done thereafter.

CHAPTER Mangroves
Mangroves, the flowering terrestrial plants have occupied the perimeters of Ma-
cajalar Bay. A total of eighteen (18) species were identified, showing diverse man-
groves in the bay out of 40 species in the Philippines. Mangroves have an overall
stand basal area of 219/m2/ha. This is dominated by Sonneratia alba (‘pagatpat’)
then followed by a number of species of Avicennia (‘piapi’)

Bay-Wide Seagrass
Numerous sections of the shallow seabeds are covered with an abundant growth
of aquatic “grasses,” collectively called seagrasses. A total of nine (9) species

Situational
were identified: Cymodocea rotundata, Cymodocea serrulata, Enhalus acoroi-
des, Halodule pinifolia, Halodule uninervis, Halophila minor, Halophila ovalis, Sy-
ringodium isoetifolium, and Thalassia hemprichii. There is high diversity of seagrass
species identified in the bay at 9 out of 13 in the Philippines. Shallow seagrass beds
cover the coastal waters of the bay at a range of <25-51%.

Analysis Coral Reefs


Coral reefs are absolutely one of the most remarkably intricate and important
ecosystems in Macajalar Bay. Most of the reefs in Macajalar Bay were flat, shallow
or sloping fringing reefs ranging from poor to good. Overall, the reefs were in fair
condition, with an average of 39% live hard coral. Most of the reefs used to be ex-
cellent or good, but the mortality of a significant fraction of the hard corals aver-
aged at 24% considerably caused by siltation especially to reefs near river mouths.

The average biomass of the reef fishes in the bay is considered in the lower me-
dium category (12.6 metric tons/km2 ). Only 3 out of the 14 towns (Balingasag,
Jasaan and Laguindingan) still have a high fish biomass (>20 mt/km2 ), half of the
majority (5, El Salvador, Kinoguitan, Lagonglong, Opol and Salay) are still in the
middle (>10 mt/km2), while the other half (5, Alubijid, Binuangan, Sugbongcogon,
Tagoloan and Villanueva) are critically low (>5 mt/km2). Also, the coastal waters
of Cagayan de Oro City have reflected an alarming very low biomass (4.0 mt/
km2).

Figure 7. The Mangroves, seagrass, and coral reefs of Macajalar Bay. Excerpt from
Ecological and Fisheries Profile of Macajalar Bay 2008

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 21


Chapter 3: Bay-Wide Situational Analysis

3.2. INTERACTION OF SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS


Sensitivity. All the sites in the bay are highly exposed to climate hazards (wave, temperature,
AND EXISTING THREATS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR sea level rise). The potential impacts of climate change makes the bay sensitive to the climate
MANAGEMENT associated disturbances. Given these scenarios, Tagoloan is the most sensitive because of the
absence of extensive shallow water habitats or presence of small patches only. This scarcity
The management plan is grounded on the real problems in the bay. The plan addresses the affects the productivity of the area especially it is an industrial area with heavy industries
extant needs and issues in the bay using the DPSIR (Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response) along the coast. But, this could potentially be enhanced through population replenishment
framework. The DPSIR model is a simple approach that allowed the MBDA to assess the status from adjacent reefs.
of their reef ecosystems as these are subjected to various drivers, pressures, and threats;
as well as, the management responses highlighting the dynamics of the various areas (e.g. Susceptibility. The coastal LGUs surrounding the increasingly urbanized Cagayan de Oro City,
ecological, fisheries, socioeconomic and governance). The DPSIR framework was utilized as particularly Clusters 2 and 3, are highly susceptible owing to marine-based pollution, presence
it aided in the management strategies for the natural resource management, development, of big river, deforested watersheds, coastal infrastructures, among others. Thess attributes
and environmental integrity in Macajalar Bay. rendering it as such likely affects the fisheries productivity of the area, and in combination of
high fishing effort, results in lower catch rates, hence fishing communities remain among one
The different issues identified were further examined on its suitability, sensitivity and of the poor sectors in the area. Destructive fishing practices still occurs in most towns and this
susceptibility characterization. The Suitability-Sensitivity-Susceptibility (SSS) tool (Mamauag requires more management effort on reducing these types of threats. In contrast, the eastern-
et al, in prep) was adopted where the MBDA members classifed the levels of each threat and and western-most towns in the bay, Cluster 4 for Salay and Binuangan and Alubijid in Cluster
issue, respectively for their own clusters. 1, are the least susceptible because of low levels of urbanization, pollution and sedimentation.

Sensitivity relates to the impact of climate change; Suitability pertains to the coastal habitat In summary, the coastal resources and habitats with least impact from threats, coupled with
or area; and, Susceptibility refers to the threats that affect the reef ecosystem goods and adequate current management efforts are found in the towns of Laguindingan and Alubijid
services. in Cluster 1 and Salay and Binuangan in Cluster 4. On the other side of the spectrum are
the highly developed Cagayan de Oro and Tagoloan that are impacted with urbanization and
The SSS further is a part of a bipartite framework, where it is coupled with GSIS (Governance industrialization. Lagundingan has the most suitable sites; whereas, Tagoloan has the least
and Social-Ecological Integrated Systems) that looks into the responses and impacts under coastal ecosystems and the most sensitive to climate change. Alubijid, Salay and Binuangan
the social and governance aspects to address the state and pressures mentioned earlier. The are considered the least susceptible to anthropogenic threats; while, the highly urbanized
GSIS-SSS outputs are the basis for corresponding management strategies in the plan (please city of Cagayan de Oro has the most threats. Options for management, therefore, has taken
see Appendix 5.1). into account these results; both at specific and integrated levels for Suitability, Sensitivity
and Susceptibility and the ecological, socio-economic and governance aspects (SSS-GSIS
The expanse of the bay is wide, so division of the bay into four clusters is done as follows: framework) to provide a clear and straightforward management support.
Cluster 1: Laguindingan, Alubijid, and El Salvador City;
Cluster 2: Opol, Cagayan de Oro City, Tagoloan, and Villanueva; Table 3. Overall SSS scores of MBDA
Cluster 3: Jasaan, Balingasag and Logonglong;
Municipalities/Cities
Cluster 4: Salay, Binuangan, Kinoguitan and Sugbongcogon.

Sugbongcogon
Laguindingan

Lagonglong
Component

Balingasag
El Salvador

Binuangan
Suitability. Among the coastal LGUs, the westernmost municipality of Laguindingan in

Kinoguitan
Villanueva
Tagoloan
Cluster 1 has the most suitable habitats with better conditions compared to other municipalities

Jasaan
Alubijid

Salay
CDO
Opol
in MBDA. Moreover, habitat and biodiversity conservation efforts are satisfactory in
Laguindingan. Most of the other sites (eg medium scores) indicated varying conditions of
Suitability H M M M M L M M M M M M H M
cover and extent ranging from fair to poor shallow habitats (eg coral reefs, mangroves and
Sensitivity M M M M M H M M M M M M H M
seagrass). The industrial town of Tagoloan, belonging to Cluster 2, had the least suitability
Susceptibility M L M M H M M M M H L L H M
score due to the absence and/or poor health conditions of its habitat and lack of marine
Overall Score
conservation initiatives. (Based on HMM MML MMM MMM MMH LHM MMM MMM MMM MMH MML MML HHH MMM
matrix)

22 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 23
Chapter 3: Bay-Wide Situational Analysis

3.3. VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Sensitivity (Note: high score more means higher sensitivity)

A rapid vulnerability assessment was conducted using the Integrated Coastal Sensitivity, Similarly, Cagayan de Oro City and Tagoloan had the highest overall sensitivity scores while
Exposure and Adaptive Capacity for Climate Change (ICSEA-C-Change) Tool. The tool Lagonglong and Kinoguitan had the lowest. The high scores for Cagayan de Oro City and
assesses the capacity of the coastal environment, in terms of biodiversity, coastal integrity Tagoloan could be accounted for its high sensitivity scores on coastal habitat mostly due to
and fisheries, to cope with the effects of climate change. Vulnerability in the ICSEA-C-Change low coral, seagrass and mangrove covers. Both areas hold the major rivers in the bay wherein
tool is measured by assigning scores to sensitivity, lack of adaptive capacity and exposure siltation or sedimentation is evident, thus the poor conditions of the ecosystems specially the
components. Vulnerability increases as the overlapping scope of the three components coral reefs as reported in Quiaoit et al, 2010. However, Opol had the highest average score
increases as illustrated in Figure 8. under the coastal habitat criterion due to its degrading coral and seagrass conditions, wheras,
Kinoguitan had the lowest. Laguindingan scored the lowest for fisheries sensitivity due to the
low number of population dependent on fishing. It is also important to note that El Salvador
is the only LGU in the bay to have reported a catch rate of <3kg per day, which makes it the
highest sensitivity score for fisheries. Further, 8/13 LGUs reported that its coastline is prone
to erosion due to its sandy or muddy beaches. Under the coastal integrity criterion, Alubijid
and Tagoloan scored the highest as these areas were affected by flood in the previous years.

Adaptive Capacity. (Note: high score more means lower adaptibility)

Jasaan had the highest overall score under adaptive capacity which indicates inadequate
measures or processes to recover from climate change impacts as compared to both Villanueva
and Balingasag. The scores for corals, seagrass meadows and mangroves were all high in Opol.
These were also observed relatively high in El Salvador and Tagoloan for corals, Alubijid for
seagrass; and Tagoloan and Binuangan for mangroves. This means that the health conditions
of these resources/habitats are poor.

Kinoguitan had low scores for all three indicators which could also account for having the
lowest overall score under the coastal habitat criterion. This means they are highly adaptive
since its coastal habitat are in good condition.

Conversely, both Opol and Tagoloan had the highest score under the same criterion. The
absence of MPA could be the cause of the latter. The average score for fish and fisheries,
Figure 8. ICSEA-C-Change Vulnerability Framework. Vulnerability can be defined
as the intersection of Sensitivity, Exposure or threat, and Lack of Adaptive Capacity
coastal integrity and human activities varied from low to moderate for all areas. The assessment
(Taken from Vulnerability Assessment Tools for Coastal Ecosystems: A Guidebook). for fisheries also showed that most of the LGUs lack management plans.

Sensitivity and lack of adaptive capacity scores are presented in Appendix Table 1 showing Exposure.
green cells for low; yellow for moderate; and red for highly vulnerable. Average scores were
given for LGUs Alubijid, El Salvador, Opol, Tagoloan, Villanueva, Balingasag and Salay as Climate change exposure was based on the following: sea surface temperature, sea level rise,
assessments were done per barangay. This was participated by the Municipal/City Disaster storm surges and extreme rainfall in this assessment. Data were provided by Xavier University-
Risk and Reduction Management and Municipal/City Agriculture Offices of the 13 LGU Engineering Research Center (XU-ERC) with corresponding recommended scores which were
Members of the MBDA. then verified by the participants. Low scores were given in particular for storm surge and
extreme rainfall for Binuangan, Sugbongcogon and Kinoguitan which resulted to a moderate
average score.

24 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 25
Chapter 3: Bay-Wide Situational Analysis

ICSEA-C-Change Vulnerability

The ICSEA-C-Change vulnerability assessment showed a moderate overall score for all areas
in Macajalar Bay (Figure 9). The map also shows scores for sensitivity, exposure and lack of
adaptive capacity.

Figure 9. Map of Macajalar Bay showing scores for sensitivity, exposure, lack of adaptive
capacity and ICSEA-C-Change Vulnerability. Colors green, yellow and red respectively
indicates low, moderate and high scores.

26 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


M BDA realizes that to improve the quality of life of the people in Misamis Oriental, Northern
Mindanao, it has to implement genuine, responsive and relevant ecological, social and
economic programs. This is encapsulated in this bay-wide Integrated Coastal Management
(ICM) Plan, consolidated and aligned with the management of the upland, lowland, river
system and coastal resources of the bay (ridge, river and reef approach, R3).

4
The issues identified and corresponding strategies indicated in the plan are crafted from a
series of consultations utilizing appropriate tools to assist the MBDA (please refer to Chapter
3). Corresponding policies and guidelines for implementation has been created for effective

CHAPTER
and sustainable mechanisms for coordination between and among different stakeholders. The
plan has been adopted and ably supported by responsible stakeholders in the conservation,
rehabilitation and sustainable development of coastal resources in Macajalar Bay.

Considering the expanse of the bay, the issues and strategies varies, thus, were done by
clusters. Some issues may be unique to a locality, but may still affect the entire bay and the
Alliance.

The Management
Some strategies may appear generic and similar, but when examined closely are very site-
specific that address issues that may not be emergent in other areas. On the other hand,
there are similar strategies that will be spatially harmonized, which can be a good recipe for
scaling up management initiatives in Macajalar Bay (i.e. in a network scale).

Plan and
Baywide, there are cross-cutting issues and management strategies which are addressed
uniquely in each cluster depending on their priorities. The following themes cut across,
namely:

Implementation
• Siltation from Rivers
• Solid Waste Management
• Alternative Livelihoods
• Coastal Law Enforcement
• UFO (Unified Fishery Ordinances) Implementation
• Absence of MPA Management plans/adoption of MPA Management Plans
• Low Fish Catch
• Drafting and Adoption of Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 29


Chapter 4: The Management Plan and Implementation

4.1 PRIORITIZATION OF STRATEGIES AND ACTIONS 4.2 CLUSTER UNIQUE ISSUES AND IDENTIFIED
MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES
From the suite of strategies identified, priorities of action differ per cluster as shown in Figure
7. Strict implementation in MPAs are urgent for Cluster 1 and 2, to be carryied out with IEC The nuances of the management strategies of each cluster are unique to each.
on the management strategies and M&Es are found crucial to all. Ordinances on fishery
measures such as deputizing fish wardens and strict implementation of mesh net sizes are
top priority in other clusters, except Cluster 4. Cluster 1 plans to embark immediately on Cluster 1
the zonation of the use of the coastal area. However, most clusters needed to work on the
finalization of the CLUP or CLWUP prior to zoning. This cluster is composed of 2 municipalities and one city, namely, Laguindingan, Alubijid,
and El Salvador City. The major and most prioritized issue in this cluster is the conflict of
Given the coastal development in the highly urbanized Cagayan de Oro, solid waste municipal water boundaries, especially between Laguindingan and Alubijid, which has been
management was also prioritized. Only Cluster 3 was observed to be more prepared to adopt going on for several years already. This has been a source of disagreement between the
and implement climate change adaptation strategies, whereas Cluster 2 required more capacity LGUs and their fisherfolk.
on this aspect. Cluster 2 will focus on finding alternative livelihood for fishers which was less
of a priority for the other clusters. Mariculture as a strategy for alternative livelihood is seen The boundary dispute comes from the fact that Alubijid is located in a critical point where the
as next important step for Clusters 1 and 3. Mangrove rehabilitation initiatives are considered coast bends towards the end of the bay, and with their coastal area relatively shorter, their
under high capacity but at low urgency by Clusters 1 and 3 which can be materialized soon municipal water is evidently slender-shaped compared to the neighboring waters. Located
after urgent ones are addressed. Cluster 4 seems to be the least capacitated in most aspects on the western end of the bay, Laguindingan and El Salvador City borders the municipality
of management, but that the other Clusters can provide assistance. of Alubijid on both sides. A proposed sea port and an existing marine sanctuary are critically
located in the boundaries of Laguindingan and Alubijid, making the issue more complex.
Hopefully, this will be resolved through the baywide alliance platform.

Table 4. Identified management strategies for Cluster 1 based on the SSS-GSIS framework.
GSIS Municipality Sensitivity Susceptibility Suitability
Integration and - Enact ordinance Resource
Finalization of for the regulation of enhancement
CCA plan with the mariculture (permit, (e.g. MPA
Governance All coordination from requirements) expansion)
academe to provide - Enact ordinances
technical assistance for No Build Zone
- Introduction of -Effective - Involvement
aquasilviculture implementation of of PO in tourism
project CRM Plan activities
Socio-Econ All - Alternative -IEC on family - Improve
livelihood programs planning program ecotourism
(soft shells culture)
- Mangrove - Regulate number - Conduct
rehabilitation of houses monitoring of
- Strict enforcement - Observe setback seagrass and
of fisheries in building others
Ecological All ordinances and laws - Implementation of - Coastal cleanup
- Enact ordinance reblocking scheme
of prohibition o (gleaning)
destructive fishing in
intertidal areas

Figure 10. Prioritization of identified management strategies for MBDA clusters.

30 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 31
Chapter 4: The Management Plan and Implementation

Cluster 2 Cluster 3

The municipalities of Cluster 2 are some of the most heavily industrialized areas within the bay, The municipalities of Cluster 3 namely, Jasaan, Balingasag Lagonglong and Salay, are
namely, Opol, Cagayan de Oro City, Tagoloan and Villanueva. The cluster plans are focused focused on fishery issues, such as low fish catch and illegal fishing. Unique to the cluster
more on governance and harmonizing policy issues. This is due to the lack of coordination is the sustainability of mariculture parks, which are especially common in the municipality of
among LGUs and even more within their respective LGUs. The priority activities include Balingasag.
policy awareness, tracking, and lobbying; as even with the presence of existing policies, there
is serious deficiency in compliance to government processes and regulations, stemming from Table 6. Identified management strategies for Cluster 3 based on the SSS-GSIS framework
the community not being fully aware of the policies. GSIS Municipality Sensitivity Susceptibility Suitability
Creation and Integration of - Strict
implementation of water-use plan to implementation
Table 5. Identified management strategies for Cluster 2 based on the SSS-GSIS framework. CCA Plan CLUP of RA 10654
Governance All
GSIS Municipality Sensitivity Susceptibility Suitability - Strict
enforcement on
- IEC for people’s - Strengthening POs - Adoption and MPA
orgs and fisherfolks - Adopt and strong implementation
- Finalization/ implementation of of MPA plan and Strict
adoption of ICM and CLUP and ICMP EAFM plan All implementation on
CCAP - Coordinate city - Establishment of SWM
- Strict enforcement council regarding MPA Strengthening pf POs IEC on sustainable Implementation
All of SWN through banning of Lagonglong and DFW aquaculture of 9003 and GAP
Governance CLENRO and brgys additional structures on aquaculture
- Ban commercial along the coastal Socio-Econ
fishing areas Implementation
- Strict enforcement Balingasag of alternative
of fishery laws livelihoods
Finalization of Introduction Strengthening of
Opol MPA Plan and Jasaan of alternative POs
adoption livelihoods
- Alternative - Empowerment of Issuance of land Mangrove expansion Strict - Strict
livelihood CFARMC tenure instrument implementation of implementation
programs(container - Capability building to POs within Lagonglong RA 10654 of RA 10654
gardening/ enhancement and timberland areas - Retraining of
fish shelter learning visits to DFW
Socio-Econ All establishment, fish best MPAs Strict implementation Strict
vendor, construction Ecological of MPA and Fishery implementation
work) Balingasag laws of RA 10654 and
- Linkages with protection of MA
industrial companies
for skilled fisherfolk Introduction Creation of other
Jasaan of alternative suitable sites for
- Ecological - Reduce siltation - Conduct livelihoods MPA
assessment and from uplands ecological
profiling - IEC on waste resource
- Mangrove segregation assessment
All reforestation - Increase marine - Watershed
Ecological biodiversity within rehabilitation
MPA sites management
and protection
Rehabilitation of
Opol MPAs

32 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 33
Chapter 4: The Management Plan and Implementation

Cluster 4 4.3 MPA NETWORKS


The municipalities within Cluster 4, namely, Binuangan, Sugboncogon, Kinoguitan, have a
priority issue on low fish catch and biomass. Ironically, this is the cluster with the most Marine
Special emphasis has been given in the plan for Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). (According
Protected Areas (MPAs) within their municipalities, too numerous in fact that expansion is
to IUCN’s definition, Marine Protected Area “is a clearly defined geographical space,
not possible because it has reached the maximum allowable MPAs in their municipal waters.
recognized, dedicated and managed, through legal or other effective means, to achieve the
The strategy of deploying payaos or fish-aggregate devices to address this urgent issues is
long term conservation of nature with associated ecosystem services and cultural values.”)
unique to this cluster.

Table 7. Identified management strategies for Cluster 4 based on the SSS-GSIS framework. This is important since MPAs are key to replenishing biodiversity and provide nourishment
GSIS Municipality Sensitivity Susceptibility Suitability for coastal communities. Studies have shown that “no-take” MPAs double the amount of fish
Creation and Implementation of Creation and as well as their size, in a very short amount of time. They also serve as safe breeding grounds
adoption of CCA CRM Plan adoption of MPA for key species. But probably the most important effect of well managed MPAs is the “spill-
All Plan Management
Plan over” effect. Because of the over-production of fish in an MPA, the area in and around the
Governance Additional protected zone eventually benefits. Neighboring fishing grounds will also reap the gains of
funding for
Binuangan DFW and having a protected area.
development of
MPA
Introduction of Adoption of Unified Introduction There are a total of 27 MPAs in Macajalr Bay (see Table 8), some are operational while some
alternative livelihood Fisheries Ordinance of alternative are weak in management. What is desired for the bay is a network of MPA, which is a system
All like crab and signid (MBDA) livelihoods
culture of individual marine protected areas defined by connectivity and operating cooperatively.
Conduct of Establishing MPA networks will scale up the benefits of individual MPAs exponentially. By
Socio-Econ Binuangan seminars for
sustainable fishing making a networks of MPAs, the ecological effectiveness and administrative efficiency is
Impose local increased; in short, a network will greatly enhance MPA effectivity.
ordinance for
Kinoguitan beach resort
operators
In the oceanographic study of Macajalar Bay (see Chapter 2) the simulated modeling of
IEC regarding MPAs Strict Implementation
implementation of of MPA the flow, movement and direction of the waters in the bay will provide the selection of the
All fisheries ordinance Management ‘source’ and ‘sink’ MPAs to form the network. With the interconnectivity of the Bay’s water
Plan and Fisheries
Ordinance movements, fish and larvae stock are replenished on both sides of the bay and in between,
Ecological Mangrove Removal of illegal - Mangrove depending on the season. This cements the importance of establishing an MPA Network
rehabilitation structures along rehabilitation
Binuangan foreshore areas on Mabini and within the bay.
Poblacion
- Closed season
- Coral restoration The Marine Protected Area - Management Effectiveness Assessment Tool (MPA-MEAT) is
an assessment tool initiated by DENR and BFAR; it aims to assess governance of MPAs in
the Philippines in terms of enforcement, implementation, and maintenance. The MPA-MEAT
is composed of a series of criteria/questions grouped into 4 levels, each level having a
corresponding number of points. The points systems helps determine the ‘level’ of an MPA in
terms of governance, and the higher the points, the better an MPA is faring. The MPA MEAT
has been conducted on some of the MPAs in Macajalar Bay in 2015 and 2017 (Table 8). In
both years, the highest scoring MPAs were from Jasaan (Agutayan Marine Protected Area)
and Laguindingan (Tubajon Marine Protected Area). These data are important in determining
what can be replicated to the other MPAs in the Bay for a more effective governance, which
will further lead to a more effective MPA Network for the bay.

34 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 35
Chapter 4: The Management Plan and Implementation

Table 8. The Marine Protected Areas of Macajalar Bay and corresponding MEAT scores
for 2015 and 2017. 4.3 BAYWIDE 5-YEAR INTEGRATED COASTAL
MEAT MEAT
MANAGEMENT STRATEGIC PATHWAYS
2015 2017
LGU No MPA Location/Barangay Overall Overall
Score Score The medium term (5-years) strategic design for the baywide integrated coastal management
Alubijid 1 Alubijid Marine Protected Area Molocboloc/ Baybay 41 55 is a consolidation of the cluster-level identified management strategies (see previous section).
Balingasag 2 Hermano Fish Sancuary Hermano 40 15 Although the plan will still consist of cluster or municipal level strategies, the results of the
3 Mambayaan Fish Sanctuary Mambayaan 27 30 collective outputs are integrated for a 5-year comprehensive management plan for Macajalar
Binuangan 4 Dampias-Mosangot Marine Dampias/Mosangot
38 --
Bay.
Sanctuary
CDO 5 Bayabas Marine Fish Sanctuary Bayabas 18 N/A
Each cluster categorized the issues-strategies tandem according to its urgency in over five
6 Cugman Marine Fish Sanctuary Zone 6, Cugman 19 N/A
(5) years. At the same time, determining the most plausible pathways to take, the people/
7 Gusa Marine Fish Sanctuary Gusa 28 N/A
8 Lapasan Marine Fish Sanctuary Lapasan 25 N/A
offices to involve, the budgetary sources, among other details to achieve the desired output
9 Puerto Marine Fish Sanctuary Purok 3, Puerto 30 N/A or outcome. There are eight themes, where each related issue across clusters are lumped,
10 Tablon Marine Fish Sanctuary Baloy, Tablon 19 N/A followed by the corresponding strategic activities among clusters. The Medium Term
El Salvador 11 Burias Shoal Molugan 44 48 Strategic Plan for 2019-23 for Macajalar Bay as shown in Appendix 5.1.4 is part of the 10-
Jasaan 12 Agutayan Marine Protected Jampason 67 61 year Strategic Plan of MBDA.
Area
Kinoguitan 13 Sumalag-Poblacion Fish Sumalag-Poblacion INC N/A
Sanctuary
14 Buko Fish Sanctuary Buko INC N/A
15 Esperanza Fish Sanctuary Esperanza INC N/A
16 Panabol Fish Sanctuary Panabol INC N/A
17 Bolisong Fish Sanctuary Bolisong INC N/A
Lagonglong 18 Kauswagan 12 N/A
19 Dampil 9 N/A
Laguindingan 20 Mauswagon Marine Protected Mauswagon 37 N/A
Area
21 Moog Marine Protected Area Moog 46 N/A
22 Tubajon Marine Protected Tubajon 60 59
Area
Opol 23 Opol Marine Sanctuary Luyongbonbon OK --
Salay 24 Dinagsaan Marine Protected Dinagsaan OK 23
Area
Sugbongcogon 25 Poblacion N/A
26 Silad N/A
Tagoloan No MPA N/A N/A N/A
Villanueva 27 Pulo Fish Sanctuary IVLO, Looc 38 --

36 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


5.1 SSS TOOL AND RESULTS

5.1.1 SSS-GSIS OF THE MACAJALAR BAY DEVELOPMENT ALLIANCE

Appendix Table 1. Integrated SSS Matrix

SENSITIVITY
H M L
L LHH LMH LLH H

APPENDICES

SUSCEPTIBILTY
L LHM LMM LLM M

SUITABILITY
L LHL LML LLL L
M MHH MMH MLH H
M MHM MMM MLM M
M MHL MML MLL L
H HHH HMH HLH H
H HHM HMM HLM M
H HHL HML HLL L

It was important to identify management strategies from an assessment of the state of the
coastal resources and habitat conditions of Macajalar Bay as subjected to various threats
(e.g. overfishing, pollution) including potential impact to climate change. The Suitability-
Sensitivity-Susceptibility (SSS) tool was used. The participants were grouped into 4 clusters,
namely, Cluster 1: Laguindingan, Alubijid, and El Salvador City; Cluster 2: Opol, Cagayan de
Oro City, Tagoloan, and Villanueva; Cluster 3: Jasaan and Balingasag (including Logonglong);
Cluster 4: Salay, Binuangan, and Kinoguitan (including Sugbongcogon).

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 39


APPENDICES

Suitability-Sensitivity-Susceptibility (SSS) Rubrics

Appendix Table 2. Scores and equivalent ranks of MBDA from Suitability assessment. Appendix Table 3. Scores and equivalent ranks of MBDA from Sensitivity assessment.

Municipalities/ Cities Municipalities/ Cities

Sugbongcogon

Sugbongcogon
Laguindingan

Laguindingan
Question #

Lagonglong

Lagonglong
Question #

Balingasag

Balingasag
El Salvador

El Salvador
Binuangan

Binuangan
Kinoguitan

Kinoguitan
Villanueva

Villanueva
Component Component

Tagoloan

Tagoloan
Jasaan

Jasaan
Alubijid

Alubijid
Salay

Salay
CDO

CDO
Opol

Opol
1 3 3 3 1 2 1 3 2 1 2 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
2 3 2 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
4 3 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 4 1 3 2 1 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 2
Ecological 5 3 3 3 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 3 3 3 5 1 1 1 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1
6 2 2 1 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 1 3 Ecological/ 6 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 1
Physical
7 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 3 Attributes 7 2 3 3 1 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 2 1
8 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 8 1 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 1 1 2
9 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 9 1 1 1 3 1 3 1 2 2 2 1 1 2
10 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 3 3 2 10 1 2 3 2 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 1
Socio-Economic 11 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 11 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 3 2 3 1
Attributes 12 3 3 2 3 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 12 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2
13 3 2 3 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 13 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 2
14 3 3 3 2 3 1 2 2 3 2 2 3 3 14 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2
Governance Socio-Economic
15 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 15 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1
Attributes Attributes
16 3 3 3 2 2 1 2 3 3 3 2 2 1 16 1 1 2 1 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
Total 41 35 35 27 30 22 33 30 30 33 35 36 37 17 2 2 2 2 1 2 3 2 2 2 1 3 3
Rank equivalent H M M M M L M M M M M M M Governance 18 3 3 3 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3
Attributes
Total 34 38 39 34 36 44 40 39 39 42 34 37 35
Score Class: Rank
Rank equivalent M M M M M H M M M M M M M
16-26 Low (L)
27-37 Medium (M)
38-48 High (H) Score Class: Rank
18-29 Low (L)
30-42 Medium (M)
43-54 High (H)

40 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 41
42
APPENDICES

56-72
40-55
24-39
Physical

Attributes
Attributes
Attributes
Ecological/
Component

Governance
Socio-Economic

Total

Low (L)

High (H)
Medium (M)
Rank equivalent

Score Class: Rank


9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1

24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
Question #

1
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
1
1
3
2
1
3
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
2

M
40
Laguindingan

L
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
2

39
Alubijid

2
2
3
3
2
2
1
1
2
3
2
2
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
2

M
44
El Salvador

1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
3
3
2
1
2
3
3
3
2
1
3
1
1
3
2
2

M
Opol

48
2
2
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
2
3
3
1
3
2
3
2
2
2

H
60
CDO

1
2
2
1
2
2
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2

M
50
Tagoloan

2
2
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
3
2
3
1
1
1
2
2

M
50
Villanueva

1
1
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
2
3
2
1
3
2
3
1
1
3
2
2

M
55
Jasaan

1
2
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
2
2
1
2
2
1
3
3
3
1
2
2
2
2

M
53
Balingasag
Municipalities/ Cities

2
2
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
2
2
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2

H
56
Lagonglong

L
2
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
2

39
Salay
Appendix Table 4. Scores and equivalent ranks of MBDA from Susceptibility assessment.

L
3
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
2

39
Binuangan

Sugbongcogon

2
3
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
2

M
41
Kinoguitan

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


5.1.2 SENSITIVITY, LAC AND VULNERABILITY SCORES IN MACAJALAR BAY
USING ICSEA-C-CHANGE TOOL

Appendix Table 5. Sensitivity scores for the 13 municipalities/cities in Macajalar Bay using the ICSEA-C-Change Tool. Cells are colored green, yellow
and red for low, moderate and high sensitivity scores, respectively.
LOW MEDIUM HIGH MUNICIPALITY
SENSITIVITY CRITERIA
(1-2) (3-4) 5 LAG ALU ELS OPL CDO TAG VIL JAS BAL LNG SAL BIN SUG KIN
How much of More than Between Less than
the coastline is 50% is lined 25 to 50% is 25% is lined
Is there a cor- 1 lined by coral by coral lined by coral by coral 1 3 3 5 5 5 4 2 3 2 3 1 1
al reef in your reefs/ commu- reefs/ com- reefs/ com- reefs/ com-
area (with nities? munities munities munities
a defined
profile)? What is the between 25
2 highest hard Over 50% less than 25% 1 2 4 5 5 5 3 2 3 3 3 2 2
to 50%
coral cover (%)
How much of seagrasses
seagrasses seagrasses
the shallow cover mored
Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan

cover more cover less


3 areas are cov- than 1/8 to 3 5 2 5 5 5 4 3 3 1 3 3 2
Are there than half of 1/8 of the
ered by sea- 1/2 of the
large sea- the reef flat reef flat
grass? reef flat
grass mead-
ows? What is the mixed bed
maximum num- 2 to 4 spe-
4 with over 5 monospecif- 3 3 2 5 3 3 4 4 3 3 2 3 1
ber of seagrass cies ic bed
species
COASTAL HABITAT

species?
between 25
How much of over 50% of less than 25%
to 50% of the
the natural the natural of natural
5 natural man- 5 3 4 5 4 3 3 3 2 5 5 1
mangrove ar- mangrove mangrove 2
Are the man- grove areas
eas are left? areas are left areas are left
grove areas are left
widespread? scrub-fring-
What kind of riverine -ba- riverine-fring- ing type
6 mangrove for- sin- fringing 1 3 4 4 4 5 4 3 3 3 3 5 3
ing type scrub-fring-
est is left? type
ing type
Average for Coastal Habitat 2.3 3.1 2.9 4.7 4.5 4.4 3.5 2.8 3.1 2.3 2.9 3.2 1.7
43
44
LOW MEDIUM HIGH MUNICIPALITY
SENSITIVITY CRITERIA
(1-2) (3-4) 5 LAG ALU ELS OPL CDO TAG VIL JAS BAL LNG SAL BIN SUG KIN
catch pre-
APPENDICES

catch a mix catch pre-


dominantly
7 Dominant catch pelagics
of demersal dominantly 3 3 4 1 4 4 3 3 3 2 3 2 3
and pelagic demersal fish
(tuna, mack- species e.g. groupers
erel, etc)
What kind of >8kg per day 3 to 8kg per <3kg per day
fishery oper- 8 Catch rate (or equivalent day (or equiv- (or equiva- 1 3 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 1 3 2
ates in your CPUE) alent CPUE) lent CPUE)
barangay/ Are the fishing considerable
area? gears used number of
restricted on habitat-asso-
9 shallow water
mostly mobile presence of 3 3 4 1 4 2 2 3 3 2 1 2 3
ciated gear
fishing gear both types
(coral, man- (e.g. fixed
grove, seagrass? gear on sea-
Habitats? grass beds)
200 per- between 200 more than

FISH AND FISHERIES


Population sons or less to 500 persons 500 persons
10
density (Con- per square per square per square 1 1 3 4 3 5 3 2 2 2 3 2 3
How import- centration of kilometer (1 kilometers (1 kilometer (1
ant is the population) household household per household
fisheries to the per 2.5 ha) 1.25 ha) per 1 ha)
community? more
Fisheries eco- 35% or less of 36% to 60% of 60% ofthan
11 system depen-
the 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 3 3 2
the popula- the popula- population
dency tion are fishers tion are fishers are fishers

1.8 2.2 3.4 2.3 3.3 3.2 2.8 2.6 2.7 2 2.2 2.4 2.6
Has the beach
12 3 4 4 5 5 3 2 3 4 3 1 3 3
changed much land gain/ac- stable eroding
in the last 12 creting
months?
Is the coast- Low cliff (<5m
line prone to Is the coastline Rocky, cliffed high); cobble, Sandy
erosion and 13 prone to ero- coast, beach gravel beach- beaches; 4 4 5 5 5 5 3 5 4 3 5 3 3
delta; mud-
marine flood- sion? rock es; alluvial or sandflat
ing? plains
Width of shore

COASTAL INTEGRITY
14 >100 [50,100] <50 5 4 3 5 5 4 4 3 3 5 5 1 1
platform (m)
15
Is the coast 2 4 3 1 1 5 2 3 2 1 1 3 5
<1:50 1:50 to 1:200 >1:200
steep?
Average for Coastal Integrity 3.5 4.3 3.7 4.0 4.0 4.3 2.9 3.5 3.3 3.0 3.0 2.5 3.0
GENERAL MEAN 2.5 3.2 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.4 2.7 2.7 2.4

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


Appendix Table 6. Lack of Adaptive Capacity (LAC) scores for the 13 municipalities/cities in Macajalar Bay using the ICSEA-C-Change Tool. Cells are
colored green, yellow and red for low, moderate and high LAC scores, respectively.

SCORING MUNICIPALITY
ADAPTIVE CAPACITY CRITERIA
2 3 4 5 LAG ALU ELS OPL CDO TAG VIL JAS BAL LNG SAL BIN SUG KIN
If there are 3 times 2 times more
corals, are more more as many massive
there more branch- branch- branching than
1 massive corals 2 3 5 5 4 5 3 4 4 2 3 2 2
ing than ing than as mas- branch-
compared massive massive sive corals ing; or no
to branching corals corals corals
ones?
number
number more
of adult
of adult large
Health If there are cor- and large as many
and large adults
of coral als, are there colonies large
colonies than juve-
Commu- more large is 1/2 that colonies
is 1/3 that niles and
nities 2 colonies com- of juvenile as small 2 3 5 4 2 5 3 3 3 3 2 2 2
of juvenile small col-
pared to small and small ones of
and small onies of
colonies for the colonies the same
colonies the same
species? of the species
Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan

of the species; or
same
species no corals
species
more between between
Is the coral less than
than 100 75 to 100 50 to 75
3 diversity much 50 species 5 4 3 5 4 5 4 3 4 3 4 3 3
species species species
reduced? remaining
remaining remaining remaining
Average/Corals 3 3.4 4.3 4.6 3.3 4.8 3.5 3.3 3.6 2.7 2.8 2.3 2.3
COASTAL HABITAT

Enhalus
Thalassia-
If there are acoroi- Enhalus
Halophila Cymo-
seagrasses, is es-Thalas- acoroides
- Halodule docea-
Enhalus acoroi- sia dominat-
4 dominat- Halodule 4 4 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 3 4 3 3
des density hemprichii ed mead-
ed mead- dominat-
highest among dominat- ow; or no
ow ed mead-
the seagrasses? ed mead- seagrass
Health of ow ow
seagrass
meadows Barren
Meadow Barren Barren area is
Are there more is contin- area is area is more than
barren areas uous and between between 60% of the
5 2 4 4 5 3 4 4 3 3 2 2 3 2
within the sea- barren 20 to 40% 40 to 60% meadow;
grass meadow? area is less of the of the or there
than 20% meadow meadow are now
meadows
Average/Seagrass 3 4.0 3.7 4.4 3 3 3.5 3 2.7 2.5 3 3 2.5
45
46
SCORING MUNICIPALITY
ADAPTIVE CAPACITY CRITERIA
2 3 4 5 LAG ALU ELS OPL CDO TAG VIL JAS BAL LNG SAL BIN SUG KIN
APPENDICES

presence presence presence


of more of 3 to 4 of 1 to 2
than 5 mangrove mangrove
mangrove species species
species capable capable
Are the slow capable of coloniz- of coloniz- Yes, all
growing, slow of coloniz- ing newly ing newly species
colonizing ing newly avaibable available are slow
6 species most available habitat habitat growing, 3 3 3 5 3 5 4 2 3 4 4 5 3
common in the habitat
at a rate at a rate at a rate slow colo-
area? that keeps that keeps that keeps nizing
Health of pace with pace with
mangrove pace with the rate the rate
forests the rate of relative of relative
of relative sea-level sea-level
sea-level rise rise
rise
seedlings seedlings seedlings Yes, all
Are there more and prop- and prop- and prop- trees are
large trees than agules agules agules
7 small propa- observed observed observed large,
seedlings 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 3 5 2
gules (in terms of between between between and prop-
density)? 8 to 12 4 to 8 1 to 4 agules are
months months months
every year every year every year absent
Average/Mangroves 2.5 3.2 3.2 4.5 3.5 4.4 3.6 2.5 2.8 3 3.6 5 2.5
Water is Water is
observed observed Water is
Is the water Water is to be to be

COASTAL HABITAT
8 murky/silty in clear all murky murky/silty murky/silty
all year 2 3 3 3 4 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 3
most year? year round for 1 to 2 for three round
quarters a quarters a
year year
short periods
periods of of warm periods
Does the area warm still still water of warm
Water 9 experience No water pre- prevails still water 4 3 3 3 2 3 2 4 2 3 4 3 2
warm still water? vails and is for several prevails
Quality days or for several
related to weeks at a months
tides time
solid waste solid waste
are ob- are ob- solid waste
Does solid waste served in served in accumu-
10 accumulate No this coastal this coastal lates in this 3 3 2 3 4 3 4 3 2 2 5 3 3
in this coastal area be- area be- coastal
area? tween 1 to tween 4 to area all
4 months 8 months year round
every year every year
Average/Water Quality 3 3 2.8 3 3.3 3 2.8 3.3 2.3 2.3 3.8 3 2.7

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


SCORING MUNICIPALITY
ADAPTIVE CAPACITY CRITERIA
2 3 4 5 LAG ALU ELS OPL CDO TAG VIL JAS BAL LNG SAL BIN SUG KIN
More than
How much of between Between 90% of the
Less than
Habitat the degraded 50 to 70% 70 to 90% degraded
50% of the
restoration 11 area remain to degraded of the of the habitats 2 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 2 2 3 2 2
effors be rehabilitat- degraded degraded remain to
habitats
ed? habitats habitats be rehabil-
itated
Almost Total MPA Total MPA Total MPA
none; is areas is areas is
How much is the MPAs are areas
7.5% to between 1 less than
12 need to expand 15% or 5 4 5 2 3 5 5 2 5 3 5 2 3
15% of the to 7.5% of 1% of the
MPA? more of municipal the munici- municipal
municipal waters pal waters waters
waters
Was the MPA No, biodi- Fisheries
desing and
Marine verity and and tour- Tourism
was the
protected 13 management tourism ism were 2 3 3 3 2 5 4 3 2 3 2 3 3
focussed on only con- yes
COASTAL HABITAT

areas aims also consider-


fishery enhance- considered ations sideration
ment alone?
Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan

To what extend
do protected No; all Only two Only one No habi-
areas focus on habitats habitats habitat tats were
14 single habitats represent- were was includ- 2 3 4 2 2 5 4 3 2 2 2 3 2
included in
(mangrove, ed in the included in ed in the the MPA
seagrass, coral) MPA the MPA MPA
alone?
Average/Marine Protected Area 2.8 3.2 3.7 2.8 2.5 4.4 4.3 2.8 2.8 2.5 2.9 2.5 2.5
Average for Coastal Habitats 2.9 3.4 3.5 3.9 3.1 3.9 3.5 3.0 2.8 2.6 3.2 3.2 2.5
What is the
contribution of
to the less than between between more than
15 fisheries 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 5 2 3 2 4 3
per capita con- 20% 20% to 40% 40 to 60% 60%
sumption of the
areas?
What is the av-
erage fish catch more than between between 1 less than 1
16 (in kilograms) 2.5 to 5 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 4
5 kilos to 2.5 kilos kilo
per day per kilos
person?
No; Or
FISH AND FISHERIES

Are fishery there are


man-
17 resource Yes no man- 2 5 5 5 5 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 5
agement plans agement
effective? plans
47
48
SCORING MUNICIPALITY
ADAPTIVE CAPACITY CRITERIA
2 3 4 5 LAG ALU ELS OPL CDO TAG VIL JAS BAL LNG SAL BIN SUG KIN
APPENDICES

What is the
fishing Less than 5 between 5 between more than
18 average to 20 5 3 3 4 4 3 2 3 2 4 5 4 4
experience per years to 10 years 10 20 years
years
fisher?
No, more Fishing plus Fishing plus
Is fishing the than 3 oth- two other another
19 only source of er sources 4 2 3 4 4 3 2 3 4 4 4 4 4
sour ces of source of Yes
livelihood? of liveli- livelihood livelihood
hood
Average for Fish and Fisheries 3.2 3 3.3 3.7 3.8 3.1 2.1 3.6 2.4 3.6 3 3.8 4

How much has between between more than


eroded 0, accret-
20 land 0 to 15m 15 to 30m 30m of 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 3
in the last 30 ing land loss land loss land loss
years?

COASTAL INTEGRITY
How much does More than
the present land 50% or
pattern de- No devia- between 1 Between
21 use there is no 4 4 3 2 3 3 2 4 2 3 2 2 3
viate from the tion to 25% 25 to 50% use land
land use plan use plan
To what extent
Human do coastal
Settle- modifications
ments (pier, wharf, More than
and seawall 50% or
No devia- between 1 Between
22 construction, there is no 4 3 2 2 3 3 2 4 2 3 2 2 3
reclamation, tion to 25% 25 to 50% use land
foreshoer use) use plan
deviated from
CLUP and similar

HUMAN ACTIVITY
regulations?

How extensive is
the conversion
of the coast-
lands from Commer- agri-
Economy 23 al Residential Rural 3 3 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 4 4 3 3
rural-agricultural Industrial cial cultural
to residential to
commercial and
industrial use?

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


How much of
the adult pop- than Between Between More than
Education 24 ulation has less Less 3 2 4 2 2 3 2 3 4 2 2 2 2
20% 20 to 40% 40 to 60% 60%
than 10 years of
schooling?
Average for Human Activity 3.5 3 3.2 2.4 2.8 2.8 2.2 3.5 2.6 3 2.5 2.3 2.8
GENERAL MEAN 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.2 2.9 2.5 3.5 2.5 2.8 2.7 2.8 3.1

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


49
APPENDICES

Appendix Table 7. ICSEA-C-Change Vulnerability scores for the 13 municipalities/cities in Macajalar


Location/ Area
Bay using the ICSEA-C-Change Tool. Cells are colored green, yellow and red for low, moderate and LGU MPA Coordinates Legal Status Ecosystem
Barangay (ha)
high LAC scores, respectively. 124˚38'19.10" E 08˚30'58.91" N 3
Adaptive ICSEA-C-Change
Municipality/City Exposure Sensitivity Bayabas Marine
Capacity Vulnerability Bayabas 124˚38'24.33" E 08˚30'56.52" N
Fish Sanctuary
Laguindingan 4.3 2.5 3.1 Moderate 124˚38'24.41" E 08˚31'09.62" N
124˚38'18.33" E 08˚30'55.99" N
Alubijid 4.8 3.2 3.2 Moderate
124˚41'43.33" E 08˚28'35.10" N 3 Coral reefs,
El Salvador 4.8 3.3 3.1 Moderate Mangroves
Cugman Marine Zone 6, 124˚41'43.90" E 08˚28'34.46" N
Opol 4.8 3.6 3.0 Moderate Fish Sanctuary Cugman 124˚41'42.52" E 08˚28'33.76" N
Cagayan de Oro 4.8 3.9 3.2 Moderate 124˚41'41.99" E 08˚28'34.56" N
Tagoloan 4.8 3.9 2.9 Moderate 124˚40'19.10" E 08˚28'42.75" N 8.5 Barangay Coral reef
Villanueva 4.8 3.0 2.5 Moderate Ordinance #
124˚40'46.97" E 08˚28'45.46" N
Gusa Marine Fish
Jasaan 4.8 3.0 3.5 Moderate Gusa 124˚40'36.22" E 08˚28'48.80" N
Sanctuary
Balingasag 4.8 3.0 2.5 Moderate Cagayan de 124˚40'33.94" E 08˚28'46.69" N

Lagonglong 4.8 2.4 2.8 Moderate Oro 124˚40'10.13" E 08˚29'7.99" N


124˚40'7.64" E 08˚29'5.67" N 3 Coral reef
Salay 4.3 2.7 2.7 Moderate
Lapasan Marine 124˚40'12.34" E 08˚29'3.01" N
Binuangan 3.3 2.7 2.8 Moderate Lapasan
Fish Sanctuary 124˚40'14.13" E 08˚29'4.83" N
Sugbongcogon 3.3
124˚40'10.13" E 08˚29'7.99" N
Kinoguitan 3.3 2.4 3.1 Moderate
124˚44'46.16" E 08˚30'1.10" N 3 Coral reef

Puerto Marine Purok 3, 124˚44'49.32" E 08˚30'4.89" N


Fish Sanctuary Puerto 124˚44'45.93" E 08˚30'1.73" N
124˚44'42.64" E 08˚30'4.25" N
5.1.3 MARINE PROTECTED AREAS 124˚42'40.62" E 08˚28'34.03" N 3 Coral reef

Tablon Marine 124˚42'37.97" E 08˚28'35.84" N


Baloy, Tablon
Fish Sanctuary 124˚42'30.03" E 08˚28'35.80" N
Appendix Table 8. The Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) of the LGUs of Macajalar Bay, with corre-
124˚42'29.92" E 08˚28'33.55" N
sponding coordinate, areas, legal status, and the ecosystems occuring in each MPA. There are a
Burias Shoal Molugan 124˚34'04.69" E 8˚32'49.70" N 14.8 City Fishery Coral reefs,
total of 27 MPAs in Macajalar Bay. Code of 2012 Seagrass
124˚34'03.34" E 8˚32'45.18" N
Location/ Area
LGU MPA Coordinates Legal Status Ecosystem 124˚34'02.35" E 8˚32'41.90" N
Barangay (ha)
124˚33'57.63" E 8˚32'41.81" N
124°28'23.6" N 8°35'37.7" E 5 Municipal Coral reefs,
Ordinance No. Seagrass, 124˚33'51.69" E 8˚32'41.31" N
Alubijid Marine Molocboloc/ 124°28'32.0" N 8°35'32.0" E El Salvador
Alubijid 45-2006 Mangroves 124˚33'49.22" E 8˚32'43.58" N
Protected Area Baybay 124°28'31.1" N 8°35'51.9" E
124˚33'49.27" E 8˚32'47.02" N;
124°28'22.5" N 8°35'56.8" E
124˚33'49.55" E 8˚32'50.67" N
124˚46'07.8" E 08˚42'53.1" N 3 Municipal Coral reefs,
124˚33'54.08" E 8˚32'55.15" N;
Ordinance No. Seagrass
Hermano Fish 124˚46'11.2" E 08˚42'57.6" N
Hermano 06-2006 Article 124˚33'59.73" E 8˚32'54.87" N
Sancuary 124˚46'07.6" E 08˚42'59.5" N 5, Section 17 Agutayan Jampason 124°41'29.7" E 8°40'12.90" N 4.5 Municipal Coral Reef
124˚46'04.1" E 08˚42'57.4" N Marine Ordinance No.
Balingasag 124°41'28.5" E 8°40'03.10" N
124˚45'25.9" E 08˚46'38.9" N 4 Municipal Coral reefs, Protected Area 24-97
Jasaan 124°41'14.4" E 8°40'02.00" N
Ordinance No. Seagrass
Mambayaan 124˚45'19.4" E 08˚46'43.6" N
Mambayaan 06-2006 Article 124°41'06.7" E 8°40'14.40" N
Fish Sanctuary 124˚45'21.0" E 08˚46'52.1" N 5, Section 17 124°41'23.2" E 8°40'17.80" N
124˚45'27.6" E 08˚46'52.7" N
Sumalag- Sumalag- 124°47'06.0" E 8°38'38.0" N 5 Municipal
124˚46'49.88" 08˚54' 44.22" 5.4 Ordinance Coral reefs, Poblacion Fish Poblacion Ordinance
124°36'37.0" E 8°59'00.0" N
No. 011 Series Seagrass Sanctuary No. 443-2010,
124˚46'51.16" 08˚54'35.28"
of 2005: 124°47'09.0" E 8°59'08.0" N Article 6,
Dampias- 124˚46'42.84" 08˚ 54'37.74" Ordinance Section 44
124°47'06.0" E 8°39'10.0" N
Mosangot Dampias/ 124˚46'43.08" 08˚ 54'44.10" declaring Kinoguitan
Binuangan Buko Fish Buko 124°30'10.7" E 9°00'24.4" N 5 Municipal
Marine Mosangot Barangay
Sanctuary Dampias and Sanctuary Ordinance
124°30'10.7" E 9°00'27.6" N
Mosangot as No. 443-2010,
124°30'07.8" E 9°00'27.9" N Article 6,
Protectd Fish
Sanctuary. 124°30'07.5" E 9°00'24.4" N Section 44

50 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 51
APPENDICES

Location/ Area Location/ Area


LGU MPA Coordinates Legal Status Ecosystem LGU MPA Coordinates Legal Status Ecosystem
Barangay (ha) Barangay (ha)
Esperanza Fish Esperanza 124°44'39.9" E 9°00'23.4" N 0.99 Municipal Sugbong- Poblacion 123.4618 8.5700'N 5
Sanctuary Ordinance cogon
124°49'57.4" E 9°00'23.4" N 124.4612 8.5700'N
No. 443-2010,
124°49'57.4" E 9°00'21.9" N Article 6, 124.4618 8.5656'N
124°50'00" E 9°00'21.9" N Section 44 124.4612 8.5656'N
Panabol Fish Panabol 124°49'06.3" E 9°00'30.1" N 0.38 Municipal Silad 124.464 8.5839'N 5
Sanctuary Ordinance
124°49'06.1" E 9°00'31.5" N 124.4637 8.5839'N
Kinoguitan No. 443-2010,
124°49'03.4" E 9°00'31.7" N Article 6, 124.4631 8.5824'N
124°49'03.2" E 9°00'30.3" N Section 44 124.4634 8.5824'N
Bolisong Fish Bolisong 124°47'48.2" E 8°59'57.6" N 0.42 Municipal Tagoloan No MPA N/A N/A N/A
Sanctuary Ordinance
124°47'48.8" E 9°00'03.8" N Villanueva Pulo Fish IVLO, Looc 124˚46'12" E 08˚35'32" N 2 Mun. Coral Reef
No. 443-2010, Sanctuary Ordinance No.
124°47'53.0" E 9°00'03.8" N Article 6, 124˚46'12" E 08˚35'22" N
494, Villanueva
124°47'55.3" E 8°59'57.1" N Section 44 124˚46'05" E 08˚35'22" N Municipal
Lagonglong Kauswagan 124°46'22.7" E 8°47'30.2" N 3 Code of 124˚46'05" E 08˚35'32" N, Fishery Code of
General thence to 2010
124°46'20.1" E 8°47'24.2" N
Ordinances, point 1
124°46'24.9" E 8°47'22.5" N Article I, section
124°46'28.3" E 8°47'29.2" N 25 I. 01.- section
25 I. 06.
Dampil 124°47'13.8" E 8°49'56.8" N 4 2007
124°47'13.2" E 8°50'07.7" N
124°47'06.1" E 8°50'08.1" N
124°47'05.3" E 8°49'59.9" N
Laguindingan Mauswagon Mauswagon 124˚25'5.05" E 8˚36'57.56" N 5 Coral reef,
Marine seagrass
124˚25'16.76" E 8˚37'3.37" N
Protected Area
124˚25'14.85" E 8˚37'7.91" N
124˚25'3.30" E 8˚37'2.16" N
Moog Marine Moog 124˚28'46.17" E 8˚37'0.73" N 8.75 Coral reef,
Protected Area seagrass
124˚28'43.60" E 8˚36'49.53" N
124˚28'51.28" E 8˚36'47.14" N
124˚28'54.07" E 8˚36'58.13" N
Tubajon Marine Tubajon 124˚28'22.38" E 8˚37'14.72" N 22 Ordinance Coral reef,
Protected Area # 94 mangroves,
124˚28'24.49" E 8˚37'22.55" N
seagrass
124˚27'56.05" E 8˚37'30.28" N
124˚27'54.76" E 8˚37'22.24" N
Opol Opol Marine Luyong- 124˚34.563' E 8˚31.872' N 5.2 Ordinance No. Coral Reef,
Sanctuary bonbon 2002-10 Mangroves
124˚34.557' E 8˚32.013' N
124˚34.490' E 8˚31.998' N
124˚34.518' E 8˚31.858' N
Salay Dinagsaan Dinagsaan 124.7849 8.9033 13.77 Coral Reef,
Marine Seagrass
124.7831 8.9031
Protected Area
124.7826 8.9052
124.7852 8.9054

52 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 53
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5.1.4 CLUSTER-LEVEL 5-YEAR WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN

Appendix Table 9. Cluster 1: Laguindingan, Alubijid, & El Salvador City


Timeline
Issues Output/ Outcome Strategies Pathway Activities LGU Vulnerability (H M L) WHO Budget Source
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
URGENT (1st Year)
1. Conflict of Municipal Boundaries Delineated Municipal Waters Joint SB resolution on municipal water Joint SB Session of water delineation Coordinate with NAMRIA, BFAR & other concerned agencies Alubijid (H) & MBDA/NAMRIA/BFAR/DILG MBDA/BFAR/LGU
delineation Laguindingan (M)
Presentation of proposed municipal water delineation Convene SB committee concerned & orient them on water delineation policy
SB committee Chairman will report the minutes to SB concerned during session
Co-Management
2. Ineffecient Law Enforcement (C4) Strengthened/Enhanced Law Strict Enforcement of Fishery Ordinances and Drafting→Presentation→Review of UFO (LGU level) Presentation of UFO draft of remaining LGU(Binoangan) Cluster Wide CLET LGU/BFAR/PNP MARITIME/PCG/ MBDA/BFAR/LGU
Enforcement Laws (UFO) (C3 & C4) Consolidation of inputs suggestions of SB (C4) Consolidation of UFO SB's Input DFW/MBDA CLET
UFO presented to MBDA Council for comments & approval
Finalization of UFO for presentation to Sangguniang Panlalawigan
3. Lack of Livelihood Opportunities (C2) Livelihood Provided (C2) Introduction of Alternative Livelihood Projects Coordinate with NGA's,NGO's & other PO's Make & submit proposal Alubijid (H), Laguindingan (M), El Salvador (L) Concerned NGA's (DA,DOLE,DTI,) LGU (MSWD), concerned NGA's,
Identiification of Beneficiaries DSWD, TESDA), NGOs, Business Sector NGO's, Business Sector
Skills training on AL Projects LGU (MSWD)
PRIORITY BUT NOT URGENT (Y2-Y3)
4. Absence of Sea Use Plan in CLUP (C3) CLUP's drafted and approved Updating Land use & Formulation of Sea use Coordinate with HLURB, DILG Sectoral Data Gathering, Orientation, Training on CLUP Cluster Wide LGU (MPDC, SB), HLURB, DILG LGU
(CCA-DRR harmonized CLUP) Formulation / Updating
Creation of Land use Committee
5. Ineffective Solid Waste Management (C3) Clean Coastal Waters (C3) Strict implementation of R. A. 9003 (C3) Formulation of 10-year Solid Waste Management Plan IEC Activities (SWM) Coastal cleanups (C3) Cluster Wide LGU(MENRO) DENR-EMB, LGU
Clustering Approach
Tap DENR
Identification of sanitary landfill site
Establish Material recovery facility
6. Lacking of PCRA Capability Enhanced PCRA Capability Capability Training Coordination with academe/ NGA's to provide technical PCRA Training (Fish, corals, sea grass, sea weeds, macroinverts, mangroves Alubijid (H), El Salvador (M), Laguindingan (L) MBDA, MMC (XU), PEMSEA, MSU PEMSEA,LGU(DA),DENR,BFAR
assistance (C2)
Identification of participants Resource Ecological Assessment (C2) MBBDABusiness Sector
Tree Growing Project
7. Decreasing Coastal Marine Resources Increased/improved coastal marine Watershed Management Plan (C2) Implementation of CRM (Habitat Management) (C2 & C4) Identification of site & assessment (C2) El Salvador (H), Alubijid (M), Laguindingan (L) LGU, DENR, BFAR,MBDA LGU, DENR, BFAR,
caused by erosion & siltation (C2) resources; Propose ordinance→public hearing to stakeholders→enactment→adoption (C2)
Formulation of MPA Management Plan (C2 & C4)
MPA expanded by 10% (C3) Enforcement of environmental ordinances/laws Business Sector
Intensify Tree Growing Project (PPP Approach)
Implement/promote organic farming/contour farming
Riverbank protection Project (Lambago/bamboo growing)
IMPORTANT, NOT URGENT (Y4-Y5)
8. Informal Settlers Informal Settlers Relocated Implementation of Land Use & Zoning Coordinate with NHA & HUDCC Baselining of Informal Settlers Alubijid (H), El Salvador (M), Laguindingan LGU (Mayor's Office), NHA LGU, NHA, DAR, HUDCC
Ordinance Formulation of Local Shelter Plan
Identification of Relocation Site
Acquisition of lot for relocation
Creation/activation of Local Housing Board
Make/ submit proposal
Creation of Housing Office
Formulation of Lot distribution Policies
9. Proposed Seaport Construction Affecting Coastal Ecosystem will be conserved Conservation of marine ecosystem Coordination with concerned stakeholders Identification & assessmentof coastal resources affected Alubijid (H), Laguindingan (M) PPA, NEDA, Ayala Lands, LGU PPA, Ayala Lands
Marine Ecosystem (PPA, NEDA/ RDC,BFAR,DENR,Academe) Relocation of MPA (MPA relocation plan drafting→transplant of corals→Hire
academe/
NGA's for technical assistance
Coordinate with LGU Villanueva (Fra-and)

54 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 57
Chapter 5: Supplemental Materials

Appendix Table 10. Cluster 2: Opol, Cagayan de Oro City, Tagoloan, & Villanuenva
Timeline
Issues Output/ Outcome Strategies Pathway Activities LGU Vulnerability (H M L) WHO Budget Source
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
URGENT (1st Year)
1. Lack of Policy Awareness on Fully aware communities Formulation and Implementation of IEC Policy Tracking Codifying existing policies Tagoloan, CDO, Opol, Villanueva Academic inatitution and LGUs Academic Institution extn and LGU-SB
Management on Coastal Resources 5 yr Plan (C4)
Orientation on Legislative tracking MBDA/DILG MBDA
Determination of Level of Implementation LGU-SB LGU-SB
IEC Design (C4) Tap technical experts to formulate the design (with the LGU Community) Dev. Com Experts and LGU LGU
Implementation of IEC (C3) LGU LGU
2. Improper Infrastructure Development Proper infrastructure development Policy Tracking and Lobbying Policy tracking Packaging of Information CDO, Opol, Villanueva, Tagoloan Academic inatitution and LGUs Academic Institution extn and LGU-SB
Lobbying Training on lobbying Dev. Com Experts and LGU LGU
Presentations to the council (Activation and strengthening of MFARMC) MBDA MBDA (outsourcing)
MFARMC BFAR (baywide)
3. Lack of Harmonious Coordination Full compliance of government Policy Tracking and Lobbying Policy Tracking Packaging of Information CDO, Opol, Villanueva, Tagoloan Academic inatitution and LGUs Academic Institution extn and LGU-SB
(LGU, GA, Investors) processes and regulations
Lobbying Presentations to the council Dev. Com Experts and LGU LGU
MFARMC BFAR (baywide)
4. Unregulated extraction along rivers Regulated extraction in rivers Enforcement of Laws Policy Tracking Packaging of Information CDO Academic institution and LGUs Academic Institution extn and LGU-SB
Lobbying Presentations to the council Dev. Com Experts and LGU LGU
Linking with the concerned agencies Regular monitoring and evaluation MFARMC BFAR (baywide)
Active involvement in the multiparty monitoring team MBDA w/ LGU LGU
Monitoring Board
5. Poor condition of the environment Improved conditions Protection and Rehabilitation Mangrove and nursery reforestation (C3) REA (C1) CDO, Tagoloan MMC/MBDA outsourcing (DENR & BFAR)
(Coral, Seagrass, mangroves, Water
Set up nursery mangrove planting LGU & DENR LGU &DENR
quality) (C3)
Establishment of artificial reefs Construction and deployment of Ars CDO, Tagoloan, Villanueva LGU & BFAR LGU & BFAR
Establishment of MPAs Identification of Site (C1) Tagoloan LGU & Academic LGU
Adoption of MPA SB & MAO/MENRO LGU
Setting up the MPA Site SB & MAO/MENRO LGU
Adoption of MPA Plan (C4, C3) SB & MAO/MENRO LGU
Rehabilitation of MPAs Site specific CDO, Opol, Villanueva Academe & LGU LGU
Expansion of MPA
PRIORITY BUT NOT URGENT (Y2-Y3)
6. Limited provision of livelihood Enhanced livelihood opportunities Approval of ordinances (Local Linkages with industrial companies (C1) Special recruitment activities (C1) CDO,Villanueva, Tagoloan, Opol LGU/PESO Industries
opportunities (C3, C1) employment)
Provision of Livelihood Opportunities Drafting of local employment ordinance (including Adoption) LGU - SB LGU-SB
(C4, C1)
Institutionalization of Livelihood programs LGU LGU
7. Lack of Management Plan (C3) Implemented Management Plan Approval of Ordinances Adoption of Plans Formulation of CRM plan (C4) CDO, Opol, Tagoloan, Villanueva MBDA, Academe, LGU LGU
Public consultation LGU LGU
Lobby for adoption MBDA/LGU LGU
8. Siltation due to upland development Rehabilitated upland area Upland rehabilitation Ecological Assessment Field surveys Tagoloan, CDO, Villanueva, Opol MMC/MBDA DENR/BFAR
(C1)
Identification of eroded areas CDORBMC DENR, SAMDHANA SHIELD
Plotting of restoration of eroded areas Site preparation
Nursery establishment
Planting (C1)

58 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 61
Chapter 5: Supplemental Materials

Appendix Table 11. Cluster 3: Jasaan, Balingasag, Lagonglong, Salay


Timeline
Issues Output/ Outcome Strategies Pathway Activities LGU Vulnerability (H M L) WHO Budget Source
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
URGENT (1st Year)
1. Occurrence of poaching and illegal Strengthened PO's and DFW's Retraining of PO's and DFW's DFW training Request BFAR for training of DFW's All LGU's in Cluster 3 BFAR-PFO, LGU-MA, MBDA BFAR-PFO, LGU-MA, MBDA (IEC materials)
fishing
Less occurrence of poaching/illegal Adoption of R.A 10654 Allocation of budget for training
fishing
Regulated illegal fishing Strict enforecement of R.A 10654 Deputization of DFW's
Declaration of closed season Massive IEC on R.A. 10654 to fisherfolks Conduct IEC to Coastal barangays on R.A. 10654
Conduct regular Seaborne Patrol
Develop/produce IEC materials
2. Ineffective MPA management High biodiversity Enforce management plan Formulation of MPA Plan Assesment of proposed MPA expansion area Balingasag, Lagonglong, Salay DENR/BFAR/MBDA DENR/BFAR/MBDA, LGU-MA
High fish productivity Conduct CLET Creation of MPA Plan Amendments of ordinance for re-expansion of MPA LGU/SB LGU/SB
Expansion of MPA Create MPA management plan LGU/MBDA/DENR/BFAR LGU-MA/MBDA/DENR/BFAR
Adoption of management plan LGU/SB LGU/SB
3. Low fish catch High fish catch & High fish biomass IEC, implement UFO Creation of Cluster 3 CLET Scheduling of Sea Borne Patrol (Cluster 3) All LGU's in Cluster 3 PNP-MARITIME, BFAR-QRT, LGU's, COASTGUARD PNP-MARITIME, BFAR-QRT, LGU-MA,
COASTGUARD
Mangrove expansion Budget allocation fuel & DFW honorarium LGU-MA LGU-MA
Identify another MPA site Adoption of UFO LGU/SB LGU/SB
Introduce alternative livelihood
programs
Resource enhancement
PRIORITY BUT NOT URGENT (Y2-Y3)
4. High mortality of fish species at MP Sustainability of MP Practice/implement Good Aquaculture Mangrove rehab & expansion Assesment of proposed mangrove expansion area Balingasag, Lagonglong, Salay DENR, XU, LGU DENR, XU, LGU-MA
Practice
* Productive MP Strict monitoring & enforcement to Linkage of DENR & BFAR for funding MBDA/LGU LGU-MA
investor vis a vis cancellation of license
to operate
Management of MP Assesment of MP BFAR, DENR, XU BFAR, DENR, XU
Outsourcing of funds LGU/MBDA LGU-MA
Orientation of G.A.P. BFAR LGU-MA/BFAR/EMC-MP
Enhancement/amendment of MOA LGU-SB, BFAR LGU-MA, BFAR, EMC-MP
5. Marine/coastal pollution Clean cosatal areas, MMK Conduct regular coastal clean up Adoption & implementation of R.A. 9003 Conduct massive IEC on SWM to coastal barangays All LGU's in Cluster 3 DENR, LGU-MENRO/MA DENR, LGU-MENRO/MA
MMK, Productive coastal areas Strict implementation of R.A 9003 Implementation of waste segregation LGU-MENRO LGU (MPDC/MO)
Linkage to establishment in coastal areas LGU-MENRO LGU
Conduct coastal clean-up LGU-MENRO LGU
IMPORTANT, NOT URGENT (Y4-Y5)
6. Lack/weak interconnectivity on the Good implementation of the plan Integration of CCA, Wates use plan & Integration of all plans Formulation of CCA , Water Use Plan (Lagonglong) All LGU's in Cluster 3 LGU Lagonglong LGU Lagonglong (MPDC/MA/MO)
ridge to reef program FLUP to CLUP
Strong connectivity on the ridge to Adoption of all the plans Updating CLUP & integration of CCA, FLUP & water use plan (Balingasag) LGU-MPDC LGU-MPDC
reef approach

62 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 65
Chapter 5: Supplemental Materials

Appendix Table 12. Cluster 4: Sugbongcogon, Binuangan, & Kinoguitan


Timeline
Issues Output/ Outcome Strategies Pathway Activities LGU Vulnerability (H M L) WHO Budget Source
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
URGENT (1st Year)
1. Less Fish Biomass ( C3 ) Increased Fish Biomass (C3) Establishment of Payao's Fund Sourcing Consolidation & Prioritization of Projects BinKiSu – HHH LGU , BFAR LGU, BFAR
Preparaton of budget proposal
Lobbying
Implemenatation of closed season Strict implementation of close season IEC/Awareness of close season
Good aquaculture practices Education Conduct technical training
2. Low Fish Catch (C3) Improve economic status among Introduced Marine & Aquasilvi Culture BinKiSu – HHH LGU (MPDO,MAO, SB) MBDA, BFAR, DENR LGU,MBDA,BFAR,DENR
fisherfolks
3. Presence of Illegal Fishing Activities Eliminate Illegal Fishing Information Education Campaign I.E.C. DESIGN (C2) Brgy to Brgy Info Drive including schools BinKiSu – HHH LGU (MAO,MENRO, MPDO) LGU (MAO,MENRO) BFAR
(C3)
4. Poor Coastal Law Enforcement (C1) Effective Coastal Law Enforcement Ammendment of existing municipal Public hearing Drafting of the revision BinKiSu – HHH- LGU (MAO, MPDC, SB, MFARMC) BFAR, MBDA LGU (SB , MAO, MPDC) BFAR, MBDA
fishery ordinance ( C1)
Lobbying Presentation to the SB and adoption
Strict implementation of RA 10654 & Seaborne Patrol Plan Drafting and Revision and Presenation to SB BinKiSu – HHH- Sugbongcogon is low simce they LGU (MAO,MENRO, MPDO) BFAR, MARITIME, LGU, BFAR,DENR,MBDA
Municipal Fishery Ordinances & UFO are active in CLE, Bin- M and Kinoguitan is High PCG
Routine seaborne patrol on municipal waters (C3)
(C3 and C1) sinc they don’t have patrol boat
5. Absence of MPA Plan ( c2 c3) MPA Plan Implemented (C2) MPA Planning Workshop MPA Planning Workshop Audience w/ brgy. Council & SB for MPA plan formulation (C3) BinKiSu – HHH LGU (MAO, MENRO) BFAR, DENR, MBDA LGU, BFAR,DENR,MBDA
MPA Plan in places/formulated Baseline data gathering (C3 C1)
Consolidation & integration
Drafting & presentation
Adoption & implementation and Enactment
PRIORITY BUT NOT URGENT (Y2-Y3)
6. Unfinished CRM Plan ADOPTED & IMPLEMENTED CRM/ICM Issuance of E.O. creating the CRM TWG CRM Planning Workshop Audience with brgy. Council & SB and all stakeholders for CRM BinKiSu - HHM LGU (MAO, MENRO,MPDO, SB) BFAR, DENR, LGU, BFAR,DENR,MBDA
PLAN ( c2 and C1) to come up with CRM/ICM plan Formulation MBDA
Sugbongcogon is meduim since they have
MBDA through DILG endorsement to Baseline data gathering (PCRA) (C3 C1)
already a CRM draft plna and o the process of
come up with CRM/ICM Plan
approval.
Consolidation & integration
Drafting & presentation
Adoption & implementation and Enactment
IMPORTANT, NOT URGENT (Y4-Y5)
7.Lack oof Guidelines Governing Tourism TOURISM ORDINANCE/CODE Amendment of Tourism Ordinance Strict implementation of Tourism Ordinance Tourism Promotion Activities BinKiSu - HMH LGU (MAO, MENRO,MPDO, SB) BFAR, DENR, LGU, DOT, BFAR, DENR
Establishments IMPLEMENTED MBDA
Revisit/review tourism ordinance Issuance of EO Hiring/Appointing Permanent Tourism Officer
Kinoguitan has an existing Tourism Plan
Empowering Municipal Tourism Officer Fund Sourcing Site Selection,
to co-signatory of new building permits
Rehabilitation of Mangroves & Corals to Nursery Establishment
enhance Eco-Tourism (C3 and C2)
Mangrove Plnating
P.O. Engagement,
Sustainability Legislation ( C2)

66 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 69
APPENDICES

5.2 PROCESS AND DOCUMENTATION


Experts of the tools on Reef Baybe and GSIS-SSS from the University of the Philippines-
Marine Science Institute facilitated the MBDA workshop. The activities were carried out on
5.2.1 PROCESS HIGHLIGHTS
a clustering basis using the existing different clusters of MBDA, with 3-4 LGU members in
each cluster. The program design gave equal time to both tools, starting with ReefBayBe and
An integral component of the project “Scaling up the Implementation of ICM in Macajalar
transitioning to SSS-GSIS.
Bay” is to come up with the first Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) plan.
The management plan must be grounded and realistic to address the extant needs and issues
WORKSHOP 1 OUTPUTS
in the bay. To achieve that, the DPSIR (Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response) framework
was adopted to confront the problems in the bay.
This approach assisted the MBDA LGU members in the decision making for management and
conservation strategies of coastal systems at all levels of governance in Macajalar Bay. The
The DPSIR model is a simple approach that allowed the MBDA to assess the status of
scope in the workshop, however, was limited at the level the baywide clusters.
their reef ecosystems as subjected to various drivers, pressures, and threats, and the
management responses highlighting the dynamics of the various disciplines (e.g. ecological,
By the end of the workshop, the environmental pressures and driving forces in the coastal
fisheries, socioeconomic and governance). The DPSIR framework was utilized as it aided in
areas were identified. The indicators and other environmental conditions were also noted to
the management strategies with regard to natural resource management, development, and
describe the origins and consequences of environmental problems and understanding their
environmental integrity in Macajalar Bay.
dynamics. Both expert and local knowledge were used to harness to generate some science-
based decision support or options.

1st Workshop on the DPSIR and EbA Framework in Diagnosing Management


The two practical uses of this workshop is that the LGU members were able to make diagnosis
Options utilizing the tools on GSIS-SSS and ReefBayBe.
and evaluation in Macajalar Bay. The tools helped each cluster to qualitatively predict impacts
of different management or development scenarios to ‘reef health.’ In the BBN model,
The Workshop on the DPSIR and EbA Framework in Diagnosing Management Options was
management scenarios included: reef associated habitat enhancement; management of
conducted on October 24-27, 2017 at Philtown Hotel, Cagayan de Oro City. The 4-day
land and water use to reduce sediment inputs to reefs; fishery management;and others.
workshop utilized the tools on GSIS-SSS and ReefBayBe.
Development scenarios included: increased pollution load due to mariculture; increased
erosion due to coastal development; and others. MBDA Local governments can then
First of the two component tools is the Reef Baybe, a decision support system to assists
use the BBN to evaluate different management scenarios for their reefs after properly
in the evaluation of management options, deciding based on hard information available and
parameterizing the model for their area (see sample in Workshop Report). In the second-half
results. The Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) tool allowed a more holistical observation of
of the workshop, the SSS-GSIS framework simplified the way managers adopt interventions
systems but focused more in the coral reef systems (e.g., coral cover, reef associated habitats,
towards effective adaptive management. The results of SSS-GSIS analysis of the 4 clusters
environmental parameters, etc.). The model identified stressors that need to be addressed
in the bay specifically showing the strategies identified are incorporated in the management
and help evaluate potential impacts of proposed management scenarios per cluster. In this
plan (see Sections xx).
tool, expert and local knowledge were used for science-based decision making and harnessed
to generate a decision support system.
All the detailed outputs per cluster of both tools were included in the the baywide management
plan under the section in the bay-wide situational analysis of the bay. It expounds on the
Second of the two component tools is the bipartite framework SSS-GSIS. The (SSS)–
interaction of socio-ecological systems (based on BayBe) and Existing Threats (Problems,
Suitability pertains to the aspect of the coastal area (MPA), Sensitivity relates to the climate
Issues and Concerns) and Implications for Management (DPSIR Baywide and Clustering).
change impact, and Susceptibility which deals on the threats that affect the reef ecosystem
goods and services. The second part looks into the responses and impacts under the social
and governance aspects (i.e. Governance and Social-Ecological Integrated Systems or GSIS)
which are expected to address the state and pressures mentioned earlier.

70 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 71
APPENDICES

bay-wide management strategies of the 5-year plan for the bay (see Attachment 4, Chapter).
2nd Workshop-Writeshop on Levelling-up the ICM Management to come up with It expounds on the strategic interventions of the Existing Problems, Issues and Concerns.
the critical management interventions needed.
Vulnerability Assessment Workshop
Continuing from the 1st Workshop in October 2017 using the DPSIR framework, the MBDA
LGUs were able to identify the extant needs and issues in the bay. With the utilization of the An inventory on LGU disaster risk and reduction management related-reports was made
tools GSIS-SSS and ReefBayBe, it allowed the MBDA to assess the status of their coastal by the MBDA PMO which showed lack or insufficient data on vulnerability assessment to
ecosystems as subjected to various drivers, pressures and threats. With the Reef Baybe climate change. The identification of strategies to address the impacts of this global threat
and SSS-GSIS models, the stressors that need to be addressed and help evaluate potential is necessary in decision-making processes, in turn, minimizing losses of the coastal habitats.
impacts of proposed management scenarios per cluster were identified per cluster. The MBDA PMO conducted the VA workshop on January 31, 2018 at the Mallberry Suites
Hotel, Cagayan de Oro City, with the participation of Municipal/City Disaster Risk and Reduction
This following workshop was levelling-up on the ICM Management Plan with the writeshop Management Officers or their representatives. A presentation of the inventory results and
where both the science-based information from the tools and local knowledge from the LGUs an introduction on VA tools using the guidebook prepared by the Marine Environment and
will be used to come up with the critical management interventions needed. The scope in the Resources Foundation (MERF) was conducted whereby the participants agreed to use the
workshop is still limited at the level the baywide clusters. ICSEA-C-Change Tool due to the limited availability of data and technical requirements.

The 2nd Workshop was held last November 27 – December 1, 2017 at the Dakak Beach Scoring for sensitivity and lack of adaptive capacity was done per LGU with the facilitation of
Resort and Hotel, Dapitan City, Zamboanga del Norte. the MBDA PMO. Data brought by the participants and those gathered by the MBDA PMO
were utilized during the plenary scoring process.
WORKSHOP 2 OUTPUTS
Workshop Output. Average scores for exposure, sensitivity and LAC were calculated per
IN this workshop, the MBDA LGU members per cluster identified and agreed on the LGU to identify its vulnerability. Uncertain responses in a few of the questions per category
management and conservation strategies of coastal systems at all levels of governance in prompted the LGUs on data that needs to be gathered and/or verified. Thus, a follow-
Macajalar Bay. up workshop was planned out with the addition of Municipal Agriculture Officers or its
representatives to assist in data provision and validation.
Taking off from the identified issues and stressors in the first workshop, the MBDA clusters
continued to identify the strategic actions to address these (see Attachment 1 for Workshop
Program). Vulnerability Assessment Validation Workshop

From the list, the issues were ranked accordingly to priority based on its urgency considering On February 22, 2018, the validation workshop for vulnerability assessment was held at the
the 5-year time frame of the management plan. Strategic actions were identified to address Philtown Hotel, Cagayan de Oro City. It was participated by the M/CDRRMO and MAO or
each issue and implementation of which to the member LGU per cluster will depend on its representatives wherein the individual LGUs’ output from the previous workshop was
its level of vulnerbility to that issue. For example, conflict of municapal water boundaries, reviewed and validated.
Alubijid and Laguindingan were prioritized since this is a buring issue among these 2 LGUs.
A strategic template was used which is a very simple approach that pinned down the pathway Workshop Output. There were some changes made to the inputs of the LGUs from the
of activities to achieve the strategy, and agreeing on whose in charge, where budget source previous workshop through the collaborative participation of the M/CDRRMO and MAO.
and its timeline over 5-year period (see Attachment 2 for the Cluster Strategic Outputs). Average scores for all categories were once again calculated to obtain overall vulnerability
Since the working unit was per cluster, the World Café was done for each of the 4 cluster to per LGU (in Appendices).
present their 5-year Strategic Plan (see Attachment 3 for the World Cafe) so other clusters
will hear their plans as well.

Similarly, all the detailed outputs per cluster and the narrative will comprise the section in the

72 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 73
APPENDICES

5.2.2. ADOPTION AND LEGALIZATION • Philippine Fisheries Code of 1998 or Republic Act 8550, mandating the municipal/
city government may enact appropriate ordinances which shall ensure the sustainable
As a bay-wide initiative, the plan will be endorsed by the MBDA to its respective LGU development, management and conservation of its territorial waters including its fisheries
Members for adoption through local ordinances. To add, the implementation of the Macajalar and aquatic resources.
Bay ICM plan will be based on the following laws:
• Executive Order 533 has ordered in Section 1 that:
• Republic Act 7160 otherwise known as the Local Government Code of 1991 has declared ICM Policy – ICM and related approaches, such as coastal resources or coastal zone
it a policy of the State that the territorial subdivisions of the State shall enjoy genuine and management, shall be the national management policy framework to promote the sustainable
meaningful local autonomy to enable them to attain their fullest development and self-reliant development of the country’s coastal and marine environment and resources in order to
communities and make them more effective partners in the attainment of national goals achieve food security, sustainable livelihood, poverty alleviation and reduction of vulnerability
and that the State shall provide for a more responsive and accountable local government to natural hazards, while preserving ecological integrity
structure instituted through a system of decentralization whereby local government units
shall be given more powers, authority, responsibilities and resources • Section 6 of EO 533 provides:
LGU Responsibilities for ICM- Consistent with the provisions of the Local Government
• Section 17 of RA 7160 provides among others: Code and the national sustainable development policies and strategies, LGUs shall act as the
Basic Services and Facilities – (a) Local government units (LGUs) shall endeavor to be self- frontline agencies in the formulation, planning and implementation of ICM programs in their
reliant and shall continue exercising the powers and discharging the duties and functions respective coastal and marine areas.
currently vested upon them. They shall also discharge the functions and responsibilities of
national agencies and offices devolved to them pursuant to this Code. As of this writing, the Macajalar Bay uniform fisheries ordinance is still being finalized.
Likewise, implementation of this plan will also be grounded on the baywide ordinance upon
• Section 33 of RA 7160 provides: the latter’s ratification.
Cooperative Undertakings among Local Government Units – LGUs, may, through appropriate
ordinances, group themselves, consolidate or coordinate their efforts, services and resources
for purposes commonly beneficial to them.

• Section 35 of RA 7160 provides:


Linkages with People and Non-government Organization – LGUs may enter into joint
ventures and such other cooperative arrangements with people’s and non-government
organizations to engage in the delivery of certain basics services, capability-building and
livelihood projects, and to develop local enterprises designed to improve productivity and
income, diversify agriculture, spur rural industrialization, promote ecological balance, and
enhance the economic and social well-being of the people.

• Republic Act 8550 otherwise known as the Philippine Fisheries Code of 1998 has declared
in Article 1 Section 16 which provide: The management of contiguous fishery resources
such as bays which straddled several municipalities, cities, and provinces, shall be done in
an integrated manner and not based on political subdivisions of municipal waters in order to
facilitate their management as single resource systems. The LGUs which share or border such
resources may group themselves and coordinate with each other to achieve the objectives of
integrated fishery resource management

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APPENDICES

5.3 NGA PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS Appendix Table 14. Status of Mangrove Rehabilitation Project Target 2017 of Misamis Oriental
within Macajalar Bay Area

5.3.1 BUREAU OF FISHERIES AND AQUATIC RESOURCES No. of


Municipality Barangay Area (has) Beneficiary Propagules
planted (pcs)
Appendix Table 13. Status of Fish Sanctuaries Establishment in Misamis Oriental
within Macajalar Bay Area Baybay Aquatic
Baybay 3 Fishermen 10,000
Association
Name of Alubijid
Name Molocboloc
Agency that Municipal
Municipality Barangay of Marine Molocboloc 2 Fisherfolk 10,000
Established Ordinance Association
Sanctuary the Sanctuary Binitinan Fisherfolk
Balingasag Binitinan 1 Association 5,000
Laguindingan Moog Brgy. Moog Fish
Sanctuary Looc Fisherfolk
Looc 1 Association 5,000
Alubijid Molocboloc/ Brgy. Molocboloc- BFAR/DENR Resolution no. 45
Baybay Baybay Fish Salay Brgy Panabol
Sanctuary Panabol 2 Fisherfolk 10,000
Opol Luyongbonbon Opol Fish Clam BFAR Association
Sanctuary Brgy. Buko
El Salvador City Molugan Burias Shoal Fish BFAR Kinoguitan Buko 3 Fisherfolk 15,000
Sanctuary Association
Balingasag Binitinan Binitinan Fish DENR Ord. No. 06-2006
Sanctuary
Appendix Table 15. Status of Mangrove Rehabilitation Project Target 2018 of Misamis Oriental
Villanueva Looc Villanueva Fish BFAR
Sanctuary within Macajalar Bay Area
Jasaan Jampason Agutayan MPA DENR & BFAR Municipal
assisted Ordinance 2010- No. of
02-0035 Municipality Barangay Area (has) Beneficiary Propagules
Binuangan Mosangot Mosangot Fish planted (pcs)
Sanctuary
Salay Dampias Dampias Fish El Salvador City Sinaloc 6 Sinaloc Fisherfolk 30,000
Sanctuary Association
Dinagsaan Dinagsaan Fish BFAR Salay Casulog 2 Casulog Fisherfolk 10,000
Sanctuary Association
Looc Looc Fish Looc 2 Looc Fisherfolk 10,000
Sugbongcogon Sanctuary Association
Brgy. Silad Brgy. Silad Fish PENRO-Gingoog Ord. No. 2008-367 Waterfall
Sanctuary City Balingasag Waterfall 1 Fisherfolk 5,000
Association
Sumalag- Sumalag- PENRO-BFAR Ord. No. 443, s.
Poblacion Poblacion Fish 2012 Kinoguitan Panabol 2 Panabol Fisherfolk 10,000
Sanctuary Association
Buko Buko Fish PENRO-BFAR Ord. No. 443, s. Buko 2 Buko Fisherfolk 10,000
Sanctuary 2012 Association
Kinoguitan Esperanza Esperanza Fish PENRO-BFAR Ord. No. 443, s.
Sanctuary 2012
Panabol Panabol Fish PENRO-BFAR Ord. No. 443, s.
Sanctuary 2012
Bolisong Bolisong Fish PENRO-BFAR Ord. No. 443, s.
Sanctuary 2012
LGUs assisted:
1. LGU Alubijid and LGU Laguindingan 2. LGU Balingasag
Date: July 5-8, 2016 Date: Jan 17-19, 2018
A. Proposed seaport conducted water quality assessment and plankton
B. Fish sanctuary or fishing ground analysis on the waters from Constancia Reef to Minergy
Plant site to Balingasag Mariculture Park as baseline
information for the technical assistance for the monitoring
of aquatic pollution and water temperature

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APPENDICES

5.3.2 DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES of existing laws and guidelines, the jurisdictional conflicts and institutional overlaps among
various agencies exercising responsibilities covering the foreshore and the coastal zone.
NATIONAL ICM PROGRAM The policy study has identified the following key concerns in addressing the problems
and issues facing the management of foreshore areas: (1) Harmonization of development
The Philippines, through the passage of Executive Order No. 533 in 2006, has paradigms perspectives in order to integrate conservation, coastal zone management, and
adopted Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) as the national strategy to ensure sustainable such concerns as climate change, local development planning and disaster risk reduction;
development of the coastal and marine environment and resources. EO No. 533 mandates and (2)Pursuit of vigorous enforcement strategies and participatory and inclusive monitoring
DENR to develop a National ICM Program (NICMP), in consultation with other concerned processes to ensure implementation of existing laws and guidelines.
agencies, sectors and stakeholders to provide direction, support and guidance to local
government units (LGUs) and stakeholders in the development and implementation of their
local ICM Programs. USER FEES AND RESOURCE RENTS

MANGROVE MANAGEMENT Financing of programs and projects is critical to the sustainable management of
protected areas. The formulation of appropriate instruments for prescribing fees for the
The DENR, through PAWB-CMMO and the Integrated Coastal Resources Management
enjoyment and sustainable use of resources in protected areas is the main focus of DAO 2000-
Project (ICRMP), recognizes the urgency of restoring, developing, protecting, maintaining and
51. A focus group discussion was held among PAMB and DENR staff in the implementation
managing mangrove resources in light of the current problems on food security, environmental
of the DAO, and a number of constraints have been identified in its smooth implementation
stability, social development and economic growth in coastal communities. Such development
in the field. Recommendations to address these constraints are composed of the following,
is affected by climate change. To achieve this, it has to formulate policies on mangroves that
among others: (1) The PAWB may try to maximize its existing projects and external funding
will guide DENR in the implementation of its mandates in the mangrove areas of the country.
sources to contract out the estimation of user fees in NIPAS PAs. The skills required for
To address the mangrove policy problems, draft administrative orders were prepared, namely:
estimating user fees do not seem to match the set of skills possessed by the current PAMB
(1) Draft JAO: “Guidelines on the Reversion of Abandoned, Undeveloped and Underutilized
staff complement; (2) PAMB staff members should be oriented with the results of existing
Fishponds under Fishpond Lease Agreements to the Department of Environment and Natural
valuation and user fee studies, so that cross-learning may be achieved. In PAs where it may
Resources through the National Convergence Approach”; (2) Draft DAO: “Cancellation of
be too costly for PAWB-DENR to contract out user fee setting studies, results for other PAs
Illegally Titled Fishponds and Illegally Constructed Fishponds in Classified Forestland and
may be applied to them granted resources, uses and users are similar in nature. PAWB can
Reclassification of Intact Mangrove Forest in Classified Alienable and Disposable Land”; and
therefore do an inventory of all user fees being implemented and recommended in all NIPAS
(3) Draft DAO: “Special Agreement for Mangrove Area Development as a Legal Instrument for
sites, and share them with all PAMB staff members nationwide; (3) The NIPAS law provides
the Development and Management of Mangrove Areas Including Beach Areas and Foreshore
a much wider discretion for fines to be set at higher levels. PAMBs might consider setting
Areas under the Administrative Jurisdiction of the Department of Environment and Natural
their respective fines at levels that approximate the amount of damages potentially incurred
Resources”, among others.
by specific violations; and (4) In areas where overlaps of NIPAS PAs occur with other legal
instruments such as the Local Government Code, the Fisheries Code or the CADTs through
FORESHORE MANAGEMENT the IPRA, it is suggested that PAMBs explore the possibility of co-management arrangements
with other management stakeholders such as LGUs or IP groups.
Effective management of foreshore areas in the Philippines requires a shift in the
government’s development paradigm. While there are existing laws and policies governing
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT MONITORING SYSTEM (EIMS)
foreshore, the dominant perspective articulated by these policies has been one of utilization.
Current policies and guidelines focus on the use and development of the foreshore area and
The ICRMP small scale subprojects that would require the preparation of IEE and
inadequately provide the legal protection needed by the foreshore and its adjacent shore
the acquisition of ECC from EMB are subject to Environmental Impact Monitoring (EIM) in
lands. The challenges faced by the coastal zone include among others, weak enforcement
accordance with the EIA law. However the Environmental Management Bureau’s prescribed

78 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 79
APPENDICES

requirements for EIM are designed for large projects that are environmentally critical (ECPs) 5.3.3 RIDP NEDA
and for non-ECPs that are located in environmentally critical areas (ECAs) as defined under
the EIA law. In view of this, the Environmental Impact Monitoring System (EIMS) is designed Q Chapter 20: Ensuring Ecological Integrity, Clean and Healthy Environment
for subprojects under ICRMP to ensure that the (1) environmental management plan and the
required conditions under the ECC are properly implemented by the project proponent; (2) to Q.1 A. Introduction Ecological integrity must be improved and sustained for
determine the effectiveness of environmental management measures in reducing the actual generations to come which results to a clean and healthy environment. Having a clean and
impacts of the subprojects; and (3) to use the information gathered in improving project healthy environment therefore plays a crucial role in the growth of the economy and human
design, correcting flaws and addressing deficiencies in project implementation. development. Development initiatives shall focused on forest resource management such as
the National Greening Program and forest maintenance and protection, to essentially increase
the proportion of land area covered with forest balanced with ecotourism development to
MANAGEMENT EFFECTIVENESS TRACKING TOOL (METT) FOR MPA create jobs. Solid waste management shall also be a key strategy that shall be pursued in
line with Republic Act 9003 (Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000) in order to
The Management Effectiveness Tracking Tool has been developed by the World Bank/ protect public health and the environment.
WWF Alliance Worldwide to help track and monitor progress in protected area management Q.2 B. Linkage of RDIP to the RDP and RM The foundations for sustainable development
effectiveness. It is designed to be a basic and simple mechanism for monitoring progress shall serve as the base to the attainment of a “Matatag, Maginhawa, at Panatag na Buhay
towards more effective management over time. It was initially developed for terrestrial para sa Lahat.” Paramount to the foundations is the physical environment which shall be
protected areas that later became the basis for the development of the tracking tool for characterized by a balanced and strategic development of infrastructure while ensuring that
marine protected areas (MPA). The MPA tracking tool uses a Score Card developed by the there is ecological integrity and a clean and healthy environment, as well as building resiliency
World Bank in 2004 to assess progress in achieving management effectiveness goals for against disasters. Given the priority investment programs identified, it is expected that these
Marine Protected Areas. The Score Card has been built around the application of the World shall contribute in achieving the sector’s outcome of ecological integrity ensured and socio-
Commission Protected Area (WCPA) Framework comprising of six components i.e. context, economic conditions of resource-based communities improved.
planning, implementation, inputs, outputs and outcomes. Q.3 C. Highlights Total investment requirements for the period 2017 to 2022
amounted to PHP 3.986 Billion including RDC-X initiated programs and projects. About 93
Appendix Table 16. Activities being conducted within Macajalar Bay in line with the implementation percent of the total investment requirements were proposed by DENR-X amounting to PHP
of the Coastal and Marine Ecosystems Management Program for CY 2018
3.692 Billion. The National Greening Program requires an estimated amount of PHP2.659
PROJECT/ACTIVITY LOCATION REMARKS Billion for the whole planning period. EMB-X proposed investments totaled to PHP86.800
- On-going coastal and marine Million which shall cover various development initiatives which include the establishment
1. Mapping of habitat assessment;
Municipalities and operationalization of air sheds in Cagayan deOro City, Iligan City and the provinces
coastal habitats - Output of the activity is the map
of Binuangan,
(corals, 50 ha & of corals and seagrass areas in of Misamis oriental, Bukidnon and Lanao del Norte. For the MGB-X, the total proposed
Kinoguitan, and
seagrass, 150 ha) the mentioned municipalities with
Sugbongcogon investment requirements are estimated at PHP86.800 Million. Priority focus is on disaster
outside NIPAS-MPAs corresponding technical report.
risk mitigation by providing LGUs with completed/updated hazard maps (e.g., flood, landslide,
2. Technical - PENRO Misamis Oriental is subsistence, coastal erosion/accretion). One of the major activities of MGB-X is the conduct of
Assistance on assisting the ICM Plan formulation
Municipalities geological assessment of proposed sanitary landfill sites. Total RDC-X initiated programs and
ICM ridge-to- of municipalities which they have
of Binuangan,
reef approach conducted coastal assessment projects investment requirements is about PHP164.900 Million which covers development
Kinoguitan, and
and linkages of with;
Sugbongcogon, initiatives along slope protection, watershed management, reforestation, landscape and
Population, Health - TA will depend upon the request
Lagundingan
and Environment of concerned LGU. seascape protection, among others.
(PHE)
G Chapter 8: Expanding Opportunities in Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

G.1 Introduction The agriculture, forestry and fishery (AFF) plays critical role in

80 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 81
APPENDICES

facilitating growth and reducing inequality especially among the poor farmers and fishers in
the rural areas. Thus, priority investments of the sector shall support the interventions that 5.4 POVERTY INCIDENCE
will reduce inequality in the region especially the rural population. Development strategies
shall be pursued during the plan period to expand the economic opportunities in the sector
Appendix Table 17. The population per Barangay; poverty incidence per municipality;
and to increase access of these opportunities. Programs, activities and projects (PAPs) estimated # of poor population per barangay in Macajalar Bay
shall be implemented that will result in greater productivity and competitiveness of these Poverty Estimated
marginalized small farm holders and small-scale fishers in the region. Municipality/City Barangays Population Incidence # of Poor
(%) Population
G.2 Linkage of RDIP to the RDP and RM For the period 2017-2022, the priority City of Cagayan de Oro Lapasan 41903 7.7 3227
investment for the sector is anchored towards the realization of achieving the two sector Gusa 26177 2016
outcomes: 1) economic opportunities in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries expanded and 2) Tablon 18608 1433
access to economic opportunities by small farmers and fisherfolk increased. Programs and Bugo 27122 2088

projects that will respond to increasing agricultural productivity shall be pursued through the Agusan 14812 1141
Cugman 20531 1581
provision of support measures along the entire agricultural value chain and infrastructure
Macabalan 20303 1563
facilities such as farm-to-market roads, irrigation systems, and post-harvest facilities. More Puntod 18399 1417
investments shall be provided to support the sector’s strategy that shall promote and Bulua 31345 2414
implement development program for high value agriculture and fishery commodities with Bayabas 12999 1001
great potential for value-adding and processing, exports, and market expansion. Various Bonbon 9195 708
programs and projects supportive to the strategies indicated in the plan were appropriately Kauswagan 34541 2660
Puerto 11,475 884
identified based on the result of the local consultations and those of the agencies’ regular
Alubijid Molocboloc 789 35.4 279
programs and projects. Corresponding budget allocations were determined to ascertain the
Baybay 1,719 609
effective delivery of basic services and implementation of the agencies’ respective programs, Loguilo 2,652 939
projects and activities, as well as to ensure that respective target indicators incorporated in City of El Salvador Molugan 9,575 23.7 2269
the results matrix are appropriately addressed. Amoros 3,534 838
Taytay 3,183 754
G.3 Highlights Pedro sa Baculio 3,838 910
Poblacion 7,596 1800
A total investment of PHP18.27 billion is needed to implement the sector’s priority Sinaloc 3,802 901

PPAs during the plan period. Of the total investment cost, 83 percent amounting to Balingasag Hermano 2,093 37.7 789
Binitinan 3,285 1238
PHP15.11 billion shall cover the PPAs to be undertaken by the Department of Agriculture and
Baliwagan 3,135 1182
its attached agencies (i.e BFAR, PCA, and PCIC), and Department of Agrarian Reform (Table Waterfall 4,517 1703
1 and Annex G-1). The remaining 17 percent (PHP3.157 billion) shall cover the investment Mandangoa 3,524 1329
requirement of the RDC-X initiated programs and projects (Annex G-2). The RDC-X-initiated Brgy 6 1,997 753
PPAs were among the priority projects identified during the RDP consultations at the local Brgy 3 2,348 885
level and endorsed by the provinces, cities and some legislators in the region. These are Mambayaan 2,649 999
Binuangan Mosangot 1,227 28.7 352.149
in excess of those already incorporated in the proposed funding allocation of respective
Dampias 1,036 297.332
implementing agencies. Infrastructure support, specifically, farm-to-market roads and
Poblacion 1,805 518.035
irrigations systems are identified in the sector, however, the detailed listing with funding Mabini 1,042 299.054
requirements are incorporated in the infrastructure Draft as of October 10, 2017 Page 41 of
253 and utilities sector including those foreign-assisted infrastructure projects to be funded
under the Philippine Rural Development Program (PRDP).

82 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 83
APPENDICES

Jasaan Aplaya 4,811 26.1 1256 Sugbongcogon Poblacion 3,175 40.6 1289
Bobontugan 5,221 1363 Sta. Cruz 286 116
Danao 3,039 793 Alicomohan 896 364
Jampason 2,579 673 Kiraging 551 224
Kimaya 4,937 1289 Mangga 1,420 577
Lower Jasaan 5,578 1456 Silad 493 200
Upper Jasaan 3,899 1018 Tagoloan Baluarte 9,306 14 1303
Luz Banzon 3,096 808 Gracia 1,847 259
San Antonio 5,552 1449 Sugbongcogon 3,885 544
Solana 3,792 990 Casinglot 8,588 1202
Kinoguitan Sumalag 961 27.6 265 Villanueva Looc 3,859 20.2 780
Buko 2,315 639 Poblacion 1 2,501 505
Poblacion 2,071 572 Poblacion 3 3,510 709
Esperanza 1,286 355 Katipunan 4,462 901
Panabol 1,033 285 Balacanas 375 76
Bolisong 855 236
Lagonglong Kauswagan 2,663 32.3 860
Tabok 2,115 683
Poblacion 3,593 1161
Kabulawan 2,663 860
Dampil 2,369 765
Laguindingan Mauswagon 3,238 35.4 1146
Tubajon 2,299 814
Moog 1,272 450
Opol Luyongbonbon 3,491 14.3 499
Barra 14,334 2050
Igpit 10,123 1448
Taboc 2,918 417
Poblacion 3,690 528
Bonbon 2,698 386
Salay Looc 2,924 27.9 816
Casulog 2,955 824
Poblacion 5,938 1657
Salay River 1 1,631 455
Salay River 2 1,446 403
Inobulan 2,892 807
Ampenican 1,303 364
Dinagsaan 610 170

84 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 85
APPENDICES

5.5 ICM WORKSHOPS PARTICIPANTS JASAAN


Marie Alden Trisa Suello Brian Dael
Maria Lilia Ompoc
Appendix Table 18. The participants of the 4 ICM Workshops composed of Johnny Macabasa
MBDA Member LGUs and partners
Merlyn Baconga
ICM WORKSHOPS1-4 PARTICIPANTS BALINGASAG
LAGUINDINGAN
May Karen Sabuga-a Joselito Sabuga-a
Erly Bunayog Iris Ragmac
Arvin Subrado Kroscieb Pangcoga
Remy Oguis Gracecil Lomongo
Milagros Cagalawan
Diosdado Ayson Ricky Janolino
Emma Mofar
Gideon Sadlucap Baby Leslie Sadlucap
LAGONGLONG
ALUBIJID
Johannes Karlo S. Ubalde
Emalyn L Neri Gecel Macalaguing
SALAY
Frederick Labis Tristan Lindsey Ares
Joan Abenojar
Jose Camensi
Lordito Aclan
Krisyl Kay Apdian
BINUANGAN
EL SALVADOR CITY
Onyx Cometa Audrey Fe Aguhar
Allan J. Bajuyo
Manuel Saligumba Fely Magdale
Expedito Quilab Sr.
Hon. Nelsi Dagcuta
Mervin Gelaga
Shirney Larosa
Ron Salva
SUGBUNGCOGON
OPOL
Randolph Hallasgo Edward Yasay
KINOGUITAN
Julie M. Ebuña Enrico Fornolles
Ronald Bentuzal Noel Acenas
Loelle Joseph Pacana Romel Lonoy
Rodolfo Atchedillo Lowel Tacandong
Marish Udtujan Maebel Lou Tedlos
Aurelio Valdehueza
CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY
Jess Along
Elizabeth C. Sumabong Teresita Inovero
PROVINCE OF MISAMIS ORIENTAL
Julito Casilac Belinda Naguita
Arlene Novo Judith Casiño
Joel V. Momongan Hector San Juan
Ivylan Iducos Dr. Josefino Bascug
Reyna Pioquinto Cirilo Pimentel
Arlene Porticos Stanley Uriarte
Mark Mangay Christine Mae Alagon
Everlyn Acera Lemar Canios
TAGOLOAN
NEDA
Joan C. Espinosa
Archimedes Lazaro
Elena M. Casiño
Tenha Marie Luib
Cholie Arboleras
PNP-MARITIME
VILLANUEVA
SP04 Nelson E. Baldamor
Rogelio Sabalbaro Ma. Teresa Villaruz
PI NE Baldamor
Robinson Miñoza
BFAR-10
Ailen Jabiniao
Vianney Gapuz
Norman Ricacho
Kun Jay Cahiles
Majen Casinillo

86 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 87
APPENDICES

PCG 5.6 CORAL REEF MAPS


Jerome Atilano
Ernesto Rull
Melchor Payte
DENR-10/PENRO
Earla Jade Naiza Llamos
Liza Requiña
Ana May Angcahas
XAVIER UNIVERSITY
Friday Atillano
Dr. Dixon Yasay
Wilson Hormeguera

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Alubijid. (DENR-PENRO)


Robert Anthony Oro
SAMDHANA INSTITUTE
Meliusa Marie Kitche
James Borcillo
Warwin Sabasaje
MBDA PMO
Kristine Galarrita
Kimberly Magdugo
Neil Clark Chavez
Christy L. Arboladora
UP-MSI
Graceous Von Yip
Laurence Robles
Sam Mamawag
DILG-10
Lorraine Key Pelaez

88 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 89
90
APPENDICES

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Balingasag. (DENR-PENRO)

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Binuangan. (DENR-PENRO)


91
92
APPENDICES

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of Cagayan de Oro City. (DENR-PENRO)

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the El Salvador City. (DENR-PENRO)


93
94
APPENDICES

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Jasaan. (DENR-PENRO)

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Kinoguitan. (DENR-PENRO)


95
96
APPENDICES

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Lagonglong. (DENR-PENRO)

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Laguindingan. (DENR-PENRO)


97
98
APPENDICES

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Opol. (DENR-PENRO)

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Salay. (DENR-PENRO)


99
100
APPENDICES

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Sugbongcogon. (DENR-PENRO)

Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan


Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Tagoloan. (DENR-PENRO)


101
APPENDICES

5.7 REFERENCES

Licuanan, W.R.Y., Siringan, F.P., Mamauag, S.S., Samson, M.S., Aliño, P.M., Rollon,
R.N., Sta. Maria, M.Y.Y., Quibilan, M.C.C., Martinez, R.J.S., España, N.B., Geronimo, R.C.,
Villanoy, C.L., Cabrera, O.C., Salamante, E.E., Miclat, E.F.B., David, L.T. 2013. Chapter 4:
Integrated Coastal Sensitivity, Exposure, and Adaptive Capacity to Climate Change. In:
MERF. 2013. Vulnerability Assessment Tools for Coastal Ecosystems: A Guidebook. Marine
Environment and Resources Foundation, Inc.: Quezon City, Philippines.

Mamauag et al. in prep. Suitability, Sensitivity, Susceptibility - Governance, Social-


Ecological Integrated Systems. Paper presented during the International Coral Reef

Appendix Figure 1. Coral Map of the Municipality of Villanueva. (DENR-PENRO)


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Roa-Quiaoit H.A., de Guzman, E Villaluz, D Dawang, F Quimpo, A Mabao, and L


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Macajalar Bay Development Alliance, Manual of Operations

http://misamisoriental.elizaga.net/resources/marine.html

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http://pemsea.org/our-work/integrated-coastal-management

http://ec.europa.eu/environment/iczm/index_en.htm

http://oneocean.org/download/db_files/White%20et%20al.2006.ICM%20
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102 Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan Macajalar Bay Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) Plan 103