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SPRING 2019

Adapting Aladdin JR.


ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS: Creative Writing

USE THIS LESSON TO: explore the process of adaptation.

TIME: 45 minutes

MATERIALS:
•• “The Inspiration and Adaptation of Aladdin’s Story” activity sheet (included on the Resources Disc)
•• Plot Summary from Aladdin JR. (see Resources Disc)

OBJECTIVES: Students will:


1. Analyze existing adaptations of the story of Aladdin to compare and contrast their thematic content, characters,
and plot.
2. Learn about the process of adaptation and how to draw inspiration from source material.
3. Use various source materials and adaptations to write their own adaptation of Aladdin’s story.
4. Explore how creativity and specificity can assist in conveying creative ideas.

INTRODUCTION: (2 minutes) Disney’s adaptation of Aladdin’s story stems from various entertainments inspired by
the original source material: a collection of largely Middle Eastern and Indian folk tales entitled One Thousand and One
Nights. In this version, there were two genies and two wicked sorcerers! “Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp” has served
as the basis for stage plays, musical suites, ballets, and movies; in this lesson, we will see how previous film adaptations
of the story influenced Disney’s animated film, as well as the stage adaptations that followed.

WARM-UP: (5 minutes) Understanding the Story


1. Gather your students in a circle, and share with them that we are going to tell the story of Aladdin JR. as an
ensemble.
2. Explain that you will go around the circle and each add one sentence to continue the story. By the time each of
them has added a sentence, they should have covered the beginning, middle, and end of the story.
3. Begin the activity with something like, “Once upon a time there was a young boy named Aladdin,” and then pass
it off to the next person to add a sentence.
4. After the group finishes the activity, add any plot points or characters that may have been missed. The “Plot
Summary of Aladdin JR.” worksheet can be helpful if you need a refresher.
5. If there is time, students can improve their specificity by trying the one-sentence story activity again.

HOOK: (15 minutes) Interpreting the Interpretation


1. Now that your students are familiar with the general plot of Aladdin JR., remind them that this is Disney’s
adaptation of the story from One Thousand and One Nights. Disney drew inspiration from several other
adaptations to create the story we all know and love.
2. Divide students into three groups and share with your students that they will explore three different adaptations
of the story.
3. Distribute the “Inspiration and Adaptation of Aladdin’s Story” activity sheets, assigning each group one film to
focus on.
4. Allow students 5-7 minutes to read the brief synopsis of their assigned film and take notes on the character
names, themes, settings, and major plot points.
5. Next, draw a three-subject Venn diagram on the board and facilitate a discussion surrounding each of the film
adaptations, asking the students to share the information they gathered to populate the Venn diagram.
6. Once each film has been discussed, draw the students’ attention to the parts of the diagram that intersect, and
briefly reflect on what the common threads are amongst all three adaptations.
MAIN ACTIVTY: (20 minutes) Adapting Aladdin JR.
1. Now that the class has explored various adaptations of Aladdin’s story, it is time for the students to develop their
own.
2. Ask your students to flip to the second page of the “Inspiration and Adaptation of Aladdin’s Story” activity sheet
and allow them five minutes to silently fill out the prompts.
HINT: You may want to ask them some guiding questions as they work silently.
3. Have students elaborate on the plot points, characters, and setting of their adaptation.
4. Next, have the students write their own plot summary that encapsulates their adaptation of the Aladdin’s story.
If you would like, share copies of the plot summary from Aladdin JR. with the students as an example of how to
effectively write a short synopsis.
5. As they write, move around the room, asking questions and encouraging them to expand on the details and
relationships of their story.
6. Leave a few minutes for student volunteers to share their adaptation ideas with the class.

REFLECTION: (3 minutes) Dialogue


Facilitate a class discussion using the following prompts:
•• What was difficult about adaptation? What was exciting?
•• What were the biggest influences in selecting a new choice for your adaptation?
•• Were there any ideas, whether in the source material, film, or from your classmates, that you wish made it into
Aladdin JR.? Why?
Plot Summary of Aladdin JR.

GENIE and the AGRABAHNS welcome us to Agrabah, introducing ALADDIN and his penniless pals,
BABKAK, OMAR, and KASSIM; Princess JASMINE and her doting father, the SULTAN; and the evil JAFAR
and IAGO (Overture/Arabian Nights). Inside the marketplace, a SHOP OWNER berates the hungry Aladdin
for stealing a loaf of bread, causing RAZOUL and his GUARDS to chase after him and his pals (One Jump
Ahead) until they escape. Afterward, when an APPLE VENDOR reviles two BEGGARS, Aladdin offers them
his bread and defends them when PRINCE ABDULLAH shoves them out of his way (One Jump Ahead –
Reprise / Proud of Your Boy).

In the palace, Jafar plots with Iago to become Sultan as Jasmine rejects Prince Abdullah and the Sultan
declares that she must marry by the next moon. Frustrated, Jasmine confides in her attendants – ISIR,
MANAL, and RAJAH – who encourage her to open up to experiences beyond the palace (These Palace
Walls). As Jasmine disguises herself and takes off to heed their advice, Jafar and Iago invoke an incantation,
and a SPOOKY VOICE reveals that Aladdin is the key to finding a magic lamp that will grant Jafar the power
to become Sultan.

In the marketplace, Aladdin and his friends put on a show in hope of earning some money (Babkak, Omar,
Aladdin, Kassim). When Aladdin notices the seemingly out-of-place Jasmine and offers to show her around
the marketplace, Jasmine unthinkingly takes an apple from a vendor, catching the attention of the guards.
The two escape together and share their mutual experience of feeling “trapped.” When the guards discover
and detain them, Jasmine reveals herself to be the Princess and is escorted back to the palace, vowing to get
Aladdin released. In disguise, Jafar and Iago pay off the guards and lead Aladdin to the CAVE OF WONDERS,
where he is instructed to fetch only the lamp. Distracted by the treasures, Aladdin becomes trapped within
the cave until he rubs the lamp and releases the all-powerful Genie (Friend Like Me), who helps him escape.
Granting the first of Aladdin’s three wishes, Genie transforms him into Prince Ali Ababwa, which Aladdin
hopes will help him to woo Jasmine.

Back at the palace, Jafar, thinking that Aladdin is still trapped in the cave, informs a despondent Jasmine that
the boy’s sentence has already been carried out. Just then, Aladdin and his friends make a grand entrance as
Prince Ali with his ENTOURAGE (Prince Ali), but his demeanor offends Jasmine, who storms off. Frustrated,
Aladdin lashes out at his friends, who in turn abandon him and leave the palace.

Later, on the Princess’s balcony, Prince Ali gains Jasmine’s trust and invites her on a magic carpet ride (A
Whole New World). After bidding her farewell, Aladdin is arrested by Jafar for trespassing in the Princess’s
private chambers. Omar, returning to help Aladdin, witnesses his arrest and runs to tell his pals, who pledge
to help him (High Adventure), but they too are detained as they storm the palace. Aladdin uses his second
wish, and Genie frees them all.

Aladdin vows to tell Jasmine the truth, but changes his mind when she tells him he is to become Sultan after
they wed. Unsure of his own moral character and ability, Aladdin fears he may need his third wish to succeed
as a ruler. After a disappointed Genie turns his back on Aladdin and retreats into the lamp, Aladdin weighs
his options, and ultimately runs off to tell Jasmine the truth. He leaves behind the lamp, which Jafar and Iago
gleefully take.

At the wedding, Jafar reveals Prince Ali’s real identity (Prince Ali – Reprise) and demands that Genie make him
Sultan. Aladdin then tricks him into wishing to become the most powerful genie of all time – forever trapping
him inside his own lamp. Using his last wish, Aladdin frees Genie; and the Sultan, moved by Aladdin’s courage
and Jasmine’s wisdom, alters the law so that the Princess can rule Agrabah and marry whomever she chooses.
Picking Aladdin, Jasmine and all of Agrabah live happily, and freely, ever after (Finale).
The Inspiration and
Adaptation of Aladdin’s Story
The Thief of Baghdad (1940)
• The Thief of Baghdad is a British adventure film by Alexander Korda based on Douglas Fairbanks’s 1924 film of
the same title.
• Ahmad, the Sultan of Baghdad, is thrown into captivity when the evil Grand Vizier Jaffar tricks him into going
into the city in disguise to see how his people live.
• A young thief named Abu helps Ahmad escape, and Jaffar and Ahmad find themselves both pursuing the
Princess of Basra.
• The Princess’s father arranges a marriage with Jaffar because he is impressed with his mechanical flying horse.
• Magic is prominent in this story. Jaffar casts spells on Ahmad and Abu, conjuring up storms and magical
items. Abu also stumbles upon a magical genie.
• Abu rescues Ahmad, prompts a revolt against Jaffar, and flies away on a magic carpet adventure.

Notes:

Now it is time to create your own adaptation of Aladdin’s story!


Individually answer the prompts below:
Which elements from these stories do you want to keep?
Which elements do you want to change?
What do you want to add to the story?
What genre is your adaptation?

In the space below, write the plot summary for your adaptation of Aladdin’s story. You can use the plot summary
of Aladdin JR. as an example of a completed plot summary.

Disney’s Aladdin JR. ©Disney


The Inspiration and
Adaptation of Aladdin’s Story
Road to Morocco (1942)
• Road to Morocco is a comedy that features two carefree castaways who find themselves on a desert shore in
an Arabian city after the ship they were hiding on explodes.
• Jeff and Orville compete for the affection of Princess Shalmar and capture the attention of her and a dancer
named Mihirmah through song.
• Princess Shalmar hears of a prophecy that predicts her first marriage will fail, so she pursues Jeff and Orville
and assures Kasim that their arranged marriage will be successful afterwards.
• When it is revealed that the prophecy was incorrect, Kasim rallies his troops when the Princess reveals she
still does not want to marry him.
• At the end of the film, Jeff, Orville, and the women escape to the United States to get married. The ship they
are on explodes, yet again signifying another adventure for the castaways.

Notes:

Now it is time to create your own adaptation of Aladdin’s story!


Individually answer the prompts below:
Which elements from these stories do you want to keep?
Which elements do you want to change?
What do you want to add to the story?
What genre is your adaptation?

In the space below, write the plot summary for your adaptation of Aladdin’s story. You can use the plot summary
of Aladdin JR. as an example of a completed plot summary.

Disney’s Aladdin JR. ©Disney


The Inspiration and
Adaptation of Aladdin’s Story
Arabian Nights (1942)
• Arabian Nights has been described as a Western film set in the Arabic world.
• The story surrounds Haroun, the ruler of Baghdad, who must go into hiding with a group of traveling
performers when his brother, Kamar usurps the throne.
• Ali Ben Ali and Scheherazade are two dancers in the wandering circus who take care of Haroun when he flees
after his throne is usurped.
• Due to a prophecy, Kamar believes Scheherazade is his future queen.
• Aladdin is a member of the wandering circus and is only a small character in this story.
• Nadan, the Grand Vizier, is the mastermind between numerous schemes to usurp the throne.
• There are no monsters or supernatural elements in the movie.

Notes:

Now it is time to create your own adaptation of Aladdin’s story!


Individually answer the prompts below:
Which elements from these stories do you want to keep?
Which elements do you want to change?
What do you want to add to the story?
What genre is your adaptation?

In the space below, write the plot summary for your adaptation of Aladdin’s story. You can use the plot summary
of Aladdin JR. as an example of a completed plot summary.

Disney’s Aladdin JR. ©Disney


When Magic Meets the Laws of Motion
SCIENCE: Physics

USE THIS LESSON TO: apply the principles of Newton’s Laws of Motion theatrically and within the story of Aladdin JR.

TIME: 45 minutes

MATERIALS:
•• Newton’s Laws of Motion posted or written in your classroom:
1. Every object persists in its state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line unless it is acted upon by a force.
2. Force is directly related to an object’s mass and acceleration. The greater the force, the greater the change in
motion.
3. For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.
•• “Swapping Magic with Science” activity sheet (included on the Resources Disc)
•• Pens or pencils

OBJECTIVES: Students will:


•• Draw connections between Newton’s Laws of Motion and the action within a theatrical story.
•• Experiment with physicalizing force and motion theatrically.
•• Exercise creative problem-solving as they work collaboratively and brainstorm how science can replace key magic
moments in Aladdin JR.

INTRODUCTION: (2 minutes) In the musical Aladdin JR., the characters rely mostly on the Genie and his magical
powers to achieve what they want within the story. Today, we will explore Newton’s Laws of Motion and explore how
they could impact the story of Aladdin JR.

WARM-UP: (5 minutes) Rest and Motion


1. Invite your students to stand in a circle and ask if anyone can explain Newton’s First Law of Motion to the class.
Guide the students as needed.
2. Have students stand up straight with their hands by their sides. Share with them that when they are in this
position, they are embodying an object at REST, representing Newton’s First Law.
3. Share with your students that REST is the first cue they have learned, and the three cues they are about to learn
symbolize a type of force. Then teach them MOVE, PULL, and PUSH.
•• REST: a motion in which you stand straight with your arms at your side
•• MOVE: a motion in which you walk in place or around the room
•• PULL: a motion in which you pull an invisible rope
•• PUSH: a motion in which you push against an invisible wall
4. Review the movements a few times while still standing in place in the circle, changing up the order each time.
5. Once your students have grasped the movements in the circle, have them MOVE around the entire classroom
while you call out the cues.
6. Side coach your students to consider speed and whether or not they are surprised by the unbalanced force. Once
they have explored these four or five times, invite them to MOVE back into their standing circle.
HOOK: (10 minutes) Meaning and Motion
1. Share with your class that they will now MOVE across the circle, passing along one of three invisible lamps. In
Aladdin JR., there is a magic lamp, and in our classroom, there are gold, silver, and copper lamps.
2. Pantomime picking up each of the lamps, sharing their names and how much they weigh: The SILVER lamp is
easy to carry; the GOLD lamp is extremely heavy; and the COPPER lamp is light as a bag of feathers.
3. Share with your students the following parameters for this activity:
•• Do not pass the lamp along to the person directly next to you.
•• Say the name of the lamp you are holding upon passing and receiving it.
•• Take the spot of the receiver after you pass it on.
4. Model for your students what it may look like to move with the GOLD lamp, passing it along for a few students
to try. Repeat this with the SILVER and COPPER lamps, giving students the chance to explore how the various
weights will impact their movement.
5. Next, select three students who will receive one of the lamps and begin the activity, having the students maintain
the passing of all three lamps simultaneously among the circle. HINT: Side coach your students by asking them
questions (such as how the weight of each lamp may affect physicality and voice), and reminding them of the
parameters.
6. After a few minutes, pause the passing of the lamps, and invite the students to choose one of the following
Aladdin JR. characters: Aladdin, Jafar, Jasmine, or Genie. As a group, briefly brainstorm character, physical, and
vocal traits of these characters.
7. Have students resume passing the lamps around the circle; however, this time they are layering in the intentions
and physicality of their selected characters. HINT: You may offer guiding questions (e.g., “Is Jafar reluctant to give
away his lamp?” or “Is Jasmine’s lamp sturdy or delicate?”).
8. After a few more minutes of this character exploration, facilitate a brief reflection connecting this activity to
Newton’s Second Law of Motion.
•• How do intention and character impact acceleration?
•• How does the weight of an object impact the force of your actions?

MAIN ACTIVITY: (25 minutes) Motion Without Magic


1. Review the third Law of Motion with your class. Brainstorm with your class about magic’s role in the show and
have them consider Genie’s use of magic to impact stationary objects within the story of Aladdin JR.
2. Facilitate a quick discussion with the following question: If all of the magic was taken out of Aladdin JR., could the
action of the plot still occur?
3. After they have shared some of their ideas on this topic, inform them that they are going to dive deeper into
three specific moments of magic in the play and divide your class into groups of four.
4. Distribute one “Swapping Science with Magic” activity sheet per group, alotting each group ten minutes to work
through the worksheet. Have them to identify which Law(s) of Motion may apply to the scene and brainstorm
how the characters can achieve the same plot point without magic
HINT: Students can use current scientific inventions or experiments in their problem-solving!
5. Instruct students to select their favorite solution and create a brief 30-second scene showing the new magic-less
solution theatrically. Have each group share their scene with the class, allowing time for students to ask questions
about each other’s solution.

REFLECTION: (3 minutes) Dialogue


Facilitate a reflection with your classroom with the following question: Before Newton proved these laws, how might
people have reacted to laws of motion? Could they ever have seemed like magic?
Swapping Magic
with Science
Newton’s Third Law of Motion: for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.
In Aladdin JR., Genie’s magic is often the action that propels the plot forward. Read your assigned plot point
below and imagine how the scene could happen without magic.

Trapped in the Cave of Wonders


When Aladdin becomes trapped in the Cave of Wonders he releases the Genie from the magic lamp. The Genie’s
magical abilities are revealed through song and dance. Genie’s powers also release Aladdin from the Cave of Wonders!

Who are the characters in this scene?


What are the plot goals of this scene?

How could you achieve the same goal of this scene without magic?

Which of Newton’s Laws of Motion are used in this new version of the scene?

Once you have brainstormed ways to achieve your plot point without magic, it is time to theatricalize your
idea to see if it works! Create a 30-second scene to share with the class.

Disney’s Aladdin JR. ©Disney


Swapping Magic
with Science
Newton’s Third Law of Motion: for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.
In Aladdin JR., Genie’s magic is often the action that propels the plot forward. Read your assigned plot point
below and imagine how the scene could happen without magic.

Prince Ali
Aladdin believes the only way he can win Princess Jasmine’s affection is if he becomes a prince. Genie grants
Aladdin’s wish and transforms him into Prince Ali Ababwa. Prince Ali then enters the palace with a flashy
entourage to impress Princess Jasmine and the Sultan.

Who are the characters in this scene?


What are the plot goals of this scene?

How could you achieve the same goal of this scene without magic?

Which of Newton’s Laws of Motion are used in this new version of the scene?

Once you have brainstormed ways to achieve your plot point without magic, it is time to theatricalize your
idea to see if it works! Create a 30-second scene to share with the class.

Disney’s Aladdin JR. ©Disney


Swapping Magic
with Science
Newton’s Third Law of Motion: for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.
In Aladdin JR., Genie’s magic is often the action that propels the plot forward. Read your assigned plot point
below and imagine how the scene could happen without magic.

Magic Carpet Ride


When Aladdin’s showy parade doesn’t impress Princess Jasmine, he visits her to apologize and win her
affection. He jumps onto the magic carpet and takes Jasmine on a flying adventure, allowing her to see the
world beyond the royal palace.

Who are the characters in this scene?


What are the plot goals of this scene?

How could you achieve the same goal of this scene without magic?

Which of Newton’s Laws of Motion are used in this new version of the scene?

Once you have brainstormed ways to achieve your plot point without magic, it is time to theatricalize your
idea to see if it works! Create a 30-second scene to share with the class.

Disney’s Aladdin JR. ©Disney


Citizens of Agrabah
SOCIAL STUDIES: Citizenship and Government

USE THIS LESSON TO: explore the power, citizenship, and government in Aladdin JR.

TIME: 45 minutes

MATERIALS:
•• Aladdin JR. accompaniment tracks for “Overture / Arabian Nights,” “A Whole New World,” and “High Adventure”
•• Pen, pencil, and paper

OBJECTIVES: Students will:


1. Explore the government system of Agrabah and the world of Aladdin JR.
2. Integrate movement with the social studies concepts of government, power, and citizenship.
3. Reflect on how they can become active citizens in their own communities.

INTRODUCTION: (1 minute) The story of Aladdin JR. takes place in a fictional land called Agrabah, where the people
are led by a Sultan. In Aladdin JR., the Sultan ultimately realizes he has to change the ancient laws to best serve his
people. This lesson will explore the government system of Agrabah and what it means to be citizens of a country
where they are presumed to have less power than the leadership.

WARM-UP: (9 minutes) Who Has the Power?


1. Ask your students to join you in a standing circle around a designated “stage space.”
2. As a group, briefly brainstorm words that come to mind when you think of “power.”
3. Instruct your students to strike a pose that embodies power. Encourage them to notice other students’ poses, and
to play with levels and angles within their poses.
4. Repeat Step 3 a few times, encouraging your students to vary their poses each time. Have them select one they
may consider using for the rest of the warm-up.
HINT: Let students know that they will want to select a pose that they can hold comfortably for several minutes.
5. Next, turn your students’ attention to the open “stage space” in the room and prompt them to enter the space one
at a time, striking a pose as the Sultan to command the most power in the room.
6. One by one, each student should add to the tableau by stiking the most powerful Sultan pose in the frozen
picture.
7. As the activity continues to progress, side coach your students with open-ended questions and pause to notice
relationships amongst the poses.
8. Ask your students to return to the standing circle and facilitate a brief reflection with the following questions:
• If Agrabah is a place where the power lies with the nobility, what kind of government system may it fall
under?
• What are the existing laws of Agrabah that we know of? Based on countries with similar government systems,
what laws may have been in place that we don’t know about from the plot of the musical?

HOOK: (10 minutes) Embodying Citizenship


1. Facilitate a brainstorm with your students surrounding what classes of people besides nobility make up the
citizens of Agrabah (e.g., beggars, marketplace vendors, palace guards). From the brainstorm, create a “Citizens of
Agrabah” list with your students.
2. Once your list is complete, ask your students to share what they believe are the essential qualities of an active
citizen within a community.
3. Share with your students that for the rest of the lesson they will embody the citizens of Agrabah, joining together
as a community to implement change.
4. Group your students in the center of the open space facing one direction and turn on some music (you may elect
to use the provided Aladdin JR. tracks).
5. Identify one member of the group (or yourself ) as the leader. The leader should move slowly to the music and the
rest of the group should mirror the leader’s movement exactly.
6. If and when the leader shifts to face a new direction, a new person now at the front of the group should
seamlessly become the leader of the “flock.”
7. Side coach this activity, helping students notice when the power shifts happen, encouraging them to make clear
movement decisions while leading, and reminding them to follow the movement closely when they are being
led.
8. Prompt the students to select their favorite movements explored throughout the activity and to move into
groups of four based on movement similarity.
MAIN ACTIVITY: (20 minutes) Creating Change
1. After the groups are formed, call your students’ attention back to your list of citizens of Agrabah. Have them
select one to embody as a group for this activity.
2. Hand out the pens and paper and prompt the groups to brainstorm what your selected citizen would want
represented in a government and its laws.
3. Instruct the citizens of Agrabah that they will now advocate for their community and write 2-3 laws to propose to
the Sultan of Agrabah to improve the quality of life.
4. Once the laws have been drafted, have each group of citizens create a tableau (or frozen image) of Agrabah
before their laws are implemented.
5. Next, have each group of citizens create a tableau that represents Agrabah after their laws are implemented.
6. Once the groups have created both of their images, prompt them to devise a movement and text-based
transition between their two images.
HINT: Their goal for the transition should be that the selected law they are suggesting to the Sultan is conveyed
clearly through movement and/or dialogue. Besides that parameter, allow them creative freedom in what sounds,
movement, text, or music they may implement into their transition.
7. Give students 1-2 minutes to rehearse their two tableaus with the transition in between images.
8. Allow time for each group of citizens to share their laws with the rest of the class.

REFLECTION: (5 minutes) Dialogue


Facilitate a class discussion using the following prompts:
•• What do you believe are the responsibilities of a citizen?
•• How can you achieve your civic responsibilities and take action within the various power structures you interact
with daily?
Hall of Wishes
VISUAL ART: Mixed-Media Collage

USE THIS LESSON TO: explore personal reflection through art-making.

TIME: 45 minutes

MATERIALS:
•• One piece of paper or poster board per student
•• Supplies for collage: newspapers, magazines, scissors, markers, crayons, tape, glue, construction paper, pens,
pencils, etc.
•• Suggested additional art supplies: paint, paint brushes, yarn, ribbons, glue gun, glitter, fabric, patterned paper, and
any other found objects

OBJECTIVES: Students will:


•• Make connections between Aladdin JR. and their own experiences.
•• Experiment with a variety of media to communicate an idea through collage.
•• Express themselves creatively through designing and executing a collage.

INTRODUCTION: (1 minute) In Aladdin JR., the story propels into action when Aladdin enters the Cave of Wonders
under strict instructions to touch nothing but the magic lamp. Invite your students to close their eyes as you describe
the treasures, colors, and temptations of the Cave of Wonders. Then share with your students that Aladdin was
distracted by all of the grandeur and beauty the cave had to offer, and as a result, found himself trapped inside with
only a magical Genie to aid in his escape.

WARM-UP: (4 minutes) Rules of the Wish


1. Invite your students to open their eyes and facilitate a brief discussion with your students using the following
prompts:
•• How can Genie help Aladdin?
•• What were Aladdin’s three wishes in the story?
•• What do you think of Aladdin saving his last wish for Genie?
•• What were Genie’s rules or parameters surrounding the granting of wishes?
2. Share with your students that they are about to embark on an installation project entitled “Hall of Wishes” in which
they will create a collage that encapsulates their wishes for themselves, their school community, and the world.
Their final product will be displayed in a school hall.
3. Brainstorm with your class some parameters that will guide your creative process. Consider setting some
guidelines surrounding respecting each other’s wishes and artwork.

HOOK: (5 minutes) Thinking of Three Wishes


1. Have your students take out their journals or distribute pencils and paper.
2. Allow students time to silently write responses to these prompts:
• What is your wish for yourself?
• What is your wish for your classroom or school community?
• What is your wish for the world?
Optional Extension
If you would like to extend this lesson over 2-3 class periods and allow your students the
opportunity to work in groups, you could invite your students to share their wishes verbally or
through tableau (or frozen picture). As a class, you can determine the recurring themes among
the wishes and break into groups by theme or type of wish to execute separate collages.

MAIN ACTIVITY: (30 minutes) Collage Creations


1. Share with your students that they are going to visually represent their wishes through a collage.
2. Set out the arts supplies and papers, allowing them to select their own materials and work individually on their
artwork. NOTE: If you are providing magazines and newspapers for your students to utilize within their art,
consider the appropriateness of the content and make sure you are providing them with a variety of materials.
3. Side coach as needed, guiding them to incorporate specific concepts you have been working on in your class.
4. Invite students to title their wish collage or collection.

REFLECTION: (5 minutes) Classroom to Gallery


1. Ask your students to lay out their artwork and prompt them to walk around the space to observe each other’s art.
2. Have students share what they like, notice, or wonder about one another’s artwork.
3. Facilitate a brainstorm in which the students discuss how they would like to assemble their artwork into the final
installation.

Optional Extension
This activity could be extended to the entire school, with each classroom or grade creating
their own “Hall of Wishes.” If possible, you could have each classroom mount their final
installation in the lobby of the school for audience members to engage with during the
performances of Aladdin JR.