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THE 9 BASIC SOUNDS

INCLUDING CORRECTIVE SOUNDS


SUCH AS P & F’s, B & V’s and S & Z’s

EXCELASIA TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT ©2009


WHAT’S IN IT FOR YOU

• To familiarize yourselves with the 9 basic sounds and to practice using


these sounds in everyday conversation.

• To correct any mistakes in the pronunciation of these sounds, along with


the most common mispronounced sounds such as P/F and B/V.

• To be more articulate with these sounds and thereby more confident in


using them in everyday conversation.

©ExcelAsia 2008
VOICED TH /TH/

 When producing this sound, your tongue should be placed


between your teeth with breath coming out from
the gap and punctuated by vibration from your throat.
Example: Please say the word...

THE
PRACTICE SAYING THESE WORDS AT HOME AND AS OFTEN AS
YOU CAN, WHILE EXAGGERATING THE UNDERLINED SOUND.

 Them  Feather
 They  Other
 These  Another
 Those  Bother
 That  Lather
 The  Bathe
 There  Lathe
 Than  Either
 Leather  Wither
 Mother  Breathe
 Father  Loathe
 Weather  Soothe
VOICED /TH/ BASIC SENTENCES
1. The chair is over there.
2. This one is bigger than that one.
3. Are those the pets we need to bathe?
4. The feather tickled the nose of my father.
5. Will there be a soothing massage after this workout?
6. I won’t bother them again.
7. Those two boys are brothers.
8. They liked the rainy weather.
9. That cat is theirs.
10. They agreed to play against each other.
VOICED /TH/ CSR SENTENCES
1. Thank you for calling “The Leather Factory”, This is Terry, how can I
help you today?
2. Good Afternoon, my name is Heather. I am calling on behalf of “The
Fair Weather Post”.
3. Just to make sure I have it right, your name is Luther Weatherbee, is
that correct?
4. For security purposes, may I please have your mother’s maiden name?
5. Thank you for that information.
6. I have your billing statement in front of me and the $2.50 is for the
activation of your account.
7. The amount on your billing statement for this month is $1,315.33.
8. I apologize but cancellations can be made only within the hour after
making the transaction.
9. Is there anything else I can help you with today?
10.Thank you for calling the weather channel have a great day!
UNVOICED TH /TH/
 When producing this sound, your tongue should be
placed between your teeth while blowing out some air
without any vibration from your throat.
Example: Please say the words...

THANK
YOU
PRACTICE SAYING THESE WORDS AT HOME AND AS OFTEN
AS YOU CAN, WHILE EXAGGERATING THE UNDERLINED
SOUND.
 Thank  Nothing
 Think  Something
 Thought  Anything
 Thin  Bath
 Theme  Wrath
 Theater  Ethyl
 Thumb  Froth
 Throne  Broth
 Thistle  Breath
 Three  Thump
 Thong  Wreath
 Math  Third
UNVOICED /TH/ BASIC SENTENCES
1. Thea had three things to do today.
2. Think of a good topic for your thesis.
3. I thought nothing could come between us.
4. They got something to eat at the theater.
5. Arthur’s theme is the title of that song.
6. Thank you for being so thoughtful.
7. They say her thigh measures thirty inches.
8. If you think she’s thin, you should see her sister.
9. This is the third time I’ve been thirsty today.
10. Fran did her math in the bath tub.
UNVOICED /TH/ CSR SENTENCES
1. Thank you for calling “Thirsty Tree Inc.” This is Matthew. How can I help
you today?
2. Good afternoon my name is Keith. I am calling on behalf of “Thread and
Thimble”.
3. Just to make sure I have it right, your account number is 00-8425533. Is
that correct?
4. For security purposes, may I please have your date of birth?
5. Thank you for that information.
6. Your current balance is $333,333.33
7. The amount on your billing statement for this month is $1,315.33.
8. I apologize for the inconvenience, but I am not authorized to terminate
your credit card.
9. Is there anything else I can help you with today?
10.Thank you for calling “Thirsty Tree Inc.”. Have a great day!
/TH/ PARAGRAPH READING
The throng of thermometers from the Thüringen
Thermometers folks arrived on Thursday. There were a
thousand thirty-three thick thermometers though, instead of
a thousand thirty-six thin thermometers, which was three
thermometers fewer than the thousand thirty-six we were
expecting; not to mention that they were thick ones,
rather than thin ones.
We thoroughly thought that we had ordered a thousand
thirty-six, not a thousand thirty-three thermometers; so we
asked the Thüringen Thermometers folks to reship the
thermometers: thin, not thick.
They apologized for sending only a thousand thirty-three
thermometers rather than a thousand thirty-six, and then
they promised to replace the thick thermometers with their
thin Thüringen thermometers.
LONG E /Ē/
 When pronouncing this vowel, the mouth usually takes on
a smiling action; with lips spreading wide from side to side.
It is a sustained sound. this vowel makes the sound “eeee”.
Examples: Please say the words...

BEACH
SHEET
PRACTICE SAYING THESE WORDS AT HOME AND AS OFTEN
AS YOU CAN, WHILE EXAGGERATING THE UNDERLINED
SOUND.
 Steer  Bean
 Between  Appeal
 Fear  Mean
 Asleep  Creed
 Dear  Meat
 Compete  Least
 Clear  Stampede
 Fleet  Meat
 Near  Beer
 Free  Reef
 Bee  Leader
 Glee  Teal
 Tree  Beast
 Seen  Exceed
 Lean  Agree
 Wheel  Read
LONG /Ē/ BASIC SENTENCES
1. You have a tea leaf stuck in your teeth.
2. Eve bought a big piece of beef today.
3. Did you hear the leader give his speech?
4. Steve, I don’t want you to sleep during the movie.
5. Let’s keep the secret between us.
6. They agreed to develop a better team ego.
7. Pete, I want you to read us your speech.
8. She needs cream cheese for her bagel.
9. Please don’t scream near my ear.
10.These beans were given to me for free.
LONG /Ē/ CSR SENTENCES
1. Thank you for calling Green Tea Leaves. This is Theodore, how
can I help you?
2. May I have the three digits you received in your email?
3. Your current balance is $333,000.
4. For security purposes, may I have your TV serial number?
5. It is located either in front or at the rear of the TV.
6. I understand you’d like to know your expenses in the last
three weeks.
7. Just to make sure I have it right, your name is Steve Keeler
and your serial number is 30-3605, is that correct?
8. Could you repeat your Green Tea Leaves account number?
9. May I have your insurance policy number?
10. I apologize for any inconvenience we may have caused you.
SHORT I /I/
 This vowel is pronounced “ih”. When producing this vowel
sound, your mouth is slightly open, make a short exhalation
of breath and cutting it off abruptly.
Examples: Please say the words…

MISTER
MISS
PRACTICE SAYING THESE WORDS AT HOME AND AS OFTEN
AS YOU CAN, WHILE EXAGGERATING THE UNDERLINED
SOUND.
 Grid  Grin
 Did  Mirror
 Middle  Dribble
 Fin  Hill
 Little  Slim
 Finger  This
 Slit  Milk
 Bit  Thin
 Flip  Think
 Drip  Pin
 Slipper  Drink
 Kill  Stint
 Bitter  Bin
 Drill  Trip
 Mitt  Been
 Fill  Glitter
SHORT /I/ BASIC SENTENCES
1. Did you have fish for dinner?

2. Sid did a little skit with his fiddle.


3. She hurt her finger on the trip.
4. Don’t flip that whip at me.
5. It’s no sin to drink gin.
6. Please don’t drift from the issue.
7. I left the milk by the pillow in the crib.
8. Mr. Smith left his slipper on top of the hill.
9. Can you come up with a list of riddles?
10. They spotted a fin in the middle of the ocean.
SHORT /I/ CSR SENTENCES
1. Thank you for calling “Philippine Logistics.” This is Michelle,
how can I help you?
2. I apologize for any inconvenience we may have caused you,
Mr. Smith.
3. Your current balance is $36.33.
4. Thank you for that information, Ms. Robinson.
5. For security purposes, may I please have your TIN number?
6. Is there anything else I can help you with?
7. I understand that you would like to know your credit
information for the last 6 months.
8. Just to make sure I have it right, your name is Richard Smith
and your account number is 63611. Is that correct?
9. May I have your credit card and PIN number please?
10. Could you repeat your middle initial please?
/E/&/I/ PARAGRAPH READING

Pete’s niece loves to eat seeds coated with


thick cheese while she sits on a heated bench
and sings with her little strings.
This kid who once bit the cheek of a hot chick
because she thought she was seeing a roasted
chicken, also licked the leaking faucet because
she thought she had a beak and was drinking
from a river.
Pete has even seen his niece peel sleeping
pills because she wanted to use the powder to
feel better.
DROP JAW A /Ä/

 This vowel is pronounced “aww”. When


producing this vowel sound, your jaw should
drop and your lips should form a wide O. It is a
slightly sustained sound.
Examples: Please say the words…

FATHER
START
PRACTICE SAYING THESE WORDS AT HOME AND AS OFTEN
AS YOU CAN, WHILE EXAGGERATING THE UNDERLINED
SOUND.
 Papa  Garden
 Bother  Party
 Bob  Lark
 Job  Guitar
 Car  Farm
 Bar  Farmer
 Star  Stark
 Far  Shark
 Mark  Tar
 Bark  Spot
 Lark  Avatar
 Park  Czar
 Dark  Retarded
DROP JAW /Ä/ BASIC SENTENCES
1. My father likes to jog in the fog.
2. The children in the park were completely guarded.
3. How far did you travel to look for the bar?
4. Did you park your car in the parking lot?
5. I lost the keys of my locker while I was playing
soccer.
6. Bob was the only student who got a star award.
7. Please stay far away after you smoke your cigar.
8. She can start playing her guitar in the park.
9. The farmer could not see the chickens in the dark.
10. Rob loved barbecue flavored popcorn.
DROP JAW /Ä/ CSR SENTENCES
1. How can I accommodate you today?
2. Would you like us to include you in our blog?
3. Yes sir, you get a free mop if you sign up right now?
4. Please don’t bother Mr. Johnson, I’d be more than happy to send your
Father a new statement.
5. I understand you’d like to know your options.
6. Yes Sir, we do have Five Star Hotels.
7. Congratulations on your new garden Mr. McArthur.
8. My brother has a credit card, would that help?
9. Yes, I want to use my card to buy an Ostrich.
10. Sorry Ms Mellado but you have $50 left, not 15.
SMILING A
/Æ/OR/A/
 This vowel is pronounced “eah”, as in “yeah”. When producing
this sound, your jaw should drop, your cheekbones should rise
and your lips should spread out wide to form a big oval smile.
Examples: Please say the words…

THAT
ADDRESS
RATHER
PRACTICE SAYING THESE WORDS AT HOME AND AS OFTEN
AS YOU CAN, WHILE EXAGGERATING THE UNDERLINED
SOUND.
 Rather  Stature
 Flatulent
 Gather
 Granted
 Flatten  Bladder
 Scatter  Rapture
 Ladder  Laughter
 Clapping  Sample
 Lassitude  Crack
 Strap
 Flapping
 Cabin
 Glad  Dancer
 Stand  Chance
 Grab  Shanty
 Trapped  Jack
SMILING /Æ/OR/A/ BASIC SENTENCES
1. That cat is fat.
2. She ran so fast in the grass.
3. Their family planned to visit San Francisco in the fall.
4. Why did Amber eat all the apples?
5. The bat looked like a rat.
6. Stan, you have to clap if you want a cap.
7. Next year Patty will go to animal camp.
8. What bag did you plan to get for dad?
9. Actually, I am no longer a bad grandson.
10. That lamp is far from Dan.
11. The hat looked flat on her big head.
12. Back home, I was often answering phone calls.
SMILING /Æ/OR/A/ CSR SENTENCES
1. Thank you for calling Acme Bats for Kids, My name is Dan, how can I help
you today?

2. Can I have your account number please?

3. Thank you for that information.

4. I understand you’d like to know your balance.

5. Your current balance is $151.91.

6. Is there anything else I can assist you with, Mr. Anderson?

7. Your name is Mr. Sam Matterson and your date of birth is January 1, 1961?
Is that correct?

8. Could you kindly say that again?

9. Thank you for calling Acme Bats have a wonderful day!


Practice and Compare the A sounds:
 Smiling /a/  Drop Jaw /ä/

1. Black 1. Block
2. Mad 2. Mod
3. Battle 3. Bottle
4. Flap 4. Flop
5. Rat 5. Rot
6. Mack 6. Mock
7. Lack 7. Lock
/Ä/ & /Æ/ PARAGRAPH READING
A fashionably tan man sat casually at the bat stand,
lashing a handful of practice bats.
The manager, a crabby old bag of bones passed by,
took off his hat and laughed.
“You’re about average, Jack. Can’t you lash any faster
than that?”
Jack had enough, so he clambered to his feet and
lashed bats faster than any man had ever lashed bats.
As a mater of fact, he lashed bats so fast that he
seemed to dance. The manager was aghast.
“Jack, you’re a master bat-lasher!” he gasped.
Satisfied at last, Jack sat back and never lashed
another bat.
SHORT U /Ə/
 This vowel is pronounced “uh”. When producing
this sound, your lips and mouth should be slightly
open; and then a sudden exhalation of breath is
made then cut short.
Examples: Please say these words…

COME
RUN
DONE
PRACTICE SAYING THESE WORDS AT HOME AND AS OFTEN
AS YOU CAN, WHILE EXAGGERATING THE UNDERLINED
SOUND.
 Cut  Duck
 Shut  Stuck
 But  Fund
 Stun  Buck
 Strum
 Fun
 Luck
 Shun  Drum
 Gun  Truck
 Begun  Clumsy
 Come  Sun
 From  Curtain
 Butter  Run
 Lunge  Crunch
 Dumpling  Cunning
 Rump
 Understand
 Stud
 Uncle
THE SCHWA /Ə/
 It is a characteristic of English that unaccented neutral vowel
sounds, especially before 'r' or 'l', tend to become a Schwa. A
Schwa sound can therefore be represented in by any vowel, or not
be represented at all. In most cases, for example, the schwa
sound is found in the following words:
 The a in about is a schwa
 The e in synthesis is a schwa
 the i in decimal is a schwa
 The o in harmony is a schwa
 The u in medium is a schwa
 The y in syringe is a schwa
 The sound between b & l in syllab le is a schwa
SHORT /U/ SCHWA /Ə/ BASIC SENTENCES
1. My cousin will accompany my mother to the
Southern isles on Sunday.
2. Are the young sons coming for lunch or for supper?
3. When the sun comes up, the guns will thunder.
4. A dozen cups of butter will be enough for us.
5. The meat is so tough that this dull knife can’t cut it.
6. I wonder why the roads are muddy when there are
no floods.
7. The results of the bar examination were published
last month.
8. We had much trouble getting a substitution for just
one day.
9. Our mischievous puppy loves to run after the ducks.
10.Much of the agricultural land in our country is
developed.
SHORT /U/ SCHWA /Ə/ CSR SENTENCES
1. Thank you for calling “Trunks Unlimited”, this is Gunther, how may I
help you today?
2. May I have your name and number please?
3. Just to verify, your name is Justin Thunder and your number is 111-
3535.
4. Okay and I understand that you’d like to inquire about our
undergarments and soft cup bras?
5. The colors that we have are sunset orange, blue, maroon, and
sunflower yellow.
6. Let me just summarize what we’ve discussed, your order is one sunset
orange soft cup bra and 2 maroon undergarments, is that correct?
7. Your delivery address is 45 Country Club Drive, Hartford, Connecticut,
94057.
8. Is there anything else I can assist you with?
9. We have one in Topeka, 2 in Augusta, Maine, and another one in
Boston.
10.We are open everyday except on Sundays.
MIDDLE U /ὐ/
 This vowel is pronounced “eugh”. When producing this vowel
sound, your mouth should still be slightly open and forms a small
circle; with a sudden exhalation of breath made then cut short.
Examples: Please say these words…

Look
Pudding
Bosom

Firewood
Mistook
PRACTICE SAYING THESE WORDS AT HOME AND AS OFTEN
AS YOU CAN, WHILE EXAGGERATING THE UNDERLINED
SOUND.

 Foot  Good
 Pussycat  Stood

 Shook  Neighborhood

 Book  Statehood

 Nook  Could

 Would  Stood

 Should  Brook
MIDDLE /Ú/ BASIC SENTENCES
1. They looked at each other as if they were good
friends.
2. Please put that cushion on the wooden chair.
3. The rookie pushed the crook with his foot.
4. It is not good to look into a chimney that is full
of soot.
5. The crook took my book and looked at the cook.
6. The workers shook the wooden pulley near the
pulpit.
7. The bullet hit the foot of the butcher when he
stole the bull.
8. The gentlemen looked after us as we waded in
the brook.
9. The pudding is amazingly good.
10.Today, I’ll put my best foot forward.
MIDDLE /Ú/ CSR SENTENCES
1. Thank you for calling Good Looks, Incorporated. How may I
help you today?
2. Could you kindly repeat that please?
3. Excalibur Exports would like to thank you for your business.
4. Your account balance is $555.00.
5. I assure you Mr. Woody, you will not have to pay extra fees.
6. Your order should arrive within two to three days.
7. I can look up the specific location of your neighborhood.
8. For security purposes could I verify your account details
please?
9. Please push the power button Mrs. Sherwood.
10.Please cross the Brooklyn bridge to reach your destination.
LONG U /Ü/
 This vowel is pronounced “oooh”. It is the longest of the U
sounds. When producing this vowel sound, your mouth should
be open and your lips fully puckered as if about to sip from a
straw forming a full pout. It is a sustained sound.
Examples: Please say the words…
 Luke
 Shoes

 Moon

 Truth

 Flew
PRACTICE SAYING THESE WORDS AT HOME AND AS OFTEN
AS YOU CAN, WHILE EXAGGERATING THE UNDERLINED
SOUND.

 Glued  Groove
 True  Mood
 Stool  Spooky
 Cool  Statuesque
 Drool  Flute
 Tool  Smooching
 Troops  Fluke
 Smooth  Truth
LONG /Ü/ BASIC SENTENCES
1. The two fools in the canoe moved swiftly over the route.
2. The gloomy group went through the motions loosely.
3. Two bamboo trees grew near Luke’s pool.
4. I can prove that he is telling the truth.
5. Is it true that the juniors are going on a cruise?
6. He chewed the food slowly for he had a loose tooth.
7. Trees were uprooted and roofs were torn away during the
typhoon.
8. A scoop of ice cream is enough to cool us off at noon.
9. Julia could not choose which piece of jewelry to take to the zoo.
10. My ruler is with the tools.
LONG /Ü/ CSR SENTENCES

1. Hello, this is Jude; how may I help you today?


2. Can you continue driving until you see an address, street sign
or intersection?
3. We will soon be offering more services.
4. What credit card will you be using?
5. Thank you for calling Prudential Life this is Lucy how may I
help you?
6. Yes you will be served food on that flight.
7. You can pay your bills through Western Union.
8. Yuletide greetings from shooters, what can I get you today?
9. Your credit card comes in two colors, blue and maroon.
10.Your bill is due on Tuesday Mr. Lucas.
COMPARE THE VOWEL SOUNDS:

SHORT U/ə/ MIDDLE U /ὐ/ LONG U /ü/

LUCK LOOK LUKE


BUCK BOOK BOOT
FUDD FOOT FOOD
P AND F CORRECTIVE SOUNDS
Face Pace Suffer Supper Cuff Cup
Fill Pill Differ Dipper Chief Cheap
Fan Pan Laughable Capable Cough Cup
Full Pull Cheifest Cheapest Chaff Chap
Flop Plop Refs Reps Beef Beep
Fast Past Coffer Copper Laugh Lap
Fair Pair Reefer Reaper Puff Pup
Fail Pail Coughs Cops Rife Ripe
File Pile Left Leapt Strife Stripe
P & F SOUNDS IN PHRASES

 A cup of coffee please.


 Offer him an apple.

 The cup’s half empty.

 Keep a fast pace

 Please pass the fruit

 The first place prize

 Fair play or foul play

 Pay the piper/pay the fifer


P & F SOUNDS IN SENTENCES

 Stand up and face the press, Mr. President.


 In Faye’s days, the phrase was “Flower Power”.
 The fish were fresh from the produce shelf.
 Fools laugh now, but they will pay later.
 Fran’s plan was referred to the higher-ups.
 The party’s at a quarter past four.
 Get off the phone, Fred, snapped Father.
 Paul can’t help fumbling the football.
 “That’s enough, Penny”, replied Mr. Phillips.
P & F SOUNDS IN POETRY
 Taffy was a Welshman; Taffy was a thief. Taffy came to my
house and stole a leg of beef. I went to Taffy's house; Taffy
was in bed. I took the leg of beef and bopped him on the
head.
 Simple Simon met a pieman going to the fair. Said Simple
Simon to the pieman, “Let me taste your ware.” Said the
pieman to Simple Simon, “Show me first your penny.” Said
Simple Simon to the pieman, “Indeed I have not any.”
/P/ & /F/ PARAGRAPH READING

Perry, a fat pink fairy who lives in Fantasyland,


and his pet Paul, a pig that is frighteningly full
of fur, went to visit Perry’s paternal grandfather
fairy. The grandfather fairy was praying when
fat pink Perry and furry Paul arrived.
Fat pink Perry noticed a pail on a plank parallel
to grandfather fairy’s favorite praying position.
He pulled the pail that was full of paint but the
pail fell on grandfather fairy’s frayed feathery
pants. Fat pink Perry and furry Paul were full of
fright when grandfather fairy stood and pushed
the pail away.
/P/ & /F/ PARAGRAPH READING
(CONT’D)
Grandfather fairy’s face frowned and pointed
his finger towards the pale pink pantry. The
frightened fat pink Perry proceeded to find out
that grandfather fairy was only pretending to be
praying. Fat pink Perry’s family was there. Papa
Frey, fat pink Perry’s father, hugged fat pink
Perry and greeted him: “Happy Birthday!” Fat
pink Perry was no longer frightened. Fat pink
Perry was pleased to find out that his family
was there to part with him on his fun-filled
fourth birthday.
V & B CORRECTIVE SOUNDS

BEST VEST RIBBER RIVER JIVE JIBE

BEE V RIBBON RIVEN STROVE STROBE

BUY VIE BELIEFS BELIEVES GRIEVE GREBE

BALE VEIL INFEST INVEST LIVE LIFE

BAT VAT SAFER SAVOR RELIEVE RELIEF

VINE WINE RIFLE RIVAL


CHALLENGING V SOUNDS

vast live vivid vegetable


vice vile savvy visionary
void rave harvest vacancy
five thrive lover convenience
grove strive louver vehicle
glove very every vivacious
live thrive vinyl evasion
vile strive convey invalid
rave very virile vestige
V SOUNDS IN PHRASES
 moving violation
 get even
 violent behavior
 It's better to give than receive
 virtue and vice
 twenty-seventh
 vanity fair
 every once in a while
 Anniversary
 veteran's bureau
 liven up
 wide variety
 invasion of privacy
 invaluable advice
 verifiable evidence
V SOUNDS IN DIALOGUE
 A: How did you avoid a parking violation?
 B: Easy. I parked my vehicle in a vacant lot.
 A: Don't they ever check there?
 B: Never. Not even in the most severe crackdowns.
 A: You're lucky. I've been cited five times.
 B: Take my advice. Get a validated parking sticker.
V SOUNDS IN ORAL READING

Valentines Day is for Lovers


Every February 14th, Von and Verna celebrate
Valentine's Day. They leave their worries behind
and revisit the place they first met seven years
ago: a small cove near the Valley of the Five
Ravens.
/B/ & /V/ PARAGRAPH READING
Berry is called “Very Berry” because he is
considered the best bet for a vet and brightest
baseball veteran in the big country of Belgium.
Aside from spending time with bunnies, Very
Berry is also fond of baseball bats. His villa has
a basement with a vault full of balls. Very Berry
is also fond of collecting bats in a vat. He and
his best buddy Bubbly Ver, broke their vow
never to buy baseball bats and balls anymore.
Very Berry and Bubbly Ver did try to ban the
van selling bats and balls to boys.
/B/ & /V/ PARAGRAPH READING
(CONT’D)
They shifted their attention from buying
baseball bats to bingeing on beer so every time
the banned van visits their vicinity, Very Berry
and Bubbly Ver would veer away and buy beer
instead. However, Very Berry and Bubbly Ver
realized that beer is vile for the body’s bile
production, so they decided to run after the
banned van and buy baseballs instead of
bingeing on beer.
Very Berry and Bubbly Ver were never happier.
S & Z CORRECTIVE SOUNDS
ESSENCE LIKEWISE PASS POSITIVE

BUS FLIMSY LISTEN DESIRE

GRACE CHOOSE JUICE ALWAYS

VICE BUSINESS DOSAGE ROSE

SUE SEASON DISRUPTS USE

INSIST BUSY SIGN RESORT

ALAS PLEASANT OURSELVES REPRESENT

MASS VISIT EASTER NOISE

GAS DESERVE TRUST PHRASE

LOOSE PLEASE PERSONAL DESIGN


SH, CH, J &Y SOUNDS
Shoe Chew Jew Major Mayor Etch Edge

She Chi Gee Watching Washing Witch Wish

Shear Cheer Jeer Year Etcher Catch Cash

Ship Chip Yip Pager Payer Midge Mitch

Shack Jack Yak Bridges Britches Leash Leech

Shin Chin Gin Lasing Latches Badge Batch

Shell Gel Yell Ageless H-less Much Mush


MORE CHALLENGING WORDS:

Jail Chest Stranger Exchange


Shares Shrew Shrinking Voyager
Yawn Jinks Fragile Jealousy
Child Chicken Yankee January
Sheaf Kitchen Genealogy Childishness
Chief Midget Shadowy Ingenuity
Yeast Yearly Jill Yen
IN PHRASES:
 Cash register
 A jet engine
 Which is which?
 Generation X
 Cajun chicken
 Year of the jackal
 Wishy-washy
 A jazz musician
 The Challenger
 Tragedy
 Wedge issues
 Yellow jacket
 Tragedy
 New Jersey shore
 Place your wager
 Pickled jellyfish
IN DIALOGUE:
A: Which university did you go to?
B: I went to Yale/jail.
A: Oh yeah? When did you graduate/get out?
B: I never finished the last term.
A: What did the genie give you.
B: Three wishes/witches.
A: Oh really? What did you use/need them for?
B: A magic ride in the night sky.
IN ORAL READING:
Jerry and Sherry were very fond of cherry jelly. Every year in July, they would
jump in their jeep and head for the orchard, where they would pick a few
bushels of the fruit in a jiffy. Then they would carry their cherished
treasure to Sherry's house, where they would proceed to change the
berries into their favorite treat.
They used an old-fashioned recipe, which called for sugar, gelatin, and of
course, jillions of cherries. They stirred the mixture in a huge aluminum
pot, then gently poured it into shallow jars.
They shared a few samples with the children, but the majority of the batch
would be saved until January or February when they could enjoy it even
more.
SCRIPTED READING EVALUATIONS
 Siddhartha
 By Hermann Hesse
 Siddhartha learned something new on every step of his path, for the world was
transformed and he was enthralled. He saw the sun rise over forest and
mountains and set over the distant palm shore. At night he saw the stars in the
heavens and the sick-shaped moon floating like a boat in the blue. He saw
trees, stars, animals, clouds, rainbows, rocks, weeds, flowers, brook and river,
the sparkle of dew on bushes in the morning, distant high mountains blue and
pale; birds sang, bees hummed, the wind blew gently across the rice fields. All
this, colored and in a thousand different forms, had always been there. The sun
and moon had always shone; the rivers had always flowed and the bees had
hummed, but in previous times all this had been nothing to Siddhartha but a
fleeting and illusive veil before his eyes, regarded with distrust, condemned to
be disregarded and ostracized from the thoughts, because it was not reality,
because reality lay on the other side of the visible. But now his eyes lingered on
this side; he saw and recognized the visible and he sought his place in this
world.
SCRIPTED READING EVALUATIONS
 A River Runs Through It
 By Norman Maclean
 I came down the bank to catch fish. Cool wind had blown in from Canada
without causing any electric storms, so the fish should be off the bottom and
feeding again. When a deer comes to water, his head shoots in and out of his
shoulders to see what’s ahead, and I was looking all around to see what fly to
put on. But I didn’t have to look further than my neck or my nose. Very big
clumsy flies bumped into my face, swarmed on my neck and wiggled in my
underwear. Blundering and soft-bellied, they had been born before they had
brains. They had spent a year under water on legs, had crawled out on a rock,
had become flies and copulated with the ninth and tenth segments of their
abdomens, and then had died as the first light wind blew them into the water
where the fish circled excitedly. They were a fish’s dream come true – stupid,
succulent, and exhausted from copulation. Still, it would be hard to know what
gigantic portion of human life is spent in this same ratio of years under water on
legs to one premature, exhausted moment on wings.


SCRIPTED READING EVALUATIONS
 The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe
 By C.S. Lewis
 Above the dam there was what ought to have been a deep pool but was now, of course, a
level floor of dark green ice. And below the dam, much lower down, was more ice, but
instead of being smooth this was all frozen into the foamy and wavy shapes in which the
water had been rushing along at the very moment when the frost came. And where the
water had been trickling over and spurting through the dam there was now a glittering
wall of icicles, as if the sides of the dam had been covered all over with flowers and
wreaths and festoons of the purest sugar. And out in the middle, and partly on top of the
dam was a funny little house shaped rather like an enormous beehive and from a hole in
the roof smoke was going up, so that when you saw it (especially if you were hungry) you
at once thought of cooking and became hungrier than you were before.
 That was what the others chiefly noticed, but Edmund noticed something else. A little
lower down the river there was another small river which came down another small valley
to join it. And looking up that valley, Edmund could see two small hills, and he was
almost sure they were the two hills which the White Witch had pointed out to him when
he parted from her at the lamp-post that other day. And then between them, he thought,
must be her palace, only a mile off or less.
SCRIPTED READING EVALUATIONS
 The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe 2
 Lucy felt a little frightened, but she felt very inquisitive and excited as well. She looked
back over her shoulder and there, between the dark tree-trunks, she could still see the
open doorway of the wardrobe and even catch a glimpse of the empty room from which
she had set out. (She had of course, left the door open, for she knew that it is a very silly
thing to shut oneself into a wardrobe.) It seemed to be still daylight there. “I can always
get back if anything goes wrong,” thought Lucy. She began to walk forward, crunch-
crunch over the snow and through the wood toward the other light. In about ten minutes
she reached it and found it was a lamp-post. As she stood looking at it, wondering why
there was a lamp-post in the middle of a wood and wondering what to do next, she heard
a pitter patter of feet coming toward her. And soon after that a very strange person
stepped out from among the trees into the light of the lamp-post.
 He was only a little taller than Lucy herself and he carried over his head an
umbrella, white with snow. From the waist upward he was like a man, but his legs were
shaped like a goat’s and instead of feet he had goat’s hoofs. He had a red woolen
muffler round his neck and his skin was rather reddish too. He had a strange, but
pleasant little face, with a short pointed beard and curly hair, and out of the hair there
stuck two horns, one on each side of his forehead. One of his hands, held the umbrella:
in the other arm he carried several brown-paper parcels. What with the parcels and the
snow it looked just as if he had been doing his Christmas shopping.
TONGUE TWISTERS

 Betty Botter had some butter,


"But," she said, "this butter's bitter.
If I bake this bitter butter,
it would make my batter bitter.
But a bit of better butter--
that would make my batter better."

So she bought a bit of butter,


better than her bitter butter,
and she baked it in her batter,
and the batter was not bitter.
TONGUE TWISTERS

 Mr. See owned a saw.


And Mr. Soar owned a seesaw.
Now See's saw sawed Soar's seesaw
Before Soar saw See,
Which made Soar sore.
Had Soar seen See's saw
Before See sawed Soar's seesaw,
See's saw would not have sawed
Soar's seesaw.
So See's saw sawed Soar's seesaw.
But it was sad to see Soar so sore
TONGUE TWISTERS

 How much wood would a woodchuck chuck


if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
He would chuck, he would, as much as he could,
and chuck as much wood as a woodchuck would
if a woodchuck could chuck wood.

 I need not your needles, they're needless to me;


For kneading of noodles, 'twere needless, you see;
But did my neat knickers but need to be kneed,
I then should have need of your needles indeed
TONGUE TWISTERS

 Silly Sally swiftly shooed seven silly sheep.


The seven silly sheep Silly Sally shooed
shilly-shallied south.
These sheep shouldn't sleep in a shack;
sheep should sleep in a shed.

 Of all the felt I ever felt,


I never felt a piece of felt
which felt as fine as that felt felt,
TONGUE TWISTERS
 When a twister a-twisting will twist him a twist,
For the twisting of his twist, he three twines doth
intwist;
But if one of the twines of the twist do untwist,
The twine that untwisteth untwisteth the twist.
Untwirling the twine that untwisteth between,
He twirls, with his twister, the two in a twine;
Then twice having twisted the twines of the twine,
He twitcheth the twice he had twined in twain.
The twain that in twining before in the twine,
TONGUE TWISTERS
 While we were walking, we were watching window
washers
wash Washington's windows with warm washing
water.
 . One-One was a racehorse.
Two-Two was one, too.
When One-One won one race,
Two-Two won one, too.
 There was a young fisher named Fischer
Who fished for a fish in a fissure.
TONGUE TWISTERS
 . Once upon a barren moor
There dwelt a bear, also a boar.
The bear could not bear the boar.
The boar thought the bear a bore.
At last the bear could bear no more
Of that boar that bored him on the moor,
And so one morn he bored the boar--
That boar will bore the bear no more.

 Suddenly swerving, seven small swans


Swam silently southward,
TONGUE TWISTERS
 Success to the successful thistle-sifter!
 Theophiles Thistle, the successful thistle-sifter,
in sifting a sieve full of un-sifted thistles,
thrust three thousand thistles through the thick
of his thumb.
Now.....if Theophiles Thistle, the successful
thistle- sifter,
in sifting a sieve full of un-sifted thistles,
thrust three thousand thistles through the thick
of his thumb,
See that thou, in sifting a sieve full of un-sifted
TONGUE TWISTERS
 They have left the thriftshop, and lost both their
theatre tickets and the
volume of valuable licenses and coupons for free
theatrical frills and thrills.

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