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Rich in fibre, vitamins and minerals, find out why these starchy, sweet root vegetables are so good

for
you and discover the best ways to cook them.
What is a sweet potato?

The sweet potato is a starchy, sweet-tasting root vegetable. They have a thin, brown skin on the
outside with coloured flesh inside – most commonly orange in colour, but other varieties are white,
purple or yellow. You can eat sweet potatoes whole or peeled, and the leaves of the plant are edible
too.

They may both be called 'potatoes', but sweet and white potatoes are not actually related.
Botanically, the sweet potato belongs to the bindweed or morning glory family, whereas the white
potato sits in the nightshade family.

Nutritional value of sweet potato

Sweet potatoes are a rich source of fibre as well as containing an array of vitamins and minerals
including iron, calcium, selenium, and they're a good source of most of our B vitamins and vitamin C.
One of the key nutritional benefits of sweet potato is that they're high in an antioxidant known as
beta-carotene, which converts to vitamin A once consumed. Add a drizzle of olive oil just before
serving to increase your absorption of beneficial beta-carotene.

Learn more about why we need fibre, vitamins and minerals.

80g of sweet potato, or about one medium potato, counts towards one of your five-a-day, unlike
white potato which does not. Take a look at our infographic to find out what counts as 5-a-day.
Can sweet potatoes help reduce the risk of cancer?

While there are no single 'superfoods' that can prevent cancer and certain risk factors for cancer are
unrelated to diet, there is evidence that eating a healthy diet can reduce the risk of cancer. Fruit and
vegetables are high in antioxidants, compounds that help defend the body against damage by 'free
radicals'. Studies have suggested that the antioxidants in the peel of sweet potatoes in particular, and
especially purple sweet potato, may help reduce this oxidation process, thereby reducing the risk of
cancer. To get the most nutrition from your sweet potatoes, don't peel – simply scrub well before
cooking.

A study in Asia also found that diets high in vitamin-A rich vegetables, including sweet potato leaves,
may provide potential protection from lung cancer.
Are sweet potatoes good for digestion?

Sweet potatoes are high in fibre, which has been shown to promote a healthy digestive system. Much
of the research so far has been conducted on animals, but it would appear that the high phytosterol
content of sweet potatoes does have a protective effect on the digestive system and may be
important in the prevention and management of duodenal and gastric ulcers, including those due to
NSAIDS (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen).
Are sweet potatoes good for helping to manage type 2 diabetes?
This is an area that needs more research, but some studies have shown that moderate consumption
of sweet potato and sweet potato leaves could help improve blood sugar regulation in type 2
diabetes.

Discover 10 top tips to manage diabetes from Diabetes UK.


Are sweet potatoes good for eye health?

A study by Food & Nutrition Research found that purple sweet potatoes contain a specific group of
antioxidants also known as anthocyanins which have been shown to be beneficial to the eyes.

Discover more about anthocyanins in purple foods.


Are sweet potatoes safe for everyone to eat?

On the whole, sweet potatoes are an excellent addition to a balanced diet. However, they do contain
something known as oxalates which binds calcium and other minerals. Too many oxalates in the
diet may cause kidney stones and so should be eaten in moderation if you have existing kidney stones
or are at high risk of developing them. If you are concerned, check with your GP.
How does cooking affect the nutritional value of sweet potato?

Cooking sweet potato does reduce its beta-carotene levels, although boiling appears to have a higher
retention compared to baking. The good news however, is that cooking sweet potato appears
to increase its vitamin C content.

SOURCE:
The health benefits of sweet potato

 By Nicola Shubrook

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/health-benefits-sweet-potato

6 benefits of sweet potatoes


The benefits of sweet potatoes are numerous and adding this superfood to your diet may help prevent
certain health conditions. Christie Ferriell Diabetes & Nutrition Education Coordinator at Reid Hospital
suggests that flavoring sweet potatotes with orange zest is an excellent way to enjoy the natural taste of
sweet potatoes without the extra calories from added sugar. Reid Hospital’s I Heart Cooking page offers
a variety of heart-healthy recipes including one for sweet potatoes. Here are some of the biggest benefits
these root vegetables have to offer.
Cancer-fighting properties
Glycemic index effects
Another benefit of sweet potatoes is their low glycemic index or GI. While refined grains such as
white bread and white rice make your blood sugar increase rapidly lower-GI foods like sweet
potatoes cause a lower blood sugar spike. Therefore low-GI sweet potatoes are often beneficial
for people with diabetes who want to fine-tune their blood sugar control notes the American
Diabetes Association.
Potassium perks
Eating potassium-rich sweet potatoes helps promote a healthy heart. Higher potassium intake
allows you to excrete more sodium lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk for heart
disease according to the American Heart Association. Sweet potatoes contain about 475
milligrams of potassium per 1/2 cup cooked portion notes the United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA). The Institute of Medicine suggests that adults consume 4700 milligrams of
potassium daily.
Vitamin A benefits
High vitamin A content is another one of the numerous benefits of sweet potatoes. Vitamin A is
crucial for healthy teeth skin mucus membranes skeletal tissue and vision. As SFGate notes
getting too little vitamin A in your diet puts you at risk for vision problems especially in dim light.
One large sweet potato provides about 1730 micrograms of vitamin A. The recommended
dietary allowance of vitamin A is 700 micrograms per day for women and 900 micrograms per
day for men.
Fiber advantages
Dietary fiber is another beneficial nutrient found in sweet potatoes. A 1/2 cup portion of cooked
sweet potato with skin contains just over three grams of fiber according to the USDA. A high
fiber intake reduces your risk for type 2 diabetes colon cancer heart disease high cholesterol
and high blood glucose — and may help improve mood and memory according to a review
published in the journal Metabolism. Adults and children need 14 grams of fiber for every 1000
calories they consume suggests a review published in Nutrition Reviews.
Adding sweet potatoes to your food plan each week offers numerous health benefits. However
because sweet potatoes are rich in carbohydrates you shouldn’t overindulge in them.
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 suggest eating five cups of starchy vegetables such
as sweet potatoes each week when following a 2000 calorie per day diet.

SOURCE: https://www.reidhealth.org/blog/6-benefits-of-sweet-potatoes

How can potatoes benefit my health?

Last updated Fri 13 October 2017


By Megan Ware RDN LD
Reviewed by Natalie Butler, RD, LD
1. Benefits
2. Nutrition
3. Tips
4. Recipes
5. Risks
potatoes
Potatoes are edible tubers, available worldwide and all year long. They are relatively cheap to grow, rich
in nutrients, and they can make a delicious treat.
The humble potato has fallen in popularity in recent years, due to the interest in low-carb foods.

However, the fiber, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals it provides can help ward off disease and
benefit human health.

Potatoes were first domesticated in the Andes in South America up to 10,000 years ago. Spanish
explorers introduced them to Europe in the early 16th century.

They are now the biggest vegetable crop in the United States (U.S.), where the average person eats 55
pounds, or 35 kilograms (kg) of potatoes every year. They are an important staple food in many countries
around the world.

This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular
foods.

Fast facts on potatoes:


Here are some key points about potatoes. More detail is in the main article.

 Some evidence suggests that potatoes might help reduce inflammation and constipation

 A medium potato contains around 164 calories and 30 percent of the recommended daily B6 intake.

 A baked potato on a winter's day makes an economical, warming, and nutritious treat.

Benefits

Potatoes can be healthful if prepared in the right way.


A high intake of fruits and vegetables can benefit health and reduce the risk of many lifestyle-related
health conditions.

Potatoes contain important nutrients, even when cooked, that can benefit human health in various ways.

Here we look at 10 ways in which the potato might contribute to a healthful lifestyle, including
preventing osteoporosis, maintaining heart health, and reducing the risk of infection.
1) Bone health

The iron, phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, and zinc in potatoes all help the body to build and maintain
bone structure and strength.

Iron and zinc play crucial roles in the production and maturation of collagen.

Phosphorus and calcium are both important in bone structure, but it is essential to balance the two
minerals for proper bone mineralization. Too much phosphorus and too little calcium result in bone loss
and contribute to osteoporosis.

2) Blood pressure

A low sodium intake is essential for maintaining a healthy blood pressure, but increasing potassiumintake
may be just as important. Potassium encourages vasodilation, or the widening of the blood vessels.

According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), fewer than 2 percentof
American adults meet the daily 4,700-milligram recommendation.

Potassium, calcium, and magnesium are all present in the potato. These have been found to
decrease blood pressure naturally.

3) Heart health

The potato's fiber, potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin B6 content, coupled with its lack of cholesterol, all
support heart health.

Potatoes contain significant amounts of fiber. Fiber helps lower the total amount of cholesterol in the
blood, thereby decreasing the risk of heart disease.

Research based on the NHANES has linked a higher intake of potassium and a lower intake of sodium to
a reduced risk of all-cause mortality and heart disease.

4) Inflammation

Choline is an important and versatile nutrient that is present in potatoes. It helps with muscle movement,
mood, learning, and memory.

It also assists in:

 maintaining the structure of cellular membranes

 transmitting nerve impulses

 the absorption of fat


 early brain development
One large potato contains 57 mg of choline. Adult males need 550 mg, and females 425 mg a day.

5) Cancer

Potatoes contain folate. Folate plays a role in DNA synthesis and repair, and so it prevents many types
of cancer cells from forming due to mutations in the DNA.

Fiber intake from fruits and vegetables like potatoes are associated with a lowered risk of colorectal
cancer.

Vitamin C and quercetin also function as antioxidants, protecting cells against damage from free radicals.

How purple potatoes could prevent colon cancer


Recent research shows that purple potatoes may help prevent inflammation and colon cancer
READ NOW

6) Digestion and regularity

The fiber content in potatoes helps prevent constipation and promote regularity for a healthy digestive
tract.

7) Weight management and satiety

Dietary fibers are commonly recognized as important factors in weight management and weight loss.

They act as "bulking agents" in the digestive system. They increase satiety and reduce appetite, so a
person feels fuller for longer and is less likely to consume more calories.
8) Metabolism

Potatoes are a great source of vitamin B6. This plays a vital role in energy metabolism, by breaking
down carbohydrates and proteins into glucose and amino acids. These smaller compounds are more easily
utilized for energy within the body.

9) Skin

Collagen is the skin's support system. Vitamin C works as an antioxidant to help prevent damage caused
by the sun, pollution, and smoke. Vitamin C also helps collagen smooth wrinkles and improve overall
skin texture.

10) Immunity

Research has found that vitamin C may help reduce the severity and duration of a cold. Potatoes are a
good source of vitamin C.

Nutrition

How healthful a potato is in the diet depends to some extent on what is added or how it is cooked. Oil,
sour cream, and butter all add calories, but the plain potato itself is relatively low in calories.

It also provides important nutrients, such as vitamin C, vitamin B6, and various minerals.

A 100-gram (g) or 3.5- ounce serving is a little more than half of a medium size potato. This much white
potato, baked with skin, contains:

 94 calories

 0.15 grams of fat

 0 grams of cholesterol

 21.08 grams of carbohydrate

 2.1 grams of dietary fiber

 2.10 grams of protein

 10 milligrams (mg) of calcium

 0.64 mg of iron

 27 mg of magnesium

 75 mg of phosphorus

 544 mg of potassium
 12.6 mg of vitamin C

 0.211 mg of vitamin B6

 38 micrograms (mcg) of folate


Potatoes also provide niacin, choline, and zinc. Different varieties provide slightly different nutrients.

Sodium: Whole, unprocessed potatoes contain very little sodium, only 10 mg per 100 g (3.5 ounces), or
less than 1 percent of the suggested daily limit. However, this is not true of processed potato products,
such as French fries and potato chips.

Alpha-lipoic acid: Potatoes also contain a compound known as alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), which helps the
body to convert glucose into energy.

Some evidence suggests that alpha-lipoic acid can help control blood glucose levels, improve
vasodilation, protect against retinopathy in diabetic patients, and preserve brain and nerve tissue.

Quercetin: Quercetin, a flavonoid found in potato skin, appears to have an anti-inflammatory and
antioxidant effect that protects the body's cells from damage by free radicals.

Flavonoids are a kind of phytonutrient, organic compounds that are believed to help protect against
disease.

Antioxidants: Potatoes contain vitamin C, which acts as an antioxidant. Antioxidants may help prevent
cell damage and cancer and promote healthy digestion and cardiovascular functions.

Fiber: The fiber in potatoes helps to maintain a healthy digestive system and circulation.

Tips

According to the USDA, over half of all potatoes in the U.S. are sold for making French fries.

However, French fries are not the only or best option.

There are many cheap and easy ways to incorporate potatoes into a healthful diet.

Choosing potatoes

There are many types of potato to choose from, not including sweet potatoes. There are white, red,
yellow, and blue varieties, and within each color, a range of options.

Here are some ideas:

 Baking: Use starchy potatoes, such as russets.


 Roasting, mashing, or baking: Use all-purpose potatoes, such as Yukon gold.

 Potato salad: Waxy potatoes, such as red, new, or fingerling potatoes, keep their shape better.
Select potatoes that are firm, un-bruised, and relatively smooth and round. Avoid any that show signs of
decay, including wet or dry rot, any roots or potatoes with a greenish hue.

It is best to buy potatoes that are unpackaged and unwashed, to avoid bacterial buildup. Washing potatoes
early removes the protective coating from the skins.

Storage

Potatoes should be stored between 45 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit, or between 7 and 10 degrees Celsius, in a
dark, dry environment, such as a cellar or pantry.

Exposure to sunlight can lead to the formation of solanine, which causes potatoes to turn green. It is toxic.
Storing potatoes in the refrigerator causes their starch content to be converted to sugar. This can give an
unpleasant flavor.

Potatoes should not be stored around onions because both vegetables emit natural gases that cause the
other to decay.

Fully grown potatoes have a shelf life of up to 2 months, but spoiled potatoes can affect the other potatoes
around them. Remove rotten potatoes to prevent the rest from spoiling.

How can potatoes benefit my health?

Last updated Fri 13 October 2017


By Megan Ware RDN LD
Reviewed by Natalie Butler, RD, LD
1. Benefits

2. Nutrition

3. Tips

4. Recipes

5. Risks
Potatoes are edible tubers, available worldwide and all year long. They are relatively cheap to
grow, rich in nutrients, and they can make a delicious treat.
The humble potato has fallen in popularity in recent years, due to the interest in low-carb foods.

However, the fiber, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals it provides can help ward off disease
and benefit human health.

Potatoes were first domesticated in the Andes in South America up to 10,000 years ago.
Spanish explorers introduced them to Europe in the early 16th century.

They are now the biggest vegetable crop in the United States (U.S.), where the average person
eats 55 pounds, or 35 kilograms (kg) of potatoes every year. They are an important staple food
in many countries around the world.

This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of
popular foods.

Fast facts on potatoes:


Here are some key points about potatoes. More detail is in the main article.

 Some evidence suggests that potatoes might help reduce inflammation and constipation

 A medium potato contains around 164 calories and 30 percent of the recommended daily B6
intake.

 A baked potato on a winter's day makes an economical, warming, and nutritious treat.

Benefits

Potatoes can be healthful if prepared in the right way.


A high intake of fruits and vegetables can benefit health and reduce the risk of many lifestyle-
related health conditions.

Potatoes contain important nutrients, even when cooked, that can benefit human health in
various ways.

Here we look at 10 ways in which the potato might contribute to a healthful lifestyle, including
preventing osteoporosis, maintaining heart health, and reducing the risk of infection.

1) Bone health

The iron, phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, and zinc in potatoes all help the body to build and
maintain bone structure and strength.
Iron and zinc play crucial roles in the production and maturation of collagen.

Phosphorus and calcium are both important in bone structure, but it is essential to balance the
two minerals for proper bone mineralization. Too much phosphorus and too little calcium result
in bone loss and contribute to osteoporosis.

2) Blood pressure

A low sodium intake is essential for maintaining a healthy blood pressure, but
increasing potassiumintake may be just as important. Potassium encourages vasodilation, or
the widening of the blood vessels.

According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), fewer than 2
percentof American adults meet the daily 4,700-milligram recommendation.

Potassium, calcium, and magnesium are all present in the potato. These have been found to
decrease blood pressure naturally.

3) Heart health

The potato's fiber, potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin B6 content, coupled with its lack
of cholesterol, all support heart health.

Potatoes contain significant amounts of fiber. Fiber helps lower the total amount of cholesterol in
the blood, thereby decreasing the risk of heart disease.

Research based on the NHANES has linked a higher intake of potassium and a lower intake of
sodium to a reduced risk of all-cause mortality and heart disease.

4) Inflammation

Choline is an important and versatile nutrient that is present in potatoes. It helps with muscle
movement, mood, learning, and memory.

It also assists in:

 maintaining the structure of cellular membranes

 transmitting nerve impulses

 the absorption of fat

 early brain development


One large potato contains 57 mg of choline. Adult males need 550 mg, and females 425 mg a
day.
5) Cancer

Potatoes contain folate. Folate plays a role in DNA synthesis and repair, and so it prevents
many types of cancer cells from forming due to mutations in the DNA.

Fiber intake from fruits and vegetables like potatoes are associated with a lowered risk
of colorectal cancer.

Vitamin C and quercetin also function as antioxidants, protecting cells against damage from free
radicals.

How purple potatoes could prevent colon cancer


Recent research shows that purple potatoes may help prevent inflammation and colon cancer
READ NOW

6) Digestion and regularity

The fiber content in potatoes helps prevent constipation and promote regularity for a healthy
digestive tract.

7) Weight management and satiety

Dietary fibers are commonly recognized as important factors in weight management and weight
loss.

They act as "bulking agents" in the digestive system. They increase satiety and reduce appetite,
so a person feels fuller for longer and is less likely to consume more calories.

8) Metabolism

Potatoes are a great source of vitamin B6. This plays a vital role in energy metabolism, by
breaking down carbohydrates and proteins into glucose and amino acids. These smaller
compounds are more easily utilized for energy within the body.

9) Skin

Collagen is the skin's support system. Vitamin C works as an antioxidant to help prevent
damage caused by the sun, pollution, and smoke. Vitamin C also helps collagen smooth
wrinkles and improve overall skin texture.
10) Immunity

Research has found that vitamin C may help reduce the severity and duration of a cold.
Potatoes are a good source of vitamin C.

Nutrition

How healthful a potato is in the diet depends to some extent on what is added or how it is
cooked. Oil, sour cream, and butter all add calories, but the plain potato itself is relatively low in
calories.

It also provides important nutrients, such as vitamin C, vitamin B6, and various minerals.

A 100-gram (g) or 3.5- ounce serving is a little more than half of a medium size potato. This
much white potato, baked with skin, contains:

 94 calories

 0.15 grams of fat

 0 grams of cholesterol

 21.08 grams of carbohydrate

 2.1 grams of dietary fiber

 2.10 grams of protein

 10 milligrams (mg) of calcium

 0.64 mg of iron

 27 mg of magnesium

 75 mg of phosphorus

 544 mg of potassium

 12.6 mg of vitamin C

 0.211 mg of vitamin B6

 38 micrograms (mcg) of folate


Potatoes also provide niacin, choline, and zinc. Different varieties provide slightly different
nutrients.

Sodium: Whole, unprocessed potatoes contain very little sodium, only 10 mg per 100 g (3.5
ounces), or less than 1 percent of the suggested daily limit. However, this is not true of
processed potato products, such as French fries and potato chips.
Alpha-lipoic acid: Potatoes also contain a compound known as alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), which
helps the body to convert glucose into energy.

Some evidence suggests that alpha-lipoic acid can help control blood glucose levels, improve
vasodilation, protect against retinopathy in diabetic patients, and preserve brain and nerve
tissue.

Quercetin: Quercetin, a flavonoid found in potato skin, appears to have an anti-inflammatory


and antioxidant effect that protects the body's cells from damage by free radicals.

Flavonoids are a kind of phytonutrient, organic compounds that are believed to help protect
against disease.

Antioxidants: Potatoes contain vitamin C, which acts as an antioxidant. Antioxidants may help
prevent cell damage and cancer and promote healthy digestion and cardiovascular functions.

Fiber: The fiber in potatoes helps to maintain a healthy digestive system and circulation.

Tips

According to the USDA, over half of all potatoes in the U.S. are sold for making French fries.

However, French fries are not the only or best option.

There are many cheap and easy ways to incorporate potatoes into a healthful diet.

Choosing potatoes

There are many types of potato to choose from, not including sweet potatoes. There are white,
red, yellow, and blue varieties, and within each color, a range of options.

Here are some ideas:

 Baking: Use starchy potatoes, such as russets.

 Roasting, mashing, or baking: Use all-purpose potatoes, such as Yukon gold.

 Potato salad: Waxy potatoes, such as red, new, or fingerling potatoes, keep their shape
better.
Select potatoes that are firm, un-bruised, and relatively smooth and round. Avoid any that show
signs of decay, including wet or dry rot, any roots or potatoes with a greenish hue.

It is best to buy potatoes that are unpackaged and unwashed, to avoid bacterial buildup.
Washing potatoes early removes the protective coating from the skins.
Storage

Potatoes should be stored between 45 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit, or between 7 and 10 degrees


Celsius, in a dark, dry environment, such as a cellar or pantry.

Exposure to sunlight can lead to the formation of solanine, which causes potatoes to turn green.
It is toxic. Storing potatoes in the refrigerator causes their starch content to be converted to
sugar. This can give an unpleasant flavor.

Potatoes should not be stored around onions because both vegetables emit natural gases that
cause the other to decay.

Fully grown potatoes have a shelf life of up to 2 months, but spoiled potatoes can affect the
other potatoes around them. Remove rotten potatoes to prevent the rest from spoiling.

7 Health and Nutrition Benefits of Potatoes

Potatoes are a versatile root vegetable and a staple food in many households.

They are an underground tuber that grows on the roots of the Solanum tuberosum plant().

Potatoes are relatively cheap, easy to grow and packed with a variety of nutrients.

Here are 7 health and nutrition benefits of potatoes.

1. Packed With Nutrients

The nutritional content of potatoes can vary depending on the variety and how they are
prepared. For example, frying potatoes adds more calories and fat than baking them.

It’s also important to note the skin of the potatoes contains a great amount of the vitamins and
minerals. Peeling potatoes can significantly reduce their nutritional content

2. Contain Antioxidants

Potatoes are rich in compounds like flavonoids, carotenoids and phenolic acids (4).
These compounds act as antioxidants in the body by neutralizing potentially harmful molecules
known as free radicals. When free radicals accumulate, they can increase the risk of chronic
diseases like heart disease, diabetes and cancer (5).

For example, a test-tube study found that the antioxidants present in potatoes may suppress the
growth of liver and colon cancer cells (6).

Studies have also found that colored potatoes like purple potatoes can have three to four times
more antioxidants than white potatoes. This makes them potentially more effective at
neutralizing free radicals (7, 8).

However, most of this evidence is from test-tube studies. More human-based research is
necessary before making any health recommendations.

SUMMARYPotatoes are a good source of antioxidants, which may reduce the risk of chronic
diseases like heart disease, diabetes and certain cancers. However, more human-based
research is required before making any recommendations.

3. May Improve Blood Sugar Control

Potatoes contain a special type of starch known as resistant starch.

This starch is not broken down and fully absorbed by the body. Instead, it reaches the large
intestine where it becomes a source of nutrients for the beneficial bacteria in your gut (9).

Research has linked resistant starch to many health benefits, including reducing insulin
resistance, which, in turn, improves blood sugar control.

In an animal study, mice fed resistant starch showed reduced insulin resistance. This means
their bodies were more efficient at removing excess sugar from the blood (10).

A study of people with type 2 diabetes found consuming a meal with resistant starch helped
better remove excess blood sugar after a meal (11).

In another study, ten people were fed 30 grams of resistant starch daily over a four-week period.
Scientists found that resistant starch reduced insulin resistance by 33% (12).

Interestingly, you can also increase the resistant starch content of potatoes. To do this, store
boiled potatoes in the fridge overnight and consume them cold (13).

SUMMARYPotatoes contain resistant starch, which may help reduce insulin resistance. In turn,
this can help improve blood sugar control.
powered by Rubicon Project
4. May Improve Digestive Health

The resistant starch in potatoes may also improve digestive health.

When resistant starch reaches the large intestine, it becomes food for beneficial gut bacteria.
These bacteria digest it and turn it into short-chain fatty acids (14).

Resistant starch from potatoes is mostly converted into the short-chain fatty acid butyrate — the
preferred food source for gut bacteria (15, 16).

Studies have shown that butyrate can reduce inflammation in the colon, strengthen the colon’s
defenses and reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (17).

Moreover, butyrate may aid patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, such as Crohn’s
disease, ulcerative colitis and diverticulitis (18).

That said, most of the evidence surrounding butyrate is from test-tube or animal studies. More
human-based research is necessary before making recommendations.

SUMMARYResistant starch in potatoes is a source of nutrition for beneficial gut bacteria. They
convert it to the short-chain fatty acid butyrate, which has been linked to reduced inflammation
in the colon, improved colon defenses and a lower risk of colorectal cancer.

5. Naturally Gluten-Free

The gluten-free diet is one of the most popular diets worldwide. It involves eliminating gluten,
which is a family of proteins found in grains like spelt, wheat, barley and rye.

Most people do not experience adverse symptoms from consuming gluten.

However, people with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity can experience severe
discomfort when consuming foods that contain gluten. Symptoms include sharp stomach pain,
diarrhea, constipation, bloating and skin rashes, just to name a few (19, 20).

If you follow a gluten-free diet, then you should consider adding potatoes to your diet. They are
naturally gluten-free, which means they won’t trigger uncomfortable symptoms.

While potatoes are gluten-free, many common potato recipes are not. Some potato dishes that
contain gluten include certain au gratin recipes and potato bread.

If you have celiac disease or a non-celiac gluten sensitivity, be sure to read the full list of
ingredients before eating a potato dish.
SUMMARYPotatoes are naturally gluten-free, which makes them an excellent food choice for
people with celiac disease or a non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

6. Incredibly Filling

Aside from being nutritious, potatoes are also incredibly filling.

In one study, 11 people were fed 38 common foods and asked to rate foods based on how filling
they were. Potatoes received the highest fullness rating of them all.

In fact, potatoes were rated as being seven times more filling than croissants, which were
ranked as the least filling food item (21).

Foods that are filling may help you regulate or lose weight, as they curb hunger pains (22).

Some evidence shows that a certain potato protein, known as potato proteinase inhibitor 2
(PI2), can curb appetite. This protein appears to enhance the release of cholecystokinin (CCK),
a hormone that promotes feelings of fullness (23).

SUMMARYStudies have shown that potatoes are among the most filling foods. They may
increase the levels of fullness hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK).

7. Extremely Versatile

Not only are potatoes healthy, but they are also delicious and versatile.

Potatoes can be prepared in many ways, including boiled, baked and steamed. However, frying
potatoes may dramatically increase their calorie content if you use a lot of oil.

Instead, try slicing potatoes and then roasting them in the oven with a light drizzle of extra virgin
olive oil and a sprinkle of rosemary.

Make sure not to remove the skin of the potatoes, as most of the nutrients are located there.
This will ensure you receive the maximum amount of nutrients from the potato.

SUMMARYPotatoes are delicious, versatile and easy to add to your diet. Try boiling, baking or
steaming them and consuming them with the skin intact.

The Bottom Line


Potatoes are rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, which make them very healthy.

Studies have linked potatoes and their nutrients to a variety of impressive health benefits,
including improved blood sugar control, reduced heart disease risk and higher immunity. They
may also improve digestive health and combat signs of aging.

Potatoes are also quite filling, which means they may help you lose weight by curbing hunger
pains and cravings.

All in all, potatoes are a great addition to your diet in moderation. They are also naturally gluten-
free, which means they can be enjoyed by almost everyone.

SOURCE:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/benefits-of-potatoes#section1

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