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Foxborough Regional Charter School

PHYSICS
GRADE 9

2014 – 2015 Curriculum Map


29 Objectives Covered/31 Total Objectives Grade 9-12 Physics
Introduction

The purpose of curriculum is to focus instruction in a grade level content / skill area.

The development of this curriculum map is a result of months of research, collaboration and hard work on the part of the entire Teaching &
Learning Division. The document itself is a living document; it is meant to be revisited on an annual basis by all those who use it: teachers,
paraprofessionals, special educators and other staff.

This particular model is a ‘back to basics’ approach to curriculum. The FRCS curriculum model is focused on standards based, measureable
learning objectives for all students. Our curriculum outlines the core knowledge base in a grade level; what a student should know and be able
to do by the end of a given year in a specific subject or skill area.

The FRCS curriculum model does not subscribe to any one boxed program or canned curriculum. Rather, FRCS develops its own curriculum and
employs a variety of instructional materials and learning experiences to facilitate student achievement of our learning objectives. Our
curriculum is thoughtfully designed to identify the core skills and knowledge that students need to be successful in each subsequent grade at
FRCS and beyond!

The enclosed document includes a complete subject area curriculum for one grade level as well as an overview of a vertical curriculum
articulation. The vertical articulation provides the context for this grade level curriculum; outlining what a student should have mastered prior
to entering this grade and what he or she will master upon promotion to the next grade level.
Vertical Curriculum Articulation

What is vertical articulation?


Vertical curriculum articulation is education-jargon for a map of standards that students will learn at each grade level in a particular content or
skill area. It is organized in a variety of forms, but the simplest (and easiest to read) is just a chart of standards and the years in which students
should master each standard in that subject.

What is the purpose of vertical curriculum articulation?


Vertical articulation gives curriculum direction and purpose. And in terms of this single grade level curriculum, it provides the context for the
learning objectives outlined in this map. It outlines what students have learned in the past and what they will be expected to learn long after
completing this grade level. ‘Backward design’ (another great education-jargon term for the 21st century)

How is this applicable for my classroom?


No matter which grade you teach, you are but one point in a child’s learning experience. The vertical curriculum articulation found on the next
page outlines where your role lays in the entire progression of students’ learning in this subject. As students arrive in your class this year and
you begin your pre-assessments, this vertical articulation will help you identify which concepts and skills your students still need and which
Vertical Articulation by Standards
Science: 2014-2015SY
Note: Science Standards are segregated K-2, 3-5, and 6-8. The Standards are grouped by topic with no commonality between numbers.
Grade K Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8
Earth Science (ES)
Earth Materials ES1 ES2 ES1, ES2 ES1, 3, 4 ES2-5 ES1-5 ES2 ES2
Weather ES3 ES3 ES3 ES7, 9 ES6 ES6, 7, 9
Earth/Solar System ES4 ES4 ES 13, 15 ES13-15 ES13-15 ES8-12 ES9-11 ES10, 12
Patterns ES5 ES5 ES10, 11 ES10, 11 ES10, 11 ES3, 4 ES3, 4
Earth History ES12 ES12 ES12 ES5, 6 ES5, 7
Mapping ES1 ES1

Life Science (LS)


Living Things LS1-3, 7 LS1, 3, 6 LS1-3, 6-8 LS1-3, 11 1, 2, 4, 11 LS1-4, 11 LS13 LS13 LS13
Heredity LS4 LS4 LS7-9 LS7-9
Evolution LS5 LS6, 8, 9 LS6, 8, 9 LS6, 8, 9 LS10, 12 LS10-11 LS10, 12
Environment LS14-16 LS14
Classification LS1 LS1
Systems LS17, 18 LS5, 6
Cells LS2-4 LS2-4

Physical Science (PS)


Properties PS1 PS1 PS1 PS1 PS1 PS1 PS1-4 PS1, 4
Matter PS2 PS2 PS2 PS2, 3 PS2, 3
Energy 4, 7, 9-10 4-5, 7-10 PS4-12 PS13, 14 PS14 PS13-16
Motion PS3 PS4 PS3-5 PS11, 12 PS11, 12
Elements PS6, 8, 10 PS5-10 PS6, 8, 10
Tech.Eng. (TE)
Materials and Tools TE1.1, 1.3 TE1.1-1.3 TE1.1-1.3 TE1.1-1.3 TE1.1-1.3 TE1.1-1.3 TE1.1-1.3 TE1.1-1.3 TE1.1-1.3
Design TE2.2 TE2.1 TE2.1, 2.2 TE2.1, 2.2 TE2.1, 2.2 TE2.1, 2.2 TE2.1, 2.2 TE2.1, 2.2 TE2.1-2.6
Curriculum Map Overview: How to read your grade level Curriculum Map

Organization of Map
 The scope and sequence of this curriculum is organized into 3 terms. Each term is organized into units of instruction
 Each unit has the following elements and each element is described on the following pages
 Teachers develop unit plans to articulate the EXPERIENCES they will facilitate for students to achieve learning objectives within the
curriculum

Motion and Forces


Unit 1
How do we characterize motion as a form of Energy?

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required vocabulary Learning Plan:


Activities, Resources & Experiences

SIS3 (HS) 1. State the SI units of mass, length and Scientific Notation Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.1, Sec. 1.3- 1.5
Convert within a unit (such as, time SI prefixes
centimeters to meters 2. State the metric (SI) prefixes (multipliers) Meter http://www.khanacademy.org/math/pre-
Use common prefixes such as and use the prefixes in problem solving Mass algebra/rates-and-ratios/metric-system-
milli-, centi-, and kilo- 3. Express a number in power of ten Grams tutorial/v/unit-conversion
Use scientific notation, where notation and use power of ten notation
appropriate in problem solving http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYgTiQ-ZIf0
4. Use significant figures when problem
solving
5. Explain and use order of magnitude
when problem solving
State Standard:
Each unit of curriculum identifies the state standards mandated by the state of Massachusetts at each grade level range for that subject area.

Measurable Student Learning Objective: (“The Students Will Be Able To”):


For each state standard, FRCS curriculum identifies measureable student objectives that chunk the standards into lesson sized, teachable
objectives. The objectives should drive every lesson plan and should drive the instruction each day. These are the objectives that an instructor
should communicate to students each day prior to the start of a lesson.

Each student objective is a measurable learning goal that focuses lesson planning and instruction. The learning objectives are your: TSWBAT (the
student will be able to) list; they are your lesson objectives. These learning objectives should drive both instruction and assessment. If we focus
instruction on a specific learning objective and develop formative assessments to assess that objective, we create a seamless transition between
our expectations for learning and actual student learning experiences. Essentially, these objectives help focus our instruction on our students’
core understanding. They identify what students need to know to be successful this year and beyond. Please note that these objectives are the
minimum expectation for students and that by no means does this limit your ability to add additional content, activities and experiences for your
students. However, before going beyond or deeper into content areas, please ensure that your students have mastered the basic learning
objectives for a given standard first.

The learning objectives in our curriculum should also drive your assessments. Each objective is purposefully designed to be inherently
measurable. Upon completing a lesson, the objectives lend themselves to formative assessments. For example, if you do a lesson with the
objective: TSWBAT: “Compare and contrast the Igneous and Metamorphic rocks”, then your formative assessment (i.e.: exit slip) at the end of
that lesson can be as simple as the open response question: “Compare and contrast the Igneous and Metamorphic rocks.” If a student can do or
demonstrate the learning objectives for a specific standard, then the student demonstrates understanding of the objective. When a student
demonstrates understanding of ALL of the associated objectives with a given standard, the student demonstrates understanding of the standard
itself! At that point, if time permits, students can explore the topic greater depth through enrichment learning.

To help you create formative assessments for these objectives, we have included a list of all of the measurable action verbs that were used in
development of this curriculum. They are the same words that are used in each of the measurable learning objectives so that as a school
system, we use the same vocabulary to talk about teaching and learning. These definitions (and formative assessment suggestions) can be
found at the end of this curriculum in Appendix A: “Assessing Student Objectives”. Please take some time to review this and see your IL with
follow up questions. Measurable learning objectives are the singular most important element of any curriculum; without it, we are just teaching
activities.

As departments develop objectives based benchmark assessments, the same vocabulary of measurable action verbs will be used to consistently
communicate the depth of learning and the assessment expectations for students at each benchmark point. For example, if the learning
objective indicates that a student should be able to simply “identify” some set of concepts, the depth of learning is really only recognition and
thus lends itself to a multiple choice assessment of that understanding. However, if the objective indicates that a student should be able to
compare and contrast two major concepts, the expected depth of learning is significantly greater. Thus the expectation of the assessment is also
greater; perhaps an open response or Venn Diagram explaining the two concepts.

With the entire district speaking the same language when it comes to what students will learn, how deep their learning will be and how they will
be assessed for understanding, we are able to create a comprehensive, cogent curriculum that develops a students’ knowledge right up Bloom’s
Taxonomy. As a result, we will be able to better educate our students grade to grade and check for understanding with confidence, quickly
identifying any learning gaps and addressing them so that every student successfully assesses our curriculum!

Learning Plan: Resources, Activities and Experiences


This is where the great instruction happens! For every student objective, our curriculum identifies and suggests resources, activities and
experiences that will help your students master it. Instruction is more than a textbook and this section of the FRCS curriculum provides
instructors with resources and suggested lessons beyond the textbook. While the text is a resource, it is only one of many.

The resources and ideas in this section have been developed by veteran instructors, colleagues and instructional leaders. They are in our
curriculum map because they’ve been tried and they work for kids. This element of the curriculum map is an excellent resource to differentiate
an instructional approach to reach different populations of your students. .

The Instructional strategies and lesson suggestions are open ended so that you may modify them to meet the needs of your students and
classroom. If after reviewing your curriculum map and your ancillary resources, you are still looking for creative ways to help your students
achieve a learning objective, please don’t hesitate to contact your instructional leader! Your IL can provide additional resources, strategies,
ideas or even model a lesson for you or co-teach the lesson with you. This element of the curriculum is designed to be periodically updated and
improved so please feel free to contribute your strategies and ideas and support your colleagues by emailing them to your instructional leader
any time!

Vital Vocabulary:
These are the words students must know in order to understand each objective. Students should be able to use these words appropriately and
within the correct context, not necessarily recite textbook definitions. To be able to use vocabulary appropriately is more valuable than
memorizing a definition. This list is not exhaustive, so please feel free to add vocabulary to meet your students’ needs. However, mastery of
these words and the underlying concepts is critical for students to understand and master the learning objective.

Essential Question(s):
This acts as the starting point (pre-assessment) as well as a summative assessment for each unit. At the beginning of each unit of instruction,
this question acts as the activator and initiates the discussion of the topic. At the end of the unit, students should be able to answer the
essential question(s) and demonstrate they have achieved understanding the learning goals/objectives. How you assess this question is left to
you as the classroom instructor, be it a written essay, oral, a report or a classroom discussion. You may also consider restating the essential
question as an open response question at the end of each unit.
4 Essential Questions
1. How do you design and create a solution to a problem in relation to areas of science?
2. How do structure and function of living things relate to other processes on earth?
3. How are the driving forces for evolution interrelated?
4. How are the many natural events that occur due to forces on earth and in space interrelated?

Science Curriculum Map Links


Biology Map
Chemistry Map
Earth Science Map
Motion and Forces
Unit 1
How do we characterize motion as a form of Energy?

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required vocabulary Learning Plan:


Activities, Resources & Experiences

SIS3 (HS) 6. State the SI units of mass, length and Scientific Notation Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.1, Sec. 1.3- 1.5
Convert within a unit (such as, time SI prefixes
centimeters to meters 7. State the metric (SI) prefixes (multipliers) Meter http://www.khanacademy.org/math/pre-
Use common prefixes such as and use the prefixes in problem solving Mass algebra/rates-and-ratios/metric-system-
milli-, centi-, and kilo- 8. Express a number in power of ten Grams tutorial/v/unit-conversion
Use scientific notation, where notation and use power of ten notation
appropriate in problem solving http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYgTiQ-ZIf0
9. Use significant figures when problem
solving
10. Explain and use order of magnitude
when problem solving

Physics (HS): 1.1 ES 1,4 1. Graphically represent magnitude and Vector quantity Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.4, Sec. 4.1- 4.2
Compare and contrast vector direction of a vector Scalar Quantity Vector Analysis worksheets
quantities (such as, 2. Add and subtract vectors using a Magnitude
displacement, velocity, protractor and ruler http://www.khanacademy.org/math/precalculus
acceleration, force, and linear 3. Use graphical method to add or subtract /vectors-precalc/vector-basic/e/graphically-
momentum) and scalar quantities two or more vectors (parallelogram adding-and-subtracting-vectors
(such as, distance, speed, energy, method and tip to tail method). http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/vectors
mass, and work)
/Lesson-1/Vectors-and-Direction
Interrelated Science Connections:
HS BIO 4.5
Motion and Forces
Unit 1 (continued)

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required vocabulary Learning Plan:


Activities, Resources & Experiences

Physics (HS): 1.2 ES 1,4 1. Compare and contrast between distance Position Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.2, Sec. 2.1- 2.2
Distinguish between and displacement Uniform motion Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.3, Sec. 3.1- 3.2
displacement, distance, velocity, 2. Compare and contrast between speed Speed Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.4, Sec. 4.3-4.4
speed and acceleration. Solve and velocity Constant acceleration
problems involving 3. Compare and contrast between velocity Constant Velocity Velocity Lab
displacement, distance, velocity, and acceleration Instantaneous velocity http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Physics-
speed and constant acceleration 4. Deconstruct instantaneous and average Instantaneous Tutorial/1-D-Kinematics
velocity or speed Acceleration
5. Define positive and negative acceleration Parabolic
or velocity Relative motion
6. Calculate acceleration, velocity and
displacement using 1D kinematic
equations
7. Define relative motion
8. Attribute the motion of freely falling
objects
9. Summarize projectile motion
Physics (HS): 1.3 ES 1 1. Construct and interpret graphs of Slope Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.2, Sec. 2.3- 2.4
Create and interpret graphs of 1- position versus time, distance versus Coordinates Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.3, Sec. 3.3
dimensional motion, such as time, speed versus time, velocity versus X,Y axis
position vs. time, distance vs. time, and acceleration versus time. https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/
time, speed vs. time, velocity vs. 2. Solve for displacement using a velocity one-dimensional-
time, and acceleration vs. time vs. time graph motion/acceleration_tutorial/v/why-distance-is-
where acceleration is constant. 3. Solve for velocity and acceleration by area-under-velocity-time-line
determining the slope of a line https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bys19z6P
ow
Motion and Forces (continued)
Unit 1 (continued)

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:


vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences

Physics (HS): 1.4 ES 4 1. Summarize Newton’s three laws and give Mass Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.5, Sec. 5.1-5.2
Interpret and apply Newton’s examples that illustrate each one Inertia
three laws of motion 2. Calculate the net force when given Weight Spring Scale Tug of War
Interrelated Science Connection: several concurrent forces Net force vs Force http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Physics-
ES 4.2 3. Graphically resolve forces into Product Tutorial/Newton-s-Laws
components if necessary to determine Directly proportional https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYVMlmL0B
the net force Inversely proportional PQ
4. Summarize and give examples of inertia
5. Solve math problems using the 2nd law
rd
6. Organize examples of Newton’s 3 law in
action
Physics (HS): 1.5 ES 1 1. Draw free-body diagrams from given Normal force Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.5, Sec. 5.2
Use free-body force diagrams to forces or examples Applied force
show forces acting on a system 2. Graphically resolve forces into Tension force http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/newtla
consisting of a pair of interacting components if necessary to determine Frictional force ws/U2L2c.cfm
objects the net force Perpendicular
3. Critique different types of forces and be
able to properly label them

Physics (HS): 1.6 ES 1,4 1. Compare and contrast between static Static friction Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.5, Sec. 5.3
Distinguish qualitatively and kinetic friction Kinetic friction
between static and kinetic 2. Apply coefficients of friction to calculate Coefficient of friction Friction Lab
friction, and describe their frictional force http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/fo
effects on the motion of objects. 3. Investigate the effects of surface area rces-newtons-laws/inclined-planes-
and weight on frictional force friction/v/intuition-on-static-and-kinetic-friction-
comparisons
Motion and Forces (continued)
Unit 1 (continued)

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:


vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences

Physics (HS): 1.7 ES 1,4 1. Integrate Newton’s law of universal Gravitational force Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.9, Sec. 9.1-9.2
Describe Newton’s law of gravitation. Free Fall Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.9, Sec. 9.4
universal gravitation in 2. Summarize Kepler’s Laws of orbital Ellipse
terms of the attraction motion Eccentricity Galileo Reading
between two objects, their 3. Critique the inverse relationship between Perihelion Kepler Lab
masses, and the distance distance and gravitational force Aphelion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNeFI_JCXlY
between them. 4. Attribute weightlessness of astronauts in https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQOHRKKNNLQ
Interrelated Science Connections: orbit
HS BIO 4.5
CHEM 6.1
ES 1.5, 1.8, 4.1, 4.2

Physics (HS): 1.8 ES 1,4 1. Judge the force that causes centripetal Tangential Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.9, Sec. 9.3
Describe conceptually acceleration and determine the direction Angular Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.8, Sec. 8.1
the forces involved in of the acceleration vector Period
circular motion 2. Calculate the centripetal force of a point Frequency Circular force demonstration
Interrelated Science Connections: mass given radius and linear speed G force
ES 4.1 3. Deconstruct the relationship between http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/circles
the period of motion and the frequency
http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/two-
of rotation.
dimensional-motion/centripetal-acceleration-
tutoria/v/centripetal-force-and-acceleration-
intuition
Conservation of Energy and Momentum
Unit 2
State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:
vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences

Physics (HS): 2.1 ES 2,4 1. Apply the principle of energy Law of Conservation of Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.6, Sec. 5.3
Interpret and provide examples conservation to analyze changes in Energy
that illustrate the law of potential, kinetic, and internal energy. Mechanical Energy Bowling Ball Demo
conservation of energy 2. Use the law of conservation of energy Mouse trap car project
Interrelated Science Connections: to generate solutions to mechanical https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eja5ILMIeoc
HS BIO 6.3 energy systems
CHEM 2.3, 5.1, 5.5, 6.4 3. Use the law of conservation energy to
ES 1.1, 2.1 create algebraic expressions to calculate
energy values in a mechanical system

Physics (HS): 2.2 ES 1,4 1. Recall the work energy theorem and Conservative forces Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.6, Sec. 6.2
Interpret and provide examples of use it to analyze energy systems Equipotential points
how energy 2. Determine the gravity potential energy http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/energy/u5
can be converted from of a given object at a location in gravity l1b.cfm
gravitational potential field
energy to kinetic energy and vice 3. Solve for kinetic energy of object in
versa motion.
Interrelated Science Connections: 4. Differentiate between conservative and
HS BIO 2.5 non-conservative forces

Physics (HS): 2.3 ES 1,2,4 1. Define mechanical energy in a system Work-Energy theorem Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.6, Sec. 6.2
Describe both qualitatively and 2. Evaluate energy systems for Mechanical energy
quantitatively how work can be conservative and non-conservative http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/wor
expressed as a change in forces k-and-energy/work-and-energy-
mechanical energy. 3. Analyze the relationship between tutorial/v/introduction-to-work-and-energy
changes in mechanical energy and work
Conservation of Energy and Momentum
Unit 2 (continued)

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:


vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences

Physics (HS): 2.4 ES 1,4 1. Calculate power Negative work Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.6, Sec. 6.1
Describe both qualitatively and 2. Analyze work and its relationship Positive Work Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.6, Sec. 6.4
quantitatively the concept of between force and displacement Power
power vs work done per unit 3. Calculate work done by a constant force Efficiency
time. 4. Use graphical analysis to calculate work Parallel force http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/energy
done by a force that varies in magnitude Joules

Physics (HS): 2.5 ES 4 1. Define linear momentum and its Momentum Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.7, Sec. 7.1-7.4
Provide and interpret examples relationship to force. Impulse
showing that linear momentum is 2. Use the Conservation of Momentum to Elastic collision Dynamic carts Demo/ Lab
the product of mass and velocity, calculate linear momentum. Inelastic collision http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/momentu
and is always conserved (law of 3. Differentiate between elastic and Law of Conservation of m
conservation of momentum). inelastic collisions Momentum http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/line
Calculate the momentum of an 4. Define impulse and its relationship to ar-momentum
object. force and time
5. Use Newton’s Laws to analyze systems in
motion
Heat and heat transfer
Unit 3
State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:
vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences

Physics (HS): 3.1 ES 1,4 1. Interpret the 3 main processes for heat Conduction Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.10, Sec. 10.1
Explain how heat energy transfer on the macro and microscopic Convection
is transferred by convection, level Radiation Soda can demo
conduction, and radiation.
Interrelated Science Connections: http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/thermalP
HS BIO 2.1
CHEM 6.4
ES 1.3

Physics (HS): 3.2 ES 1,4 1. Exemplify the meaning of thermal Heat Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.10, Sec. 10.2
Explain how heat energy equilibrium the role of temperature Temperature
will move from a higher 2. Carryout basic calorimetric calculations Equilibrium http://www.khanacademy.org/partner-content/mit-
temperature to a lower k12/mit-k12-physics/v/heat-transfer
temperature until
equilibrium is reached.
Heat and heat transfer
Unit 3 Continued
State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:
vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences

Physics (HS): 3.3 ES 1,4 1. Apply the principle of energy Evaporation Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.10, Sec. 10.3-10.4
Describe the relationship conservation to calculate changes in Sublimation
between average molecular potential, kinetic, and internal energy. Condensation http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/states-of-
kinetic energy and 2. Produce and Interpret phase diagrams Boiling matter
temperature. Recognize that 3. Summarize the expansion and Thermal Expansion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lAxBTLgYfU
energy is absorbed when a contraction of molecules during the Latent Heat
substance changes from a transfer of energy Radiation
solid to a liquid to a gas, 4. Illustrate the difference between latent Pressure
and that energy is released heat of fusion and vaporization Volume
when a substance changes 5. Exemplify the process of evaporation and
from a gas to a liquid to a condensation and apply it to real world
solid. Explain the applications
relationships among
evaporation, condensation,
cooling, and warming.
Interrelated Science Connections:
HS BIO 6.4
CHEM 1.1, 1.3, 6.1, 6.3, 7.3
Physics (HS): 3.4 ES 1 1. Analyze different materials by their Specific heat capacity Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.10, Sec. 10.4
Explain the relationships specific heat values.
among temperature 2. Illustrate the relationship between Measuring/Calculating Energy, Heat Capacity
changes in a substance, specific heat and energy problems
the amount of heat
transferred, the amount
(mass) of the substance,
http://www.kentchemistry.com/links/Matter/Heatin
and the specific heat of
gCurve.htm
the substance.
Interrelated Science Connections: http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/thermalP/L
CHEM 7.3, 7.4 esson-2/Measuring-the-Quantity-of-Heat
ES 1.7 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ar4bSlKz3s
Waves
Unit 4
State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:
vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences
Physics (HS): 4.1 ES 4 1. Characterize the conditions of simple Amplitude Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.13, Sec. 13.1-13.2
Describe the measurable harmonic motion. Wavelength
properties of waves 2. Calculate the period and frequency of an Frequency http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/waves
(velocity, frequency, object vibrating with simple harmonic
wavelength, amplitude, motion. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c38H6UKt3_I
period) and explain the 3. Generate and Interpret graphical models
relationships among of simple harmonic motion
them. Recognize
examples of simple
harmonic motion.

Physics (HS): 4.2 ES 1,4 1. Differentiate between mechanical and Mechanical wave Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.13, Sec. 13.3-13.4
Distinguish between electromagnetic waves. Medium
mechanical and 2. Recognize mechanical waves require a Electromagnetic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGyRe_SGnc
electromagnetic waves. medium wave k
3. Identify electromagnetic waves by their
frequency and wavelength
Physics (HS): 4.3 ES 1,4 1. Interpret waveforms of transverse and Transverse wave Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.13, Sec. 13.3-13.4
Distinguish between the longitudinal waves. Longitudinal wave
two types of mechanical 2. Describe the direction of energy in Pulse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAXx0018QCc
waves, transverse and mechanical waves
longitudinal.

Physics (HS): 4.4 ES 1,4 1. Apply the law of reflection for flat Reflection Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.15, Sec. 15.1
Describe qualitatively mirrors. Refraction Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.16, Sec. 16.1
the basic principles of 2. Predict refraction angle by interpreting Index of refraction Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.17, Sec. 17.1
reflection and refraction refraction index http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/refln
of waves. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQE659ICjqQ
Waves
Unit 4 Continued

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:


vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences
Physics (HS): 4.5 ES 4 1. Calculate wave speed in a constant Lambda Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.14, Sec. 141-14.2
Recognize that medium
mechanical waves 2. Analyze wave speeds in different http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/refrn/u14I3
generally move faster mediums a.cfm
through a solid than
through a liquid and
faster through a liquid
than through a gas.
Interrelated Scienc Connections:
CHEM 1.3

Physics (HS): 4.6 ES 1,4 1. Evaluate the Doppler effect as a function Doppler effect Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.14, Sec. 14.3-14.4
Describe the apparent of speed relative to the observer Red Shift
change in frequency of 2. Interpret red shift and blue shift and its Blue Shift https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4OnBYrbCjY
waves due to the motion application to planetary motion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDTV_W1FIYw
of a source or a receiver
(The Doppler effect).
Interrelated Scienc Connections:
ES 4.1
Electromagnetism
Unit 5

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:


vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences
Physics (HS): 5.1 ES 1,4 1. Recognize static charge is created by Electricity Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.19, Sec. 19.1
Recognize that an electric the flow of electrons Electrostatics
charge tends to be static 2. Compare and contrast conductors and Conductor Static Electricity Lab
on insulators and can insulators. Insulator http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/balloons
move on and in 3. Explore the internal workings of an Valence electrons http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/estatics
conductors. Explain that atom Protons
energy can produce a 4. Analyze and predict charge flow Charge by induction
separation of charges. Ground
Interrelated Science Connections:
HS BIO 4.7,4.4
CHEM 3.2, 8.1

Physics (HS): 5.2 ES 1,4 1. Evaluate the basic properties of Voltage Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.21, Sec. 21.1-21.2
Develop qualitative and electric current and solve problems Electric current
quantitative relating current, charge, and time. Electrical resistance Circuit Board Lab
understandings of 2. Calculate resistance, current, and Ohm’s Law http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/ohms-law
current, voltage, potential difference using the resistance
resistance, and the definition of resistance.
connections among them 3. Recognize current and time are
(Ohm’s law). inversely related
Interrelated Science Connections: 4. Understand that voltage is a product of
HS BIO 4.4 force and distance
Electromagnetism
Unit 5 (continued)

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:


vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences
Physics (HS): 5.3 ES 1 1. Interpret and construct circuit diagrams. Series circuit Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.21, Sec. 21.2-21.3
Analyze simple 2. Design basic circuits to analyze Parallel circuit
arrangements of electrical 3. Test and evaluate circuits using multi Voltage drop http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/electr
components in both series meters Equivalent icity-and-magnetism/v/circuits--part-1
and parallel circuits. 4. Calculate the equivalent resistance for a EMF http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/electr
Recognize symbols and circuit of resistors in parallel and find the Fuse icity-and-magnetism/v/circuits--part-2
understand the functions of current in and potential difference across
common circuit elements each resistor.
(battery, connecting wire, 5. Calculate the equivalent resistance for a
switch, fuse, resistance) in a circuit of resistors in series and parallel to
schematic diagram. find the current in and potential
difference across each resistor in the
circuit.

Physics (HS): 5.4 ES 1,4 1. Compare and contrast electric force with Coulomb’s Law Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.19, Sec. 19.2-19.3
Describe conceptually gravitational force. Coulomb
the attractive or 2. Calculate electric force using Coulomb’s Electric Field Designing a simple DC motor
repulsive forces between Law. http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/estatics/u8l
objects relative to their 3. Analyze the relationship between distance 3b.cfm
charges and the distance and charge to predict changes in force
between them 4. Construct graphical models to illustrate
(Coulomb’s law). electric field lines.
Interrelated Science Connections:
CHEM 2.2, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3,
3.4, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 7.1, 8.1
Electromagnetism
Unit 5 (continued)

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:


vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences
Physics (HS): 5.5 ES 1,4 1. Compare and contrast potential energy Potential difference Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.20 Sec. 20.1-20.3
Explain how electric and potential difference. Electric potential
current is a flow of 2. Integrate concepts of potential energy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqGvUbvVQXg
charge caused by a when identifying voltage
potential difference 3. Understand that current flows from a
(voltage), and how power high to low potential
is equal to current 4. Solve problems involving electrical energy
multiplied by voltage. and potential difference.
Interrelated Science Connections:
CHEM 3.2

Physics (HS): 5.6 ES 4 1. Evaluate the magnetic field produced by Magnetic field Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.22, Sec. 22.1-22.2
Recognize that moving current in a straight conductor and in a Electromagnet Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.23, Sec. 23.1-23.2
electric charges produce solenoid.
magnetic forces and moving 2. Apply the right hand rule to determine the
magnets produce electric direction of the magnetic field in a current http://www.khanacademy.org/about/blog/post/347
forces. Recognize that the carrying wire. 26851466/dc-motors
interplay of electric and 3. Design a simple DC motor
magnetic forces is the basis http://www.animations.physics.unsw.edu.au/jw/elec
for electric motors, tricmotors.html#DCmotors
generators, and other
technologies.
Electromagnetic Radiation
Unit 6

State Standard Student Learning objective(s) Required Learning Plan:


vocabulary Activities, Resources & Experiences

Physics (HS): 6.1 ES 4 1. Characterize electromagnetic waves; Electromagnetic Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.15, Sec. 15.1-15.2
Recognize that what they are and how they are wave
electromagnetic waves produced. http://missionscience.nasa.gov/ems/02_anatomy.ht
are transverse waves 2. Evaluate how electromagnetic waves ml
and travel at the speed transfer energy.
of light through a
vacuum.
Physics (HS): 6.2 ES 1,4 1. Cite applications of electromagnetic Electromagnetic Pearson Physics; Walker Chap.15, Sec. 15.1-15.2
Describe the waves. spectrum
electromagnetic 2. Classify electromagnetic waves by their Diffraction grating http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/color-vision
spectrum in terms of frequency and wavelength
frequency and 3. Describe characteristics of visible light
wavelength, and identify
the locations of radio
waves, microwaves,
infrared radiation,
visible light (red,
orange, yellow,
green, blue, indigo, and
violet), ultraviolet rays,
x-rays, and gamma rays
on the spectrum.
Interrelated Science Connections:
ES 1.2
Appendix A:
Assessing Student Learning
Measurable Action Words & Formative Assessment Types
As educators, it is vital that we are consistent and transparent with our learning expectations. This section provides us with a common set of
terminology associated with student learning objectives and assessment. It will help you design your unit and lesson plans with the end in mind;
developing assessments for student objectives and then developing lessons and units to help your students achieve these objectives. We don’t
want to teach to a test, but we do want to ensure that we assess our students’ learning of the core skills and knowledge outlined by the state.
This section standardizes the vocabulary that we all use to identify not only what our students should know, but the depth of knowledge they
should attain and the means through which we assess their understanding.

Objectives and assessments:


Each standard has at least one associated student objective. These objectives should act as your lesson objectives and should be the learning
goal of your students. In order to assess student learning of these objectives, it is important that we are using common terminology. A list of
measurable action verbs used in this document as well as a description of what level of understanding students should be able to demonstrate
to achieve such objectives is located on the next page. In addition, recommendations for developing your own formative assessments to check
for understanding of each objective are included. These definitions are broad so that you may apply them to your own assessments as needed.

Developing formative and other classroom assessments:


 Less is more: While essay assessments take more time to correct, they provide more insight into your students’ depth of understanding.
You don’t need to give nearly as many questions and students are required to really show what they know.
 Assess the objectives as the core knowledge and leave the ‘nice-to-knows’ off the formal assessments
 Teach to the objective and standard, not the text. Text and text assessments are not specific to MA and thus don’t always assess what
DESE identified standards. This doesn’t mean you can’t assess knowledge outside of them, but assessment should focus on the standards
and objectives
 Assess each day: a quick 1 question exit slip gives you a good idea if a student grasps the concept.

Reading the chart below:


 Each heading indicates a depth/level of understanding aligned with Bloom’s Taxonomy
 “Skill definition” is the action verb for a given objective. It’s what the student should be able to do
 “Assessment format expectations and suggestions” are just that: the kind of formative assessment you can use to see if a student can
demonstrate the particular level or depth of understanding
Analytical & Evaluative Skills
Skills Definition Assessment format expectations and suggestions
Analyze: Given or collect information or data to support a Expectations for analysis are some form of explanation based on given or collected data.
conclusion. Written assessments are usually in the form of a lab report (i.e.: conclusions section)
Categorize / Rank: Students are given or collect a set of Students usually test the examples or specimen to determine their characteristics.
examples or specimens and must sort them into appropriate Students organize their categorization in a table and support with data and written or oral
groups or classes based on their characteristics. explanation.
Compare & Contrast: Identify and explain the similarities and Expectations for this skill focuses on writing about science concepts: essay or graphic
differences of two or more concepts organizer form (i.e.: Venn Diagram)
Differentiate Between: Students describe the differences This can be done using a ‘T-chart’ or other graphic organizer. This can also be
between two or more concepts, specimen, examples or items. incorporated into a written response
Simplify: Summarize Written or oral explanation of a concept in students’ own words
Evaluate: Determine the significance Usually assessed in written form. Students support their evaluation with data or
background knowledge

Synthesis & Application Skills


Skills Definition Assessment format expectations and suggestions
Determine: Decide upon or identify Pick out the correct term or concept from a group. Provide and fill in the correct term or
concept.
Diagram / Illustrate: Students create a drawing that includes Expectations are that students can generate scientific diagrams or illustrations. Labels and
labels and written explanation. explanation should be included.
Solve / Calculate: find the answer or solution (usually Given some data set, students find the answer or solution. Include work and units.
mathematically) Formulas are provided by instructor
Design / Create / Develop / Construct: Make or build This is very broad, but the expectation is that a performance assessment of some kind is
given
Demonstrate: show The expectation for this is that students physically show a skill or demonstrate an
understanding in written form.
Comprehension Skills
Skills Definition Assessment format expectations and suggestions
Classify: Arrange and assign to a category The assessment expectation is that students can arrange examples into appropriate categories.
This may be matching or listing and may or may not include a brief explanation
Describe: Students’ written or oral description Expectations are that students can describe (orally or written) a concept in their own words.
‘Describe’ objectives focus more on broad comprehension than explanation of detailed
mechanisms
Explain: Written explanation, usually with a diagram Students should be able to explain a concept in detail and provide supporting fact and/or data;
diagrams often accompany this in sci.
Predict: Forecast or hypothesize an outcome based on This is usually done as the hypothesis for a lab or sci. fair project. The expectation is that
supporting data or background knowledge students support hypotheses with ‘why’.
Summarize: Paraphrase content into simpler terms Summaries are usually written and often act as follow up assessments to a passage that is read.
Distinguish Between: Determine differences between The expectation is that students can accomplish ½ of the compare-contrast essay by identifying
key differences between two (usually similar) concepts or ideas. Usually written.

Recall Skills
Skills Definition Assessment format expectations and suggestions
Define: Provide a definition. Assessing this skill is more effective if put in the student’s own words or description. Matching or
student generated definitions
Label / Name: Provide or choose a name for an item, The expectation is either to match or write in a label for a given diagram or fill in the blank
object or concept.
Recognize: pick out from a variety of possible choices Multiple choice is the most common recognition skill assessment
Sequence: Place the concepts or items in a specific, Expectations are that students can either select or write a series of concepts in an appropriate
relevant order and accurate sequence
Identify Select or list (usually characteristics) label, list Students should be able to select or write in the appropriate concept or vocabulary word
or identify
Organize / List: Put associated concepts in order Students create an order that may or may not be based on a standard criterion. This can be
written, oral or physically done
Appendix B:
FRCS Unit Plan Template
FRCS Unit Plan

Teacher __________________________ Grade Level _______________

Unit Title ___________ Length of Unit ______________

Essential Question(s): _________________________________________________________________

Student Learning Outcomes/Objectives (SWBAT):

Assessments:

Learning Experiences:
Reflection:
Appendix C:
Content Specific Terminology Glossary
Grade 9 Physics Glossary

Describe
Summarize
Identify
Explain
Distinguish
Analyze
Diagram
Compare and Contrast
Differentiate
Discuss
Relate
Evaluate
Justify
Characterize
Synthesize
Rank
Outline