Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 45

PART I

BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

Work immersion refers to the subject of the Senior High School

Curriculum implemented by the department of education (DepEd), which

involves hands-on experience or work simulation in which learners can apply

their competencies and acquired knowledge relevant to their track. One of

the goals of K to 12 Basic Education program is to develop students in

different learning competencies, work ethic, and values relevant to pursuing

further education and/or joining the world of work. To achieve conformity

between basic education and the nation’s development targets, work

immersion a required subject has been incorporated into the curriculum.

This program provides learners with opportunities to apply their

competencies in areas of specialization or applied subjects in authentic work

environment. To achieve these objectives, work immersion is thus a

requirement for graduation from secondary education. Students are

immersed in actual work environments such as hotels and restaurants,

Workshop offices in which prior training is relevant.

The food and beverage sector grew out of simple origins: as people

travelled from their homes, going about their business, they often had a

need or desire to eat or drink. Others were encouraged to meet this

demand by supplying food and drink. As the interests of the public

1
became more diverse.so too did the offerings of the food and beverage

sector.

Virtually everyone working in the food service industry will have to

deal with customer complaints at some point in their career. Whether it's

something as simple as getting the wrong drink at a fast food restaurant or

a service complaint at a high-end gourmet restaurant.

Training employee’s on the importance of being patience. All

employees must be well oriented in proper handling of guest complaints.

Having a well oriented team from line staff to the top line management

makes a good impression on the guest.

One of the most important parts of giving great customer service is

know how to deal effectively with customer complaints. Things are bound to

go wrong once in a while no matter how hard you try. Food gets burned,

orders get forgotten in the middle of a dinner rush and peak hours or new

servers forget all their training.

A complaint is an expression or dissatisfaction about the standard of

service actions, or lack of action by an organization to an individual.

According to Tronvoll (2012), it is an action taken by an individual which

involves communicating something negative regarding a product or service.

This study is conducted because the researcher’s need to know to the

performance of the grade 12 Food and beverage services students in

handling customer complaints.

2
Significance of the study

The findings of the study would help the waiters also their company to

be aware that proper handling of customer complaints and concerns will help

prosper their business.

This study will benefit the following persons:

Future Researchers. It will serve as their basis as a correlation study. It

will be good examples for the researchers dealing with relevant problems of

the same study the researcher want to assess.

Students. It can help the students know that skills and knowledge is helpful

to their performances in their work immersion.

Trainees. It enhances the students to be effective by providing them with

applied learning opportunities.

Customer. It will also benefit the customers in their awareness about the

effectiveness of proper handling of customer complaints and concerns.

Food Institution. It will make staff’s aware of their professional

responsibilities and roles as facilitators of learning.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Figure 1 shows that the researcher used to answer the problems rise

in the study. The researcher needed to determine the performance of the

learners in handling customer complaints and concerns for her to be able to

3
identify the advanced knowledge of food and beverage services students.

Then, the researcher assessed the knowledge, skill, and attitude of the

learners using a survey questionnaire. With all these determined, the

researcher was able to design an action plan suited to the learners’ needs.

Conceptual Framework

This figure illustrates conceptual paradigm of the study.

Input Process Output

Customer Action plan to


Collection of
complaints and improve the
the data and
concerns. performance of
through survey Grade 12 food and
Performance of questionnaire. beverage service
the Grade 12 Analysis and students in
Food and handling guest
interpretation
Beverages complaints and
of the data.
Services concerns.
students.

Feedback
Figure 1. Research Paradigm

Figure 1

4
STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

This study aims to assess the performance of grade 12 food and

beverage services students of Rizal experimental station and pilot school of

cottage industries in handling customer complaints and concerns.

Specifically, it seeks to answer the following questions:

1. What is the performance of grade 12 food and beverage services students

in handling customer complaints and concerns?

2. What are the problems encountered by grade 12 food and beverage

services students in handling customer complaints and concerns?

3. Is there a significant relationship between the performance and the

problems encountered by the grade 12 Food and beverage services students

in handling costumer complaints and concerns?

4. What action plan can be proposed to improve the performance of grade

12 food and beverage services students in handling complaints and

concerns?

Null Hypothesis

Ho 1. There is no significant relationship between the performance and the

problems encountered by the grade Food 12 and beverage services students

in handling costumer complaints and concerns.

5
Definition of Terms

Assessment. It is the evaluation of the overall performance of the Grade 12

Food and beverage services students in handling the customer complaints.

Complaints. It refers to the dissatisfaction of the customer towards the

food server.

Customer service. It refers to a service offered by the food server towards

the guest

Food and Beverage Services. It refers to the subject and specialization of

senior high school students.

Guest. It refers to the person who consume the products ask for good

service.

Performance. It is completion of a task with application of knowledge, skills

and abilities. In work place, performance or job performance means good

ranking with the hypothesized conception of requirements of a task role.

Work immersion. It refers to the subject of grade 12 students in which

they need to conduct their training with their selected specialization.

Scope and Delimitation of the Study

The scope of the study is limited to assess the performance of food

and beverage services students in handling costumer complaints and

concerns. The respondents will be composed of 60 randomly selected grade

6
12 food and beverage services students in Rizal experimental station and

pilot school of cottage industries who attended the work immersion for the

school year 2018-2019.

7
PART II

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

This part explores the related and the relevant previous studies

conducted in this area. It focuses on what previous studies have said about

the organizational responses to consumer complaints and their impacts on

complainant’s satisfaction and customer retention. Literature was sourced

from journals, web articles, books, news reports and other sources

considered to be credible.

On the Customer Complaint towards server

A complaint is an expression of dissatisfaction, about the standard of

service, actions or lack of action by an organization to an individual.

According to Tronvoll (2012), it is an action taken by an individual which

involves communicating something negative regarding a product or service.

Moreover, Crié (2001) asserted that it will be based on the perceived

dissatisfaction with a product, a service or an event in the course of the

buying process or during the consumption. Hoyer & McInnis (2010) further

argues this dissatisfaction is based on the customer’s feelings and

perception. This view is very significant in the services domain since quality

evaluation to a certain degree is based on customer’s subjectivity and failure

in services can affect customer outcome and service process (Hansen et al.,

2009).

8
Complaint management is the way in which companies systematically

handle problems in customer relations (Jeschke et al., 2000). According to

Johnston (2001) cited in Hansen et al. (2009) it involves the receipt,

investigation, settlement and prevention of customer complaints and

recovery of the customer. A customer complaint is a report from a consumer

providing documentation about a problem with a product or service or again,

is any expression of dissatisfaction by a customer or potential about

customer delivery or a product by the company or its agents (Landon,

1980).

In the study of Tronvoll (2012), he argue this processes can be

likened to information processing in an organization. The goal is to stabilize

customer relationships that are at risk and to assure a specific level of

quality by creating a consistent business environment regarding personnel.

On Nature and Scope of Customer Complaint

Customer complaints behavior (CCB) has often in marketing been

seen as either a static and post-purchase activity or as a dynamic

adjustment process. This issue is still debated. A complaint provides an

opportunity for service recovery followed by a chance to educate the

customer, strengthen loyalty and evoke positive Word of Mouth (WOM)

comments. Successful organizations encourage customers to complain

(Tronvoll, 2012). It is because of the dynamic competition in the service

9
sector that there is a growing interest in understanding how customers

evaluate the service experience (Stauss & Seidel, 2004).

So since all organizations experience some degree of customer

dissatisfaction (Ndibusi & Ling, 2006), it makes it crucial to study post

dissatisfaction behavior of customers. Research by Casado et al., (2011)

suggests that consumer complaint behavior (CCB) is a complex

phenomenon. The complexity in CCB is reflected in the number of alternative

taxonomies, schema and definitions proposed to explain this kind of

behavior.

Tronvoll (2007) adds that higher information control and weaker ties

between the consumer and the service provider enhance customer

complaints. Therefore, management needs to establish the processes and

service providers' responses in terms of service-recovery activities, 12

organizational responses and implications for customer experience outcome

like problems of lost customer lifetime value and behavioral intentions

(Tronvoll, 2007).

Complaint behavior is not being well handled in terms of customer

service (Kim et al., 2003; Ndibusi & Ling, 2006). There is need of feedback

and action to reduce their negative effect. Basing on the above, marketers

are today seeking information on consumer behavior and how to handle

customer complaints.

10
Information and feedback from customers are generally acknowledged

as important factors in achieving a positive marketing outcome (Maxham &

Netemeyer, 2003). Unfortunately, most of the customers do not complain

after service failure dissatisfaction, but exit (Tax et al., 1998). Therefore,

organizations need to understand how customers react to service failure and

the providers' efforts towards recovery. Customer complaint behavior (CCB)

refers to the responses triggered by perceived dissatisfaction that is neither

psychologically accepted nor quickly forgotten in consumption of a product

or service (Homburg & Fürst, 2005).

A commonly used definition of customer complaining behavior was

suggested by Singh (1988), who conceptualized it as a set of multiple

(behavioral and non-behavioral) responses, some or all of which are

triggered by perceived dissatisfaction with a purchase episode. On their part,

Jacoby and Jaccard (1981) had earlier defined it as an action taken by an

individual that involves communicating something negative regarding a

product or service. Complaining by satisfied consumers is considered outside

the realm of Customer complaints behavior (Singh 1988).

Traditionally, the common determinant of complaining behavior was

described as dissatisfaction. Consumer dissatisfaction is a result of the

discrepancy between expected and realized performance (Ndibusi & Ling, 13

2006). Dissatisfaction is based on disconfirmation of expectation (Oliver,

1987) and it is defined as a customer experience that is less than the

11
perceived expectation. Negative disconfirmation occurs when the service

performance does not live up to prior expectations. During service

encounters, consumers expect zero-defects in service delivery. Despite the

service provider’s attempts to offer consistent, high-quality service to

consumers, service failures may still occur because of the critical service

characteristics of inseparability and variability. Service delivery is

heterogeneous across service encounters due to the variability in situational

factors and individual differences between consumers and service employees

(Singh, 1990). Dissatisfaction is identified as the independent factor that is

necessary to trigger consumer complaints (Johnston & Michel, 2008).

However, many consumers who are dissatisfied may not take any

complaint actions, and those who take actions expect to get justice (Gruber

et al., 2009). For customers who feel that justice was not served, they are

likely to feel angry, and may engage in negative WOM or may exit (Brodgett

& Anderson, 2008). It has been argued that organizations may recover

customers after one failure; however, it may be difficult to recover from

multiple failures. This requires well planned communication effectiveness

with appropriate dialogue and interactions.

On Handling Customer Complaints

Complaints and the processes for handling them are important issues

for service providers because they have the potential to have an adverse

effect on customer satisfaction and loyalty (Anderson, 1994). Two major

12
areas of research are on the motivation or antecedents for complaining

behavior (Bolfing, 1989); customer factors like demographic characteristics

(Tronvoll, 2007); attitudes and experience with regard to complaining

behavior (Singh, 1990). Research on CCB has focused mainly on the

customer’s attitude towards complaining (Richins, 1983), attribution of

blame and the likelihood of a successful solution (Singh, 1990). Lovelock et

al., (2001) recommends effective generic guidelines in the successful

resolution of complaints. They include acting expediently to resolve the

issue; acknowledging mistakes without being defensive; not arguing with

customers; openness in solving the problem; considering the possibility of

compensation trying to regain the goodwill of customers (McCole, 2004).

Despite the fact that organizations appreciate the importance of

managing complaints, overall customer satisfaction after a failure has not

improved (Michel et al., 2009). Organizations should encourage dissatisfied

customers to complain so that they can solve the problem and retain the

customer. Unfortunately, organizations that do not rise to the challenge of

complaining customers are turning down the important opportunity of

reclaiming and improving a relationship. Owing to the apparent importance

of effective complaints handling, there is a research gap on how organization

management should treat all complaining customers to create complaint

satisfaction.

13
Organizations keep trying to improve the service quality but basing on

the nature of the service, overall customer satisfaction remains a problem in

organizations. 22 A meta-analysis of satisfaction with complaint handling has

identified antecedents such as expectation, performance and disconfirmation

of expectations (Szymanski & Henard, 2001) while another study has looked

at the affective responses to complaint handling experienced by the

customer (Varela-Neira et al., 2010). From the metaanalyses perspective,

complaint handling is judged by post-complaint customer behavior such as

repurchase intentions and WOM activity (Gruber, 2011). Further research is

needed in order to establish a clear line between an organization’s response

to a complaint and the impact that that response has on post-complaint

customer behaviors. There is also need to quantify the effects of each

response dimension on PCB to plan an effective service recovery (Gee et al.,

2008). To address this research gap, the researcher ought to develop and

empirically test a model based on CCB; complaints handling mechanisms

and customer behavioral responses. Service recovery has an outcome

dimension (Duffy et al., 2006), which is “what?” the customer receives as

part of the organization’s efforts to recover, whereas the process dimension

of service recovery is concerned with “how?” recovery is achieved. Duffy et

al. (2006) suggest that the outcome dimension is more important when the

original service is delivered, but the importance of the process dimension is

accentuated in service recovery. However, this may depend on the service in

question. Kau & Loh (2006) contends that service recovery involves
14
interaction between a service provider and a customer; a shortfall in the

provision of the original service, a response to the shortfall, and a desired

result to turn a dissatisfied customer into a satisfied one.

Customer Complaint Procedures

It is essential for a firm to have an effectual response when a

complaint takes place. This should be seen in the form of the quality of the

reply, ability to address customers concern and perception and plan for

future prevention. Behrens et al. (2007).

Various authors have separately tried to conceptualized complaint

management process. For example, Wysocki et al. (2010) identifies three

important aspects of the complaint process which includes (i) activity

seeking customer complaints; (ii) recognizing the type of customer that is

complaining; and (iii) responding appropriately based on the type of

complainants. Complaint management should be evolved through a four-

stage process starting with an in-depth analysis and strategic use of past

complaints and results Adams (1993). Cook & Macaulay (1997) deal with the

rather normative concept of empowered complaint management. Important

elements in this concept include a positive and proactive (nondefensive)

attitude towards complaints, fast reply and simple solution, and that

complaint handlers should be regarded as an important part of the company.

Johnston (2001) however, supports the operational view on complaint

15
management which advocates for the process by which complaints are

handled and customers recovered.

The proponents of operational view on complaint management process

argued for speedy response, reliability, and consistency of response, ease of

access to the complaint process, keeping the complainant informed, and

well-trained staff who understand the complaint process (Johnston, 2001)

for successful implementation of complain management process. Hansen et

al. (2009) categorized operational view on complaint management into three

sub-dimensions: (i) complaining accessibility; (ii)trainee -customer

interaction; and (iii) compensation policy. 24 It is important that the retailer

convinces his/her customers that complaints are welcome and that they will

be handled seriously Hansen et al. (2009). Since Johnston (2001) asserted

mistakes are an unavoidable feature of all human endeavor and complaints

are a natural consequence of any service. This may imply that if a trainee

receives only few complaints, it could be dissatisfied consumers are just

switching to a competitive retailer without voicing a complaint (Goodmann,

1999) or if the customer is uncertain on where/or how to deliver the

complaint or, even worse, if the customer doubts the retailers interest in

receiving the complaint (Hansen et al., 2009).

16
On Determine Improved Ways of Handling Customer Complaints.

When dissatisfied customers decide to complain, winning the

reluctance explained above, they are offering companies a second

opportunity. Only when customers, through direct complaining, are looking

for redress, apology and psychological benefit it is possible to transform

their dissatisfaction into a second, post-complaining, level of satisfaction or

'secondary satisfaction' (Oliver, 1987). However, complaint management

appears to be a double edge blade: on the one hand there is a favorable

opportunity to regain customers; on the other hand a poor complaint

management procedure can alienate customers forever. The interesting and

challenging side of complaint management is that the company can be

aware of the given answer and of the future repurchase behavior, but how

the response is perceived by a dissatisfied consumer, how this perception

influences the satisfaction or dissatisfaction and, consequently, the

repurchase intentions stay completely hidden (Gilly, 1987).

According to research, a complaining customer will perceive and then

judge the complaints procedure also according to the concept of perceived

justice (Blodgett, Granbois & Walters, 1993; Blodgett, Hill & Tax, 1997). This

concept can be separated into three different dimensions:

These three dimensions are the Distributed justice, Procedural justice

and the Interactional justice. Distributive justice is related to the specific

17
outcome of the recovery effort. Procedural justice is related to the adopted

set of policies, procedures and criteria used in arriving at the outcome.

Interactional justice is related to the manner in which people are treated

during the recovery effort.

It is extremely important to consider all the three dimensions

involved, avoiding focusing exclusively on one of them. There is not a

common agreement about which dimension of justice has the largest impact

on consumers (Kau & Loh, 2006, p. 107) while it is reasonable to think that

it is the combination of the three dimensions to determine the overall

perception and the subsequent behavior (Blodgett, Hill & Tax, 1997, p. 190).

Indeed, a customer can be dissatisfied by a particular complaints procedure

if the problem has been completely solved but the procedure is considered

too expensive and/or the experienced relationship with the complaint

handler has been frustrating. P Therefore, the concept of justice should be

used when evaluating or establishing complaint handling policies and

procedures (Blodgett, Granbois & Walters, 1993, p. 402). Davidow (2003)

has focused on six complaint handling factors which influence the perceived

justice of the procedure.

The Factors that represent values for customers are Timeliness,

Facilitation, Redress, Apology, Credibility, and Attentiveness. Timeliness is

the speed with which organization respond to complaints. Facilitation is the

policies and procedures in place to facilitate complaint handling. Apology is

18
the psychology compensation. Credibility is the measures adopted in order

to prevent the occurrence of the problem in the future. Attentiveness is the

care and attention offered by the organization or its representatives.

The impact of handling complaints is more amplified than ever.

Customers and consumers are more connected, more knowledgeable, more

immediate, and there is a shifting power in their favor. It is now common

practice for consumers to look at online reviews before buying a product or

service.

It has been said that attracting a new customer can cost five to 10

times as much as keeping an existing one. In addition, customers who have

an issue resolved will tell three to five people about their positive

experience. The speed and effectiveness of complaint handling can be a

differentiator between competitors, not only from a customer and consumer

perspective but from a QA perspective. Correcting problematic trends in an

ongoing manner will make a better company.

Perceived Justice Theory

Service researchers have turned to theories of organizational justice to

explain customers' reactions to service recovery (Tissot, 2003). Justice

perceptions are the individual subjective assessments of organizational

responses. The subjective evaluation of the response of the complainant is

crucial because perceptions are the subjective, often biased, interpretation

of reality that account for individual behavior (Gelbrich &Roschk, 2010).

19
Blodgett and Anderson, (1994) contend that prior research demonstrates

that the behaviour of complainants depends largely on their perceptions of

justice. Higher levels of distributive, interactional and procedural justice lead

to more favourable re-patronage intentions and a decreased likelihood of

negative WOM (Blodgett &Anderson, 2000). Complainants who perceive that

justice is not served likely become even angrier, engage in negative WOM

and exit (Tax et al., 1998).Customers should be treated as individuals whose

specific requests are acknowledged. Procedural justice refers to process

fairness and the evaluation of the procedures and systems used to

determine customer outcomes, such as the speed of recovery (Tax et al.,

1998) or the information communicated (or not communicated) about the

recovery process (Michel, 2002). Procedural justice involves dealing with

decision-making procedures, or having a complaint procedure the customers

perceive as fair. Consumer evaluation of the interaction dimension suggests

that the quality of the interpersonal treatment and communication during

the encounter are likely to be heavily weighted by consumers when

evaluating service encounters (Smith et al., 1999). However procedural

fairness could be mitigated by a rude, impersonal interactional style through

which information is obtained and outcomes are communicated. Therefore,

employees have the task of handling customer complaints equitably. In case

of unfair treatment of the customer, service recovery must re-establish

justice (from the customer's perspective). This is because justice during

service recovery is determined by the customer.


20
SYNTHESIS

A study on handling customer complaints as a factor associated with

customer satisfaction. Research in the area of handling customer complaints

shows that the relationship between the customer and the service provider is

important to assure specific level quality of satisfaction. On the whole, the

reviewed literatures and studies enlightened the mind of the researcher as

they provided information necessary to answer the question or request that

this paper aims to assess.

21
PART III

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY

This part details the methodology used to execute the project. This

included the research approach and design, the population, sample and

sampling technique, instrumentation, and data analysis techniques employed

in the study.

Research Design

This study aims to assess the performance of grade 12 Food and

Beverage Services students in handling customer complaints and concerns.

The researchers will apply non experimental research specifically cross-

sectional survey research design.

According to Campbell and Stanley survey research design refers to a

written document, an outline questionnaire, a face to face interview or a

telephone interview. The researcher will use a survey questionnaire to obtain

the information needed.

Population and Sample of the study

The respondent’s samples are 60 grade 12 food and beverage services

students in Rizal Experimental Station and Pilot School of Cottage Industries.

The position is held by Britton & Garmo (2002) that a research sample size

constitutes a selection of a small researchable unit of a given population

using methods that enable representation and generalization.


22
The researcher used Non-probability sampling that helps researchers

to select elements of a population that are seen by the researcher to possess

desirable traits and knowledge to vital to the achievement of the study. A

non-probability sampling method called purposive sampling technique will be

using by the researcher.

Instrumentation of the Study

The researchers adapted the performance of grade 12 food and

beverage services students in handling customer complaints and concerns.

The researcher will ask permission to their adviser before conducting the

survey. The instrument is admitted through a survey questionnaire.

A survey questionnaire is a collection of structured question items

presented on a sheet of paper and distributed to respondents to collect their

opinions and responses (Britton & Garmo, 2002). Yin (2005) posits that a

survey questionnaire allows for standardization in data taking and also

allows for accurate statistical measurement of responses in order to arrive at

credible results. Britton and Garmo (2002) opine that survey questionnaires

allow respondent’s to exhibit objectivity and candidness, especially when it is

designed to allow respondents to remain anonymous. The study utilized

questionnaires as a primary data collection instrument.

23
Data Gathering procedure

The first step before going the survey proper is to make a request

letter. Upon approval the researcher retrieves the letter. The school principal

as well as the class adviser and other faculty members were selected in

administration. In administering the questionnaire, the researchers were use

the time allotted for vacant to avoid distractions of class discussion. The

student responses were given enough time to answer the question. After the

data gathering the researcher now collected it for tallying the scores and to

apply the statistical treatment to be used with the study.

Data Processing and Statistical Treatment

This part contains of statistical tool used in the study which contains

the percentage frequency distribution. To easily understand the data, the

researchers will use percentage frequency distribution to present the

performance of grade 12 food and beverage services students in handling

customer complaints and concerns.

According to SAGE, Research Methods percentage frequency

distribution is a display of data that specifies the percentage of observations

that exist for each data point or grouping of data points. It is a particularly

useful method of expressing the relative frequency of survey responses and

other data. Many times, percentage frequency distributions are displayed as

tables or bar graphs or pie charts.


24
Statistical Treatment of Data

The primary instrument used for this study is a questionnaire checklist.

Simple frequency counts and percentages will be used in the study. It made

use of the descriptive approach in the presentation of the data. Tables and

figures will be utilized to give the reader a comprehensive picture of the

gathered data and information. The data gathered will ensure their validity

and reliability.

After each questionnaire is collected, tabulations of raw data were

made in a frequency distribution matrix. Percentage and mean values are

computed. Tables were constructed showing the items , frequency , counts,

percentages and mean values.

The criterion used in interpreting and analysing the collected data is

the weighted mean. To get the percentage of the frequency distribution, the

given frequencies were divided by the total number of frequencies or

number of population and the quotient was then multiplied by one hundred

(100 ). (viscara , 2003).

𝑓
1. The formula is Ρ = × 100
𝑁

Where:

f= frequency

25
n=number of respondents

% percentage

Constant=100

2. To get the weighted mean, the formula was

𝑓𝑥
𝑥=
𝑛

Where:

X is the weighted mean

F is the frequency

X is the weight of the score

N is the total number of respondents

26
PART IV

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

This part contains the presentation, analysis and interpretation of data

gathered in the survey questionnaire.

1. What is performance of food and beverages students in

handling customer complaints and concern?

Table1.

Frequency and percentage distribution according to gender

Gender Frequency Percentage

Female 32 53%

Male 28 47%

Total 60 100%

The table 1 shows frequency and percentage distribution of Food and

Beverage Services students in Rizal Experimental Station and Pilot School of

Cottage Industries according to their gender. Accordingly, 32 of the

respondents are female which constitutes 53% of the total population and

28 are male which constitutes 47% of the total population.

27
Table 2

Frequency and percentage distribution according to age

Age Frequency Percentage

17 17 28%

18 37 45%

19 9 15%

20 4 7%

21 2 3%

24 1 2%

Total 60 100%

The table 2 shows frequency and percentage distribution of Food and

Beverage Services students in Rizal Experimental Station and Pilot School of

Cottage Industries according to their age 17 or 28% of the total population

age 17, 37 or 45% of the total population age 18. 9 or 15% of the total

population age 19, 4 or 7% of the total population age 20, 2 or 3% of the

population age 21, 1 or 2% of the population are 24.

28
Table 3

Knowledge Numerical value Rank

1. I can handle customer 3.22 4


complaints and concerns.

2. I can immediately take 3.14 5


action when the
customer complains.
3. I can determine when 3.27 3
a customer is not
satisfied with my service.
4. I can apply work 3.28 2
ethics in handling
customer complaints and
concerns.
5. I can accept my fault 3.59 1
in terms of my service.

Average mean 3.3 Always

Table 3 present that most of the respondents are knowledgeable in handling

customer complaints and concerns.

29
Table 4

Skills Numerical value Rank

1. I act quickly and 3.38 3


professionally in dealing
customer complaints.
2. I research the situation 3.45 2
before taking action.

3. I used polite, positive 3.55 1


tone in dealing with
customer complaints.
4. I let the customers feel 3.29 4
they are right.

5. I offer a solution that will 3.27 5


make the customer calm.

Average mean 3.38

Table 4 revealed that most of the respondents are skilled in handling

customer complaints and concerns.

30
Table 5

Attitude Numerical value Rank

1. I apologize 3.74 1
immediately for
inconvenience for my
service.
1. I respect their 3.65 3
complaints and see it
as a positive
perspective.
3. I listen carefully to 3.66 2
the complaining
guest.
4. I politely ask for 3.58 5
the issues or concern
from the guest.
5. I keep calm while 3.62 4
talking to the guest.
Average mean 3.67 Always

The table 5 shows that most of the respondents are having good attitude in

handling customer complaints and concerns.

Legend:

Mean scale Description

0.1-1 never

1.1-2 rarely

2.1-3 sometimes

3.1-4 always
31
KNOWLEDGE

3.6
3.5
3.4
3.3
weighted mean
3.2
3.1
3
2.9
QUESTION 1 QUESTION 2 QUESTION 3 QUESTION 4 QUESTION 5

Figure 1

This graph revealed that respondents are mostly knowledgeable in accepting

their fault in terms of their service. However they are least knowledgeable in

taking actions immediately when the customer complaints.

SKILLS

3.6

3.5

3.4
weighted mean
3.3

3.2

3.1
QUESTION 1 QUESTION 2 QUESTION 3 QUESTION 4 QUESTION 5

Figure 2

This graph present that respondents are mostly used polite, positive tone in

dealing with customer complaints.


32
ATTITUDE
4.5
4
3.5
3
2.5
NUMERICAL VALUE
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
QUESTION 1 QUESTION 2 QUESTION 3 QUESTION 4 QUESTION 5

Figure3.

The graph revealed that respondents are polite in asking for the issues and

concerns of the guest. While they are mostly keep calm while talking to the

guests.

2. What are the problems encountered by the food and

beverage students in handling customer complaints and

concerns?

The second problem of this study looks into the problems encountered by

the food and beverage students in handling customer complaints and

concerns. The food and beverage students have good performance in

handling customer complaints and concerns. However there are some

instances that they encountered problems in applying work ethics and they

cannot take actions immediately when the customer complaints.

33
PART V

SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

This part contains the summary, conclusion and recommendation of the data

gathered.

Summary of findings

The salient findings of the study are as follows:

1. The food and beverage services students assess in terms of

knowledge, skills and attitude. The researchers perceived the student

as good with weighted mean of 3.3, 3.67, 3.29.

2. The food and beverage students have good performance in handling

customer complaints and concerns. However there are some instances

that they encountered problems in applying work ethics and they

cannot take actions immediately when the customer complaints.

Conclusions

Base on the findings of the study, the following conclusions were drawn.

1. The researchers assert that food and beverage services students have

good performance in handling customer complaints and concerns.

34
2. The researchers believe that the food and beverage services students

had the knowledge, skills and they showed good attitude in handling

customer complaints and concerns.

3. The researchers conclude that there is no significant relationship

between the performance and the problems encountered by the grade

Food 12 and beverage services students in handling costumer

complaints and concerns.

Recommendation

Base on the findings and conclusions presented, the following

recommendations are suggested.

1. The researchers advises that food and beverage services student

performance need enhancement especially in handling customer

complaints and concerns.

2. The researchers advise that food and beverages services students

should have enough skills and knowledge for them to do well in

handling customer complaints and concerns.


35
3. The researchers suggest that the teachers in food and beverage

services students must conduct actual performance especially in

handling customer complaints.

4. The researchers recommend to conducts an action plan to improve and

maintain the good performance of Grade 12 food and beverage service

students in handling guest complaints and concerns.

36
Appendices

LETTER OF REQUEST TO CONDUCT STUDY


Rizal Experimental Station and Pilot School of Cottage Industries
Jenny’s Avenue Maybunga, Pasig City

January 30, 2019

BERNADETTE S. AGUSTIN
SHS Assistant Principal I
Rizal Experimental Station and Pilot
School of Cottage Industries
Jenny’s Avenue Maybunga, Pasig City

Dear Madam:
Greetings!
We, the Grade Twelve Senior High School Student are presently conducting our
research paper entitle” Assessment in the performance of Food and Beverage
Services students in handling customer complaints and concerns ” as a requirement
in the subject Inquiries, Investigation and Immersion.

In this connection, please allow us to conduct our research to the selected food and
beverage services student of RESPSCI.

Thank you very much for the kind consideration and cooperation. We believed that
this research paper will provide great benefits not only to the student members but to the
entire school work immersion program progress.

Respectfully yours,
s
ANILITA ABUNDO
NIKKI IMBANG
GESSYLYN RIVERA
MICHAELA ALAVER
REGINA SAPATUSE
Noted by:

AILENE FERRER
III Teacher
Approved by:

BERNADETTE S. AGUSTIN

37
SHS Assistant Principal

LETTER OF VALIDATION
Rizal Experimental Station and Pilot
School of Cottage Industries
Jenny’s Ave. Extension Maybunga, Pasig City

January 30, 2019

JESSA CRIS T. ALBINO


CED I
Rizal Experimental Station and Pilot
School of Cottage Industries
Jenny’s Ave. Extension Maybunga, Pasig City

Madam:

Good day!

We wish to conduct our study on the “Assessment in the Performance of


Food and Beverage Services Students in Handling Customer Complaints and
Concerns” as a requirement in the subject Inquiries, Investigation and Immersion.

On this note, we humbly ask for your expertise to validate the attached
research-made survey questionnaire we prepared in this study.

We greatly appreciate your consideration and cooperation.

Respectfully yours,

ANILITA ABUNDO

NIKKI IMBANG

GESSYLYN RIVERA

MICHAELA SALAVER

REGINA SAPATUSE

Noted by:
AILENE D. FERRER
III Teacher
Approved by:

JESSA CRIS T. ALBINO


CED I
38
SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE

Thank you for your contribution in the study about “Assessment in the
Performance of Food and Beverage Services Students in handling Customer
Complaints and Concerns”. The information shared will be valued and will
be treated with confidentiality.

Name (Optional):_______________Gender:_____ Age: __

Assessment in the performance of Food and beverage services


Ment
students in handling customer’s complaints and concerns

4-Always 3-Sometimes 2-Rarely 1-Never

Skills 4 3 2 1

1. I act quickly and professionally in dealing


customer complaints.
2. I research the situation before taking
action.
3. I used polite, positive tone in dealing with
customer complaints.
4. I let the customers feel they are right.
5. I offer a solution that will make the
customer calm.

Knowledge 4 3 2 1
1. I can handle customer complaints and
concerns.
2. I can immediately take action when the
customer complains.
3. I can determine when a customer is not
satisfied with my service.
4. I can apply work ethics in handling
customer complaints and concerns.
5. I can accept my fault in terms of my
service.

39
Attitude 4 3 2 1

1. I apologize immediately for inconvenience


for my service.
2. I respect their complaints and see it as a
positive perspective.
3. I listen carefully to the complaining guest.

4. I politely ask for the issues or concern from


the guest.
5. I keep calm while talking to the guest .

40
LIST OF REFERENCES

Journals
Adamson, C. (1993). Evolving complaint procedures. Managing service
quality, 3(2), 439444

Amin, M.E. (2005). Social science research conception, methodology and


analysis. Kampala, Makerere University Printery.
Anderson, M. (1994). The relationship between justice and attitudes: An
examination of justice effects on event and system-related attitudes.
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 103(1), 21-36.
Awara, N.F. (2010), “Strengthening Customer Retention Through the
Management of
Customer Relationship in Services Marketing,” University of Calabar
(UNICAL), Nigeria; available at:http://ssrn.com abstract = 1607881.
Behrens, B., Wilde, I., & Hoffmann, M. (2007). Complaint management
using the extended 8D- method along the automotive supply chain.
Production Engineering, 1 (1), 91-95.

Bitner, M.J. (2010). Evaluating service encounters: the effects of physical


surroundings and employee responses. Journal of Marketing, 54, 69-83.

Blodgett, J.G. & Anderson, R.D. (2000). A Bayesian network model of the
consumer complaint process. Journal of Service Research, 2, 4, 321-38.

Blodgett, J.G., Granbois, D.H. and Walters, R.G. (1993) 'The effects of
perceived justice on complainants' negative word-of-mouth behavior and
repatronage intentions', Journal of retailing, 69 (4), pp. 399-428.

Blodgett, J.G., Hill, D.J. and Tax, S.S. (1997) 'The effects of distributive,
procedural and interactional justice on post-complaint behavior', Journal of
retailing, 73(2), pp. 185-210.
41
Blodgett, J.G., Wakefield, K.L. and Barnes, J.H. (1995) 'The effects of
customer service on consumer complaining behavior', Journal of services
marketing, 9 (4), pp. 31 – 42.

Bodey, K. and Grace, D. (2006) 'Segmenting service “complainers” and


“noncomplainers” on the basis of consumer characteristics', Journal of
services marketing, 20 (3), pp. 178-187.

Bolfing, C.P. (1989). How do consumers express dissatisfaction and what


can service marketers do about it? Journal of Services Marketing, 3, 5-23.

Britton & Garmo (2002). The theory of the estimation of test reliability.
Psychometrika, 2, 151-160.

Cardozo, Richard, N.. (1975). How image vary by product class. Journal of
Retailing, 50, 71-78.

Casado.A, Nicolau.J and Mas.F (2011) “The harm full consequence of failed
recoveries in the banking industry”, International Journal of Banking, Vol 29
No1, p.32-49.

Chase, R. B., & Dasu, S. (2001). Want to Perfect your Company's Service?
Use Behavioural Science. Harvard Business Review, 79, 79-84

Claes, Fornell & Donald R. Lehmann, L. (1994). Two structural equation


models: LISREL and PLS applied to consumer exit-voice theory. Journal of
Marketing Research, 19, 440-452.

Cook, S., & Macaulay, S. (1997). Practical steps to empowered complaint


management. Managing Service Quality, 7(1), 39-42.

42
Cooper and Schindler, (2003). The Problem of Statistical Power in MIS
Research, MIS Quarterly, 5:1, March, 87-106.

Collie J., Dugdale D. and Jarvis R. (2000) Deregulation of small company


financial reporting in the UK: Contemporary issues in accounting regulation.
S. McLeay and A. Riccaboni, Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Crié, D. (2001). Un cadre conceptuel d’analyse du comportement de


réclamation. Recherche et Applications en Marketing, 16, 45-65

Crie, D., & Ladwein, R. (2002). Complaint letters and commitment theory:
an empirical approach in mail order selling. Journal of Targeting,
Measurement and Analysis for Marketing, 11 (1), 45 – 55.

Davidow, M. (2003) 'Organizational responses to customer complaints: what


works and what doesn't', Journal of service research, 5 (3), pp. 225-250.

Davidow, M., & Dacin, P.A. (2007). Understanding and influencing consume
complaint behaviour: improving organizational complaint management.
Advances in Consumer Research, 24, 450 – 456.

Duffy, J.M. Miller, J.M. & Bexley, J.B. (2006). Banking customers' varied
reactions to service recovery strategies. International Journal of Bank
Marketing, 24, 2, 11232.

Folkes, V.S. (1984). Consumer reactions to product failure: an attribution


approach. Journal of Consumer Research, 10, 398-409.

Fornell, C. and Wernerfelt, B. (1988) 'Defensive marketing strategy by


customer complaint management', Journal of marketing research, 24
(November), pp. 337-346.

43
Fraenkel, J. R., & Wallen, N. E. (2003). How to design and evaluate research
in education (5th ed.). Boston: McGraw Hill.

Gee, R., Coates, G., & Nicholson, M. (2008). Understanding and profitably
managing customer loyalty. Marketing Intelligence & Planning, 26(4), 359–
374. doi:10.1108/02634500810879278

Gelbrich, K. and Roschk, H. (2010). A Meta analysis of organizational


Complaint Handling and Customer Responses: Journal of Service research.
1, 1-20. Marketing Management, 22(5-6), 619-642.

WEBSITES
https://upserve-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/upserve.com/restaurant-

insider/why-do-customers-complain-a-look-at-diners-most-popular-

complaints/amp/?amp_js_v=a2&amp_gsa=1&usqp=mq331AQECAFYAQ%3D

%3D#referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&amp_tf=From%20%25

1%24s

https://trainingmag.com/content/how-handle-customer-complaints/

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267574570_The_Impact_of_Com

plaints'_Handling_on_Customers'_Satisfaction_Empirical_Study_on_Commer

cial_Banks'_Clients_in_Jordan

https://www.superoffice.com/blog/customer-complaints-good-for-business/

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/237386433_Coping_With_Custom

er_Complaints

44
https://www.instituteofcustomerservice.com/research-insight/guidance-

notes/article/handling-complaints

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1094670505283785

https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/dspace-

jspui/bitstream/2134/11932/3/Handling%20Customer%20Complaints%20Ef

fectively_MSQ.pdf

https://ideas.repec.org/a/ora/journl/v1y2012i2p827-833.html

https://www.instituteofcustomerservice.com/research-insight/guidance-

notes/article/handling-complaints

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0016/100762/complaints-
handling-research-2016.pdf

45