You are on page 1of 9

REDUCING RESISTANCE AMONG ALTERNATIVE LEARNING

SYSTEM (ALS) LEARNERS TOWARDS ALS THROUGH


ENHANCED IMPLEMENTATION

I. CONTEXT AND RATIONALE

A. Introduction (Define the System)

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute

for Statistics (2013) reported that in a global scale, there were more than 57 million out-of-school

children in primary ages and at least another 69 million young adolescents were not attending

primary and secondary school. In the Philippines, school dropouts has been increasing (Piron,

2013) leading to 4 million out of school children and youth (PSA, 2015). As an affirmative action

of this problem, Alternative Learning System (ALS) has been making tremendous efforts to lessen

or even entirely eradicate illiteracy in the Philippines. It aims to provide a free and practical

alternative to the existing formal education to the out of school learners to make them a functional

literate persons and become a productive citizens of their community and our nation in general;

however, in the Education for All (EFA) 1990 – 2015 report submitted by the Philippine

government to UNESCO revealed that this program was not successful in providing basic learning

needs and only 2% of the potential ALS learners were served and only a small percentage pass the

Accreditation and Equivalency (A & E) test. Teaching those out – of – school learners has been

really a big challenge among the teachers because these learners lack interest (Carag, 2013; Atilano,

Omanito, Desipeda, Domingo & Grabin, 2016) and are discriminated in the society (UNESCO,

2013) that somehow affect their level of self-efficacy because they have been thrown with negative
criticisms that they are failures, that they are a bunch of dimwit learners, and that they are a shame

because they were not able to keep pace with the students in formal education.

B. Background (Assessing the Situation)

Despite the efforts, strategies and programs implemented, it has been observed that a lot of

learners, still, are resistant to actively participate in the class activities in which their academic

performance is greatly contingent. Through the informal interviews, the researchers identified that

this problem may have occurred as a manifestation of some learning barriers such as lack of

interest/motivation and low self-efficacy.

C. Identifying the Root Causes

Taking into account of the initial data gathered, it has been identified that this problem

arises as a manifestation of some learning barriers aforementioned.

lack of interest/motivation

low self-efficacy resistance to ALS

II. ACTION RESEARCH QUESTIONS

This action research sought to examine the effectiveness of EIA on reducing the resistance among

the respondents to ALS. Specifically, it aims to answer the following research questions:

1. What is the effect of the EIA on the respondents’ interest in attending classes?
2. What is the effect of the EIA on the respondents’ self-efficacy?

3. Is the EIA effective in reducing the respondents’ resistance to ALS?

III. PROPOSED INNOVATION, INTERVENTION, STRATEGY

ACTION PLAN: ENHANCED

ROOT CAUSES IMPLEMENTATION OF ALS DESIRED


IDENTIFIED
OUTCOME

 Contract signing – creating a formal High

Lack of interest/ motivation agreement between the learner and interest/motivation and

Low self-efficacy the teacher…bind by a contract in self-efficacy resulting

which they will fulfill the identified to reduced/no resistance

responsibilities. to ALS

 scheduling – arrangement of time for

their learning sessions

 mentoring: guiding learners through

telling success stories from previous

graduates

Since it has been observed that the learners lack interest/motivation that results to their resistance

to ALS, the researchers proposed the implementation of contract signing to remind the learners of their

goals as well as their corresponding responsibilities to achieve their goals. In addition, learners will be given

a timetable (agreed beforehand between the teacher and the learner) to remind their class schedule as well
as to emphasize that they have to prioritize their classes. Moreover, once in a month mentoring will be

implemented to enhance the learners’ self-efficacy.

IV. ACTION RESEARCH METHODS

Data Collection and Analysis Plan

INTERVENTION ACTION DATA NEEDED DATA DATA ANALYSIS


RESEARCH COLLECTION TECHNIQUES
QUESTION TECHNIQUES
What is the effect of 1. Attendance (no. 1. Records of the 1. Frequency count

ENHANCED the EIA on the of days present and teacher’s class of learner’s

IMPLEMENTATION learners’ interest in no. of days absent) attendance attendance

OF ALS (EIA) attending classes? 2. Weekly log of 2. Teacher’s

teacher’s 2. Teachers shall observations will be

observation keep track of the analyzed using

learners’ class thematic analysis.

behavior and

performance.

What is the effect of 1. Responses to 1. An informal 1. Student’s

the EIA on learners’ interview questions interview shall be responses to the

self-efficacy? conducted. interview questions

will be analyzed

using thematic

analysis.
V. ACTION RESEARCH WORK PLAN AND TIMELINE
Activities Month 1 Month Month Month Month Month Month
5 6 7 8 9 10
W1 W2 W3 W4

VI. COST ESTIMATES

a. Budget Proposal

PARTICULARS QUANTITY COST AMOUNT

1. Bond paper 1 ream 200 200

2. Marker 8 pieces 35 280

3. Ink 3 bottles 80 240

4. Ball pen 12 pieces 150 750

5. Pencil 10 pieces 80 400

6. Notebook/journal 8 pieces 69 552

7. Pushpin 8 boxes 30 240

8. Cartolina 200 pieces 5 1000

9. folder 40 5 200

10. plastic envelope 8 85 680

with holder

TOTAL 4, 762
VII. PLANS FOR DESSIMINATION

District – wide dissemination – through the district ALS coordinator (DALC), a district – wide
interfacing will be held.

Regional – wide dissemination – invite representatives from each provinces in Region 10 for a
conference focusing on EIA.

Nation – wide dissemination – invite representatives from each region to discuss/scrutinize the
action plan for … approval of the central office …

VIII. REFERENCES

Self-efficacy is concerned with judgments of how well one can execute courses of action required to deal

with prospective situations (Bandura, 1982 as cited by

Academic self-efficacy can by defined as one’s confidence in their personal ability to complete academic

tasks
Implementation Theory (Action Plan)

ROOT CAUSES ACTION PLAN DESIRED OUTCOME


IDENTIFIED COMPONENTS
Lack of self-confidence  Personality Increase of self-confidence
enhancement training
 Team building activities
 Motivation
Negative attitude towards ALS/  Make learning goal- Positive attitude towards
lack of interest oriented (Setting clear ALS/increase of interest
goal with your class will
give them the sense of
accomplishment.)
 Vary instructional
methods (This helps
your students to be more
engaged and excited to
participate.)

Fear of criticisms  giving positive Positive attitude towards


feedback/ constructive criticisms
criticism

HOW THE STRATEGIES HELP THE STUDENTS…

Data gathering was solely based on observation and interview with students.

The learners who are enrolled in ALS are often timid and self-conscious. They are afraid to openly discuss

or actively participate which may negatively affect their ability to learn. This problem arise due to age

differences and are also afraid of negative evaluation.


FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DROPOUT RATE IN ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM AND
ACCREDITATION AND EQUIVALENCY PROGRAM – ATILANO, OMANITO, DESIPEDA

THE IMPACT OF NON-COGNITIVE SKILLS ON OUTCOMES FRO YOUNG PEOPLE –


LITERATURE REVIEW 2013

IMPROVING STUDENT ACADEMIC AND NON-COGNITIVE OUTCOMES THROUGH


PERSONALIZATION FRO ACADEMIC AND SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING

Research suggests that non-cognitive variables


are potent predictors of school-based
outcomes (e.g., academic performance and
persistence)

non-cognitive skills - set of attitudes, behaviors, and strategies that are thought to underpin success in
school; even more important than cognitive skills or IQ

students’ perception of their ability… influence their motivation and persistence leading to improved
academic outcomes.

scope: motivation, self-perceptions: self-concept of ability; self-efficacy

outdoor adventure programmes

The core elements of PASL are:


(1) routine rapid check ins between adults and students—where
adults intentionally and routinely check in with a targeted group of students,
(2) goal setting activities that help students set short and long term goals,
(3) intentional use of data to track student progress,
(4) educator teams of administrators, guidance counselors, and teachers that meet to discuss student
progress, and
(5) a culture of personalization. Together, these practices provide a system of personalization.