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EXPECTATIONS FOR THE MI PROGRAM

 Improved equipment reliability


 Reduction in equipment failures that lead to safety and environmental
 incidents
 Improved product consistency
 Improved maintenance consistency and efficiency
 Reduction of unplanned maintenance time and costs
 Reduced operating costs
 Improved spare parts management
 Improved contractor performance
 Compliance with government regulations

OVERVIEW OF INTEGRITY MANAGEMENT THROUGHOUT THE PLANT


LIFECYCLE

Common Predictive Maintenance and Non-destructive Testing Techniques


 Temperature Measurement
 Dynamic Monitoring
 Oil Analysis
 Corrosion Monitoring
 Non-destructive Testing
 Electrical Testing and Monitoring
 Observation and Surveillance
 Performance Monitoring

Fitness for Service (FFS)


An FFS assessment is performed on pressure-retaining equipment with a deficiency to justify
continued service or to identify the parameters required to enter or return the equipment to service.
FFS Evaluation Methodology
Equipment damage or flaw conditions for applicable pressure-retaining equipment, pressure vessels,
piping, and storage tank shells are as below:

• Brittle fracture

• General metal loss

• Local metal loss

• Pitting corrosion

• Blisters and laminations

• Weld misalignment and shell distortions

• Crack-like flaws

• Equipment operating in the creep range

• Fire damage

For each damage or flaw condition, there is a damage-specific procedure for conducting an FFS
assessment. An eight-step procedure for conducting an FFS assessment for each damage condition
of a component:

1. Flaw and damage mechanism identification

2. Applicability and limitations of the FFS assessment procedures

3. Data requirements for conducting the FFS assessment

4. FFS assessment techniques and acceptance criteria

5. Remaining life evaluation

6. Equipment or component remediation

7. On-stream monitoring of the component or equipment

8. Documentation of the FFS assessment

PLANNED / REACTIVE MAINTENANCE TASKS / MAINTENANCE HISTORY


Routine ‘Planned Preventative Maintenance’ tasks are primarily designed to ensure the ongoing
availability of the asset. These will include ‘servicing’ and operator routine check that form the lowest
level of inspection.

WRITTEN SCHEME OF EXAMINATION (WSE)


WSE specifies the minimum examination and testing that will be carried out, how often, and any
techniques that may be required. Before this can be developed, it is necessary to consider how the
asset can degrade over time, and which techniques that can detect this.

REPAIR, RE-RATE OR RETIRE


Usually a repair is the preferred route to return the plant to the original duty. Repairs need careful
specification and planning to ensure that the original duty can be maintained. On completion further
examination will usually be required to verify that the repair is satisfactory.

Repairs are not always possible or cost effective, and an alternative is to re-rate the plant and
continue to use it for a less arduous application, for example at a less demanding pressure or
temperature.
When a repair is not technically possible or cost effective, and re-rating is not possible, retirement of
the asset may be the only option, and to replace with new.