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CASE STUDY

Babubhai Bhimabhai Bokhiria & Anr vs State Of Gujarat


& Ors

( 2013 ) 9 SCC 500

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FACTS OF THE CASE

The facts giving rise to the present petition are that one Mulubhai Gigabhai
Modhvadiya was murdered on 16th of November, 2005 and for that a case was
registered at Kalambaug Police Station,Porbandar, under Section

302, 201, 34, 120B, 465, 468 and 471 of the Indian Penal Code and Section
25 of the Arms Act.

Police after usual investigation submitted the charge-sheet and the case was
ultimately committed for trial to the Court of Session. When the trial was so pending,
the wife of the deceased filed an application for further investigation under Section
173(8) of the Code of Criminal Procedure (hereinafter referred to as ‘the Code’),
alleging petitioner’s complicity in the crime, inter alia, stating that the petitioner was a
business rival of the deceased whereas one of the main accused is his business
partner with whom he conspired to kill the deceased. It was alleged that petitioner
was a Minister earlier from the party which was in power in the State and therefore,
he was let off during investigation.

It was also pointed out that a letter written almost a year ago by the deceased
was recovered from his purse in which it was stated that in the event of his death,
the petitioner shall be held responsible as he intended to kill him. In reply to the said
application, the Investigating Officer filed his affidavit stating therein that during the
course of investigation, nobody supported the plea of the wife that the deceased was
apprehending any threat from the petitioner or for that matter, any other person. In
another affidavit filed by the Investigating Officer, a firm stand was taken that no
material had surfaced to show the complicity of the petitioner in the offence. It was
pointed out by the Investigating Officer that the deceased filed an application for
arms licence and in that application also he did not disclose any threat or
apprehension to his life from any person, including the petitioner herein.
Notwithstanding the aforesaid affidavit of the Investigating Officer, the Sessions
Judge directed for further investigation.

In the light of the aforesaid, the investigating agency submitted further report
stating therein that the call records of the period immediately preceding the death of
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the deceased do not show any nexus between him and the petitioner and the
deceased did not have any threat from the petitioner. In this way, the police did not
find the complicity of the petitioner in the crime.

During the course of trial of other accused, 134 witnesses were examined and
at that stage, an application was filed by the son of the deceased praying for
arraigning the petitioner as an accused in exercise of power under Section 319 of the
Code. Said application was allowed by the learned Sessions Judge on its finding that
prima facie strong evidence exists to summon the petitioner as the letter recovered
from the deceased incriminated him.

It was also observed that the veracity of the letter recovered from the
deceased was established by two witnesses who confirmed that the letter was in the
handwriting of the deceased.Aggrieved by the aforesaid order, the petitioner
preferred Special Criminal Application No. 638 of 2008 before the High Court of
Gujarat. And special leave to appeal granted

ISSUES

1.Whether the appeal petition is maintainable ?

2.Whether the findings of lower court is maintainable ?

3.Whether the act of accused can be brought under the preview of sec 120B of IPC,
?

4.Whether the act of judge to allow the plea of deceased son under sec 310 of the
code legally bindable?

5.Whether the investighation report lack genuinity as per the allegations made by
the appellant?

PROVISION OF LAW

Section 302 in The Indian Penal Code

Punishment for murder.—Whoever commits murder shall be punished with death, or


1[imprisonment for life], and shall also be liable to fine.

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Section 201 in The Indian Penal Code

Causing disappearance of evidence of offence, or giving false information to screen


offender.—Whoever, knowing or having reason to believe that an offence has been
committed, causes any evidence of the commission of that offence to disappear, with
the intention of screening the offender from legal punishment, or with that intention
gives any information respecting the offence which he knows or believes to be false;
if a capital offence.—shall, if the offence which he knows or believes to have been
committed is punishable with death, be punished with imprisonment of either
description for a term which may extend to seven years, and shall also be liable to
fine; if punishable with imprisonment for life.—and if the offence is punishable with
1[imprisonment for life], or with imprisonment which may extend to ten years, shall
be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to
three years, and shall also be liable to fine; if punishable with less than ten years’
imprisonment.—and if the offence is punishable with imprisonment for any term not
extending to ten years, shall be punished with imprisonment of the description
provided for the offence, for a term which may extend to one-fourth part of the
longest term of the imprisonment provided for the offence, or with fine, or with both.
Illustration A, knowing that B has murdered Z, assists B to hide the body with the
intention of screening B from punishment. A is liable to imprisonment of either
description for seven years, and also to fine.

Section 34 in The Indian Penal Code

Acts done by several persons in furtherance of common intention.—When a criminal


act is done by several persons in furtherance of the common intention of all, each of
such persons is liable for that act in the same manner as if it were done by him
alone.]

Section 120B in The Indian Penal Code

Punishment of criminal conspiracy.—

(1) Whoever is a party to a criminal conspiracy to commit an offence punishable with


death, 2[imprisonment for life] or rigorous imprisonment for a term of two years or
upwards, shall, where no express provision is made in this Code for the punishment

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of such a conspiracy, be punished in the same manner as if he had abetted such
offence.

(2) Whoever is a party to a criminal conspiracy other than a criminal conspiracy to


commit an offence punishable as aforesaid shall be punished with imprisonment of
either description for a term not exceeding six months, or with fine or with both.]

Section 465 in The Indian Penal Code

Punishment for forgery.—Whoever commits forgery shall be punished with


imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to two years, or with
fine, or with both.

Section 468 in The Indian Penal Code

Forgery for purpose of cheating.—Whoever commits forgery, intending that the


1[document or electronic record forged] shall be used for the purpose of cheating,
shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may
extend to seven years, and shall also be liable to fine.

Section 471 in The Indian Penal Code

Using as genuine a forged 1[document or electronic record].—Whoever fraudulently


or dishonestly uses as genuine any 1[document or electronic record] which he knows
or has reason to believe to be a forged 1[document or electronic record], shall be
punished in the same manner as if he had forged such 1[document or electronic
record].

Section 25 in Arms Act

Punishment for certain offences— 20

(1) Whoever—

(a) manufactures, sells, transfers, converts, repairs, tests or proves, or exposes or


offers for sale or transfer, or has in his possession for sale, transfer, conversion,
repair, test or proof, any arms or ammunition in contravention of section 5; or

(b) shortens the barrel of a firearm or converts an immitation firearm into a firearm in
contravention of section 6; or 21

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(d) bring into, or takes out of, India, any arms or ammunition of any class or
description in contravention of section 11, shall be punishable with imprisonment for
a term which shall not be less than three years but which may extend to seven years
and shall also be liable to fine.

22 [(1A) Whoever acquires, has in his possession or carries any prohibited arms or
prohibited ammunition in contravention of section 7 shall be punishable with
imprisonment for a term which shall not be less than five years, but which may
extend to ten years and shall also be liable to fine.

(1AA) Whoever manufactures, sells, transfers, converts, repairs, tests or proves, or


exposes or offers for sale or transfer or has in his possession for sale, transfer,
conversion, repair, test or proof, any prohibited arms or prohibited ammunition in
contravention of section 7 shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which
shall not be less than seven years but which may extend to imprisonment for life and
shall also be liable to fine.

23 [(1AAA) ] Whoever has in contravention of a notification issued under section 24A


in his possession or in contravention of a notification issued under section 24B
carries or otherwise has in his possession, any arms or ammunition shall be
punishable with imprisonment for a term which shall not be less than 24 [three years,
but which may extend to seven years] shall also be liable to fine.

Section 319 in The Indian Penal Code

Hurt.—Whoever causes bodily pain, disease or infirmity to any person is said to


cause hurt.

ARGUMENT BY PETITIONER

Mr. V.A. Bobde, learned Senior Counsel appearing on behalf of the appellant
submits that in the course of trial of an offence, when it appears from the evidence
that any person, not being the accused, has committed any offence for which such
person could be tried together with the accused facing trial, the court may proceed
against such person for the offence which he appears to have committed. He points
out that the power under Section 319 of the Code can be exercised when it appears
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from the evidence that any person not being the accused, has committed any
offence.

In his submission, the evidence would obviously mean the evidence


admissible in law. He submits that the note allegedly recovered from the deceased
expresses mere apprehension of death and, therefore, it is inadmissible in evidence
and does not come within the ambit of Section 32 of the Evidence Act (hereinafter
referred to as “the Act”). He further submits that the note does not relate to the cause
of death nor it describes any circumstance that led to his death. It has also been
pointed out that the note recovered is also not relevant under Section 32 of the Act
as it has no proximity with the event of his death, as the same was written over a
year ago.

That it is though only a prima facie case is to be established from the


evidence led before the court not necessarily tested on the anvil of Cross-
Examination, it requires much stronger evidence than mere probability of his
complicity. The test that has to be applied is one which is more than prima facie case
as exercised at the time of framing of charge, but short of satisfaction to an extent
that the evidence, if goes unrebutted, would lead to conviction. In the absence of
such satisfaction, the court should refrain from exercising power under
Section 319 Cr.P.C.

Section 319 of the Code confers power on the trial court to find out whether a
person who ought to have been added as an accused has erroneously been omitted
or has deliberately been excluded by the investigating agency and that satisfaction
has to be arrived at on the basis of the evidence so led during the trial. On the
degree of satisfaction for invoking power under Section 319 of the Code, this Court
observed that though the test of prima facie case being made out is same as that
when the cognizance of the offence is taken and process issued, the degree of
satisfaction under Section 319 of the Code is much higher.

Having summarised the law on the degree of satisfaction required by the


courts to summon an accused to face trial in exercise of power under Section 319 of
the Code, we now proceed to consider the submissions advanced by the learned
counsel. It is common ground that the only evidence that the trial court has relied to

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summon the appellant to face the trial is the note written by the deceased in his own
handwriting apprehending death at the appellant’s hand. The same reads as follows:

Mulubhai Modhvadiya write this note that the then Irrigation Minister Babubhai
Bokhiriya @ Babulal want to kill me due to personal differences with me. Therefore I
inform to the State and to the police by this note that whenever I die, then I request
to do thorough investigation because phone calls are coming threatening to kill me. If
I will make complaint today then he will by using his influence destroy the complaint,
therefore I am keeping this note in my purse and I am clearly stating that If I will die
due to murder then my murder will be done by Babu Bokhiriya only, if dumb
government listen to my note than take strict action against Babu Bhokhiriya and my
soul will be pleased. I am also giving my finger print on this letter and also signing
under it. Therefore you have no doubt about it.

ARGUMENT BY RESPONDENT

Dr. A.M. Singhvi, learned senior counsel appearing for Respondent No.2,
however, submits that any statement – written or verbal, made under an expectation
of death is relevant under Section 32 of the Act and need not necessarily be followed
by death immediately. He submits that the letter recovered from the deceased
discloses a relevant fact as the same has been made under apprehension of death
and relates to its cause. Though he admits that the letter was written over a year
ago, it is his contention that it can still be taken into consideration as it is not
necessary to have immediate nexus between the words written and the death. In
support of the submission, reliance has been placed on a decision of this Court in
the case of Rattan Singh v. State of Himachal Pradesh, 1997 (4) SCC 161 wherein it
has been held as follows:

The collocation of the words in Section 32(1) “circumstances of the


transaction which resulted in his death” is apparently of wider amplitude than saying
“circumstances which caused his death”. There need not necessarily be a direct
nexus between “circumstances” and death. It is enough if the words spoken by the
deceased have reference to any circumstance which has connection with any of the
transactions which ended up in the death of the deceased. Such statement would
also fall within the purview of Section 32(1) of the Evidence Act. In other words, it is
not necessary that such circumstance should be proximate, for, even distant
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circumstances can also become admissible under the sub-section, provided it has
nexus with the transaction which resulted in the death

” We have given our thoughtful consideration to the rival submissions and the
first question which falls for our determination is whether the note in question is
admissible in evidence or in other words, can be treated as a dying declaration
under Section 32 of the Act. Section 32 of the Act reads as follows:Cases in which
statement of relevant fact by person who is dead or cannot be found, etc., is
relevant.- Statements, written or verbal, of relevant facts made by a person who is
dead, or who cannot be found, or who has become incapable of giving evidence, or
whose attendance cannot be procured without an amount of delay or expense, which
under the circumstances of the case, appears to the Court unreasonable, are
themselves relevant facts in the following cases:

when it relates to cause of death.-When the statement is made by a person as


to the cause of his death, or as to any of the circumstances of the transaction which
resulted in his death, in cases in which the cause of that person's death comes into
question.From a plain reading of the aforesaid provision, it is evident that a
statement of a fact by a person who is dead when it relates to cause of death is
relevant. It is an exception to the rule of hearsay.

Any statement made by a person as to the cause of his death or as to any of


the circumstances of the transaction which resulted in his death is relevant in a case
in which the cause of death of the person making the statement comes into question.
Indian law has made a departure from the English law where the statements which
directly relate to the cause of death are admissible. General expressions suspecting
a particular individual not directly related to the occasion of death are not admissible
when the cause of death of the deceased comes into question. In the present case,
except the apprehension expressed by the deceased, the statement made by him
does not relate to the cause of his death or to any circumstance of the transaction
which resulted in his death. Once we hold so, the note does not satisfy the
requirement of Section 32 of the Act. The note, therefore, in our opinion, is not
admissible in evidence and, thus, cannot be considered as such to enable exercise
of power under Section 319 of the Code.

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DECISION OF COURT[JUDGEMENT]

In the result, the court allow this appeal and set aside the order of the trial
Court summoning the appellant to face trial and the Order of the High Court affirming
the same.

REASON FOR THE DECISION

The court in its judgement reasoning clearly provided that It is not as broad as
the analogous use in “circumstantial evidence” which includes evidence of all
relevant facts. It is on the other hand narrower than ‘res gestae’ [See Pakala
Narayana Swami v. The King Emperor, AIR 1939 PC 47]. As we have already
stated, the circumstance must have some proximate relation to the actual
occurrence if the statement of the deceased is to be admissible under s.32(1) of
the Evidence Act.This Court in the case of Sharad Birdhichand Sarda v. State of
Maharashtra, 1984 (4) SCC 116, after review of a large number of decisions of the
Privy Council, various High Courts and the Supreme Court, endorsed the view taken
by the Privy Council in Pakala Narayanswami (supra) in the following words:

Thus, from a review of the authorities mentioned above and the clear language
of Section 32(1) of the Evidence Act, the following propositions emerge:

(1) Section 32 is an exception to the rule of hearsay and makes admissible the
statement of a person who dies, whether the death is a homicide or a suicide,
provided the statement relates to the cause of death, or exhibits circumstances
leading to the death. In this respect, as indicated above, the Indian Evidence Act, in
view of the peculiar conditions of our society and the diverse nature and character of
our people, has thought it necessary to widen the sphere of Section 32 to avoid
injustice.” All these decisions support the view which we have taken that the note
written by the deceased does not relate to the cause of his death or to any of the
circumstances of the transaction which resulted in his death and therefore, is
inadmissible in law.
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Now we revert to the authority of this Court in Rattan Singh (supra) relied on by Dr.
Singhvi. In the said case, the deceased immediately before she was fired at, spoke
out that the accused was standing nearby with a gun. In a split second the sound of
firearm shot was heard and in a trice her life snuffed off. In the said background, this
Court held that the words spoken by the deceased have connection with the
circumstance of transaction which resulted into death. In the case in hand, excepting
apprehension, there is nothing in the note. No circumstance of any transaction
resulting in the death of the deceased is found in the note. Hence, this decision in no
way supports the contention of Dr. Singhvi.

The other evidence sought to be relied for summoning the appellant is the alleged
conversation between the appellant and the accused on and immediately after the
day of the occurrence. But, nothing has come during the course of trial regarding the
content of the conversation and from call records alone, the appellant’s complicity in
the crime does not surface at all.

From what we have observed above, it is evident that no evidence has at all come
during the trial which shows even a prima facie complicity of the appellant in the
crime. In that view of the matter, the order passed by the trial court summoning the
appellant, as affirmed by the High Court, cannot be allowed to stand.

To put the record straight, Mr. Bobde has raised various other contentions to show
that the appellant cannot be put on trial, but in view of our answer to the aforesaid
contentions, we deem it inexpedient to either incorporate or answer the same.

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PART 2

CRITICAL COMMENT

The petitioner has invoked Articles 226 and 227 of the Constitution and Section 482
of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 ('the Cr.P.C.' for short) for the prayer to set
aside the order dated 29-3-2008 below Exh. 225 of Additional Sessions Judge,
Porbandar whereby the petitioner is ordered to be summoned as accused person by
a bailable warrant under Section 319 of Cr.P.C. The petition has come up for final
hearing and disposal at a critical stage when, after the initial admission and ex-parte
injunction against the impugned order on 3-4-2008, the matter has reached the
Supreme Court and directions as under are issued on 14-11-2008 in S.L.P. (Cri.)
Nos. 3911 of 2008 and 4039 of 2008:

(a) Since the Special Criminal Case is now pending before the High Court, we feel it
proper to request the High Court to decide the said case within a period of four
weeks from this date without granting any unnecessary adjournments to either of the
parties.

(b) In the event, the decision has not yet been arrived at in the trial, in that case, the
judgment shall not be pronounced by the trial Court for a period of four weeks from
this date.

In the context of almost all the prosecution witnesses, numbering around 140, having
been examined in the trial Court and the judgment being likely to be pronounced
shortly, as stated at the Bar, the proposal for calling for records and proceedings for
a comprehensive view of the facts and material on record was strongly objected; and
it was at the instance of the Court that arguments for final disposal were commenced
and addressed on day-to-day basis since 1-12-2008.

Basic and undisputed facts are that offences punishable under Sections 302, 201,
34, 120B, 465, 468 and 471 of the Indian Penal Code and Section 25(1-B)(a) of the
Arms Act and Section 135 of the Bombay Police Act came to be registered on 16-11-
2005, pursuant to which charge-sheet was filed and Sessions Case No. 5 of 2007
was instituted after committal. The wife of the deceased victim of the offences moved
the High Court for a direction to hand over the investigation to C.B.I. and that petition
(Special Criminal Application No. 597 of 2006) was dismissed on 1-2-2007 with the
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direction that, if an appropriate application were made by the petitioner therein,
under Section 173(8) of Cr.P.C., the trial Court shall consider it independently
without being influenced by the observations made in that petition. Even at that
stage, the widow of the deceased had pointed out the facts of the present petitioner
being a business rival and an ex-minister of the ruling party, while one of the main
accused persons was a business partner of the present petitioner.

It was also pointed out that a letter written by the deceased was recovered from the
purse carried by him at the time of his death which stated that, if the deceased were
killed, the present petitioner would be the person causing it as he intended to kill him.
Pursuant to the aforesaid order, the widow made an application Exh. 20 for further
investigation under Section 173(8) of Cr.P.C. and the Investigating Officer filed his
affidavit within 12 days, referring to four subsequent statements of the deceased
himself which were recorded in different context without reference to the aforesaid
letter which was written before one year of his death. Another affidavit dated 6-8-
2007 was filed by the Investigating Officer and further affidavit of Circle Inspector
was filed on 17-8-2007 to state that no evidence was found linking the present
petitioner to the crime.

The Sessions Court, however, made an order on 8-10-2007 below Exh. 20 and
directed the police inspector to carry out further investigation and submit his report.
The police inspector submitted his affidavit on 17-3-2008, inter alia, stating that the
application for Narco Analysis and Brain Maping Tests of ten persons was already
rejected by the Court; that the call details of mobile phones for the period
immediately preceding the crime did not reveal any communication between the
deceased and the present petitioner; that the brother of deceased had contested in
the 2000 election against the present petitioner and the deceased was active in the
campaign due to which his wife and son believed that the petitioner might have
caused the death of the deceased.

It is lastly stated that whether the petitioner had inspired the other accused to kill the
deceased could be ascertained if Narco Analysis and Brain Maping Tests were
permitted to be conducted on the ten other accused persons; but since the
application therefor was rejected, a proposal for preferring an appeal was forwarded
to the Legal Department. Upon a query in that regard, it was stated by learned

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A.P.P. before this Court that the Government did not propose to file an appeal
pursuant to the said proposal.

It is the case of the petitioner that, at the fag-end of the trial when not less than 134
witnesses were already examined, the application Exh. 225 came to be filed by the
son of deceased on 7-3-2008 for joining the petitioner as an accused person in
exercise of the power under Section 319 of Cr.P.C., even as the main and interested
witnesses had also not made any definite statement before the Court or investigating
agency about involvement of the petitioner in the offences being tried. It was
submitted that a person cannot be arraigned as an accused person merely on the
basis of a suspicion or for making a fishing inquiry or on the basis of allegations of
biased or imperfect investigation. Relying upon judgment of the Supreme Court in
Guriya v. State of Bihar : 2007 (8) SCC 224,

it was submitted that a person can be added as accused only on the basis of
evidence adduced before the Court and not on the basis of materials available in the
charge-sheet or the case diary, because such materials contained in the charge-
sheet or the case diary do not constitute evidence. The discretion of the Court must
be exercised judiciously and it being an extraordinary power, it should be used very
sparingly and only if compelling reasons exist. The word 'evidence' in Section 319
contemplates evidence of witnesses given in Court. Relying upon judgment of the
Supreme Court in Palanisamy Gounder v. State Represented by Inspector of Police
2005 (12) SCC 327 and Michael Machado v. Central Bureau of Investigation : 2000
(3) SCC 262, it was submitted that the Court must have reasonable satisfaction from
the evidence already collected during trial that some person, who is not arraigned as
an accused, had committed an offence, and for such offence, that other person could
as well be tried along with the other accused.

The discretionary power conferred upon the Court should be exercised only to
achieve criminal justice. The stage at which trial has proceeded already and the
quantum of evidence collected till then, as also the time which the Court had spent
for collecting such evidence have to be taken into account. If the witnesses already
examined are quite large in number, the Court must seriously consider whether the
objects sought to be achieved by exercise of the power under Section 319 are worth
wasting the whole labour already undertaken. Unless the Court is hopeful that there

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is a reasonable prospect of the case as against the newly-brought accused ending in
his conviction, the Court should refrain from adopting such a course of action.

It is clear that if the statement of the deceased is to be admissible under this section
it must be a statement relating to the circumstances of the transaction resulting in his
death. The statement may be made before the cause of death has arisen, or before
the deceased has any reason to anticipate being killed, but general expressions
indicating fear or suspicion whether of a particular individual or otherwise and not
directly related to the occasion of the death will not be admissible. A necessary
condition of admissibility under the section is that the circumstance must have some
proximate relation to the actual occurrence. For instance, a statement made by the
deceased that he was proceeding to the spot where he was in fact killed, or as to his
reasons for so proceeding, or that he was going to meet a particular person, or that
he had been invited by such person to meet him would each of them be a
circumstance of the transaction, and would be so whether the person was unknown,
or was not the person accused. The phrase “circumstances of the transaction” is a
phrase that no doubt conveys some limitations.

The statement may be made before the cause of death has arisen, or before the
deceased has any reason to anticipate being killed. The circumstances must be
circumstances of the transaction : general expressions indicating fear or suspicion
whether of a particular individual or otherwise and not directly related to the occasion
of the death will not be admissible

Any statement made by a person as to the cause of his death or as to any of the
circumstances of the transaction which resulted in his death is relevant in a case in
which the cause of death of the person making the statement comes into question.
Indian law has made a departure from the English law where the statements which
directly relate to the cause of death are admissible. General expressions suspecting
a particular individual not directly related to the occasion of death are not admissible
when the cause of death of the deceased comes into question. In the present case,
except the apprehension expressed by the deceased, the statement made by him
does not relate to the cause of his death or to any circumstance of the transaction
which resulted in his death. Once we hold so, the note does not satisfy the
requirement of Section 32 of the Act. The note, therefore, in our opinion, is not

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admissible in evidence and, thus, cannot be considered as such to enable exercise
of power under Section 319 of the Code.

Relying upon judgment of a three-Judge Bench of the Supreme Court in Y. Saraba


Reddy v. Puthur Rami Reddy : 2007 (4) SCC 773, the following observations were
pointed out:

If the satisfaction of the Investigating Officer or supervising officer is to be treated as


determinative, then the very purpose of Section 319 of the Code would be frustrated.

The following observations in the recent decision dated 7-11-2008 of the Supreme
Court in Hardeep Singh v. State of Punjab in Criminal Appeal Nos. 1750 and 1751 of
2008 were emphasized:

It is thus difficult to accept the contention of the learned Counsel for the appellants
that the term 'evidence' used in Sub-section (1) of Section 319 of the Code would
mean evidence which is tested by cross-examination. The question of testing the
evidence by cross-examination would arise only after addition of the accused. There
is no question of cross-examining the witness prior to adding such person as
accused. Section does not contemplate an additional stage of first summoning the
person and giving him an opportunity of cross-examining the witness who has
deposed against him, and thereafter, deciding whether such person should or should
not be added as accused. The word 'evidence' occurring in Sub-section (1) of
Section 319 is used in comprehensive and broad sense which would also include the
material collected by the Investigating Officer and the evidence which comes before
the Court and from which the Court is satisfied that person not arraigned before it is
involved in the commission of the crime.

We may only observe that it is settled law that at the stage of issuing summons or
process, a Court has to see whether there is prima facie case against the person
sought to be summoned or against whom process is sought to be issued. At that
stage, there is no question of giving an opportunity of hearing to such person. The
entire scheme of the Code is that an accused person does not come into picture at
all till process is issued. As held by this Court in several cases including a leading
decision in Nagavva v. Veeranna : 1976 (3) SCC 736, the accused at pre-process
stage has no locus standi and is not entitled to be heard on the question whether the

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process should be issued against him or not. It may, therefore, be said that till
summons or process is issued against the accused, he has no right of audience and
in that case, it cannot be said that on being satisfied on the basis of examination-in-
chief, an application under Section 319 of the Code is not maintainabl

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